A publication about artworks with themes of science, nature and technology. Get free issues by visiting our shop!

Visualizing Wonder

We Are Where Art & Science Collide

Art & Science Journal is a website and biannual publication about artworks that deal with themes of science, nature and technology. Based in Ottawa, Canada, our publication focuses on the wonder that occurs when fields collide. We strive to be an informative and engaging resource for educators, students, and artscience enthusiasts alike. We see artworks as a physical presence that can expand upon knowledge that we have read or heard about, and as such can act as a medium for sharing information and ideas.

Click here for more information >>

Publications

Our publications are available for purchase online and in print format. Art & Science Journal Issue Two is now available for purchase for $10 print and $2 digital


Explore our publications >>

Submit Your Project

Throughout the year we accept submissions for our website and print issues. If you have an art or design project that deals with themes of science, nature or technology, submit your work. We want to talk about it!

Click here for more information >>

I don’t believe in escapism, fantasy, I believe in the magic that is just there. Björk

Our Blog

Taking A Closer Look: Photomicrography
Photography has been used for decades to capture the images that we see with our eyes, but, it can also help us to see things that we could never see with just the naked eye.
Photomicrographers are those who photograph the microscopic world around us. With the help of special cameras, we can now see cell nuclei or the intestines of fruit flies if we so wanted to. There are hundreds of photomicrographers in the world, each with their own unique specialization or style; like artists, they present to us their own interpretations of microscopic objects, using various techniques, such as two-photon excitation microscopy, which “provides distinct advantages for three-dimensional imaging”. This process is used for “imaging of living cells, especially within intact tissues such as brain slices, embryos, whole organs, and even entire animals”, making Dr. Paul Appleton’s pictures both studies of biological components of organisms, but also aesthetically, vibrant, geometric abstractions. 
Claudia Buttera creates similar pieces, most of them cells under stress, and frames them to be placed in a gallery setting, where both the science of the subject and aesthetic of the overall piece is appreciated for as a work of art. The muse is nature, the artist Buttera.
Nikola Rahme moves slightly further away from the subjects, revealing the actual features and body parts of wasps and beetles, instead of merely the puzzle pieces of their anatomy known as cells. Works such as Rahme’s help viewers put a ‘face’ to the cluster of shapes that the aforementioned photomicrographers capture.

-Anna Paluch
Taking A Closer Look: Photomicrography
Photography has been used for decades to capture the images that we see with our eyes, but, it can also help us to see things that we could never see with just the naked eye.
Photomicrographers are those who photograph the microscopic world around us. With the help of special cameras, we can now see cell nuclei or the intestines of fruit flies if we so wanted to. There are hundreds of photomicrographers in the world, each with their own unique specialization or style; like artists, they present to us their own interpretations of microscopic objects, using various techniques, such as two-photon excitation microscopy, which “provides distinct advantages for three-dimensional imaging”. This process is used for “imaging of living cells, especially within intact tissues such as brain slices, embryos, whole organs, and even entire animals”, making Dr. Paul Appleton’s pictures both studies of biological components of organisms, but also aesthetically, vibrant, geometric abstractions. 
Claudia Buttera creates similar pieces, most of them cells under stress, and frames them to be placed in a gallery setting, where both the science of the subject and aesthetic of the overall piece is appreciated for as a work of art. The muse is nature, the artist Buttera.
Nikola Rahme moves slightly further away from the subjects, revealing the actual features and body parts of wasps and beetles, instead of merely the puzzle pieces of their anatomy known as cells. Works such as Rahme’s help viewers put a ‘face’ to the cluster of shapes that the aforementioned photomicrographers capture.

-Anna Paluch
Taking A Closer Look: Photomicrography
Photography has been used for decades to capture the images that we see with our eyes, but, it can also help us to see things that we could never see with just the naked eye.
Photomicrographers are those who photograph the microscopic world around us. With the help of special cameras, we can now see cell nuclei or the intestines of fruit flies if we so wanted to. There are hundreds of photomicrographers in the world, each with their own unique specialization or style; like artists, they present to us their own interpretations of microscopic objects, using various techniques, such as two-photon excitation microscopy, which “provides distinct advantages for three-dimensional imaging”. This process is used for “imaging of living cells, especially within intact tissues such as brain slices, embryos, whole organs, and even entire animals”, making Dr. Paul Appleton’s pictures both studies of biological components of organisms, but also aesthetically, vibrant, geometric abstractions. 
Claudia Buttera creates similar pieces, most of them cells under stress, and frames them to be placed in a gallery setting, where both the science of the subject and aesthetic of the overall piece is appreciated for as a work of art. The muse is nature, the artist Buttera.
Nikola Rahme moves slightly further away from the subjects, revealing the actual features and body parts of wasps and beetles, instead of merely the puzzle pieces of their anatomy known as cells. Works such as Rahme’s help viewers put a ‘face’ to the cluster of shapes that the aforementioned photomicrographers capture.

-Anna Paluch

Taking A Closer Look: Photomicrography

Photography has been used for decades to capture the images that we see with our eyes, but, it can also help us to see things that we could never see with just the naked eye.

Photomicrographers are those who photograph the microscopic world around us. With the help of special cameras, we can now see cell nuclei or the intestines of fruit flies if we so wanted to. There are hundreds of photomicrographers in the world, each with their own unique specialization or style; like artists, they present to us their own interpretations of microscopic objects, using various techniques, such as two-photon excitation microscopy, which “provides distinct advantages for three-dimensional imaging”. This process is used for “imaging of living cells, especially within intact tissues such as brain slices, embryos, whole organs, and even entire animals”, making Dr. Paul Appleton’s pictures both studies of biological components of organisms, but also aesthetically, vibrant, geometric abstractions.

Claudia Buttera creates similar pieces, most of them cells under stress, and frames them to be placed in a gallery setting, where both the science of the subject and aesthetic of the overall piece is appreciated for as a work of art. The muse is nature, the artist Buttera.

Nikola Rahme moves slightly further away from the subjects, revealing the actual features and body parts of wasps and beetles, instead of merely the puzzle pieces of their anatomy known as cells. Works such as Rahme’s help viewers put a ‘face’ to the cluster of shapes that the aforementioned photomicrographers capture.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ photomicrography cells science biology Microscopy microbiology nuclei photography Dr. Paul Appleton Claudia Buttera Nikola Rahme anna paluch art art and science journal

Visualizing the Beauty of Mathematics

In the above video you can see an equation, the visualization or blueprint of the equation in motion, and then the tangible object it represents. This shows that our world can be defined and examined, merely by combining numbers, symbols and concepts.

For non-mathematicians (or maths enthusiasts), equations appear daunting, let alone even considered for any aesthetic qualities. The project “Beauty of Mathematics” by Yann Pineill & Nicolas Lefaucheux, take these equations, and animate them to show their true image; that these equations depict movement, describe snowflakes, or create a masterpiece of computer technology. Just like we read artworks, equations are also meant to be interpreted for their meaning, but not everyone is trained to read equations. The project reads the equations for us, translates them if you will, and we are then able to relate a series of numbers and symbols to objects in our daily lives.

It is a wonderful way to begin the process of getting others interested in becoming versed in the language of mathematics. For, “mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty — a beauty cold and austere, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music.” - Bertrand Russell

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

yann pineillnicholas lefaucheuxthe beauty of mathematicsmathsmathematicsequationsanna paluchartscienceart and science journal

Q&A With Geoffrey Harrison: An Interview with the Art and Science Journal

Geoffrey Harrison is a painter specializing in figuration and anatomy that has recently discussed his residencies in London with us. Check out the video above (password is geoff) and the interview below to see what he has to share:

Lea Hamilton: Could you elaborate on your experience at your residency(ies?) What was it like to work with those specimens? Did you feel the environment influenced your body of work in the creative process itself as well as the content?

Geoffrey Harrison: I had been going into the Pathology Museum at St Bart’s for a while to look at the specimens and draw. I’d been working with anatomical images since I had a show at the Art Workers’ Guild in 2010 which was called ‘in the midst of life’. It was a series of paintings of dead animals. It sounds pretty grim, but was actually all about beauty and life. In some of the paintings it wasn’t clear whether the animal was alive or dead, while in others, it was pretty clear. I think these more explicitly visceral images led me towards the work I produced for the Bloomsbury Festival in 2011, which was an installation of very large drawings of ‘intestinal’ loops. I happened to be introduced to some people from the museum a huge nineteenth century, three story high, purpose built hall with galleried walkways on two upper levels. Somehow it is hidden away up a shabby staircase in a corner of the hospital. The shelves are crammed with specimens and the atmosphere is fairly unique but I was quite familiar by then with human specimens as both my parents had been Medical Illustrators, so I felt quite at home. It was a nice place to draw and the environment retained a Victorian atmosphere, which may have influenced me.

The more I discovered about the specimens however - the human aspect; the who and why and where and so on, the less I was at ease. I was pleased about that though. I didn’t want to get blasé about seeing such challenging things and really felt that it was important to still have an emotional response to the specimens. Much of the forensic collection have particularly sad and violent backstories, which brought a lot of that emotional content. I think that has carried through to the work I am doing now, which although not entirely focused on gross anatomy and specimens.

Working in both institutions has been really interesting experience. At the Museum, it was mainly a place for me to go and sketch and draw inspiration from. It was about the space and the contents. I ended up producing a series of work which I showed there and which has since been shown in a few other places and is due to travel overseas this year. The experience at the RVC has been more immersive and about the people and processes in the college as well as the objects that tend to attract my attention. In addition to producing artwork, I am involved in funding applications, public engagement and art teaching.

LH: How long has the concept of autopoiesis influenced your work?

GH: I started working with this concept perhaps before I realised it. I had long been in the habit of reducing the images I worked with to singular entities, which I eventually described as islands or archipelagos. In this way I was approaching this idea of margins and boundaries around things. I became a bit preoccupied with this idea of where one things ends and another begins and started to think about body parts and processes in this way. I think the work on islands really led to this because even though visually the things I was painting, animals, chairs, they were all surrogates for the human body, and by extension, the individual as a separate entity, self sufficient and isolated.

Of course, we are an interdependent species. We may kid ourselves that we are self-sufficient, and independent but like the hermit crabs I studied, we are actually totally dependent on a community and a bunch of other creatures. I have a compulsion to delineate and isolate, while at the same time recognising that the world doesn’t really work like that. Things are intricately linked and don’t necessarily end in crisp lines. Margins are blurred and diffuse as the seashore where the water percolates through the sand. You can’t really separate the two if you look closely enough. I recognise this and yet I am still drawn to delineate and classify. Is this cognitive dissonance?

Anyway, I wanted to somehow illustrate this paradox and create images of things that appear feasible as whole enclosed systems, but that aren’t possible. While doing some drawings of intestinal looking organs that were complete loops, like Mobius strips I was looking at M. C. Escher and I came across a book called ‘I am a Strange Loop’ by Douglas Hofstadter. His work led me to the concept of Autopoiesis, which I thought was an ideal description for my work and liked that it was relevant to mathematics and biology as well as philosophy and sociology.

LH: Both of your residencies (at Bart’s Pathology Museum and The Royal Veterinary College) are sort of hidden and tucked away. Given your interest in isolation, is that partly what drew you towards these residencies, or was it more based on past experience with anatomy and medical illustration?

GH: I’m not sure that I consciously made an effort to find places to work that were hidden away, but perhaps that made more more interested in them. I think I was fortunate enough to be introduced to these places as a result of similar work before, which yea, is probably all down to the Medical Illustration thing. It seems to be one continuum. Perhaps it will all loop back to the beginning at the end.

LH: How do you personally view the anatomical collections that you work with? Do they lean more toward being curiosities, or do they present themselves as preserved, perpetual objects?

GH: That’s a really interesting question. The nature of the ‘curious’ must depend on the viewer. I don’t see the specimens themselves as curious. Interesting and fantastic in some cases, yes, but I’d think I was being lazy if I stopped at curious, like I was simply noting an odd shaped vegetable. Some of the medical and veterinary specimens that I spend my time with are still relevant in a practical educational sense, while others are pretty much redundant in the face of trends of disease or medical progress. For some people, however, preserved specimens of unusual afflictions are gonna have a kind of ‘fairground sideshow’ quality and will remain curiosities, but if that inspires people to look beyond the bizarre and freakish and contemplate the ‘science’, that’s great.

Pickling and even plastination fundamentally change the nature of the specimen, so they aren’t really preserved verbatim. They are altered and won’t last forever anyway.

LH: I find it interesting that you have such great interest in self-sustaining objects, but the actual anatomical specimens that you study need to be carefully preserved and sustained by others. Is this boundary between sustaining and preserving blurred or disrupted by your interaction with the objects and subsequent created artworks? Do they become ‘fresh’ again, or is the boundary even relevant?

GH: Perhaps I am casting a fresh eye on the subject, which might give someone an alternative perspective, but I also think that while the specimens stay immutable (and this is not always the case) a med student, for example, may look at it one day and see one thing and the next something completely different according to the page they are on in their textbook. There are many ways to refresh a perspective. I think this boundary is totally relevant. That’s an intriguing boundary there. The point at which the world changes when we understand something about it. Secrets divulged, innocence lost. Hmmm.

I’m not sure this answers the question but I got intrigued by the idea of ‘fresh again’ when I was studying cane toads that had been squashed by traffic on an island where I used to live. The flattened corpses used to desiccate in the heat, but whenever it would rain, the amphibian hydrophilic skin would rehydrate and they’d become fresh again. In the end though, they’d disintegrate to nothing. The objects in the jar are in a very gradual state of deterioration. I think the fact that they continually need maintenance and care belies their ultimate impermanence. Someone will forget to top them up, they’ll spring a leak or get dropped. They are only going one way. Mind you, there is a pretty healthy looking specimen in the Barts’ collection that dates from the 1700s, so the journey to dust is longer for some than others…

- Lea Hamilton

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

art and science journalinterviewLea HamiltonGeoffrey Harrisonresidencieslondonanatomypainting
Flower ‘Bulbs’
Though designers make pieces that are commodities of everyday use, a lot of the functional pieces created by designers can still be considered ‘art’ in their own way.
German designer Miriam Aust of Aust Amelung created the “Vase & Leuchte” (2011) table lamp that functions as both a lamp and vase. The act of combining the element of light and plants into the design is like an experiment, giving the piece a laboratory aesthetic. The plants are placed in the main bowl structure with water, and the light bulb is protected by a glass structure, similar to a laboratory glass beaker, in the middle of the bowl. This allows for the light to travel through the plants, highlighting unique elements such as the vascular tissue of leaves or reflecting root patterns onto walls. You can order your very own “Vase & Leuchte” at the dua shop.
Japanese product designer Yuma Kuno has created a slightly similar piece, involving light bulbs as vases. In 2007, Japan’s Ministry of Environment asked companies to stop using inefficient incandescent light bulbs. Kuno saw a chance to use these obsolete objects and change their function to something useful; the bulbs can hold small flowers, and even the filament is used as a stem holder.
Whether highlighting the aesthetic biology of a plant or merely being used as a simple holder for one, both the works of Miriam Aust and Yuma Kuno are great design ideas!

-Anna Paluch
Flower ‘Bulbs’
Though designers make pieces that are commodities of everyday use, a lot of the functional pieces created by designers can still be considered ‘art’ in their own way.
German designer Miriam Aust of Aust Amelung created the “Vase & Leuchte” (2011) table lamp that functions as both a lamp and vase. The act of combining the element of light and plants into the design is like an experiment, giving the piece a laboratory aesthetic. The plants are placed in the main bowl structure with water, and the light bulb is protected by a glass structure, similar to a laboratory glass beaker, in the middle of the bowl. This allows for the light to travel through the plants, highlighting unique elements such as the vascular tissue of leaves or reflecting root patterns onto walls. You can order your very own “Vase & Leuchte” at the dua shop.
Japanese product designer Yuma Kuno has created a slightly similar piece, involving light bulbs as vases. In 2007, Japan’s Ministry of Environment asked companies to stop using inefficient incandescent light bulbs. Kuno saw a chance to use these obsolete objects and change their function to something useful; the bulbs can hold small flowers, and even the filament is used as a stem holder.
Whether highlighting the aesthetic biology of a plant or merely being used as a simple holder for one, both the works of Miriam Aust and Yuma Kuno are great design ideas!

-Anna Paluch
Flower ‘Bulbs’
Though designers make pieces that are commodities of everyday use, a lot of the functional pieces created by designers can still be considered ‘art’ in their own way.
German designer Miriam Aust of Aust Amelung created the “Vase & Leuchte” (2011) table lamp that functions as both a lamp and vase. The act of combining the element of light and plants into the design is like an experiment, giving the piece a laboratory aesthetic. The plants are placed in the main bowl structure with water, and the light bulb is protected by a glass structure, similar to a laboratory glass beaker, in the middle of the bowl. This allows for the light to travel through the plants, highlighting unique elements such as the vascular tissue of leaves or reflecting root patterns onto walls. You can order your very own “Vase & Leuchte” at the dua shop.
Japanese product designer Yuma Kuno has created a slightly similar piece, involving light bulbs as vases. In 2007, Japan’s Ministry of Environment asked companies to stop using inefficient incandescent light bulbs. Kuno saw a chance to use these obsolete objects and change their function to something useful; the bulbs can hold small flowers, and even the filament is used as a stem holder.
Whether highlighting the aesthetic biology of a plant or merely being used as a simple holder for one, both the works of Miriam Aust and Yuma Kuno are great design ideas!

-Anna Paluch
Flower ‘Bulbs’
Though designers make pieces that are commodities of everyday use, a lot of the functional pieces created by designers can still be considered ‘art’ in their own way.
German designer Miriam Aust of Aust Amelung created the “Vase & Leuchte” (2011) table lamp that functions as both a lamp and vase. The act of combining the element of light and plants into the design is like an experiment, giving the piece a laboratory aesthetic. The plants are placed in the main bowl structure with water, and the light bulb is protected by a glass structure, similar to a laboratory glass beaker, in the middle of the bowl. This allows for the light to travel through the plants, highlighting unique elements such as the vascular tissue of leaves or reflecting root patterns onto walls. You can order your very own “Vase & Leuchte” at the dua shop.
Japanese product designer Yuma Kuno has created a slightly similar piece, involving light bulbs as vases. In 2007, Japan’s Ministry of Environment asked companies to stop using inefficient incandescent light bulbs. Kuno saw a chance to use these obsolete objects and change their function to something useful; the bulbs can hold small flowers, and even the filament is used as a stem holder.
Whether highlighting the aesthetic biology of a plant or merely being used as a simple holder for one, both the works of Miriam Aust and Yuma Kuno are great design ideas!

-Anna Paluch

Flower ‘Bulbs’

Though designers make pieces that are commodities of everyday use, a lot of the functional pieces created by designers can still be considered ‘art’ in their own way.

German designer Miriam Aust of Aust Amelung created the “Vase & Leuchte” (2011) table lamp that functions as both a lamp and vase. The act of combining the element of light and plants into the design is like an experiment, giving the piece a laboratory aesthetic. The plants are placed in the main bowl structure with water, and the light bulb is protected by a glass structure, similar to a laboratory glass beaker, in the middle of the bowl. This allows for the light to travel through the plants, highlighting unique elements such as the vascular tissue of leaves or reflecting root patterns onto walls. You can order your very own “Vase & Leuchte” at the dua shop.

Japanese product designer Yuma Kuno has created a slightly similar piece, involving light bulbs as vases. In 2007, Japan’s Ministry of Environment asked companies to stop using inefficient incandescent light bulbs. Kuno saw a chance to use these obsolete objects and change their function to something useful; the bulbs can hold small flowers, and even the filament is used as a stem holder.

Whether highlighting the aesthetic biology of a plant or merely being used as a simple holder for one, both the works of Miriam Aust and Yuma Kuno are great design ideas!

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ yuma kuno miriam aust anna paluch art science art and science journal light bulb plants flowers Environment recycle
Art of the Lepidoptera
Moths and fabric are often two words that not many people like to see together, but artist Yumi Okita actually makes moths (and butterflies!) out of various pieces of cotton fabric, embroidered and painted on for detail, with fake fur accents. The fabric sculptures average about six inches in height and nine inches in width for butterflies, and four inches in height and ten inches in width for moths, creating slightly larger copies of the insect’s real life counterparts.
These moths and butterflies (belonging to the order of insects known as Lepidoptera) are great tools for admiring the detail in the insects’ scales on their wings, or designs on their bodies.
There is another artist though, whose practice is to go even more into detail, by creating watercolour paintings of butterfly and moth wings up close; so close, that you can see every detail in the scales. Artist Chelsea H-A even makes custom watercolours, based off of an individual’s favourite colours or favourite species of moth and butterfly, yet still staying true to the aesthetic of these insect’s wings.
A cool idea would be to display a sculpture of Yumi Okita’s with a corresponding watercolour of Chelsea H-A’s, which you can do yourself, as both artists sell their art on their respective Etsy stores!
Check out more of Yumi Okita’s work here.
And have a look at Chelsea H-A’s work here.
-Anna Paluch
Art of the Lepidoptera
Moths and fabric are often two words that not many people like to see together, but artist Yumi Okita actually makes moths (and butterflies!) out of various pieces of cotton fabric, embroidered and painted on for detail, with fake fur accents. The fabric sculptures average about six inches in height and nine inches in width for butterflies, and four inches in height and ten inches in width for moths, creating slightly larger copies of the insect’s real life counterparts.
These moths and butterflies (belonging to the order of insects known as Lepidoptera) are great tools for admiring the detail in the insects’ scales on their wings, or designs on their bodies.
There is another artist though, whose practice is to go even more into detail, by creating watercolour paintings of butterfly and moth wings up close; so close, that you can see every detail in the scales. Artist Chelsea H-A even makes custom watercolours, based off of an individual’s favourite colours or favourite species of moth and butterfly, yet still staying true to the aesthetic of these insect’s wings.
A cool idea would be to display a sculpture of Yumi Okita’s with a corresponding watercolour of Chelsea H-A’s, which you can do yourself, as both artists sell their art on their respective Etsy stores!
Check out more of Yumi Okita’s work here.
And have a look at Chelsea H-A’s work here.
-Anna Paluch
Art of the Lepidoptera
Moths and fabric are often two words that not many people like to see together, but artist Yumi Okita actually makes moths (and butterflies!) out of various pieces of cotton fabric, embroidered and painted on for detail, with fake fur accents. The fabric sculptures average about six inches in height and nine inches in width for butterflies, and four inches in height and ten inches in width for moths, creating slightly larger copies of the insect’s real life counterparts.
These moths and butterflies (belonging to the order of insects known as Lepidoptera) are great tools for admiring the detail in the insects’ scales on their wings, or designs on their bodies.
There is another artist though, whose practice is to go even more into detail, by creating watercolour paintings of butterfly and moth wings up close; so close, that you can see every detail in the scales. Artist Chelsea H-A even makes custom watercolours, based off of an individual’s favourite colours or favourite species of moth and butterfly, yet still staying true to the aesthetic of these insect’s wings.
A cool idea would be to display a sculpture of Yumi Okita’s with a corresponding watercolour of Chelsea H-A’s, which you can do yourself, as both artists sell their art on their respective Etsy stores!
Check out more of Yumi Okita’s work here.
And have a look at Chelsea H-A’s work here.
-Anna Paluch
Art of the Lepidoptera
Moths and fabric are often two words that not many people like to see together, but artist Yumi Okita actually makes moths (and butterflies!) out of various pieces of cotton fabric, embroidered and painted on for detail, with fake fur accents. The fabric sculptures average about six inches in height and nine inches in width for butterflies, and four inches in height and ten inches in width for moths, creating slightly larger copies of the insect’s real life counterparts.
These moths and butterflies (belonging to the order of insects known as Lepidoptera) are great tools for admiring the detail in the insects’ scales on their wings, or designs on their bodies.
There is another artist though, whose practice is to go even more into detail, by creating watercolour paintings of butterfly and moth wings up close; so close, that you can see every detail in the scales. Artist Chelsea H-A even makes custom watercolours, based off of an individual’s favourite colours or favourite species of moth and butterfly, yet still staying true to the aesthetic of these insect’s wings.
A cool idea would be to display a sculpture of Yumi Okita’s with a corresponding watercolour of Chelsea H-A’s, which you can do yourself, as both artists sell their art on their respective Etsy stores!
Check out more of Yumi Okita’s work here.
And have a look at Chelsea H-A’s work here.
-Anna Paluch

Art of the Lepidoptera

Moths and fabric are often two words that not many people like to see together, but artist Yumi Okita actually makes moths (and butterflies!) out of various pieces of cotton fabric, embroidered and painted on for detail, with fake fur accents. The fabric sculptures average about six inches in height and nine inches in width for butterflies, and four inches in height and ten inches in width for moths, creating slightly larger copies of the insect’s real life counterparts.

These moths and butterflies (belonging to the order of insects known as Lepidoptera) are great tools for admiring the detail in the insects’ scales on their wings, or designs on their bodies.

There is another artist though, whose practice is to go even more into detail, by creating watercolour paintings of butterfly and moth wings up close; so close, that you can see every detail in the scales. Artist Chelsea H-A even makes custom watercolours, based off of an individual’s favourite colours or favourite species of moth and butterfly, yet still staying true to the aesthetic of these insect’s wings.

A cool idea would be to display a sculpture of Yumi Okita’s with a corresponding watercolour of Chelsea H-A’s, which you can do yourself, as both artists sell their art on their respective Etsy stores!

Check out more of Yumi Okita’s work here.

And have a look at Chelsea H-A’s work here.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ Yumi Okita Chelsea H-A anna paluch butterfly moth butterflies moths fabric art watercolour lepidoptera art science art and science journal
Sarah Edwards - Remember Me: What remains
Sarah Edwards’s Remember Me: What remains is a simple and elegant sound artwork that uses public interaction with a cityscape to recreate a time when the now extinct (from the area) Growling Grass Frog (Litoria raniformis) was commonly heard throughout metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. In doing so, Edwards not only plays on the notion of a city soundscape, but crosses boundaries of space-time.
The work, which was shown at 2013’s Liquid Architecture Festival, presents historic field recordings of the Growling Grass Frog originally recorded via reel-to-reel tape in 1953 for scientific research by now Professor Murray Littlejohn. Edwards takes these recordings out of museum storage, allowing the public to interact with, and re-experience something that is now lost. 
The piece is now housed online, allowing users to interact with a digital map of the area to hear where the frog once called from, however during Liquid Architecture the piece was available via radio in the areas shown on the digital map, allowing city wanderers to hear the frog as if it were in real time. This caused the listener to be both aurally, visually and geographically immersed in the work, and encouraged the listener to imagine a different time, layering the past over the present. 
Works of art that draw attention to scientific and environmental issues are important for involving a wider audience in conservation and scientific study, and for connecting the present to the past by creating visual, aural, and kinetic understandings.
- Alinta Krauth

Sarah Edwards - Remember Me: What remains

Sarah Edwards’s Remember Me: What remains is a simple and elegant sound artwork that uses public interaction with a cityscape to recreate a time when the now extinct (from the area) Growling Grass Frog (Litoria raniformis) was commonly heard throughout metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. In doing so, Edwards not only plays on the notion of a city soundscape, but crosses boundaries of space-time.

The work, which was shown at 2013’s Liquid Architecture Festival, presents historic field recordings of the Growling Grass Frog originally recorded via reel-to-reel tape in 1953 for scientific research by now Professor Murray Littlejohn. Edwards takes these recordings out of museum storage, allowing the public to interact with, and re-experience something that is now lost.

The piece is now housed online, allowing users to interact with a digital map of the area to hear where the frog once called from, however during Liquid Architecture the piece was available via radio in the areas shown on the digital map, allowing city wanderers to hear the frog as if it were in real time. This caused the listener to be both aurally, visually and geographically immersed in the work, and encouraged the listener to imagine a different time, layering the past over the present.

Works of art that draw attention to scientific and environmental issues are important for involving a wider audience in conservation and scientific study, and for connecting the present to the past by creating visual, aural, and kinetic understandings.

- Alinta Krauth

science and art sound art liquid architecture alinta krauth remember me sarah edwards
Camila Carlow’s Eye Heart Spleen
When we look at human organs, sometimes their imagery can be off-putting (though fascinating!) but artist Camila Carlow uses our organs, at least pictures of them, to create her intricate Eye Heart Spleen series; human organs made from foraged plants.
The artist combines different plants, such as flowers and leaves, already themselves unique living organisms, to create one piece, one organ, of another living organism; the human. It is interesting to look at her series in regards to the place of humans in the world; how we pick flowers, tear down trees and stomp around in the grass, only to then have our bodies be consumed by the earth, covered by flowers, trees and grass. The plants sustain us, as either food or helping to create oxygen, just like our organs, and just like plants, we sometimes too forget to take care of our organs. As the artist states, “regardless of whether we fill ourselves with toxins or nourishing food, whether we exercise or not - our organs sustain us, working away effortlessly and unnoticed”. Both plants and organs are delicate structures, and both need to be taken care of, in order for them to take care of us.
To learn more about Camila Carlow’s work, you can visit her website, or if you would like to purchase one of her prints, they are available on Etsy.
-Anna Paluch
Camila Carlow’s Eye Heart Spleen
When we look at human organs, sometimes their imagery can be off-putting (though fascinating!) but artist Camila Carlow uses our organs, at least pictures of them, to create her intricate Eye Heart Spleen series; human organs made from foraged plants.
The artist combines different plants, such as flowers and leaves, already themselves unique living organisms, to create one piece, one organ, of another living organism; the human. It is interesting to look at her series in regards to the place of humans in the world; how we pick flowers, tear down trees and stomp around in the grass, only to then have our bodies be consumed by the earth, covered by flowers, trees and grass. The plants sustain us, as either food or helping to create oxygen, just like our organs, and just like plants, we sometimes too forget to take care of our organs. As the artist states, “regardless of whether we fill ourselves with toxins or nourishing food, whether we exercise or not - our organs sustain us, working away effortlessly and unnoticed”. Both plants and organs are delicate structures, and both need to be taken care of, in order for them to take care of us.
To learn more about Camila Carlow’s work, you can visit her website, or if you would like to purchase one of her prints, they are available on Etsy.
-Anna Paluch
Camila Carlow’s Eye Heart Spleen
When we look at human organs, sometimes their imagery can be off-putting (though fascinating!) but artist Camila Carlow uses our organs, at least pictures of them, to create her intricate Eye Heart Spleen series; human organs made from foraged plants.
The artist combines different plants, such as flowers and leaves, already themselves unique living organisms, to create one piece, one organ, of another living organism; the human. It is interesting to look at her series in regards to the place of humans in the world; how we pick flowers, tear down trees and stomp around in the grass, only to then have our bodies be consumed by the earth, covered by flowers, trees and grass. The plants sustain us, as either food or helping to create oxygen, just like our organs, and just like plants, we sometimes too forget to take care of our organs. As the artist states, “regardless of whether we fill ourselves with toxins or nourishing food, whether we exercise or not - our organs sustain us, working away effortlessly and unnoticed”. Both plants and organs are delicate structures, and both need to be taken care of, in order for them to take care of us.
To learn more about Camila Carlow’s work, you can visit her website, or if you would like to purchase one of her prints, they are available on Etsy.
-Anna Paluch

Camila Carlow’s Eye Heart Spleen

When we look at human organs, sometimes their imagery can be off-putting (though fascinating!) but artist Camila Carlow uses our organs, at least pictures of them, to create her intricate Eye Heart Spleen series; human organs made from foraged plants.

The artist combines different plants, such as flowers and leaves, already themselves unique living organisms, to create one piece, one organ, of another living organism; the human. It is interesting to look at her series in regards to the place of humans in the world; how we pick flowers, tear down trees and stomp around in the grass, only to then have our bodies be consumed by the earth, covered by flowers, trees and grass. The plants sustain us, as either food or helping to create oxygen, just like our organs, and just like plants, we sometimes too forget to take care of our organs. As the artist states, “regardless of whether we fill ourselves with toxins or nourishing food, whether we exercise or not - our organs sustain us, working away effortlessly and unnoticed”. Both plants and organs are delicate structures, and both need to be taken care of, in order for them to take care of us.

To learn more about Camila Carlow’s work, you can visit her website, or if you would like to purchase one of her prints, they are available on Etsy.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ camila carlow eye heart spleen anatomy botany flowers plants organs human organs human body art science art and science journal anna paluch
Light Up the Skies
When two artists with different aesthetic backgrounds collaborate, they often create stunning pieces, and the collaboration between artist’s Aaron Koblin and Janet Echelman is no exception.
Janet Echelman, who has been featured already on Art & Science Journal, creates fishnet-like aerial sculptures that look as if they were floating entities in the sky. The nets’ shapes are manipulated to form anything from funnels to winged creatures. Aaron Koblin is an artist and designer who focuses on data and digital technologies, how this information relates to cultural trends and how people react to changing technologies.
These artists collaborated together on March 15, 2014 at TED 2014 to create “Skies Painted with Unnumbered Sparks” outside the Vancouver Convention Centre where the TED talks were being held. TED is integral to this installation, as the two artists met at TED 2011 after their talks. In order to make such an installation possible, Echelman needed the expertise of Autodesk, a 3D design engineering software that specializes in working with interesting design problems. The amazing feature about this outdoor installation is that passersby can choreograph the lights on the web with their smartphones, controlling the aesthetic nature of the piece through technology.
If you would like to see how a sculpture of this magnitude was imagined, and then installed, TED blog has a ‘making-of’ gallery.
The installation will be up in Vancouver until the 22nd of March, 2014.
-Anna Paluch
Light Up the Skies
When two artists with different aesthetic backgrounds collaborate, they often create stunning pieces, and the collaboration between artist’s Aaron Koblin and Janet Echelman is no exception.
Janet Echelman, who has been featured already on Art & Science Journal, creates fishnet-like aerial sculptures that look as if they were floating entities in the sky. The nets’ shapes are manipulated to form anything from funnels to winged creatures. Aaron Koblin is an artist and designer who focuses on data and digital technologies, how this information relates to cultural trends and how people react to changing technologies.
These artists collaborated together on March 15, 2014 at TED 2014 to create “Skies Painted with Unnumbered Sparks” outside the Vancouver Convention Centre where the TED talks were being held. TED is integral to this installation, as the two artists met at TED 2011 after their talks. In order to make such an installation possible, Echelman needed the expertise of Autodesk, a 3D design engineering software that specializes in working with interesting design problems. The amazing feature about this outdoor installation is that passersby can choreograph the lights on the web with their smartphones, controlling the aesthetic nature of the piece through technology.
If you would like to see how a sculpture of this magnitude was imagined, and then installed, TED blog has a ‘making-of’ gallery.
The installation will be up in Vancouver until the 22nd of March, 2014.
-Anna Paluch

Light Up the Skies

When two artists with different aesthetic backgrounds collaborate, they often create stunning pieces, and the collaboration between artist’s Aaron Koblin and Janet Echelman is no exception.

Janet Echelman, who has been featured already on Art & Science Journal, creates fishnet-like aerial sculptures that look as if they were floating entities in the sky. The nets’ shapes are manipulated to form anything from funnels to winged creatures. Aaron Koblin is an artist and designer who focuses on data and digital technologies, how this information relates to cultural trends and how people react to changing technologies.

These artists collaborated together on March 15, 2014 at TED 2014 to create “Skies Painted with Unnumbered Sparks” outside the Vancouver Convention Centre where the TED talks were being held. TED is integral to this installation, as the two artists met at TED 2011 after their talks. In order to make such an installation possible, Echelman needed the expertise of Autodesk, a 3D design engineering software that specializes in working with interesting design problems. The amazing feature about this outdoor installation is that passersby can choreograph the lights on the web with their smartphones, controlling the aesthetic nature of the piece through technology.

If you would like to see how a sculpture of this magnitude was imagined, and then installed, TED blog has a ‘making-of’ gallery.

The installation will be up in Vancouver until the 22nd of March, 2014.

-Anna Paluch

2 Photos
/ Janet Echelman Aarron Koblin TED Vancouver webs technology engineering anna paluch art science art and science journal autodesk

Water Light Graffiti by Antonin Fourneau

Graffiti art on its own is an amazing, albeit misunderstood art practice, but what happens when you swap concrete walls for LED lights and spray cans with a water gun? You get Water Light Graffiti! Created by Antonin Fourneau as part of his artist residency with Digitalarti Artlab, Water Light Graffiti is a wall of LED lights that is triggered to turn on selected lights, when they come into contact with water. It is fun for all ages! Months of testing went into making sure the LED lights turned on once in contact with water, but clearly all that work paid off.

Electronics and water are not often paired together, but because water is conductive, it reacts with specifically placed metal contacts on the circuit board of lights, decreasing resistance and allowing a current to flow. Christopher J. Woodall created his own version of this water-activated circuit, and with plenty of info-graphics and instructions, provides enough information for you to make your own!

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

antonin fourneauanna paluchwater light graffitielectricitywatergraffiticonductivitycodesLED lightsChristopher J. Woodallartscienceart and science journaldigitalarti artlab
Weaving the Invisible Thread: Urban Fiction 2.0 by Petra Gemeinboeck
Urban Fiction 2.0 is a participatory installation that deploys locative devices and social media. Enacted in Sydney, Australia, the installation is activated by participants through a special mobile app that allows them to “weave an imaginary lace over Sydney’s urban and social landscape.”

With the app, users can move through physical space and cause disturbances to the imaginary “lace” projected onto a GPS rendering of the city. As the app measures the movements of each participant in real time, any motion or disturbance caused will immediately alter the virtual lace.
Images of lace, fabric, and thread symbolize the urban and social sphere and point to the idea of each participant’s role as a networked actor, moving through the space and collectively tracing their paths. An example of locative art, Urban Fiction 2.0 allows users to feel a heightened sense of awareness of their positions in the imaginary lacy grid of the city and in the physical space they occupy. With a nod to the locative capabilities of Web 2.0 platforms, Urban Fiction 2.0 enables participants to “weave” their own experiences into the model of the city grid, issuing a sense of their actions in the broader context of a networked society.
For more information about Petra Gemeinboeck’s work, please visit her website here.
- Victoria Nolte
Weaving the Invisible Thread: Urban Fiction 2.0 by Petra Gemeinboeck
Urban Fiction 2.0 is a participatory installation that deploys locative devices and social media. Enacted in Sydney, Australia, the installation is activated by participants through a special mobile app that allows them to “weave an imaginary lace over Sydney’s urban and social landscape.”

With the app, users can move through physical space and cause disturbances to the imaginary “lace” projected onto a GPS rendering of the city. As the app measures the movements of each participant in real time, any motion or disturbance caused will immediately alter the virtual lace.
Images of lace, fabric, and thread symbolize the urban and social sphere and point to the idea of each participant’s role as a networked actor, moving through the space and collectively tracing their paths. An example of locative art, Urban Fiction 2.0 allows users to feel a heightened sense of awareness of their positions in the imaginary lacy grid of the city and in the physical space they occupy. With a nod to the locative capabilities of Web 2.0 platforms, Urban Fiction 2.0 enables participants to “weave” their own experiences into the model of the city grid, issuing a sense of their actions in the broader context of a networked society.
For more information about Petra Gemeinboeck’s work, please visit her website here.
- Victoria Nolte

Weaving the Invisible Thread: Urban Fiction 2.0 by Petra Gemeinboeck

Urban Fiction 2.0 is a participatory installation that deploys locative devices and social media. Enacted in Sydney, Australia, the installation is activated by participants through a special mobile app that allows them to “weave an imaginary lace over Sydney’s urban and social landscape.”

With the app, users can move through physical space and cause disturbances to the imaginary “lace” projected onto a GPS rendering of the city. As the app measures the movements of each participant in real time, any motion or disturbance caused will immediately alter the virtual lace.

Images of lace, fabric, and thread symbolize the urban and social sphere and point to the idea of each participant’s role as a networked actor, moving through the space and collectively tracing their paths. An example of locative art, Urban Fiction 2.0 allows users to feel a heightened sense of awareness of their positions in the imaginary lacy grid of the city and in the physical space they occupy. With a nod to the locative capabilities of Web 2.0 platforms, Urban Fiction 2.0 enables participants to “weave” their own experiences into the model of the city grid, issuing a sense of their actions in the broader context of a networked society.

For more information about Petra Gemeinboeck’s work, please visit her website here.

- Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ art technology urban fiction 2.0 petra gemeinboeck locative media participatory art installation victoria nolte

Contact Us

Please include your email address