A publication about artworks with themes of science, nature and technology. Get free issues by visiting our shop!

Visualizing Wonder

We Are Where Art & Science Collide

Art & Science Journal is a website and biannual publication about artworks that deal with themes of science, nature and technology. Based in Ottawa, Canada, our publication focuses on the wonder that occurs when fields collide. We strive to be an informative and engaging resource for educators, students, and artscience enthusiasts alike. We see artworks as a physical presence that can expand upon knowledge that we have read or heard about, and as such can act as a medium for sharing information and ideas.

Click here for more information >>

Publications

Our publications are available for purchase online and in print format. Art & Science Journal Issue Two is now available for purchase for $10 print and $2 digital


Explore our publications >>

Submit Your Project

Throughout the year we accept submissions for our website and print issues. If you have an art or design project that deals with themes of science, nature or technology, submit your work. We want to talk about it!

Click here for more information >>

I don’t believe in escapism, fantasy, I believe in the magic that is just there. Björk

Our Blog

ArtSci Artists and Designers!

Don’t forget that you can submit your work for a feature on Art & Science Journal by sending in a detailed description, images, and a link to your website to submissions@artandsciencejournal.com We can’t wait to see your work! - Lee Jones
Continue Reading...
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones

Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?

The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.

With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.

Visit the MeMo website.

- Lee Jones

8 Photos
/ art design death jessica charlesworth MeMo technology
The Optical Illusions of Kohei Nawa
Using crystal beads and prism sheets, artist Kohei Nawa manipulates the audience’s perceptions of the images. In his PixCell (Beads) series (2005-2009), taxidermy animals are covered in clear crystal beads, obstructing our perception of the surface, and thus, the true image of the animal. In his PixCell (Prism) series (2003-2009), Nawa encases objects in acrylic boxes, but, with an added layer of prism sheets, that cut the light travelling into the boxes in two, and creating the illusion of multiples of the object, much like a hologram. In the latter work, the sculptural pieces are placed in a room that optically flattens the space and the works; the artist is taking already three-dimensional objects, flattening them by playing with the configuration of the space to appear two-dimensional, then placing prism sheets in the acrylic boxes to render the images three-dimensional by playing with the configuration in the smaller spaces of the boxes.
Distortion is a key element in the artists’ work. The skin of the animals in the PixCell (Beads) series is altered, creating a different view of the structure of the animal as a whole, and through each individual bead. The artist himself described the animals as being “replaced by ‘a husk of light’, and the new vision ‘the cell of an image’ (PixCell) is shown”, where the beads become the new ‘biological’ make-up of the animal. The random grouping of some of the beads can be seen as a direct commentary on how we perceive images, especially how the public is fed information, and the fact that sometimes even seeing the whole picture, with all the information, can still obscure the original intent of a piece. It is all in perception; two people seeing a piece will go away from it with two different perspectives on its intention or meaning.
-Anna Paluch
The Optical Illusions of Kohei Nawa
Using crystal beads and prism sheets, artist Kohei Nawa manipulates the audience’s perceptions of the images. In his PixCell (Beads) series (2005-2009), taxidermy animals are covered in clear crystal beads, obstructing our perception of the surface, and thus, the true image of the animal. In his PixCell (Prism) series (2003-2009), Nawa encases objects in acrylic boxes, but, with an added layer of prism sheets, that cut the light travelling into the boxes in two, and creating the illusion of multiples of the object, much like a hologram. In the latter work, the sculptural pieces are placed in a room that optically flattens the space and the works; the artist is taking already three-dimensional objects, flattening them by playing with the configuration of the space to appear two-dimensional, then placing prism sheets in the acrylic boxes to render the images three-dimensional by playing with the configuration in the smaller spaces of the boxes.
Distortion is a key element in the artists’ work. The skin of the animals in the PixCell (Beads) series is altered, creating a different view of the structure of the animal as a whole, and through each individual bead. The artist himself described the animals as being “replaced by ‘a husk of light’, and the new vision ‘the cell of an image’ (PixCell) is shown”, where the beads become the new ‘biological’ make-up of the animal. The random grouping of some of the beads can be seen as a direct commentary on how we perceive images, especially how the public is fed information, and the fact that sometimes even seeing the whole picture, with all the information, can still obscure the original intent of a piece. It is all in perception; two people seeing a piece will go away from it with two different perspectives on its intention or meaning.
-Anna Paluch
The Optical Illusions of Kohei Nawa
Using crystal beads and prism sheets, artist Kohei Nawa manipulates the audience’s perceptions of the images. In his PixCell (Beads) series (2005-2009), taxidermy animals are covered in clear crystal beads, obstructing our perception of the surface, and thus, the true image of the animal. In his PixCell (Prism) series (2003-2009), Nawa encases objects in acrylic boxes, but, with an added layer of prism sheets, that cut the light travelling into the boxes in two, and creating the illusion of multiples of the object, much like a hologram. In the latter work, the sculptural pieces are placed in a room that optically flattens the space and the works; the artist is taking already three-dimensional objects, flattening them by playing with the configuration of the space to appear two-dimensional, then placing prism sheets in the acrylic boxes to render the images three-dimensional by playing with the configuration in the smaller spaces of the boxes.
Distortion is a key element in the artists’ work. The skin of the animals in the PixCell (Beads) series is altered, creating a different view of the structure of the animal as a whole, and through each individual bead. The artist himself described the animals as being “replaced by ‘a husk of light’, and the new vision ‘the cell of an image’ (PixCell) is shown”, where the beads become the new ‘biological’ make-up of the animal. The random grouping of some of the beads can be seen as a direct commentary on how we perceive images, especially how the public is fed information, and the fact that sometimes even seeing the whole picture, with all the information, can still obscure the original intent of a piece. It is all in perception; two people seeing a piece will go away from it with two different perspectives on its intention or meaning.
-Anna Paluch

The Optical Illusions of Kohei Nawa

Using crystal beads and prism sheets, artist Kohei Nawa manipulates the audience’s perceptions of the images. In his PixCell (Beads) series (2005-2009), taxidermy animals are covered in clear crystal beads, obstructing our perception of the surface, and thus, the true image of the animal. In his PixCell (Prism) series (2003-2009), Nawa encases objects in acrylic boxes, but, with an added layer of prism sheets, that cut the light travelling into the boxes in two, and creating the illusion of multiples of the object, much like a hologram. In the latter work, the sculptural pieces are placed in a room that optically flattens the space and the works; the artist is taking already three-dimensional objects, flattening them by playing with the configuration of the space to appear two-dimensional, then placing prism sheets in the acrylic boxes to render the images three-dimensional by playing with the configuration in the smaller spaces of the boxes.

Distortion is a key element in the artists’ work. The skin of the animals in the PixCell (Beads) series is altered, creating a different view of the structure of the animal as a whole, and through each individual bead. The artist himself described the animals as being “replaced by ‘a husk of light’, and the new vision ‘the cell of an image’ (PixCell) is shown”, where the beads become the new ‘biological’ make-up of the animal. The random grouping of some of the beads can be seen as a direct commentary on how we perceive images, especially how the public is fed information, and the fact that sometimes even seeing the whole picture, with all the information, can still obscure the original intent of a piece. It is all in perception; two people seeing a piece will go away from it with two different perspectives on its intention or meaning.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ kohei nawa anna paluch optical illusion optics crystals prisms light art science art and science journal
A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones
A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones
A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones
A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones
A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones
A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones
A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones

A Form of Happiness: Dopamine

We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.

A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 

Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio

- Lee Jones

7 Photos
/ art design jessica charlesworth a form of happiness dopamine tim parsons speculative design product design chemistry science

Hoverboards Just Became Real (or Not?) - HUVrTech

Came across this video online and just had to share. A company called HUVrTech has launched a hoverboard set to be released in December 2014. Whether it’s real or not, it’s definitely a brilliant marketing stunt. 

Here’s their story:

"What began as a summer project in 2010 at the MIT Physics Graduate Program has evolved into one of the most exciting independent products to be developed out of MIT since the high-powered lithium-ion batteries developed by Yet-Ming Chiang in 2001. Our team consists of materials science, electricity & magnetism experts who’ve solved an important part of one of science’s mysteries: the key to antigravity.

The HUVr Board team ultimately aims to improve the efficiency, speed and sustainability of mass transportation. Yet rather than spend several more years closed off from the world while investing in research and development, the team and our world-class investors have worked to change the economics R&D by marketing this exciting consumer product in order to fund ongoing R&D.”

Visit their website here

- Lee Jones

arthoverboardhuvrtechdesigntechnology
SuperBetter is a Game that Helps You Reach Your Health Goals 
Game designer Jane McGonigal turned a traumatic event in her life into a virtual superpower when she chose to assist her concussion recovery by developing a role-playing game. Superbetter is the brainchild and online multi-player game that helps players achieve their health goals or recover from an illness or injury. McGonigal experienced significant depression and a mental fog, post-injury, and she found that creating an online world where should could virtually battle her symptoms and increase her personal resilience caused her suffering to end.
Her research into recovery, resiliency, and post-traumatic growth helped her design and offer Superbetter as a collaborative effort between players to collectively problem solve. The game helps to cultivate an attitude and experience of accomplishment, and assists in healing, health, and wellness. McGonigal says, “In the best-designed games, our human experience is optimized…” and Superbetter capitalizes on that truth. The process, more than the product, help players reach their health goals by having them actively participate in the four kinds of resilience. Physical, mental, social, and emotion resilience are all increased, through play, and the result is one of a change in priorities, a decreased fear of doing what makes one happy, and a new sense of purpose. Now, instead of racing cars or collecting mushrooms, you can increase the quality and maybe even the length of your life while game playing. 
Visit SuperBetter, and for more information watch Jane McGonigal’s TED Talk. 
- Lee Jones
SuperBetter is a Game that Helps You Reach Your Health Goals 
Game designer Jane McGonigal turned a traumatic event in her life into a virtual superpower when she chose to assist her concussion recovery by developing a role-playing game. Superbetter is the brainchild and online multi-player game that helps players achieve their health goals or recover from an illness or injury. McGonigal experienced significant depression and a mental fog, post-injury, and she found that creating an online world where should could virtually battle her symptoms and increase her personal resilience caused her suffering to end.
Her research into recovery, resiliency, and post-traumatic growth helped her design and offer Superbetter as a collaborative effort between players to collectively problem solve. The game helps to cultivate an attitude and experience of accomplishment, and assists in healing, health, and wellness. McGonigal says, “In the best-designed games, our human experience is optimized…” and Superbetter capitalizes on that truth. The process, more than the product, help players reach their health goals by having them actively participate in the four kinds of resilience. Physical, mental, social, and emotion resilience are all increased, through play, and the result is one of a change in priorities, a decreased fear of doing what makes one happy, and a new sense of purpose. Now, instead of racing cars or collecting mushrooms, you can increase the quality and maybe even the length of your life while game playing. 
Visit SuperBetter, and for more information watch Jane McGonigal’s TED Talk. 
- Lee Jones
SuperBetter is a Game that Helps You Reach Your Health Goals 
Game designer Jane McGonigal turned a traumatic event in her life into a virtual superpower when she chose to assist her concussion recovery by developing a role-playing game. Superbetter is the brainchild and online multi-player game that helps players achieve their health goals or recover from an illness or injury. McGonigal experienced significant depression and a mental fog, post-injury, and she found that creating an online world where should could virtually battle her symptoms and increase her personal resilience caused her suffering to end.
Her research into recovery, resiliency, and post-traumatic growth helped her design and offer Superbetter as a collaborative effort between players to collectively problem solve. The game helps to cultivate an attitude and experience of accomplishment, and assists in healing, health, and wellness. McGonigal says, “In the best-designed games, our human experience is optimized…” and Superbetter capitalizes on that truth. The process, more than the product, help players reach their health goals by having them actively participate in the four kinds of resilience. Physical, mental, social, and emotion resilience are all increased, through play, and the result is one of a change in priorities, a decreased fear of doing what makes one happy, and a new sense of purpose. Now, instead of racing cars or collecting mushrooms, you can increase the quality and maybe even the length of your life while game playing. 
Visit SuperBetter, and for more information watch Jane McGonigal’s TED Talk. 
- Lee Jones

SuperBetter is a Game that Helps You Reach Your Health Goals

Game designer Jane McGonigal turned a traumatic event in her life into a virtual superpower when she chose to assist her concussion recovery by developing a role-playing game. Superbetter is the brainchild and online multi-player game that helps players achieve their health goals or recover from an illness or injury. McGonigal experienced significant depression and a mental fog, post-injury, and she found that creating an online world where should could virtually battle her symptoms and increase her personal resilience caused her suffering to end.

Her research into recovery, resiliency, and post-traumatic growth helped her design and offer Superbetter as a collaborative effort between players to collectively problem solve. The game helps to cultivate an attitude and experience of accomplishment, and assists in healing, health, and wellness. McGonigal says, “In the best-designed games, our human experience is optimized…” and Superbetter capitalizes on that truth. The process, more than the product, help players reach their health goals by having them actively participate in the four kinds of resilience. Physical, mental, social, and emotion resilience are all increased, through play, and the result is one of a change in priorities, a decreased fear of doing what makes one happy, and a new sense of purpose. Now, instead of racing cars or collecting mushrooms, you can increase the quality and maybe even the length of your life while game playing. 

Visit SuperBetter, and for more information watch Jane McGonigal’s TED Talk. 

- Lee Jones

3 Photos
/ SuperBetter jane mcgonigal game game design TED
Helen Friel’s “Here’s Looking at Euclid”
Mathematics is like art; you either understand the concepts (i.e., you ‘get it’), or you become completely lost when coming into contact with them. Some people are able to understand both complex theories and expressions in art, and equations that, for some people, look like a bag of numbers and symbols exploded onto a piece of paper. In 1847, Oliver Byrne, a civil engineer and author, published a book called “Euclid’s Elements” which used coloured graphic explanations of each geometric principle. The style of graphics is similar to that of the Bauhaus and De Stijl movements, but since the book predates each, it could very well have been an inspiration for the creativity of the modernists.
Fast forward to the present, and a new rebirth of this book’s mathematical illustrations is inspiring paper engineer and illustrator Helen Friel to create three-dimensional sculpture replicas of the exact graphics in the book. The artists’ series, entitled “Here’s Looking at Euclid” (2012) uses the instructions found in Byrne’s book to create tangible mathematical theorems in the palm of your hand. Sure, it is a cool sculpture all on its own, but it is also an amazing tool to help teach people these theorems, especially those who are more visual learners and have difficulty concentrating on a page full of numbers.
If you would like to make one of these sculptures yourself, you can download and make your very own paper model of Pythagoras’ Theorem here.
-Anna Paluch
Helen Friel’s “Here’s Looking at Euclid”
Mathematics is like art; you either understand the concepts (i.e., you ‘get it’), or you become completely lost when coming into contact with them. Some people are able to understand both complex theories and expressions in art, and equations that, for some people, look like a bag of numbers and symbols exploded onto a piece of paper. In 1847, Oliver Byrne, a civil engineer and author, published a book called “Euclid’s Elements” which used coloured graphic explanations of each geometric principle. The style of graphics is similar to that of the Bauhaus and De Stijl movements, but since the book predates each, it could very well have been an inspiration for the creativity of the modernists.
Fast forward to the present, and a new rebirth of this book’s mathematical illustrations is inspiring paper engineer and illustrator Helen Friel to create three-dimensional sculpture replicas of the exact graphics in the book. The artists’ series, entitled “Here’s Looking at Euclid” (2012) uses the instructions found in Byrne’s book to create tangible mathematical theorems in the palm of your hand. Sure, it is a cool sculpture all on its own, but it is also an amazing tool to help teach people these theorems, especially those who are more visual learners and have difficulty concentrating on a page full of numbers.
If you would like to make one of these sculptures yourself, you can download and make your very own paper model of Pythagoras’ Theorem here.
-Anna Paluch
Helen Friel’s “Here’s Looking at Euclid”
Mathematics is like art; you either understand the concepts (i.e., you ‘get it’), or you become completely lost when coming into contact with them. Some people are able to understand both complex theories and expressions in art, and equations that, for some people, look like a bag of numbers and symbols exploded onto a piece of paper. In 1847, Oliver Byrne, a civil engineer and author, published a book called “Euclid’s Elements” which used coloured graphic explanations of each geometric principle. The style of graphics is similar to that of the Bauhaus and De Stijl movements, but since the book predates each, it could very well have been an inspiration for the creativity of the modernists.
Fast forward to the present, and a new rebirth of this book’s mathematical illustrations is inspiring paper engineer and illustrator Helen Friel to create three-dimensional sculpture replicas of the exact graphics in the book. The artists’ series, entitled “Here’s Looking at Euclid” (2012) uses the instructions found in Byrne’s book to create tangible mathematical theorems in the palm of your hand. Sure, it is a cool sculpture all on its own, but it is also an amazing tool to help teach people these theorems, especially those who are more visual learners and have difficulty concentrating on a page full of numbers.
If you would like to make one of these sculptures yourself, you can download and make your very own paper model of Pythagoras’ Theorem here.
-Anna Paluch
Helen Friel’s “Here’s Looking at Euclid”
Mathematics is like art; you either understand the concepts (i.e., you ‘get it’), or you become completely lost when coming into contact with them. Some people are able to understand both complex theories and expressions in art, and equations that, for some people, look like a bag of numbers and symbols exploded onto a piece of paper. In 1847, Oliver Byrne, a civil engineer and author, published a book called “Euclid’s Elements” which used coloured graphic explanations of each geometric principle. The style of graphics is similar to that of the Bauhaus and De Stijl movements, but since the book predates each, it could very well have been an inspiration for the creativity of the modernists.
Fast forward to the present, and a new rebirth of this book’s mathematical illustrations is inspiring paper engineer and illustrator Helen Friel to create three-dimensional sculpture replicas of the exact graphics in the book. The artists’ series, entitled “Here’s Looking at Euclid” (2012) uses the instructions found in Byrne’s book to create tangible mathematical theorems in the palm of your hand. Sure, it is a cool sculpture all on its own, but it is also an amazing tool to help teach people these theorems, especially those who are more visual learners and have difficulty concentrating on a page full of numbers.
If you would like to make one of these sculptures yourself, you can download and make your very own paper model of Pythagoras’ Theorem here.
-Anna Paluch

Helen Friel’s “Here’s Looking at Euclid”

Mathematics is like art; you either understand the concepts (i.e., you ‘get it’), or you become completely lost when coming into contact with them. Some people are able to understand both complex theories and expressions in art, and equations that, for some people, look like a bag of numbers and symbols exploded onto a piece of paper. In 1847, Oliver Byrne, a civil engineer and author, published a book called “Euclid’s Elements” which used coloured graphic explanations of each geometric principle. The style of graphics is similar to that of the Bauhaus and De Stijl movements, but since the book predates each, it could very well have been an inspiration for the creativity of the modernists.

Fast forward to the present, and a new rebirth of this book’s mathematical illustrations is inspiring paper engineer and illustrator Helen Friel to create three-dimensional sculpture replicas of the exact graphics in the book. The artists’ series, entitled “Here’s Looking at Euclid” (2012) uses the instructions found in Byrne’s book to create tangible mathematical theorems in the palm of your hand. Sure, it is a cool sculpture all on its own, but it is also an amazing tool to help teach people these theorems, especially those who are more visual learners and have difficulty concentrating on a page full of numbers.

If you would like to make one of these sculptures yourself, you can download and make your very own paper model of Pythagoras’ Theorem here.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ helen friel oliver byrne anna paluch geometry mathematics art science engineering paper engineering paper art art and science art and science journal Euclid
Michael Burk’s “Therefore I am” Imagines Future Possibilities for Prenatal Screening
 
As advanced as technology is and with the number of devices and machines available to us, a machine that produces an in-depth look into the life and future of an unborn child, has still yet to be actualized. Ultrasounds and sonograms give us a peek into the life and development of a child while in the womb, but Michael Burk, of the Berlin University of the Arts, has created a way to look deeper into the life and future of those yet to be born. Burk’s Therefore I Am displays his fictional measuring instrument, the purpose of which is to produce a story about one’s life and ultimately their death.
This deeper look into prenatal diagnostics is executed by Burk’s machine, when initiated by the user. A blood sample is inserted, the dial is turned, and animation on the machine’s screen displays images that mimic chromosomes, and strands of deoxyribonucleic acid molecules. Once the machine is finished, it produces and prints a life story based on the blood sample measurement. A typical life story includes the gender of the person, their interests, their sexual orientation, and their career choice. The instrument gives a life, future, and real feel to a person who has yet to even take their first breath.
Watch the video Therefore I Am on vimeo. 
- Lee Jones
Michael Burk’s “Therefore I am” Imagines Future Possibilities for Prenatal Screening
 
As advanced as technology is and with the number of devices and machines available to us, a machine that produces an in-depth look into the life and future of an unborn child, has still yet to be actualized. Ultrasounds and sonograms give us a peek into the life and development of a child while in the womb, but Michael Burk, of the Berlin University of the Arts, has created a way to look deeper into the life and future of those yet to be born. Burk’s Therefore I Am displays his fictional measuring instrument, the purpose of which is to produce a story about one’s life and ultimately their death.
This deeper look into prenatal diagnostics is executed by Burk’s machine, when initiated by the user. A blood sample is inserted, the dial is turned, and animation on the machine’s screen displays images that mimic chromosomes, and strands of deoxyribonucleic acid molecules. Once the machine is finished, it produces and prints a life story based on the blood sample measurement. A typical life story includes the gender of the person, their interests, their sexual orientation, and their career choice. The instrument gives a life, future, and real feel to a person who has yet to even take their first breath.
Watch the video Therefore I Am on vimeo. 
- Lee Jones
Michael Burk’s “Therefore I am” Imagines Future Possibilities for Prenatal Screening
 
As advanced as technology is and with the number of devices and machines available to us, a machine that produces an in-depth look into the life and future of an unborn child, has still yet to be actualized. Ultrasounds and sonograms give us a peek into the life and development of a child while in the womb, but Michael Burk, of the Berlin University of the Arts, has created a way to look deeper into the life and future of those yet to be born. Burk’s Therefore I Am displays his fictional measuring instrument, the purpose of which is to produce a story about one’s life and ultimately their death.
This deeper look into prenatal diagnostics is executed by Burk’s machine, when initiated by the user. A blood sample is inserted, the dial is turned, and animation on the machine’s screen displays images that mimic chromosomes, and strands of deoxyribonucleic acid molecules. Once the machine is finished, it produces and prints a life story based on the blood sample measurement. A typical life story includes the gender of the person, their interests, their sexual orientation, and their career choice. The instrument gives a life, future, and real feel to a person who has yet to even take their first breath.
Watch the video Therefore I Am on vimeo. 
- Lee Jones
Michael Burk’s “Therefore I am” Imagines Future Possibilities for Prenatal Screening
 
As advanced as technology is and with the number of devices and machines available to us, a machine that produces an in-depth look into the life and future of an unborn child, has still yet to be actualized. Ultrasounds and sonograms give us a peek into the life and development of a child while in the womb, but Michael Burk, of the Berlin University of the Arts, has created a way to look deeper into the life and future of those yet to be born. Burk’s Therefore I Am displays his fictional measuring instrument, the purpose of which is to produce a story about one’s life and ultimately their death.
This deeper look into prenatal diagnostics is executed by Burk’s machine, when initiated by the user. A blood sample is inserted, the dial is turned, and animation on the machine’s screen displays images that mimic chromosomes, and strands of deoxyribonucleic acid molecules. Once the machine is finished, it produces and prints a life story based on the blood sample measurement. A typical life story includes the gender of the person, their interests, their sexual orientation, and their career choice. The instrument gives a life, future, and real feel to a person who has yet to even take their first breath.
Watch the video Therefore I Am on vimeo. 
- Lee Jones
Michael Burk’s “Therefore I am” Imagines Future Possibilities for Prenatal Screening
 
As advanced as technology is and with the number of devices and machines available to us, a machine that produces an in-depth look into the life and future of an unborn child, has still yet to be actualized. Ultrasounds and sonograms give us a peek into the life and development of a child while in the womb, but Michael Burk, of the Berlin University of the Arts, has created a way to look deeper into the life and future of those yet to be born. Burk’s Therefore I Am displays his fictional measuring instrument, the purpose of which is to produce a story about one’s life and ultimately their death.
This deeper look into prenatal diagnostics is executed by Burk’s machine, when initiated by the user. A blood sample is inserted, the dial is turned, and animation on the machine’s screen displays images that mimic chromosomes, and strands of deoxyribonucleic acid molecules. Once the machine is finished, it produces and prints a life story based on the blood sample measurement. A typical life story includes the gender of the person, their interests, their sexual orientation, and their career choice. The instrument gives a life, future, and real feel to a person who has yet to even take their first breath.
Watch the video Therefore I Am on vimeo. 
- Lee Jones
Michael Burk’s “Therefore I am” Imagines Future Possibilities for Prenatal Screening
 
As advanced as technology is and with the number of devices and machines available to us, a machine that produces an in-depth look into the life and future of an unborn child, has still yet to be actualized. Ultrasounds and sonograms give us a peek into the life and development of a child while in the womb, but Michael Burk, of the Berlin University of the Arts, has created a way to look deeper into the life and future of those yet to be born. Burk’s Therefore I Am displays his fictional measuring instrument, the purpose of which is to produce a story about one’s life and ultimately their death.
This deeper look into prenatal diagnostics is executed by Burk’s machine, when initiated by the user. A blood sample is inserted, the dial is turned, and animation on the machine’s screen displays images that mimic chromosomes, and strands of deoxyribonucleic acid molecules. Once the machine is finished, it produces and prints a life story based on the blood sample measurement. A typical life story includes the gender of the person, their interests, their sexual orientation, and their career choice. The instrument gives a life, future, and real feel to a person who has yet to even take their first breath.
Watch the video Therefore I Am on vimeo. 
- Lee Jones

Michael Burk’s “Therefore I am” Imagines Future Possibilities for Prenatal Screening


As advanced as technology is and with the number of devices and machines available to us, a machine that produces an in-depth look into the life and future of an unborn child, has still yet to be actualized. Ultrasounds and sonograms give us a peek into the life and development of a child while in the womb, but Michael Burk, of the Berlin University of the Arts, has created a way to look deeper into the life and future of those yet to be born. Burk’s Therefore I Am displays his fictional measuring instrument, the purpose of which is to produce a story about one’s life and ultimately their death.

This deeper look into prenatal diagnostics is executed by Burk’s machine, when initiated by the user. A blood sample is inserted, the dial is turned, and animation on the machine’s screen displays images that mimic chromosomes, and strands of deoxyribonucleic acid molecules. Once the machine is finished, it produces and prints a life story based on the blood sample measurement. A typical life story includes the gender of the person, their interests, their sexual orientation, and their career choice. The instrument gives a life, future, and real feel to a person who has yet to even take their first breath.

Watch the video Therefore I Am on vimeo. 

- Lee Jones

6 Photos
/ art technology prenatal screening michael burk Therefore I am vimeo
Wear Your Chromosomes: Jewelry Collection Made from 3D Prints of Microscopy Data 
The X and Y-chromosomes found in humans are now wearable. Electron microscopist, Louise Hughes, has created a jewelry collection designed to mirror the look and shape of human chromosomes. Hughes designs every piece from microscopy data and produces it using 3D printing technology. Having already used the structures of organisms to create other jewelry pieces, Hughes felt she could not leave out the essential DNA and chromosomes. The 46 chromosomes found in our cells have never before been so beautifully displayed and worn.
As humans the genes in our DNA, as well as our environment, come to define us. When cells divide, chromosomes compress and form distinct shapes. Those shapes are what inspire the jewelry pieces made by Hughes. Male chromosomes, X and Y, female chromosomes, X and X and the triplet 21st chromosome that causes Down’s syndrome are all replicated in the human chromosome jewelry line. From rings and pendants, to earrings and cufflinks, the stainless steel, bronze, and silver pieces are available in both, karyotpye 1 or 2 structural designs. It has been said that art imitates life and with the human chromosome jewelry designs by Louise Hughes, art is literally replicates life.
Explore the Human Chromosome Jewelry Collection by Louise Hudges on Kickstarter. 
- Lee Jones
Wear Your Chromosomes: Jewelry Collection Made from 3D Prints of Microscopy Data 
The X and Y-chromosomes found in humans are now wearable. Electron microscopist, Louise Hughes, has created a jewelry collection designed to mirror the look and shape of human chromosomes. Hughes designs every piece from microscopy data and produces it using 3D printing technology. Having already used the structures of organisms to create other jewelry pieces, Hughes felt she could not leave out the essential DNA and chromosomes. The 46 chromosomes found in our cells have never before been so beautifully displayed and worn.
As humans the genes in our DNA, as well as our environment, come to define us. When cells divide, chromosomes compress and form distinct shapes. Those shapes are what inspire the jewelry pieces made by Hughes. Male chromosomes, X and Y, female chromosomes, X and X and the triplet 21st chromosome that causes Down’s syndrome are all replicated in the human chromosome jewelry line. From rings and pendants, to earrings and cufflinks, the stainless steel, bronze, and silver pieces are available in both, karyotpye 1 or 2 structural designs. It has been said that art imitates life and with the human chromosome jewelry designs by Louise Hughes, art is literally replicates life.
Explore the Human Chromosome Jewelry Collection by Louise Hudges on Kickstarter. 
- Lee Jones
George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 
To most people, numbers on a page and mathematic equations can evoke anxiety and headache or induce calmness and comfort. To very few, however, do algorithms and geometry equate to a detailed and beautiful beginning to art. George Thomson is a 23 year-old student from the United Kingdom who takes great pride and spends countless hours producing art from numbers, or fractal art. George says that for him the images produced by the numerous calculations required represent the beauty and wonders of the universe.
Due to the size produced, the fractal art pieces he creates are perfect for replication as canvas prints. Each piece, as unique as the universe in which it reflects, Thomson says one image can take about 72 hours to produce. The millions of calculations result in peaceful, yet stimulating images, which produce a final picture similar to that of a nebula or what you might see when peering down through a microscope. Thomson’s computer generated fractal art pieces are being shared and sold by him for the first time ever. Each fractal art piece is its own story of uniqueness, color, and light, produced by geometric patterns and shapes.
Visit the Kickstarter page for George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 Project.
- Lee Jones
George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 
To most people, numbers on a page and mathematic equations can evoke anxiety and headache or induce calmness and comfort. To very few, however, do algorithms and geometry equate to a detailed and beautiful beginning to art. George Thomson is a 23 year-old student from the United Kingdom who takes great pride and spends countless hours producing art from numbers, or fractal art. George says that for him the images produced by the numerous calculations required represent the beauty and wonders of the universe.
Due to the size produced, the fractal art pieces he creates are perfect for replication as canvas prints. Each piece, as unique as the universe in which it reflects, Thomson says one image can take about 72 hours to produce. The millions of calculations result in peaceful, yet stimulating images, which produce a final picture similar to that of a nebula or what you might see when peering down through a microscope. Thomson’s computer generated fractal art pieces are being shared and sold by him for the first time ever. Each fractal art piece is its own story of uniqueness, color, and light, produced by geometric patterns and shapes.
Visit the Kickstarter page for George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 Project.
- Lee Jones
George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 
To most people, numbers on a page and mathematic equations can evoke anxiety and headache or induce calmness and comfort. To very few, however, do algorithms and geometry equate to a detailed and beautiful beginning to art. George Thomson is a 23 year-old student from the United Kingdom who takes great pride and spends countless hours producing art from numbers, or fractal art. George says that for him the images produced by the numerous calculations required represent the beauty and wonders of the universe.
Due to the size produced, the fractal art pieces he creates are perfect for replication as canvas prints. Each piece, as unique as the universe in which it reflects, Thomson says one image can take about 72 hours to produce. The millions of calculations result in peaceful, yet stimulating images, which produce a final picture similar to that of a nebula or what you might see when peering down through a microscope. Thomson’s computer generated fractal art pieces are being shared and sold by him for the first time ever. Each fractal art piece is its own story of uniqueness, color, and light, produced by geometric patterns and shapes.
Visit the Kickstarter page for George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 Project.
- Lee Jones
George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 
To most people, numbers on a page and mathematic equations can evoke anxiety and headache or induce calmness and comfort. To very few, however, do algorithms and geometry equate to a detailed and beautiful beginning to art. George Thomson is a 23 year-old student from the United Kingdom who takes great pride and spends countless hours producing art from numbers, or fractal art. George says that for him the images produced by the numerous calculations required represent the beauty and wonders of the universe.
Due to the size produced, the fractal art pieces he creates are perfect for replication as canvas prints. Each piece, as unique as the universe in which it reflects, Thomson says one image can take about 72 hours to produce. The millions of calculations result in peaceful, yet stimulating images, which produce a final picture similar to that of a nebula or what you might see when peering down through a microscope. Thomson’s computer generated fractal art pieces are being shared and sold by him for the first time ever. Each fractal art piece is its own story of uniqueness, color, and light, produced by geometric patterns and shapes.
Visit the Kickstarter page for George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 Project.
- Lee Jones
George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 
To most people, numbers on a page and mathematic equations can evoke anxiety and headache or induce calmness and comfort. To very few, however, do algorithms and geometry equate to a detailed and beautiful beginning to art. George Thomson is a 23 year-old student from the United Kingdom who takes great pride and spends countless hours producing art from numbers, or fractal art. George says that for him the images produced by the numerous calculations required represent the beauty and wonders of the universe.
Due to the size produced, the fractal art pieces he creates are perfect for replication as canvas prints. Each piece, as unique as the universe in which it reflects, Thomson says one image can take about 72 hours to produce. The millions of calculations result in peaceful, yet stimulating images, which produce a final picture similar to that of a nebula or what you might see when peering down through a microscope. Thomson’s computer generated fractal art pieces are being shared and sold by him for the first time ever. Each fractal art piece is its own story of uniqueness, color, and light, produced by geometric patterns and shapes.
Visit the Kickstarter page for George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 Project.
- Lee Jones

George Thomson’s Fractal Art


To most people, numbers on a page and mathematic equations can evoke anxiety and headache or induce calmness and comfort. To very few, however, do algorithms and geometry equate to a detailed and beautiful beginning to art. George Thomson is a 23 year-old student from the United Kingdom who takes great pride and spends countless hours producing art from numbers, or fractal art. George says that for him the images produced by the numerous calculations required represent the beauty and wonders of the universe.

Due to the size produced, the fractal art pieces he creates are perfect for replication as canvas prints. Each piece, as unique as the universe in which it reflects, Thomson says one image can take about 72 hours to produce. The millions of calculations result in peaceful, yet stimulating images, which produce a final picture similar to that of a nebula or what you might see when peering down through a microscope. Thomson’s computer generated fractal art pieces are being shared and sold by him for the first time ever. Each fractal art piece is its own story of uniqueness, color, and light, produced by geometric patterns and shapes.

Visit the Kickstarter page for George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 Project.

- Lee Jones

5 Photos
/ art math fractal george thomson fractal art kickstarter

Contact Us

Please include your email address