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Visualizing Wonder

We Are Where Art & Science Collide

Art & Science Journal is a website and biannual publication about artworks that deal with themes of science, nature and technology. Based in Ottawa, Canada, our publication focuses on the wonder that occurs when fields collide. We strive to be an informative and engaging resource for educators, students, and artscience enthusiasts alike. We see artworks as a physical presence that can expand upon knowledge that we have read or heard about, and as such can act as a medium for sharing information and ideas.

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The Telegarden
Between the years of 1995 and 2004 the University of South Carolina, and subsequently the Ars Electronica Centre in Austria, were home to an innovative project called “The Telegarden”. This garden featured an area of dirt and plants inside a planter, which also held an industrial robot arm, which could be controlled through the internet.
How the garden worked, was that people from all over the world were able to observe the garden through a camera in the robot arm, but also, have the power to water and tend to the plants. If there was a free space the robot arm even allowed an individual, through the internet, the ability to plant a seed and take care of it. 
Professor Ken Goldberg explained that the decision to use a garden for this interactive project was that it is “very human, very immediate, very tactile”, a stark contrast to the idea of the internet and anything associated with it as complex, mathematical and machine-like. The internet is fast-paced, connecting us to other people and information in milliseconds, but the garden cannot be rushed, it must be cared for carefully,
As Randall Packer states:
“The Telegarden creates a physical garden as an environment to stage social interaction and community in virtual space. The Telegarden is a metaphor for the care and feeding of the delicate social ecology of the net." — San Jose Museum of Art, April 1998.

-Anna Paluch

The Telegarden

Between the years of 1995 and 2004 the University of South Carolina, and subsequently the Ars Electronica Centre in Austria, were home to an innovative project called “The Telegarden”. This garden featured an area of dirt and plants inside a planter, which also held an industrial robot arm, which could be controlled through the internet.

How the garden worked, was that people from all over the world were able to observe the garden through a camera in the robot arm, but also, have the power to water and tend to the plants. If there was a free space the robot arm even allowed an individual, through the internet, the ability to plant a seed and take care of it. 

Professor Ken Goldberg explained that the decision to use a garden for this interactive project was that it is “very human, very immediate, very tactile”, a stark contrast to the idea of the internet and anything associated with it as complex, mathematical and machine-like. The internet is fast-paced, connecting us to other people and information in milliseconds, but the garden cannot be rushed, it must be cared for carefully,

As Randall Packer states:

The Telegarden creates a physical garden as an environment to stage social interaction and community in virtual space. The Telegarden is a metaphor for the care and feeding of the delicate social ecology of the net." — San Jose Museum of Art, April 1998.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

The Telegarden university of south carolina ars electronica anna paluch art science art and science journal garden biology robotics engineering biodiversity
A Sweet 3-D Printing Project!
Bees are fascinating little creatures, having the capacity to build intricate structures. Marketing agencies, Sid Lee and The Ebeling Group decided to harness the bees building skills by manipulating the shape in which the they build their hives, creating organic sculptures for their client Dewar’s. 
The results include bottles and busts made purely from honeycomb; not chiseled or stuck together, but formed naturally by the bees themselves. With 3-D printing gaining popularity, it is wonderful to see natural examples of 3-D printing. The artists and bee keepers involved in the 3-D project are also able to study the process the bees go through to build their hives, as the outer shell is made of see-through plastic. 
Everything was taken into consideration to make the 80,000 bees as comfortable as possible; the base and see-through shell were designed to mimic the enclosed space of a normal bee hive. The bees were even helped in building their new hives, given ‘blueprints’ in order to collect pollen and nectarThis is a great example of thinking ‘outside the box’, and marketing done right!
There is a video of the process available here.
If you would like to read about other artists who work with bees to create natural honeycomb sculptures, check out Tomás Libertíny and Aganetha Dyck.
-Anna Paluch
A Sweet 3-D Printing Project!
Bees are fascinating little creatures, having the capacity to build intricate structures. Marketing agencies, Sid Lee and The Ebeling Group decided to harness the bees building skills by manipulating the shape in which the they build their hives, creating organic sculptures for their client Dewar’s. 
The results include bottles and busts made purely from honeycomb; not chiseled or stuck together, but formed naturally by the bees themselves. With 3-D printing gaining popularity, it is wonderful to see natural examples of 3-D printing. The artists and bee keepers involved in the 3-D project are also able to study the process the bees go through to build their hives, as the outer shell is made of see-through plastic. 
Everything was taken into consideration to make the 80,000 bees as comfortable as possible; the base and see-through shell were designed to mimic the enclosed space of a normal bee hive. The bees were even helped in building their new hives, given ‘blueprints’ in order to collect pollen and nectarThis is a great example of thinking ‘outside the box’, and marketing done right!
There is a video of the process available here.
If you would like to read about other artists who work with bees to create natural honeycomb sculptures, check out Tomás Libertíny and Aganetha Dyck.
-Anna Paluch

A Sweet 3-D Printing Project!

Bees are fascinating little creatures, having the capacity to build intricate structures. Marketing agencies, Sid Lee and The Ebeling Group decided to harness the bees building skills by manipulating the shape in which the they build their hives, creating organic sculptures for their client Dewar’s. 

The results include bottles and busts made purely from honeycomb; not chiseled or stuck together, but formed naturally by the bees themselves. With 3-D printing gaining popularity, it is wonderful to see natural examples of 3-D printing. The artists and bee keepers involved in the 3-D project are also able to study the process the bees go through to build their hives, as the outer shell is made of see-through plastic. 

Everything was taken into consideration to make the 80,000 bees as comfortable as possible; the base and see-through shell were designed to mimic the enclosed space of a normal bee hive. The bees were even helped in building their new hives, given ‘blueprints’ in order to collect pollen and nectar

This is a great example of thinking ‘outside the box’, and marketing done right!

There is a video of the process available here.

If you would like to read about other artists who work with bees to create natural honeycomb sculptures, check out Tomás Libertíny and Aganetha Dyck.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ bees honey 3D Printing nature engineering biology marketing Tomas libertiny aganetha dyck anna paluch art science art and science journal advertising
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch

Home Sweet Home

Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).

With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 

With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.

Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?

A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ aki inomata anna paluch hermit crabs animals shells plastic scanning technology 3D Printing art science art and science journal ct scan shelter home physiology architecture biology

Windswept by Charles Sowers

Though we cannot physically hold wind or see its swirling forms around us, we can definitely feel it.

In order to help visualize wind-currents, artist Charles Sowers created a kinetic installation consisting of 612 aluminum weather vanes called “Windswept” (2011). These were then meticulously placed on the side of the Randall Museum in San Francisco. Through this installation, we are able to see the patterns in the wind; where the currents go, how they turn, and sometimes how wind can abruptly change direction. This gives us a visual representation of the natural, invisible, force which moves around us, and sometimes with enough force, pushes and pulls us.

As the artist states:

Our ordinary experience of wind is as a solitary sample point of a very large invisible phenomenon. Windswept is a kind of large sensor array that samples the wind at its point of interaction with the Randall Museum building and reveals the complexity and structure of that interaction.

This sort of installation creates a better understanding, and appreciation, of the wind. It is not just one large gust; a single wave can be made up of smaller currents, going in their own directions from the main flow. A dialogue begins to form between the building and the wind, the weather vanes acting as translators.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Charles Sowersanna paluchwindweather vaneweatherRandall MuseumWindsweptscienceartart and science journal
Seismic Activities
Continuing the topic of last week’s post on earthquake inspired art, this post will highlight two more artists whose works are inspired by fault lines and our Earth’s movements.
Juan Geuer was an artist whose works resulted from a harmonious blend of art and science. The artists’ most well-known piece is “Al Asnaam” (1979), which permanently resides at the Ottawa Art Gallery.
The piece includes a highly sensitive horizontal pendulum, which reacts to movements on the Earth’s surface, later translating those movements through a laser-light which pierces the space to project itself onto the opposing wall. The room in which the piece resides becomes part of the installation, and the people walking around the piece inside the room help create very minute ‘earthquakes’ with every step they take; or what the piece reads as earthquakes. It is known as a “people participating seismometer”, which in turn helps audiences become aware of the effect that our daily movements have on the Earth’s surface.
Ken Goldberg is a professor and artist whose collaborative work “Bloom” (2013) utilizes his geographic location, almost a kilometre and a half away from California’s Hayward Fault line, to create an “Internet-based earthwork”. This work tracks the low-level movements of the fault line, showing that even when there is no massive quake, the ground below us is constantly moving, pulling different ways, and grumbling away unnoticed. The webpage that supports this work, broadcasts these movements live, translating them into bursts of vibrant colours.
The works of these two artists, help us to understand both how we impact our own Earth’s movements, and just how unpredictable those movements can be.
-Anna Paluch
Seismic Activities
Continuing the topic of last week’s post on earthquake inspired art, this post will highlight two more artists whose works are inspired by fault lines and our Earth’s movements.
Juan Geuer was an artist whose works resulted from a harmonious blend of art and science. The artists’ most well-known piece is “Al Asnaam” (1979), which permanently resides at the Ottawa Art Gallery.
The piece includes a highly sensitive horizontal pendulum, which reacts to movements on the Earth’s surface, later translating those movements through a laser-light which pierces the space to project itself onto the opposing wall. The room in which the piece resides becomes part of the installation, and the people walking around the piece inside the room help create very minute ‘earthquakes’ with every step they take; or what the piece reads as earthquakes. It is known as a “people participating seismometer”, which in turn helps audiences become aware of the effect that our daily movements have on the Earth’s surface.
Ken Goldberg is a professor and artist whose collaborative work “Bloom” (2013) utilizes his geographic location, almost a kilometre and a half away from California’s Hayward Fault line, to create an “Internet-based earthwork”. This work tracks the low-level movements of the fault line, showing that even when there is no massive quake, the ground below us is constantly moving, pulling different ways, and grumbling away unnoticed. The webpage that supports this work, broadcasts these movements live, translating them into bursts of vibrant colours.
The works of these two artists, help us to understand both how we impact our own Earth’s movements, and just how unpredictable those movements can be.
-Anna Paluch
Seismic Activities
Continuing the topic of last week’s post on earthquake inspired art, this post will highlight two more artists whose works are inspired by fault lines and our Earth’s movements.
Juan Geuer was an artist whose works resulted from a harmonious blend of art and science. The artists’ most well-known piece is “Al Asnaam” (1979), which permanently resides at the Ottawa Art Gallery.
The piece includes a highly sensitive horizontal pendulum, which reacts to movements on the Earth’s surface, later translating those movements through a laser-light which pierces the space to project itself onto the opposing wall. The room in which the piece resides becomes part of the installation, and the people walking around the piece inside the room help create very minute ‘earthquakes’ with every step they take; or what the piece reads as earthquakes. It is known as a “people participating seismometer”, which in turn helps audiences become aware of the effect that our daily movements have on the Earth’s surface.
Ken Goldberg is a professor and artist whose collaborative work “Bloom” (2013) utilizes his geographic location, almost a kilometre and a half away from California’s Hayward Fault line, to create an “Internet-based earthwork”. This work tracks the low-level movements of the fault line, showing that even when there is no massive quake, the ground below us is constantly moving, pulling different ways, and grumbling away unnoticed. The webpage that supports this work, broadcasts these movements live, translating them into bursts of vibrant colours.
The works of these two artists, help us to understand both how we impact our own Earth’s movements, and just how unpredictable those movements can be.
-Anna Paluch

Seismic Activities

Continuing the topic of last week’s post on earthquake inspired art, this post will highlight two more artists whose works are inspired by fault lines and our Earth’s movements.

Juan Geuer was an artist whose works resulted from a harmonious blend of art and science. The artists’ most well-known piece is “Al Asnaam” (1979), which permanently resides at the Ottawa Art Gallery.

The piece includes a highly sensitive horizontal pendulum, which reacts to movements on the Earth’s surface, later translating those movements through a laser-light which pierces the space to project itself onto the opposing wall. The room in which the piece resides becomes part of the installation, and the people walking around the piece inside the room help create very minute ‘earthquakes’ with every step they take; or what the piece reads as earthquakes. It is known as a “people participating seismometer”, which in turn helps audiences become aware of the effect that our daily movements have on the Earth’s surface.

Ken Goldberg is a professor and artist whose collaborative work “Bloom” (2013) utilizes his geographic location, almost a kilometre and a half away from California’s Hayward Fault line, to create an “Internet-based earthwork”. This work tracks the low-level movements of the fault line, showing that even when there is no massive quake, the ground below us is constantly moving, pulling different ways, and grumbling away unnoticed. The webpage that supports this work, broadcasts these movements live, translating them into bursts of vibrant colours.

The works of these two artists, help us to understand both how we impact our own Earth’s movements, and just how unpredictable those movements can be.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ juan geuer ken goldberg earthquake seismic activity Earth art science art and science journal anna paluch Ottawa Art Gallery

As artist Leo Selvaggio attests to in his video above, privacy is becoming a precious commodity. With the ever-increasing prevalence of technology and mobile devices, it’s difficult to maintain a low profile. Many of our actions, both online and out and about, are being recorded and surveilled, either on a camera or by virtually tracking our positions via mobile devices. This has driven Selvaggio to create a work of art and a hacking device that allows for its wearer to walk about undetected by the cameras that surveil them - URME Surveillance. Pronounced “you-are-me”, this device is a 3-D printed rubber mask manufactured by ThatsMyFace.com. The level of rendering is realistic enough to fool the facial recognition software, so that every person wearing the mask is recognized as Leo Selvaggio, not themselves.

Selvaggio has been living and working in Chicago, stating in his video that it is the most surveilled city in America - with over 25,000 cameras rigged with military-grade facial recognition software, it’s easy to see why Selvaggio would want to create some sort of bypass for those who would rather not be monitored. Instead of hiding the public’s face, Selvaggio is giving them a new one, “protecting the public from surveillance and creating a safe space to explore our digital identities.”

Aside from the rubber mask, URME Surveillance has two other products available to users: a paper mask, best worn in large groups, and a video encryption software that places Selvaggio’s face over those that appear in the video. Selvaggio is aware of the less savory activities that these masks could be used for, but insists that URME Surveillance is an “organized artistic intervention”, driven by a desire to allow an individual the ability to “assert themselves in a public space”. As such, it is expected that these devices are used responsibly by those who choose to wear them. 

To learn more about URME Surveillance or support its Indiegogo campaign, click here.

- Lea Hamilton 

(source)

URME SurveillanceLeo Selvaggioarthackingmask3d printingtechnologysurveillanceartandsciencejournalLea Hamilton
Art as Aftershock
Earthquakes are dangerous phenomena, yet two artists chose to present these natural disasters, in a way that makes viewers contemplate, rather than fear them.
Luke Jerram and Carlos Amorales created works that comment on the 2011 Japanese Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, and 1985 earthquake in Mexico City, respectively. Their works allow viewers to contemplate the nature of earthquakes with the help of visualizations through seismographic data.
In Jerram’s piece, the artist took the seismographic data from the Tōhoku earthquake, and rotated it using a computer program to see the data in three-dimensions, later printing it in those dimensions. The sculpture, made in 2011, represents nine minutes of the earthquake, allowing viewers to calculate, and imagine, the severity of the disaster on their own.
Amorales approaches the 1985 earthquake in a more theoretical presentation, in “Vertical Earthquake” (2010). Rather than using data, the artist creates his own fault lines and cracks on the walls, drawing epicentres around each. The artist chose to capture the chaos and emotion of the event. Within the installation, newspaper clippings of the disaster are displayed, with fault lines drawn on them as well. 
Where Jerram uses data to help visualize the severity of the earthquake in Japan, Morales plays with drama and emotion, creating a fragmented image which symbolically reflects the earthquake that he witnessed. Both pieces however, are sobering reminders of the immense power our Earth has over man-made constructions.
-Anna Paluch
Art as Aftershock
Earthquakes are dangerous phenomena, yet two artists chose to present these natural disasters, in a way that makes viewers contemplate, rather than fear them.
Luke Jerram and Carlos Amorales created works that comment on the 2011 Japanese Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, and 1985 earthquake in Mexico City, respectively. Their works allow viewers to contemplate the nature of earthquakes with the help of visualizations through seismographic data.
In Jerram’s piece, the artist took the seismographic data from the Tōhoku earthquake, and rotated it using a computer program to see the data in three-dimensions, later printing it in those dimensions. The sculpture, made in 2011, represents nine minutes of the earthquake, allowing viewers to calculate, and imagine, the severity of the disaster on their own.
Amorales approaches the 1985 earthquake in a more theoretical presentation, in “Vertical Earthquake” (2010). Rather than using data, the artist creates his own fault lines and cracks on the walls, drawing epicentres around each. The artist chose to capture the chaos and emotion of the event. Within the installation, newspaper clippings of the disaster are displayed, with fault lines drawn on them as well. 
Where Jerram uses data to help visualize the severity of the earthquake in Japan, Morales plays with drama and emotion, creating a fragmented image which symbolically reflects the earthquake that he witnessed. Both pieces however, are sobering reminders of the immense power our Earth has over man-made constructions.
-Anna Paluch
Art as Aftershock
Earthquakes are dangerous phenomena, yet two artists chose to present these natural disasters, in a way that makes viewers contemplate, rather than fear them.
Luke Jerram and Carlos Amorales created works that comment on the 2011 Japanese Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, and 1985 earthquake in Mexico City, respectively. Their works allow viewers to contemplate the nature of earthquakes with the help of visualizations through seismographic data.
In Jerram’s piece, the artist took the seismographic data from the Tōhoku earthquake, and rotated it using a computer program to see the data in three-dimensions, later printing it in those dimensions. The sculpture, made in 2011, represents nine minutes of the earthquake, allowing viewers to calculate, and imagine, the severity of the disaster on their own.
Amorales approaches the 1985 earthquake in a more theoretical presentation, in “Vertical Earthquake” (2010). Rather than using data, the artist creates his own fault lines and cracks on the walls, drawing epicentres around each. The artist chose to capture the chaos and emotion of the event. Within the installation, newspaper clippings of the disaster are displayed, with fault lines drawn on them as well. 
Where Jerram uses data to help visualize the severity of the earthquake in Japan, Morales plays with drama and emotion, creating a fragmented image which symbolically reflects the earthquake that he witnessed. Both pieces however, are sobering reminders of the immense power our Earth has over man-made constructions.
-Anna Paluch
Art as Aftershock
Earthquakes are dangerous phenomena, yet two artists chose to present these natural disasters, in a way that makes viewers contemplate, rather than fear them.
Luke Jerram and Carlos Amorales created works that comment on the 2011 Japanese Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, and 1985 earthquake in Mexico City, respectively. Their works allow viewers to contemplate the nature of earthquakes with the help of visualizations through seismographic data.
In Jerram’s piece, the artist took the seismographic data from the Tōhoku earthquake, and rotated it using a computer program to see the data in three-dimensions, later printing it in those dimensions. The sculpture, made in 2011, represents nine minutes of the earthquake, allowing viewers to calculate, and imagine, the severity of the disaster on their own.
Amorales approaches the 1985 earthquake in a more theoretical presentation, in “Vertical Earthquake” (2010). Rather than using data, the artist creates his own fault lines and cracks on the walls, drawing epicentres around each. The artist chose to capture the chaos and emotion of the event. Within the installation, newspaper clippings of the disaster are displayed, with fault lines drawn on them as well. 
Where Jerram uses data to help visualize the severity of the earthquake in Japan, Morales plays with drama and emotion, creating a fragmented image which symbolically reflects the earthquake that he witnessed. Both pieces however, are sobering reminders of the immense power our Earth has over man-made constructions.
-Anna Paluch

Art as Aftershock

Earthquakes are dangerous phenomena, yet two artists chose to present these natural disasters, in a way that makes viewers contemplate, rather than fear them.

Luke Jerram and Carlos Amorales created works that comment on the 2011 Japanese Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, and 1985 earthquake in Mexico City, respectively. Their works allow viewers to contemplate the nature of earthquakes with the help of visualizations through seismographic data.

In Jerram’s piece, the artist took the seismographic data from the Tōhoku earthquake, and rotated it using a computer program to see the data in three-dimensions, later printing it in those dimensions. The sculpture, made in 2011, represents nine minutes of the earthquake, allowing viewers to calculate, and imagine, the severity of the disaster on their own.

Amorales approaches the 1985 earthquake in a more theoretical presentation, in “Vertical Earthquake” (2010). Rather than using data, the artist creates his own fault lines and cracks on the walls, drawing epicentres around each. The artist chose to capture the chaos and emotion of the event. Within the installation, newspaper clippings of the disaster are displayed, with fault lines drawn on them as well.

Where Jerram uses data to help visualize the severity of the earthquake in Japan, Morales plays with drama and emotion, creating a fragmented image which symbolically reflects the earthquake that he witnessed. Both pieces however, are sobering reminders of the immense power our Earth has over man-made constructions.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ Luke Jerram Carlos Amorales anna paluch seismograph seismogam earthquake art science art and science journal sculpture installation Tohoko japan earthquake mexico city earthquake
Local Coverage - PUSH: The New Printmakers
Contemporary printmaking practices live in an in-between space. As a medium, it is caught between its history and its relevance as a mode of expression. Printmaking is often thought of as a dying art, sometimes involving complicated processes and machinery that are no longer being manufactured. But, the relevance of printmaking as an art form is still present, as is shown by a new printmaking exhibition being held at Studio Sixty Six in Ottawa.

PUSH: The New Printmakers brings together several artists specializing in different types of printmaking. The works are comprised of linocuts, screen printing, woodcuts and relief prints.The artists included in the show are Melissa Blackman, Delphine Sullivan, Dante Penman, Claudia Gutierrez, Tegan Alston, Stéphanie St-Jean Aubre and Kimberly Edgar, all graduates from the Ottawa School of Art. While all the works are tied together by their medium and their black and white palette, each artist’s oeuvre addresses different artistic preoccupations, ranging from issues of identity, the idea of the specimen, to the relationship between landmarks and memory. 

For those who are interested in checking out the show, it will be open until June 26th. Click here for more information.
If you are interested in seeing interviews with the artists and gallery owner, click here.
-Lea Hamilton
Local Coverage - PUSH: The New Printmakers
Contemporary printmaking practices live in an in-between space. As a medium, it is caught between its history and its relevance as a mode of expression. Printmaking is often thought of as a dying art, sometimes involving complicated processes and machinery that are no longer being manufactured. But, the relevance of printmaking as an art form is still present, as is shown by a new printmaking exhibition being held at Studio Sixty Six in Ottawa.

PUSH: The New Printmakers brings together several artists specializing in different types of printmaking. The works are comprised of linocuts, screen printing, woodcuts and relief prints.The artists included in the show are Melissa Blackman, Delphine Sullivan, Dante Penman, Claudia Gutierrez, Tegan Alston, Stéphanie St-Jean Aubre and Kimberly Edgar, all graduates from the Ottawa School of Art. While all the works are tied together by their medium and their black and white palette, each artist’s oeuvre addresses different artistic preoccupations, ranging from issues of identity, the idea of the specimen, to the relationship between landmarks and memory. 

For those who are interested in checking out the show, it will be open until June 26th. Click here for more information.
If you are interested in seeing interviews with the artists and gallery owner, click here.
-Lea Hamilton
Local Coverage - PUSH: The New Printmakers
Contemporary printmaking practices live in an in-between space. As a medium, it is caught between its history and its relevance as a mode of expression. Printmaking is often thought of as a dying art, sometimes involving complicated processes and machinery that are no longer being manufactured. But, the relevance of printmaking as an art form is still present, as is shown by a new printmaking exhibition being held at Studio Sixty Six in Ottawa.

PUSH: The New Printmakers brings together several artists specializing in different types of printmaking. The works are comprised of linocuts, screen printing, woodcuts and relief prints.The artists included in the show are Melissa Blackman, Delphine Sullivan, Dante Penman, Claudia Gutierrez, Tegan Alston, Stéphanie St-Jean Aubre and Kimberly Edgar, all graduates from the Ottawa School of Art. While all the works are tied together by their medium and their black and white palette, each artist’s oeuvre addresses different artistic preoccupations, ranging from issues of identity, the idea of the specimen, to the relationship between landmarks and memory. 

For those who are interested in checking out the show, it will be open until June 26th. Click here for more information.
If you are interested in seeing interviews with the artists and gallery owner, click here.
-Lea Hamilton
Local Coverage - PUSH: The New Printmakers
Contemporary printmaking practices live in an in-between space. As a medium, it is caught between its history and its relevance as a mode of expression. Printmaking is often thought of as a dying art, sometimes involving complicated processes and machinery that are no longer being manufactured. But, the relevance of printmaking as an art form is still present, as is shown by a new printmaking exhibition being held at Studio Sixty Six in Ottawa.

PUSH: The New Printmakers brings together several artists specializing in different types of printmaking. The works are comprised of linocuts, screen printing, woodcuts and relief prints.The artists included in the show are Melissa Blackman, Delphine Sullivan, Dante Penman, Claudia Gutierrez, Tegan Alston, Stéphanie St-Jean Aubre and Kimberly Edgar, all graduates from the Ottawa School of Art. While all the works are tied together by their medium and their black and white palette, each artist’s oeuvre addresses different artistic preoccupations, ranging from issues of identity, the idea of the specimen, to the relationship between landmarks and memory. 

For those who are interested in checking out the show, it will be open until June 26th. Click here for more information.
If you are interested in seeing interviews with the artists and gallery owner, click here.
-Lea Hamilton
Reimagined Ecosystems
Coral reefs come in many shapes, sizes and colours. Not only are they important to the oceans, but to the environment as a whole. Acting as the ‘rainforests of the sea’, coral reefs are home to a large array of diverse animals and plants, as well as being natural breakwaters which help to minimize the impact and damage from natural disasters such as cyclones. Coral reefs are not only beautiful, they are essentially life-sustaining, providing shelter for animals, which then feed people living near the reefs.
Artists that look to reefs for inspiration in their work include Courtney Mattison and Jane Ladan. 
In Mattison’s show Our Changing Seas III, the artist creates large scale ceramic coral reef sculptures, some white and some coloured, in order to show the effects that global warming has on the reefs. The vibrant reefs begin to be swallowed up by the bleached, dying reefs. The artist hopes that her work can influence others to act fast to protect the reefs while there is still time to save the living ones, and hopefully restore the bleached reefs to their once vibrant and life-sustaining selves. 
Jane Ladan works with the colours of these reefs to create her wearable art. The Mauritius-born artist, who is based in Ottawa, creates works that celebrate the rich colours and textures that are found in nature. She also uses Mauritius’ unique cultural blend, with influences coming from countries such as China and India, and its environment, mixing exotic flowers with undersea foliage, to help shape how she expresses herself creatively.
Where Mattison creates work to encourage preservation, Ladan creates work with a similar theme, in the sense that the beauty of her pieces should be seen as a reminder of the beauty of all natural things; in order to keep appreciating this beauty, we must do our part to help preserve it. 
-Anna Paluch
Reimagined Ecosystems
Coral reefs come in many shapes, sizes and colours. Not only are they important to the oceans, but to the environment as a whole. Acting as the ‘rainforests of the sea’, coral reefs are home to a large array of diverse animals and plants, as well as being natural breakwaters which help to minimize the impact and damage from natural disasters such as cyclones. Coral reefs are not only beautiful, they are essentially life-sustaining, providing shelter for animals, which then feed people living near the reefs.
Artists that look to reefs for inspiration in their work include Courtney Mattison and Jane Ladan. 
In Mattison’s show Our Changing Seas III, the artist creates large scale ceramic coral reef sculptures, some white and some coloured, in order to show the effects that global warming has on the reefs. The vibrant reefs begin to be swallowed up by the bleached, dying reefs. The artist hopes that her work can influence others to act fast to protect the reefs while there is still time to save the living ones, and hopefully restore the bleached reefs to their once vibrant and life-sustaining selves. 
Jane Ladan works with the colours of these reefs to create her wearable art. The Mauritius-born artist, who is based in Ottawa, creates works that celebrate the rich colours and textures that are found in nature. She also uses Mauritius’ unique cultural blend, with influences coming from countries such as China and India, and its environment, mixing exotic flowers with undersea foliage, to help shape how she expresses herself creatively.
Where Mattison creates work to encourage preservation, Ladan creates work with a similar theme, in the sense that the beauty of her pieces should be seen as a reminder of the beauty of all natural things; in order to keep appreciating this beauty, we must do our part to help preserve it. 
-Anna Paluch

Reimagined Ecosystems

Coral reefs come in many shapes, sizes and colours. Not only are they important to the oceans, but to the environment as a whole. Acting as the ‘rainforests of the sea’, coral reefs are home to a large array of diverse animals and plants, as well as being natural breakwaters which help to minimize the impact and damage from natural disasters such as cyclones. Coral reefs are not only beautiful, they are essentially life-sustaining, providing shelter for animals, which then feed people living near the reefs.

Artists that look to reefs for inspiration in their work include Courtney Mattison and Jane Ladan.

In Mattison’s show Our Changing Seas III, the artist creates large scale ceramic coral reef sculptures, some white and some coloured, in order to show the effects that global warming has on the reefs. The vibrant reefs begin to be swallowed up by the bleached, dying reefs. The artist hopes that her work can influence others to act fast to protect the reefs while there is still time to save the living ones, and hopefully restore the bleached reefs to their once vibrant and life-sustaining selves.

Jane Ladan works with the colours of these reefs to create her wearable art. The Mauritius-born artist, who is based in Ottawa, creates works that celebrate the rich colours and textures that are found in nature. She also uses Mauritius’ unique cultural blend, with influences coming from countries such as China and India, and its environment, mixing exotic flowers with undersea foliage, to help shape how she expresses herself creatively.

Where Mattison creates work to encourage preservation, Ladan creates work with a similar theme, in the sense that the beauty of her pieces should be seen as a reminder of the beauty of all natural things; in order to keep appreciating this beauty, we must do our part to help preserve it.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ jane ladan courtney mattison anna paluch coral reefs oceans nature art science art and science journal sculpture reefs sea seas ocean ecosystem Environment fashion conservation
Shadow Play
With the help of geometric sculptures, artist Fabrizio Corneli constructs intricate shadow-images. The artist plays with light and its reflective abilities to create human faces, animals and geometric patterns. It may seem like the artist’s work is made by simply cutting a stencil into a metal object, but the artist’s shadow pieces are actually made by placing specifically shaped, abstract metal objects on the projection surface, with the light bouncing off and through those objects, to cast shadows which mimic features such as eyes, mouths, or even a girl on a swing.
The end result is an intangible piece of art; yes, the sculptural elements are tangible, but the image, the actual focus of the piece cannot be touched without distorting it, nor can it be seen without the use of light.
With the help of mathematics, the artist is able to carefully position his abstract sculptures in a way that will optimally project the result of the light reflection. As the artist states, “light is energy which creates form”; all the artist has to do is create a vessel into which light can travel, and then step back, to allow the light itself to form its own work of art. Light not only reveals the shape, but also creates it.
The results are almost like non-images, as in, the shadows on the walls are residues of what should be there, or was there, or could be. The images create an environment of the anamorphosis, combining science and poetry, mathematics and art.

-Anna Paluch
Shadow Play
With the help of geometric sculptures, artist Fabrizio Corneli constructs intricate shadow-images. The artist plays with light and its reflective abilities to create human faces, animals and geometric patterns. It may seem like the artist’s work is made by simply cutting a stencil into a metal object, but the artist’s shadow pieces are actually made by placing specifically shaped, abstract metal objects on the projection surface, with the light bouncing off and through those objects, to cast shadows which mimic features such as eyes, mouths, or even a girl on a swing.
The end result is an intangible piece of art; yes, the sculptural elements are tangible, but the image, the actual focus of the piece cannot be touched without distorting it, nor can it be seen without the use of light.
With the help of mathematics, the artist is able to carefully position his abstract sculptures in a way that will optimally project the result of the light reflection. As the artist states, “light is energy which creates form”; all the artist has to do is create a vessel into which light can travel, and then step back, to allow the light itself to form its own work of art. Light not only reveals the shape, but also creates it.
The results are almost like non-images, as in, the shadows on the walls are residues of what should be there, or was there, or could be. The images create an environment of the anamorphosis, combining science and poetry, mathematics and art.

-Anna Paluch

Shadow Play

With the help of geometric sculptures, artist Fabrizio Corneli constructs intricate shadow-images. The artist plays with light and its reflective abilities to create human faces, animals and geometric patterns. It may seem like the artist’s work is made by simply cutting a stencil into a metal object, but the artist’s shadow pieces are actually made by placing specifically shaped, abstract metal objects on the projection surface, with the light bouncing off and through those objects, to cast shadows which mimic features such as eyes, mouths, or even a girl on a swing.

The end result is an intangible piece of art; yes, the sculptural elements are tangible, but the image, the actual focus of the piece cannot be touched without distorting it, nor can it be seen without the use of light.

With the help of mathematics, the artist is able to carefully position his abstract sculptures in a way that will optimally project the result of the light reflection. As the artist states, “light is energy which creates form”; all the artist has to do is create a vessel into which light can travel, and then step back, to allow the light itself to form its own work of art. Light not only reveals the shape, but also creates it.

The results are almost like non-images, as in, the shadows on the walls are residues of what should be there, or was there, or could be. The images create an environment of the anamorphosis, combining science and poetry, mathematics and art.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ fabrizio corneli anna paluch optics light shadow sculpture art science art and science journal

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