Ruin Academy
What gives a building presence, one that has been abandoned and inevitably caught up in the process of decay? The crumbling walls, broken glass panes, barred windows and doors speak to us in certain ways—some different than others. The question can be asked, how can we re-envision the uninhabited namely, the abandoned and forgotten (factories, apartment blocks, warehouses)—those that stand as testaments to industrial society?
What is Ruin Academy?
Ruin Academy is an independent architectural research center in Taipei city Taiwan. It is run in co-operation between the Casagrande Laboratory in Finland and JUT Foundation for Arts & Architecture Taiwan. Occupying a 5-storey apartment building, Ruin is equipped with large studio and sleeping space for teaching classes and visiting artists, gardens for growing food, and a traditional sauna for relaxation.   
Primarily, Ruin is founded upon the idea of decay meaning, the focus lies beyond the industrial and post-industrial city to that of the decomposing city. This process, or rather evolution is growth—growth from that which once was but can no longer be. Ruin is not an experiment that reflects the modern trend of home renovation or design, but a reaction to the existing conditions of an evolving city. Extracted from the website, “Ruin Academy does not rely on design, but hooks on to the Local Knowledge of the Taipei basin and reacts on this.” This demonstrates a sense of place brought about by the awareness of existing and potential future conditions of the local geographic region. It is focusing on what remains rather, than designing anew—for design itself can ultimately replace reality by concealing existing conditions.  
What are Third Generation cities?
Third Generation cities are those that have grown from the ruin of industrial society but lie beyond its fordist structure of social and economic organization. Elements of Third Generation cities include: Anarchist Gardening (the spontaneous and nomadic construction of community gardens and urban farms that operate outside official urban development), Urban Acupuncture (the design of architecture that is placed in positions throughout the city in order to act as “needles” for producing and increasing the urban Qi), and River Urbanism (a form of landscape urbanism).
Principally, Third Generation cities can be conceived of as rhizomatic in nature and ultimately, bound up with pre-existing and future conditions of human construction. Extracted from the website, “modernism is lost and the industrial machine will become organic. This happens in Taipei and this is what we study. Ruin Academy is an organic machine.” It would seem that it is the atrophy of the city that illumines the nature of the city and defines our age—what will we do with all of the buildings already built, considering by 2050 70% of the world’s population will be living in urban areas and “space” continues to become limited?
In the end, it may not only be a matter of design or perspective in terms of how we look at the city, but what actions we take alongside the natural processes that unfold and transform the spaces we have inhabited, do inhabit, and will come to inhabit. It would seem that the collective space Ruin Academy has created may be just the right start for building, dwelling and thinking.  
 - Lee-Michael J. Pronko
Ruin Academy
What gives a building presence, one that has been abandoned and inevitably caught up in the process of decay? The crumbling walls, broken glass panes, barred windows and doors speak to us in certain ways—some different than others. The question can be asked, how can we re-envision the uninhabited namely, the abandoned and forgotten (factories, apartment blocks, warehouses)—those that stand as testaments to industrial society?
What is Ruin Academy?
Ruin Academy is an independent architectural research center in Taipei city Taiwan. It is run in co-operation between the Casagrande Laboratory in Finland and JUT Foundation for Arts & Architecture Taiwan. Occupying a 5-storey apartment building, Ruin is equipped with large studio and sleeping space for teaching classes and visiting artists, gardens for growing food, and a traditional sauna for relaxation.   
Primarily, Ruin is founded upon the idea of decay meaning, the focus lies beyond the industrial and post-industrial city to that of the decomposing city. This process, or rather evolution is growth—growth from that which once was but can no longer be. Ruin is not an experiment that reflects the modern trend of home renovation or design, but a reaction to the existing conditions of an evolving city. Extracted from the website, “Ruin Academy does not rely on design, but hooks on to the Local Knowledge of the Taipei basin and reacts on this.” This demonstrates a sense of place brought about by the awareness of existing and potential future conditions of the local geographic region. It is focusing on what remains rather, than designing anew—for design itself can ultimately replace reality by concealing existing conditions.  
What are Third Generation cities?
Third Generation cities are those that have grown from the ruin of industrial society but lie beyond its fordist structure of social and economic organization. Elements of Third Generation cities include: Anarchist Gardening (the spontaneous and nomadic construction of community gardens and urban farms that operate outside official urban development), Urban Acupuncture (the design of architecture that is placed in positions throughout the city in order to act as “needles” for producing and increasing the urban Qi), and River Urbanism (a form of landscape urbanism).
Principally, Third Generation cities can be conceived of as rhizomatic in nature and ultimately, bound up with pre-existing and future conditions of human construction. Extracted from the website, “modernism is lost and the industrial machine will become organic. This happens in Taipei and this is what we study. Ruin Academy is an organic machine.” It would seem that it is the atrophy of the city that illumines the nature of the city and defines our age—what will we do with all of the buildings already built, considering by 2050 70% of the world’s population will be living in urban areas and “space” continues to become limited?
In the end, it may not only be a matter of design or perspective in terms of how we look at the city, but what actions we take alongside the natural processes that unfold and transform the spaces we have inhabited, do inhabit, and will come to inhabit. It would seem that the collective space Ruin Academy has created may be just the right start for building, dwelling and thinking.  
 - Lee-Michael J. Pronko
Ruin Academy
What gives a building presence, one that has been abandoned and inevitably caught up in the process of decay? The crumbling walls, broken glass panes, barred windows and doors speak to us in certain ways—some different than others. The question can be asked, how can we re-envision the uninhabited namely, the abandoned and forgotten (factories, apartment blocks, warehouses)—those that stand as testaments to industrial society?
What is Ruin Academy?
Ruin Academy is an independent architectural research center in Taipei city Taiwan. It is run in co-operation between the Casagrande Laboratory in Finland and JUT Foundation for Arts & Architecture Taiwan. Occupying a 5-storey apartment building, Ruin is equipped with large studio and sleeping space for teaching classes and visiting artists, gardens for growing food, and a traditional sauna for relaxation.   
Primarily, Ruin is founded upon the idea of decay meaning, the focus lies beyond the industrial and post-industrial city to that of the decomposing city. This process, or rather evolution is growth—growth from that which once was but can no longer be. Ruin is not an experiment that reflects the modern trend of home renovation or design, but a reaction to the existing conditions of an evolving city. Extracted from the website, “Ruin Academy does not rely on design, but hooks on to the Local Knowledge of the Taipei basin and reacts on this.” This demonstrates a sense of place brought about by the awareness of existing and potential future conditions of the local geographic region. It is focusing on what remains rather, than designing anew—for design itself can ultimately replace reality by concealing existing conditions.  
What are Third Generation cities?
Third Generation cities are those that have grown from the ruin of industrial society but lie beyond its fordist structure of social and economic organization. Elements of Third Generation cities include: Anarchist Gardening (the spontaneous and nomadic construction of community gardens and urban farms that operate outside official urban development), Urban Acupuncture (the design of architecture that is placed in positions throughout the city in order to act as “needles” for producing and increasing the urban Qi), and River Urbanism (a form of landscape urbanism).
Principally, Third Generation cities can be conceived of as rhizomatic in nature and ultimately, bound up with pre-existing and future conditions of human construction. Extracted from the website, “modernism is lost and the industrial machine will become organic. This happens in Taipei and this is what we study. Ruin Academy is an organic machine.” It would seem that it is the atrophy of the city that illumines the nature of the city and defines our age—what will we do with all of the buildings already built, considering by 2050 70% of the world’s population will be living in urban areas and “space” continues to become limited?
In the end, it may not only be a matter of design or perspective in terms of how we look at the city, but what actions we take alongside the natural processes that unfold and transform the spaces we have inhabited, do inhabit, and will come to inhabit. It would seem that the collective space Ruin Academy has created may be just the right start for building, dwelling and thinking.  
 - Lee-Michael J. Pronko
Ruin Academy
What gives a building presence, one that has been abandoned and inevitably caught up in the process of decay? The crumbling walls, broken glass panes, barred windows and doors speak to us in certain ways—some different than others. The question can be asked, how can we re-envision the uninhabited namely, the abandoned and forgotten (factories, apartment blocks, warehouses)—those that stand as testaments to industrial society?
What is Ruin Academy?
Ruin Academy is an independent architectural research center in Taipei city Taiwan. It is run in co-operation between the Casagrande Laboratory in Finland and JUT Foundation for Arts & Architecture Taiwan. Occupying a 5-storey apartment building, Ruin is equipped with large studio and sleeping space for teaching classes and visiting artists, gardens for growing food, and a traditional sauna for relaxation.   
Primarily, Ruin is founded upon the idea of decay meaning, the focus lies beyond the industrial and post-industrial city to that of the decomposing city. This process, or rather evolution is growth—growth from that which once was but can no longer be. Ruin is not an experiment that reflects the modern trend of home renovation or design, but a reaction to the existing conditions of an evolving city. Extracted from the website, “Ruin Academy does not rely on design, but hooks on to the Local Knowledge of the Taipei basin and reacts on this.” This demonstrates a sense of place brought about by the awareness of existing and potential future conditions of the local geographic region. It is focusing on what remains rather, than designing anew—for design itself can ultimately replace reality by concealing existing conditions.  
What are Third Generation cities?
Third Generation cities are those that have grown from the ruin of industrial society but lie beyond its fordist structure of social and economic organization. Elements of Third Generation cities include: Anarchist Gardening (the spontaneous and nomadic construction of community gardens and urban farms that operate outside official urban development), Urban Acupuncture (the design of architecture that is placed in positions throughout the city in order to act as “needles” for producing and increasing the urban Qi), and River Urbanism (a form of landscape urbanism).
Principally, Third Generation cities can be conceived of as rhizomatic in nature and ultimately, bound up with pre-existing and future conditions of human construction. Extracted from the website, “modernism is lost and the industrial machine will become organic. This happens in Taipei and this is what we study. Ruin Academy is an organic machine.” It would seem that it is the atrophy of the city that illumines the nature of the city and defines our age—what will we do with all of the buildings already built, considering by 2050 70% of the world’s population will be living in urban areas and “space” continues to become limited?
In the end, it may not only be a matter of design or perspective in terms of how we look at the city, but what actions we take alongside the natural processes that unfold and transform the spaces we have inhabited, do inhabit, and will come to inhabit. It would seem that the collective space Ruin Academy has created may be just the right start for building, dwelling and thinking.  
 - Lee-Michael J. Pronko
Ruin Academy
What gives a building presence, one that has been abandoned and inevitably caught up in the process of decay? The crumbling walls, broken glass panes, barred windows and doors speak to us in certain ways—some different than others. The question can be asked, how can we re-envision the uninhabited namely, the abandoned and forgotten (factories, apartment blocks, warehouses)—those that stand as testaments to industrial society?
What is Ruin Academy?
Ruin Academy is an independent architectural research center in Taipei city Taiwan. It is run in co-operation between the Casagrande Laboratory in Finland and JUT Foundation for Arts & Architecture Taiwan. Occupying a 5-storey apartment building, Ruin is equipped with large studio and sleeping space for teaching classes and visiting artists, gardens for growing food, and a traditional sauna for relaxation.   
Primarily, Ruin is founded upon the idea of decay meaning, the focus lies beyond the industrial and post-industrial city to that of the decomposing city. This process, or rather evolution is growth—growth from that which once was but can no longer be. Ruin is not an experiment that reflects the modern trend of home renovation or design, but a reaction to the existing conditions of an evolving city. Extracted from the website, “Ruin Academy does not rely on design, but hooks on to the Local Knowledge of the Taipei basin and reacts on this.” This demonstrates a sense of place brought about by the awareness of existing and potential future conditions of the local geographic region. It is focusing on what remains rather, than designing anew—for design itself can ultimately replace reality by concealing existing conditions.  
What are Third Generation cities?
Third Generation cities are those that have grown from the ruin of industrial society but lie beyond its fordist structure of social and economic organization. Elements of Third Generation cities include: Anarchist Gardening (the spontaneous and nomadic construction of community gardens and urban farms that operate outside official urban development), Urban Acupuncture (the design of architecture that is placed in positions throughout the city in order to act as “needles” for producing and increasing the urban Qi), and River Urbanism (a form of landscape urbanism).
Principally, Third Generation cities can be conceived of as rhizomatic in nature and ultimately, bound up with pre-existing and future conditions of human construction. Extracted from the website, “modernism is lost and the industrial machine will become organic. This happens in Taipei and this is what we study. Ruin Academy is an organic machine.” It would seem that it is the atrophy of the city that illumines the nature of the city and defines our age—what will we do with all of the buildings already built, considering by 2050 70% of the world’s population will be living in urban areas and “space” continues to become limited?
In the end, it may not only be a matter of design or perspective in terms of how we look at the city, but what actions we take alongside the natural processes that unfold and transform the spaces we have inhabited, do inhabit, and will come to inhabit. It would seem that the collective space Ruin Academy has created may be just the right start for building, dwelling and thinking.  
 - Lee-Michael J. Pronko
Ruin Academy
What gives a building presence, one that has been abandoned and inevitably caught up in the process of decay? The crumbling walls, broken glass panes, barred windows and doors speak to us in certain ways—some different than others. The question can be asked, how can we re-envision the uninhabited namely, the abandoned and forgotten (factories, apartment blocks, warehouses)—those that stand as testaments to industrial society?
What is Ruin Academy?
Ruin Academy is an independent architectural research center in Taipei city Taiwan. It is run in co-operation between the Casagrande Laboratory in Finland and JUT Foundation for Arts & Architecture Taiwan. Occupying a 5-storey apartment building, Ruin is equipped with large studio and sleeping space for teaching classes and visiting artists, gardens for growing food, and a traditional sauna for relaxation.   
Primarily, Ruin is founded upon the idea of decay meaning, the focus lies beyond the industrial and post-industrial city to that of the decomposing city. This process, or rather evolution is growth—growth from that which once was but can no longer be. Ruin is not an experiment that reflects the modern trend of home renovation or design, but a reaction to the existing conditions of an evolving city. Extracted from the website, “Ruin Academy does not rely on design, but hooks on to the Local Knowledge of the Taipei basin and reacts on this.” This demonstrates a sense of place brought about by the awareness of existing and potential future conditions of the local geographic region. It is focusing on what remains rather, than designing anew—for design itself can ultimately replace reality by concealing existing conditions.  
What are Third Generation cities?
Third Generation cities are those that have grown from the ruin of industrial society but lie beyond its fordist structure of social and economic organization. Elements of Third Generation cities include: Anarchist Gardening (the spontaneous and nomadic construction of community gardens and urban farms that operate outside official urban development), Urban Acupuncture (the design of architecture that is placed in positions throughout the city in order to act as “needles” for producing and increasing the urban Qi), and River Urbanism (a form of landscape urbanism).
Principally, Third Generation cities can be conceived of as rhizomatic in nature and ultimately, bound up with pre-existing and future conditions of human construction. Extracted from the website, “modernism is lost and the industrial machine will become organic. This happens in Taipei and this is what we study. Ruin Academy is an organic machine.” It would seem that it is the atrophy of the city that illumines the nature of the city and defines our age—what will we do with all of the buildings already built, considering by 2050 70% of the world’s population will be living in urban areas and “space” continues to become limited?
In the end, it may not only be a matter of design or perspective in terms of how we look at the city, but what actions we take alongside the natural processes that unfold and transform the spaces we have inhabited, do inhabit, and will come to inhabit. It would seem that the collective space Ruin Academy has created may be just the right start for building, dwelling and thinking.  
 - Lee-Michael J. Pronko

Ruin Academy

What gives a building presence, one that has been abandoned and inevitably caught up in the process of decay? The crumbling walls, broken glass panes, barred windows and doors speak to us in certain ways—some different than others. The question can be asked, how can we re-envision the uninhabited namely, the abandoned and forgotten (factories, apartment blocks, warehouses)—those that stand as testaments to industrial society?

What is Ruin Academy?

Ruin Academy is an independent architectural research center in Taipei city Taiwan. It is run in co-operation between the Casagrande Laboratory in Finland and JUT Foundation for Arts & Architecture Taiwan. Occupying a 5-storey apartment building, Ruin is equipped with large studio and sleeping space for teaching classes and visiting artists, gardens for growing food, and a traditional sauna for relaxation.   

Primarily, Ruin is founded upon the idea of decay meaning, the focus lies beyond the industrial and post-industrial city to that of the decomposing city. This process, or rather evolution is growth—growth from that which once was but can no longer be. Ruin is not an experiment that reflects the modern trend of home renovation or design, but a reaction to the existing conditions of an evolving city. Extracted from the website, “Ruin Academy does not rely on design, but hooks on to the Local Knowledge of the Taipei basin and reacts on this.” This demonstrates a sense of place brought about by the awareness of existing and potential future conditions of the local geographic region. It is focusing on what remains rather, than designing anew—for design itself can ultimately replace reality by concealing existing conditions.  

What are Third Generation cities?

Third Generation cities are those that have grown from the ruin of industrial society but lie beyond its fordist structure of social and economic organization. Elements of Third Generation cities include: Anarchist Gardening (the spontaneous and nomadic construction of community gardens and urban farms that operate outside official urban development), Urban Acupuncture (the design of architecture that is placed in positions throughout the city in order to act as “needles” for producing and increasing the urban Qi), and River Urbanism (a form of landscape urbanism).

Principally, Third Generation cities can be conceived of as rhizomatic in nature and ultimately, bound up with pre-existing and future conditions of human construction. Extracted from the website, “modernism is lost and the industrial machine will become organic. This happens in Taipei and this is what we study. Ruin Academy is an organic machine.” It would seem that it is the atrophy of the city that illumines the nature of the city and defines our age—what will we do with all of the buildings already built, considering by 2050 70% of the world’s population will be living in urban areas and “space” continues to become limited?

In the end, it may not only be a matter of design or perspective in terms of how we look at the city, but what actions we take alongside the natural processes that unfold and transform the spaces we have inhabited, do inhabit, and will come to inhabit. It would seem that the collective space Ruin Academy has created may be just the right start for building, dwelling and thinking.  

 Lee-Michael J. Pronko

Ruin Academy

What gives a building presence, one that has been abandoned and inevitably caught up in the process of decay? The crumbling walls, broken glass panes, barred windows and doors speak to us in certain ways—some different than others. The question can be asked, how can we re-envision the uninhabited namely, the abandoned and forgotten (factories, apartment blocks, warehouses)—those that stand as testaments to industrial society?

What is Ruin Academy?

Ruin Academy is an independent architectural research center in Taipei city Taiwan. It is run in co-operation between the Casagrande Laboratory in Finland and JUT Foundation for Arts & Architecture Taiwan. Occupying a 5-storey apartment building, Ruin is equipped with large studio and sleeping space for teaching classes and visiting artists, gardens for growing food, and a traditional sauna for relaxation.   

Primarily, Ruin is founded upon the idea of decay meaning, the focus lies beyond the industrial and post-industrial city to that of the decomposing city. This process, or rather evolution is growth—growth from that which once was but can no longer be. Ruin is not an experiment that reflects the modern trend of home renovation or design, but a reaction to the existing conditions of an evolving city. Extracted from the website, “Ruin Academy does not rely on design, but hooks on to the Local Knowledge of the Taipei basin and reacts on this.” This demonstrates a sense of place brought about by the awareness of existing and potential future conditions of the local geographic region. It is focusing on what remains rather, than designing anew—for design itself can ultimately replace reality by concealing existing conditions.  

What are Third Generation cities?

Third Generation cities are those that have grown from the ruin of industrial society but lie beyond its fordist structure of social and economic organization. Elements of Third Generation cities include: Anarchist Gardening (the spontaneous and nomadic construction of community gardens and urban farms that operate outside official urban development), Urban Acupuncture (the design of architecture that is placed in positions throughout the city in order to act as “needles” for producing and increasing the urban Qi), and River Urbanism (a form of landscape urbanism).

Principally, Third Generation cities can be conceived of as rhizomatic in nature and ultimately, bound up with pre-existing and future conditions of human construction. Extracted from the website, “modernism is lost and the industrial machine will become organic. This happens in Taipei and this is what we study. Ruin Academy is an organic machine.” It would seem that it is the atrophy of the city that illumines the nature of the city and defines our age—what will we do with all of the buildings already built, considering by 2050 70% of the world’s population will be living in urban areas and “space” continues to become limited?

In the end, it may not only be a matter of design or perspective in terms of how we look at the city, but what actions we take alongside the natural processes that unfold and transform the spaces we have inhabited, do inhabit, and will come to inhabit. It would seem that the collective space Ruin Academy has created may be just the right start for building, dwelling and thinking.  

 Lee-Michael J. Pronko





  Posted on August 21, 2012

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