Gyorgy Kepes
György Kepes (1906 – 2001) was an Hungarian-born artist, professor, author and aesthetic theorist whose work contributed significantly to theories in art and design education in the latter half of the 20th century.
     Along with being a keen experimental artist and instructor, Kepes was also a prolific writer, publishing important books on aesthetics and design including his acclaimed Language of Vision (1944), a work in which Kepes looked to visual art as “an invaluable educational medium.” After working at the New Bauhaus in Chicago as well as Brooklyn College, Kepes moved to teach at MIT where he founded what is now known as the Center for Advanced Visual Studies. Here, he was able to draw from exciting, new technological resources for his art practice; x-ray machines, stroboscopic photography, telescopes, sonar and radar graphing systems and other technology helped Kepes create, define, and challenge the “scientific aesthetic.” These photographs from his body of work show the range of Kepes’s artistic experimentation and the creative potential of these new advances in art, media, and science.
For more information on the life and work of György Kepes, check out this NYT article, the MIT website, and this book.
- Erin Saunders
Gyorgy Kepes
György Kepes (1906 – 2001) was an Hungarian-born artist, professor, author and aesthetic theorist whose work contributed significantly to theories in art and design education in the latter half of the 20th century.
     Along with being a keen experimental artist and instructor, Kepes was also a prolific writer, publishing important books on aesthetics and design including his acclaimed Language of Vision (1944), a work in which Kepes looked to visual art as “an invaluable educational medium.” After working at the New Bauhaus in Chicago as well as Brooklyn College, Kepes moved to teach at MIT where he founded what is now known as the Center for Advanced Visual Studies. Here, he was able to draw from exciting, new technological resources for his art practice; x-ray machines, stroboscopic photography, telescopes, sonar and radar graphing systems and other technology helped Kepes create, define, and challenge the “scientific aesthetic.” These photographs from his body of work show the range of Kepes’s artistic experimentation and the creative potential of these new advances in art, media, and science.
For more information on the life and work of György Kepes, check out this NYT article, the MIT website, and this book.
- Erin Saunders
Gyorgy Kepes
György Kepes (1906 – 2001) was an Hungarian-born artist, professor, author and aesthetic theorist whose work contributed significantly to theories in art and design education in the latter half of the 20th century.
     Along with being a keen experimental artist and instructor, Kepes was also a prolific writer, publishing important books on aesthetics and design including his acclaimed Language of Vision (1944), a work in which Kepes looked to visual art as “an invaluable educational medium.” After working at the New Bauhaus in Chicago as well as Brooklyn College, Kepes moved to teach at MIT where he founded what is now known as the Center for Advanced Visual Studies. Here, he was able to draw from exciting, new technological resources for his art practice; x-ray machines, stroboscopic photography, telescopes, sonar and radar graphing systems and other technology helped Kepes create, define, and challenge the “scientific aesthetic.” These photographs from his body of work show the range of Kepes’s artistic experimentation and the creative potential of these new advances in art, media, and science.
For more information on the life and work of György Kepes, check out this NYT article, the MIT website, and this book.
- Erin Saunders
Gyorgy Kepes
György Kepes (1906 – 2001) was an Hungarian-born artist, professor, author and aesthetic theorist whose work contributed significantly to theories in art and design education in the latter half of the 20th century.
     Along with being a keen experimental artist and instructor, Kepes was also a prolific writer, publishing important books on aesthetics and design including his acclaimed Language of Vision (1944), a work in which Kepes looked to visual art as “an invaluable educational medium.” After working at the New Bauhaus in Chicago as well as Brooklyn College, Kepes moved to teach at MIT where he founded what is now known as the Center for Advanced Visual Studies. Here, he was able to draw from exciting, new technological resources for his art practice; x-ray machines, stroboscopic photography, telescopes, sonar and radar graphing systems and other technology helped Kepes create, define, and challenge the “scientific aesthetic.” These photographs from his body of work show the range of Kepes’s artistic experimentation and the creative potential of these new advances in art, media, and science.
For more information on the life and work of György Kepes, check out this NYT article, the MIT website, and this book.
- Erin Saunders
Gyorgy Kepes
György Kepes (1906 – 2001) was an Hungarian-born artist, professor, author and aesthetic theorist whose work contributed significantly to theories in art and design education in the latter half of the 20th century.
     Along with being a keen experimental artist and instructor, Kepes was also a prolific writer, publishing important books on aesthetics and design including his acclaimed Language of Vision (1944), a work in which Kepes looked to visual art as “an invaluable educational medium.” After working at the New Bauhaus in Chicago as well as Brooklyn College, Kepes moved to teach at MIT where he founded what is now known as the Center for Advanced Visual Studies. Here, he was able to draw from exciting, new technological resources for his art practice; x-ray machines, stroboscopic photography, telescopes, sonar and radar graphing systems and other technology helped Kepes create, define, and challenge the “scientific aesthetic.” These photographs from his body of work show the range of Kepes’s artistic experimentation and the creative potential of these new advances in art, media, and science.
For more information on the life and work of György Kepes, check out this NYT article, the MIT website, and this book.
- Erin Saunders
Gyorgy Kepes
György Kepes (1906 – 2001) was an Hungarian-born artist, professor, author and aesthetic theorist whose work contributed significantly to theories in art and design education in the latter half of the 20th century.
     Along with being a keen experimental artist and instructor, Kepes was also a prolific writer, publishing important books on aesthetics and design including his acclaimed Language of Vision (1944), a work in which Kepes looked to visual art as “an invaluable educational medium.” After working at the New Bauhaus in Chicago as well as Brooklyn College, Kepes moved to teach at MIT where he founded what is now known as the Center for Advanced Visual Studies. Here, he was able to draw from exciting, new technological resources for his art practice; x-ray machines, stroboscopic photography, telescopes, sonar and radar graphing systems and other technology helped Kepes create, define, and challenge the “scientific aesthetic.” These photographs from his body of work show the range of Kepes’s artistic experimentation and the creative potential of these new advances in art, media, and science.
For more information on the life and work of György Kepes, check out this NYT article, the MIT website, and this book.
- Erin Saunders
Gyorgy Kepes
György Kepes (1906 – 2001) was an Hungarian-born artist, professor, author and aesthetic theorist whose work contributed significantly to theories in art and design education in the latter half of the 20th century.
     Along with being a keen experimental artist and instructor, Kepes was also a prolific writer, publishing important books on aesthetics and design including his acclaimed Language of Vision (1944), a work in which Kepes looked to visual art as “an invaluable educational medium.” After working at the New Bauhaus in Chicago as well as Brooklyn College, Kepes moved to teach at MIT where he founded what is now known as the Center for Advanced Visual Studies. Here, he was able to draw from exciting, new technological resources for his art practice; x-ray machines, stroboscopic photography, telescopes, sonar and radar graphing systems and other technology helped Kepes create, define, and challenge the “scientific aesthetic.” These photographs from his body of work show the range of Kepes’s artistic experimentation and the creative potential of these new advances in art, media, and science.
For more information on the life and work of György Kepes, check out this NYT article, the MIT website, and this book.
- Erin Saunders

Gyorgy Kepes

György Kepes (1906 – 2001) was an Hungarian-born artist, professor, author and aesthetic theorist whose work contributed significantly to theories in art and design education in the latter half of the 20th century.

     Along with being a keen experimental artist and instructor, Kepes was also a prolific writer, publishing important books on aesthetics and design including his acclaimed Language of Vision (1944), a work in which Kepes looked to visual art as “an invaluable educational medium.” After working at the New Bauhaus in Chicago as well as Brooklyn College, Kepes moved to teach at MIT where he founded what is now known as the Center for Advanced Visual Studies. Here, he was able to draw from exciting, new technological resources for his art practice; x-ray machines, stroboscopic photography, telescopes, sonar and radar graphing systems and other technology helped Kepes create, define, and challenge the “scientific aesthetic.” These photographs from his body of work show the range of Kepes’s artistic experimentation and the creative potential of these new advances in art, media, and science.

For more information on the life and work of György Kepes, check out this NYT article, the MIT website, and this book.

- Erin Saunders

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Gyorgy Kepes

György Kepes (1906 – 2001) was an Hungarian-born artist, professor, author and aesthetic theorist whose work contributed significantly to theories in art and design education in the latter half of the 20th century.

     Along with being a keen experimental artist and instructor, Kepes was also a prolific writer, publishing important books on aesthetics and design including his acclaimed Language of Vision (1944), a work in which Kepes looked to visual art as “an invaluable educational medium.” After working at the New Bauhaus in Chicago as well as Brooklyn College, Kepes moved to teach at MIT where he founded what is now known as the Center for Advanced Visual Studies. Here, he was able to draw from exciting, new technological resources for his art practice; x-ray machines, stroboscopic photography, telescopes, sonar and radar graphing systems and other technology helped Kepes create, define, and challenge the “scientific aesthetic.” These photographs from his body of work show the range of Kepes’s artistic experimentation and the creative potential of these new advances in art, media, and science.

For more information on the life and work of György Kepes, check out this NYT article, the MIT website, and this book.

- Erin Saunders

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)





  Posted on November 23, 2012

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