Simon F. Park
A Senior Lecturer in Molecular Bacteriology at University of Surrey, Simon F. Park’s artworks are driven by a need to correct the common misconception that microbiological life is primitive and always detrimental. As Park states,  
"I hope that through my art, and collaborations with artists, that the real and sublime nature of the microbiological world can be revealed. I also find the interface between arts and science to be a powerfully pluripotent one, that can occasionally give rise to outliers and thus new avenues of scientific investigation."
As a microbiologist, Park works mostly with microorganisms and uses them to explore the inherent creativity of the natural world and to reveal its subtle, and usually hidden, narratives. But, rather than imposing any strict human-centred design upon the organisms that he works with, he prefers to evoke them as  co-authors in the creative process so that important events that many of us often overlook, or fail to consider intimately, become manifest. To see more of Park’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Simon F. Park
Simon F. Park
A Senior Lecturer in Molecular Bacteriology at University of Surrey, Simon F. Park’s artworks are driven by a need to correct the common misconception that microbiological life is primitive and always detrimental. As Park states,  
"I hope that through my art, and collaborations with artists, that the real and sublime nature of the microbiological world can be revealed. I also find the interface between arts and science to be a powerfully pluripotent one, that can occasionally give rise to outliers and thus new avenues of scientific investigation."
As a microbiologist, Park works mostly with microorganisms and uses them to explore the inherent creativity of the natural world and to reveal its subtle, and usually hidden, narratives. But, rather than imposing any strict human-centred design upon the organisms that he works with, he prefers to evoke them as  co-authors in the creative process so that important events that many of us often overlook, or fail to consider intimately, become manifest. To see more of Park’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Simon F. Park
Simon F. Park
A Senior Lecturer in Molecular Bacteriology at University of Surrey, Simon F. Park’s artworks are driven by a need to correct the common misconception that microbiological life is primitive and always detrimental. As Park states,  
"I hope that through my art, and collaborations with artists, that the real and sublime nature of the microbiological world can be revealed. I also find the interface between arts and science to be a powerfully pluripotent one, that can occasionally give rise to outliers and thus new avenues of scientific investigation."
As a microbiologist, Park works mostly with microorganisms and uses them to explore the inherent creativity of the natural world and to reveal its subtle, and usually hidden, narratives. But, rather than imposing any strict human-centred design upon the organisms that he works with, he prefers to evoke them as  co-authors in the creative process so that important events that many of us often overlook, or fail to consider intimately, become manifest. To see more of Park’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Simon F. Park
Simon F. Park
A Senior Lecturer in Molecular Bacteriology at University of Surrey, Simon F. Park’s artworks are driven by a need to correct the common misconception that microbiological life is primitive and always detrimental. As Park states,  
"I hope that through my art, and collaborations with artists, that the real and sublime nature of the microbiological world can be revealed. I also find the interface between arts and science to be a powerfully pluripotent one, that can occasionally give rise to outliers and thus new avenues of scientific investigation."
As a microbiologist, Park works mostly with microorganisms and uses them to explore the inherent creativity of the natural world and to reveal its subtle, and usually hidden, narratives. But, rather than imposing any strict human-centred design upon the organisms that he works with, he prefers to evoke them as  co-authors in the creative process so that important events that many of us often overlook, or fail to consider intimately, become manifest. To see more of Park’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Simon F. Park

Simon F. Park

A Senior Lecturer in Molecular Bacteriology at University of Surrey, Simon F. Park’s artworks are driven by a need to correct the common misconception that microbiological life is primitive and always detrimental. As Park states,  

"I hope that through my art, and collaborations with artists, that the real and sublime nature of the microbiological world can be revealed. I also find the interface between arts and science to be a powerfully pluripotent one, that can occasionally give rise to outliers and thus new avenues of scientific investigation."

As a microbiologist, Park works mostly with microorganisms and uses them to explore the inherent creativity of the natural world and to reveal its subtle, and usually hidden, narratives. But, rather than imposing any strict human-centred design upon the organisms that he works with, he prefers to evoke them as  co-authors in the creative process so that important events that many of us often overlook, or fail to consider intimately, become manifest. To see more of Park’s work, click here. 

- Lee Jones

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Simon F. Park

A Senior Lecturer in Molecular Bacteriology at University of Surrey, Simon F. Park’s artworks are driven by a need to correct the common misconception that microbiological life is primitive and always detrimental. As Park states,  

"I hope that through my art, and collaborations with artists, that the real and sublime nature of the microbiological world can be revealed. I also find the interface between arts and science to be a powerfully pluripotent one, that can occasionally give rise to outliers and thus new avenues of scientific investigation."

As a microbiologist, Park works mostly with microorganisms and uses them to explore the inherent creativity of the natural world and to reveal its subtle, and usually hidden, narratives. But, rather than imposing any strict human-centred design upon the organisms that he works with, he prefers to evoke them as  co-authors in the creative process so that important events that many of us often overlook, or fail to consider intimately, become manifest. To see more of Park’s work, click here. 

- Lee Jones

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)





  Posted on November 27, 2012

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