Daniel Freytag
Daniel Freytag is a UK-based photographer whose work explores the hidden beauty of everyday objects by isolating them from their contexts.
 In this series titled Fade, Freytag recalls the long-standing tradition of botanical documentation; these photographs, however, offer a new contemporary aesthetic layer that “[transforms] the ordinary into extraordinary.” Freytag’s projects look to draw together different art practices – photography and design – but to also avoid those conventions of ornamentation so characteristic of today’s photography. This, he writes, gives “depth to the unexpected beauty of the everyday. And with this comes an intimacy in its realness: No artifice, no set-up, purely the ability to re-engage the viewer with the ‘newness’ of the normal, and perhaps, at times, render it almost surreal.”

See more of Freytag’s work at his website here, and find some prints for sale here.
- Erin Saunders
Daniel Freytag
Daniel Freytag is a UK-based photographer whose work explores the hidden beauty of everyday objects by isolating them from their contexts.
 In this series titled Fade, Freytag recalls the long-standing tradition of botanical documentation; these photographs, however, offer a new contemporary aesthetic layer that “[transforms] the ordinary into extraordinary.” Freytag’s projects look to draw together different art practices – photography and design – but to also avoid those conventions of ornamentation so characteristic of today’s photography. This, he writes, gives “depth to the unexpected beauty of the everyday. And with this comes an intimacy in its realness: No artifice, no set-up, purely the ability to re-engage the viewer with the ‘newness’ of the normal, and perhaps, at times, render it almost surreal.”

See more of Freytag’s work at his website here, and find some prints for sale here.
- Erin Saunders
Daniel Freytag
Daniel Freytag is a UK-based photographer whose work explores the hidden beauty of everyday objects by isolating them from their contexts.
 In this series titled Fade, Freytag recalls the long-standing tradition of botanical documentation; these photographs, however, offer a new contemporary aesthetic layer that “[transforms] the ordinary into extraordinary.” Freytag’s projects look to draw together different art practices – photography and design – but to also avoid those conventions of ornamentation so characteristic of today’s photography. This, he writes, gives “depth to the unexpected beauty of the everyday. And with this comes an intimacy in its realness: No artifice, no set-up, purely the ability to re-engage the viewer with the ‘newness’ of the normal, and perhaps, at times, render it almost surreal.”

See more of Freytag’s work at his website here, and find some prints for sale here.
- Erin Saunders

Daniel Freytag

Daniel Freytag is a UK-based photographer whose work explores the hidden beauty of everyday objects by isolating them from their contexts.

 In this series titled Fade, Freytag recalls the long-standing tradition of botanical documentation; these photographs, however, offer a new contemporary aesthetic layer that “[transforms] the ordinary into extraordinary.” Freytag’s projects look to draw together different art practices – photography and design – but to also avoid those conventions of ornamentation so characteristic of today’s photography. This, he writes, gives “depth to the unexpected beauty of the everyday. And with this comes an intimacy in its realness: No artifice, no set-up, purely the ability to re-engage the viewer with the ‘newness’ of the normal, and perhaps, at times, render it almost surreal.”

See more of Freytag’s work at his website here, and find some prints for sale here.

- Erin Saunders

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Daniel Freytag

Daniel Freytag is a UK-based photographer whose work explores the hidden beauty of everyday objects by isolating them from their contexts.

 In this series titled Fade, Freytag recalls the long-standing tradition of botanical documentation; these photographs, however, offer a new contemporary aesthetic layer that “[transforms] the ordinary into extraordinary.” Freytag’s projects look to draw together different art practices – photography and design – but to also avoid those conventions of ornamentation so characteristic of today’s photography. This, he writes, gives “depth to the unexpected beauty of the everyday. And with this comes an intimacy in its realness: No artifice, no set-up, purely the ability to re-engage the viewer with the ‘newness’ of the normal, and perhaps, at times, render it almost surreal.”

See more of Freytag’s work at his website here, and find some prints for sale here.

- Erin Saunders

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)





  Posted on December 21, 2012

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