Anna-Sophia John
In her works Anna-Sophia John explores how we interpret abstraction. In these works she has created images that are incomprehensible and without recognizable subjects. Because of the abstraction, there are no reference points for the viewer to decipher the image, so we all add our own interpretation of what the images signify. John focuses on this process and the psychology of it. Like the famous Rorschach inkblot test; we see what we want to. 
But there is another aspect to all this interpretation. Without reference points in the subject matter, we are forced to look into the aesthetics of the work. As John states, 
"the viewers attention is focused on the artistic presentation, rather than the subject of the image. This provokes the audience to see the image as a whole, and forces the viewer to look into the image—questioning the techniques and intentions, rather than simply glancing at it."
Overall, John’s work analyses how we see and interpret art. For more information on her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Anna-Sophia John
Anna-Sophia John
In her works Anna-Sophia John explores how we interpret abstraction. In these works she has created images that are incomprehensible and without recognizable subjects. Because of the abstraction, there are no reference points for the viewer to decipher the image, so we all add our own interpretation of what the images signify. John focuses on this process and the psychology of it. Like the famous Rorschach inkblot test; we see what we want to. 
But there is another aspect to all this interpretation. Without reference points in the subject matter, we are forced to look into the aesthetics of the work. As John states, 
"the viewers attention is focused on the artistic presentation, rather than the subject of the image. This provokes the audience to see the image as a whole, and forces the viewer to look into the image—questioning the techniques and intentions, rather than simply glancing at it."
Overall, John’s work analyses how we see and interpret art. For more information on her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Anna-Sophia John
Anna-Sophia John
In her works Anna-Sophia John explores how we interpret abstraction. In these works she has created images that are incomprehensible and without recognizable subjects. Because of the abstraction, there are no reference points for the viewer to decipher the image, so we all add our own interpretation of what the images signify. John focuses on this process and the psychology of it. Like the famous Rorschach inkblot test; we see what we want to. 
But there is another aspect to all this interpretation. Without reference points in the subject matter, we are forced to look into the aesthetics of the work. As John states, 
"the viewers attention is focused on the artistic presentation, rather than the subject of the image. This provokes the audience to see the image as a whole, and forces the viewer to look into the image—questioning the techniques and intentions, rather than simply glancing at it."
Overall, John’s work analyses how we see and interpret art. For more information on her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Anna-Sophia John
Anna-Sophia John
In her works Anna-Sophia John explores how we interpret abstraction. In these works she has created images that are incomprehensible and without recognizable subjects. Because of the abstraction, there are no reference points for the viewer to decipher the image, so we all add our own interpretation of what the images signify. John focuses on this process and the psychology of it. Like the famous Rorschach inkblot test; we see what we want to. 
But there is another aspect to all this interpretation. Without reference points in the subject matter, we are forced to look into the aesthetics of the work. As John states, 
"the viewers attention is focused on the artistic presentation, rather than the subject of the image. This provokes the audience to see the image as a whole, and forces the viewer to look into the image—questioning the techniques and intentions, rather than simply glancing at it."
Overall, John’s work analyses how we see and interpret art. For more information on her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Anna-Sophia John
Anna-Sophia John
In her works Anna-Sophia John explores how we interpret abstraction. In these works she has created images that are incomprehensible and without recognizable subjects. Because of the abstraction, there are no reference points for the viewer to decipher the image, so we all add our own interpretation of what the images signify. John focuses on this process and the psychology of it. Like the famous Rorschach inkblot test; we see what we want to. 
But there is another aspect to all this interpretation. Without reference points in the subject matter, we are forced to look into the aesthetics of the work. As John states, 
"the viewers attention is focused on the artistic presentation, rather than the subject of the image. This provokes the audience to see the image as a whole, and forces the viewer to look into the image—questioning the techniques and intentions, rather than simply glancing at it."
Overall, John’s work analyses how we see and interpret art. For more information on her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Anna-Sophia John
Anna-Sophia John
In her works Anna-Sophia John explores how we interpret abstraction. In these works she has created images that are incomprehensible and without recognizable subjects. Because of the abstraction, there are no reference points for the viewer to decipher the image, so we all add our own interpretation of what the images signify. John focuses on this process and the psychology of it. Like the famous Rorschach inkblot test; we see what we want to. 
But there is another aspect to all this interpretation. Without reference points in the subject matter, we are forced to look into the aesthetics of the work. As John states, 
"the viewers attention is focused on the artistic presentation, rather than the subject of the image. This provokes the audience to see the image as a whole, and forces the viewer to look into the image—questioning the techniques and intentions, rather than simply glancing at it."
Overall, John’s work analyses how we see and interpret art. For more information on her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Anna-Sophia John
Anna-Sophia John
In her works Anna-Sophia John explores how we interpret abstraction. In these works she has created images that are incomprehensible and without recognizable subjects. Because of the abstraction, there are no reference points for the viewer to decipher the image, so we all add our own interpretation of what the images signify. John focuses on this process and the psychology of it. Like the famous Rorschach inkblot test; we see what we want to. 
But there is another aspect to all this interpretation. Without reference points in the subject matter, we are forced to look into the aesthetics of the work. As John states, 
"the viewers attention is focused on the artistic presentation, rather than the subject of the image. This provokes the audience to see the image as a whole, and forces the viewer to look into the image—questioning the techniques and intentions, rather than simply glancing at it."
Overall, John’s work analyses how we see and interpret art. For more information on her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Anna-Sophia John
Anna-Sophia John
In her works Anna-Sophia John explores how we interpret abstraction. In these works she has created images that are incomprehensible and without recognizable subjects. Because of the abstraction, there are no reference points for the viewer to decipher the image, so we all add our own interpretation of what the images signify. John focuses on this process and the psychology of it. Like the famous Rorschach inkblot test; we see what we want to. 
But there is another aspect to all this interpretation. Without reference points in the subject matter, we are forced to look into the aesthetics of the work. As John states, 
"the viewers attention is focused on the artistic presentation, rather than the subject of the image. This provokes the audience to see the image as a whole, and forces the viewer to look into the image—questioning the techniques and intentions, rather than simply glancing at it."
Overall, John’s work analyses how we see and interpret art. For more information on her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Anna-Sophia John

Anna-Sophia John

In her works Anna-Sophia John explores how we interpret abstraction. In these works she has created images that are incomprehensible and without recognizable subjects. Because of the abstraction, there are no reference points for the viewer to decipher the image, so we all add our own interpretation of what the images signify. John focuses on this process and the psychology of it. Like the famous Rorschach inkblot test; we see what we want to. 

But there is another aspect to all this interpretation. Without reference points in the subject matter, we are forced to look into the aesthetics of the work. As John states, 

"the viewers attention is focused on the artistic presentation, rather than the subject of the image. This provokes the audience to see the image as a whole, and forces the viewer to look into the image—questioning the techniques and intentions, rather than simply glancing at it."

Overall, John’s work analyses how we see and interpret art. For more information on her work, click here. 

- Lee Jones

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Anna-Sophia John

In her works Anna-Sophia John explores how we interpret abstraction. In these works she has created images that are incomprehensible and without recognizable subjects. Because of the abstraction, there are no reference points for the viewer to decipher the image, so we all add our own interpretation of what the images signify. John focuses on this process and the psychology of it. Like the famous Rorschach inkblot test; we see what we want to. 

But there is another aspect to all this interpretation. Without reference points in the subject matter, we are forced to look into the aesthetics of the work. As John states, 

"the viewers attention is focused on the artistic presentation, rather than the subject of the image. This provokes the audience to see the image as a whole, and forces the viewer to look into the image—questioning the techniques and intentions, rather than simply glancing at it."

Overall, John’s work analyses how we see and interpret art. For more information on her work, click here. 

- Lee Jones

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)





  Posted on December 29, 2012

Share this

103 Notes

  1. katiehorodecki reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  2. absurd-solipsist reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  3. lookiamhuman reblogged this from spirallingmadness
  4. annisaanurfitriyana reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  5. thegothicmermaid reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  6. adevotion reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  7. jillweir reblogged this from trailofyarn
  8. margoselby reblogged this from trailofyarn
  9. cptptc reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  10. trailofyarn reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  11. thelifeoftuan reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  12. innubendo reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  13. accidentaldiscoveries reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  14. emoutrasculturas reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  15. squidfights reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  16. findingmyselfinlife reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  17. laneways reblogged this from d-issonance
  18. samwalkerhoarded reblogged this from acertainshadeofyellow
  19. satchelmonster reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  20. maneatingsuccubus reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  21. deerhaaan reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  22. caligater reblogged this from artandsciencejournal and added:
    Getting better at seeing.
  23. aeniima reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  24. lizardfield reblogged this from orrganism
  25. neontigrrr reblogged this from artandsciencejournal