Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier

Vincent Fournier

In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,

"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."

His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 

- Lee Jones

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Vincent Fournier

In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,

"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."

His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 

- Lee Jones

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)





  Posted on January 1, 2013

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