Christina Mitrentse: Multiverse
In this series of works, Christina Mitrentse focuses on the idea of the multiverse; a subject defined as “an infinite realm of being or potential being of which the universe is regarded as a part.” To create this series, Mitrentse borrowed images from scientific publications and combined them with everyday imagery. These drawings, made with graphite powder, pastel powder, ink and charcoal on paper demonstrate the power of drawing as a medium. As the artist states,
"It serves as a tool for critical enquiry, for mapping time, philosophy and ultimately the construction of multiverse worlds, constantly open up visual possibilities."
These artworks entice us because we cannot figure out where they are. The images look like outer space, yet the waves and clouds present visuals that are much closer to us. To see more of Mitrentse’s works, click here. 
Until March 2nd, Mitrentse’s works will be at the dalla Rosa Gallery for the exhibit Welcome to the Multiverse.
- Lee Jones
© Christina Mitrentse - Anomalous God Is Not Great No1, (diptych)
Christina Mitrentse: Multiverse
In this series of works, Christina Mitrentse focuses on the idea of the multiverse; a subject defined as “an infinite realm of being or potential being of which the universe is regarded as a part.” To create this series, Mitrentse borrowed images from scientific publications and combined them with everyday imagery. These drawings, made with graphite powder, pastel powder, ink and charcoal on paper demonstrate the power of drawing as a medium. As the artist states,
"It serves as a tool for critical enquiry, for mapping time, philosophy and ultimately the construction of multiverse worlds, constantly open up visual possibilities."
These artworks entice us because we cannot figure out where they are. The images look like outer space, yet the waves and clouds present visuals that are much closer to us. To see more of Mitrentse’s works, click here. 
Until March 2nd, Mitrentse’s works will be at the dalla Rosa Gallery for the exhibit Welcome to the Multiverse.
- Lee Jones
© Christina Mitrentse - Anomalous God Is Not Great No1, (diptych)
Christina Mitrentse: Multiverse
In this series of works, Christina Mitrentse focuses on the idea of the multiverse; a subject defined as “an infinite realm of being or potential being of which the universe is regarded as a part.” To create this series, Mitrentse borrowed images from scientific publications and combined them with everyday imagery. These drawings, made with graphite powder, pastel powder, ink and charcoal on paper demonstrate the power of drawing as a medium. As the artist states,
"It serves as a tool for critical enquiry, for mapping time, philosophy and ultimately the construction of multiverse worlds, constantly open up visual possibilities."
These artworks entice us because we cannot figure out where they are. The images look like outer space, yet the waves and clouds present visuals that are much closer to us. To see more of Mitrentse’s works, click here. 
Until March 2nd, Mitrentse’s works will be at the dalla Rosa Gallery for the exhibit Welcome to the Multiverse.
- Lee Jones
© Christina Mitrentse - Cosmogenesis detail i, drawing on paper
Christina Mitrentse: Multiverse
In this series of works, Christina Mitrentse focuses on the idea of the multiverse; a subject defined as “an infinite realm of being or potential being of which the universe is regarded as a part.” To create this series, Mitrentse borrowed images from scientific publications and combined them with everyday imagery. These drawings, made with graphite powder, pastel powder, ink and charcoal on paper demonstrate the power of drawing as a medium. As the artist states,
"It serves as a tool for critical enquiry, for mapping time, philosophy and ultimately the construction of multiverse worlds, constantly open up visual possibilities."
These artworks entice us because we cannot figure out where they are. The images look like outer space, yet the waves and clouds present visuals that are much closer to us. To see more of Mitrentse’s works, click here. 
Until March 2nd, Mitrentse’s works will be at the dalla Rosa Gallery for the exhibit Welcome to the Multiverse.
- Lee Jones
© Christina Mitrentse - Anomalous God is not Great No2 -diptych
Christina Mitrentse: Multiverse
In this series of works, Christina Mitrentse focuses on the idea of the multiverse; a subject defined as “an infinite realm of being or potential being of which the universe is regarded as a part.” To create this series, Mitrentse borrowed images from scientific publications and combined them with everyday imagery. These drawings, made with graphite powder, pastel powder, ink and charcoal on paper demonstrate the power of drawing as a medium. As the artist states,
"It serves as a tool for critical enquiry, for mapping time, philosophy and ultimately the construction of multiverse worlds, constantly open up visual possibilities."
These artworks entice us because we cannot figure out where they are. The images look like outer space, yet the waves and clouds present visuals that are much closer to us. To see more of Mitrentse’s works, click here. 
Until March 2nd, Mitrentse’s works will be at the dalla Rosa Gallery for the exhibit Welcome to the Multiverse.
- Lee Jones
© Christina Mitrentse - Anomalous God is Not Great – No1,

Christina Mitrentse: Multiverse

In this series of works, Christina Mitrentse focuses on the idea of the multiverse; a subject defined as “an infinite realm of being or potential being of which the universe is regarded as a part.” To create this series, Mitrentse borrowed images from scientific publications and combined them with everyday imagery. These drawings, made with graphite powder, pastel powder, ink and charcoal on paper demonstrate the power of drawing as a medium. As the artist states,

"It serves as a tool for critical enquiry, for mapping time, philosophy and ultimately the construction of multiverse worlds, constantly open up visual possibilities."

These artworks entice us because we cannot figure out where they are. The images look like outer space, yet the waves and clouds present visuals that are much closer to us. To see more of Mitrentse’s works, click here. 

Until March 2nd, Mitrentse’s works will be at the dalla Rosa Gallery for the exhibit Welcome to the Multiverse.

- Lee Jones

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Christina Mitrentse: Multiverse

In this series of works, Christina Mitrentse focuses on the idea of the multiverse; a subject defined as “an infinite realm of being or potential being of which the universe is regarded as a part.” To create this series, Mitrentse borrowed images from scientific publications and combined them with everyday imagery. These drawings, made with graphite powder, pastel powder, ink and charcoal on paper demonstrate the power of drawing as a medium. As the artist states,

"It serves as a tool for critical enquiry, for mapping time, philosophy and ultimately the construction of multiverse worlds, constantly open up visual possibilities."

These artworks entice us because we cannot figure out where they are. The images look like outer space, yet the waves and clouds present visuals that are much closer to us. To see more of Mitrentse’s works, click here. 

Until March 2nd, Mitrentse’s works will be at the dalla Rosa Gallery for the exhibit Welcome to the Multiverse.

- Lee Jones

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)





  Posted on February 10, 2013

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