Zachary Norman
These images may look like 3D objects but Zachary Norman, a MFA Candidate in Photography at Indiana University, creates these illusionistic geometric forms through his use of photography. As Norman describes his process,
Each image was constructed using only two anamorphic sheets of (flat) inkjet paper, a roll of green seamless paper, a set of lights and a camera. The apparent three-dimensionality of each form is an illusion achieved through anamorphism and multiple strobes flashes (exposures) all executed “in-camera”. The colors of the forms are the result of middle mixtures achieved through multiple exposures. The colors were determined by a strict formula- the color spectrum was quantified, using the hexadecimal format, and then divided by the number of faces of a given Platonic Solid, each face was then assigned a fraction of the color spectrum. For example, an octahedron has eight sides so the spectrum was divided into eight equal fractions and each face of the octahedron was assigned one of these colors.
For more information on Norman’s work, visit his website here, or his tumblr blog here. 
- Lee Jones
Zachary Norman
Zachary Norman
These images may look like 3D objects but Zachary Norman, a MFA Candidate in Photography at Indiana University, creates these illusionistic geometric forms through his use of photography. As Norman describes his process,
Each image was constructed using only two anamorphic sheets of (flat) inkjet paper, a roll of green seamless paper, a set of lights and a camera. The apparent three-dimensionality of each form is an illusion achieved through anamorphism and multiple strobes flashes (exposures) all executed “in-camera”. The colors of the forms are the result of middle mixtures achieved through multiple exposures. The colors were determined by a strict formula- the color spectrum was quantified, using the hexadecimal format, and then divided by the number of faces of a given Platonic Solid, each face was then assigned a fraction of the color spectrum. For example, an octahedron has eight sides so the spectrum was divided into eight equal fractions and each face of the octahedron was assigned one of these colors.
For more information on Norman’s work, visit his website here, or his tumblr blog here. 
- Lee Jones
Zachary Norman
Zachary Norman
These images may look like 3D objects but Zachary Norman, a MFA Candidate in Photography at Indiana University, creates these illusionistic geometric forms through his use of photography. As Norman describes his process,
Each image was constructed using only two anamorphic sheets of (flat) inkjet paper, a roll of green seamless paper, a set of lights and a camera. The apparent three-dimensionality of each form is an illusion achieved through anamorphism and multiple strobes flashes (exposures) all executed “in-camera”. The colors of the forms are the result of middle mixtures achieved through multiple exposures. The colors were determined by a strict formula- the color spectrum was quantified, using the hexadecimal format, and then divided by the number of faces of a given Platonic Solid, each face was then assigned a fraction of the color spectrum. For example, an octahedron has eight sides so the spectrum was divided into eight equal fractions and each face of the octahedron was assigned one of these colors.
For more information on Norman’s work, visit his website here, or his tumblr blog here. 
- Lee Jones
Zachary Norman
Zachary Norman
These images may look like 3D objects but Zachary Norman, a MFA Candidate in Photography at Indiana University, creates these illusionistic geometric forms through his use of photography. As Norman describes his process,
Each image was constructed using only two anamorphic sheets of (flat) inkjet paper, a roll of green seamless paper, a set of lights and a camera. The apparent three-dimensionality of each form is an illusion achieved through anamorphism and multiple strobes flashes (exposures) all executed “in-camera”. The colors of the forms are the result of middle mixtures achieved through multiple exposures. The colors were determined by a strict formula- the color spectrum was quantified, using the hexadecimal format, and then divided by the number of faces of a given Platonic Solid, each face was then assigned a fraction of the color spectrum. For example, an octahedron has eight sides so the spectrum was divided into eight equal fractions and each face of the octahedron was assigned one of these colors.
For more information on Norman’s work, visit his website here, or his tumblr blog here. 
- Lee Jones
Zachary Norman
Zachary Norman
These images may look like 3D objects but Zachary Norman, a MFA Candidate in Photography at Indiana University, creates these illusionistic geometric forms through his use of photography. As Norman describes his process,
Each image was constructed using only two anamorphic sheets of (flat) inkjet paper, a roll of green seamless paper, a set of lights and a camera. The apparent three-dimensionality of each form is an illusion achieved through anamorphism and multiple strobes flashes (exposures) all executed “in-camera”. The colors of the forms are the result of middle mixtures achieved through multiple exposures. The colors were determined by a strict formula- the color spectrum was quantified, using the hexadecimal format, and then divided by the number of faces of a given Platonic Solid, each face was then assigned a fraction of the color spectrum. For example, an octahedron has eight sides so the spectrum was divided into eight equal fractions and each face of the octahedron was assigned one of these colors.
For more information on Norman’s work, visit his website here, or his tumblr blog here. 
- Lee Jones
Zachary Norman
Zachary Norman
These images may look like 3D objects but Zachary Norman, a MFA Candidate in Photography at Indiana University, creates these illusionistic geometric forms through his use of photography. As Norman describes his process,
Each image was constructed using only two anamorphic sheets of (flat) inkjet paper, a roll of green seamless paper, a set of lights and a camera. The apparent three-dimensionality of each form is an illusion achieved through anamorphism and multiple strobes flashes (exposures) all executed “in-camera”. The colors of the forms are the result of middle mixtures achieved through multiple exposures. The colors were determined by a strict formula- the color spectrum was quantified, using the hexadecimal format, and then divided by the number of faces of a given Platonic Solid, each face was then assigned a fraction of the color spectrum. For example, an octahedron has eight sides so the spectrum was divided into eight equal fractions and each face of the octahedron was assigned one of these colors.
For more information on Norman’s work, visit his website here, or his tumblr blog here. 
- Lee Jones
Zachary Norman

Zachary Norman

These images may look like 3D objects but Zachary Norman, a MFA Candidate in Photography at Indiana University, creates these illusionistic geometric forms through his use of photography. As Norman describes his process,

Each image was constructed using only two anamorphic sheets of (flat) inkjet paper, a roll of green seamless paper, a set of lights and a camera. The apparent three-dimensionality of each form is an illusion achieved through anamorphism and multiple strobes flashes (exposures) all executed “in-camera”. The colors of the forms are the result of middle mixtures achieved through multiple exposures. The colors were determined by a strict formula- the color spectrum was quantified, using the hexadecimal format, and then divided by the number of faces of a given Platonic Solid, each face was then assigned a fraction of the color spectrum. For example, an octahedron has eight sides so the spectrum was divided into eight equal fractions and each face of the octahedron was assigned one of these colors.

For more information on Norman’s work, visit his website here, or his tumblr blog here

- Lee Jones

Zachary Norman

These images may look like 3D objects but Zachary Norman, a MFA Candidate in Photography at Indiana University, creates these illusionistic geometric forms through his use of photography. As Norman describes his process,

Each image was constructed using only two anamorphic sheets of (flat) inkjet paper, a roll of green seamless paper, a set of lights and a camera. The apparent three-dimensionality of each form is an illusion achieved through anamorphism and multiple strobes flashes (exposures) all executed “in-camera”. The colors of the forms are the result of middle mixtures achieved through multiple exposures. The colors were determined by a strict formula- the color spectrum was quantified, using the hexadecimal format, and then divided by the number of faces of a given Platonic Solid, each face was then assigned a fraction of the color spectrum. For example, an octahedron has eight sides so the spectrum was divided into eight equal fractions and each face of the octahedron was assigned one of these colors.

For more information on Norman’s work, visit his website here, or his tumblr blog here

- Lee Jones





  Posted on February 26, 2013

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