Nouveau Biomorphism
The art of Natasha Mazurka is currently on display at the Ottawa Art Gallery, in the exhibit entitled Natural Motif. Her work mimics that of, not only the Group of Seven, but biomorphic shapes of trees and microbes found in nature, and sometimes in landscape (like the image of the Sundarbans Mangrove Forest, beside the painting of one of Natasha’s works).
Artists such as Natasha, have a whole world of inspiration within the natural world, from which to work from. Twists, curves, spheres, and other shapes are constant reminders of how visual nature is, in terms of our own interpretation. Though usually working on circular canvases, Natasha’s works displayed in Natural Motif are on rectangular canvases, alluding to the connection between her biomorphic shapes, to that of the classical Group of Seven trees, bent and curled due to wind, such as in A.Y. Jackson’s Arctic in the Summer (1961), or Arthur Lismer’s Georgian Bay Pines (1962).
Another inspiration to Natasha’s work, as mentioned during the artist talk for the exhibit, was that of Art Nouveau, which was influenced, at least in decorative terms, by the sudden movement of nature and new biological forms found with the improvement of scientific discovery. The paint on her canvases itself uses rich tones that are often found in Art Nouveau and nature, but with an ombré effect as if the painting is giving off light from the center. As if it was a life-force.
If you would like to see for yourself, the intricate details and natural patterns of Natasha’s work, it will be on display until March 17, 2013.
-Anna Paluch
Nouveau Biomorphism
The art of Natasha Mazurka is currently on display at the Ottawa Art Gallery, in the exhibit entitled Natural Motif. Her work mimics that of, not only the Group of Seven, but biomorphic shapes of trees and microbes found in nature, and sometimes in landscape (like the image of the Sundarbans Mangrove Forest, beside the painting of one of Natasha’s works).
Artists such as Natasha, have a whole world of inspiration within the natural world, from which to work from. Twists, curves, spheres, and other shapes are constant reminders of how visual nature is, in terms of our own interpretation. Though usually working on circular canvases, Natasha’s works displayed in Natural Motif are on rectangular canvases, alluding to the connection between her biomorphic shapes, to that of the classical Group of Seven trees, bent and curled due to wind, such as in A.Y. Jackson’s Arctic in the Summer (1961), or Arthur Lismer’s Georgian Bay Pines (1962).
Another inspiration to Natasha’s work, as mentioned during the artist talk for the exhibit, was that of Art Nouveau, which was influenced, at least in decorative terms, by the sudden movement of nature and new biological forms found with the improvement of scientific discovery. The paint on her canvases itself uses rich tones that are often found in Art Nouveau and nature, but with an ombré effect as if the painting is giving off light from the center. As if it was a life-force.
If you would like to see for yourself, the intricate details and natural patterns of Natasha’s work, it will be on display until March 17, 2013.
-Anna Paluch

Nouveau Biomorphism

The art of Natasha Mazurka is currently on display at the Ottawa Art Gallery, in the exhibit entitled Natural Motif. Her work mimics that of, not only the Group of Seven, but biomorphic shapes of trees and microbes found in nature, and sometimes in landscape (like the image of the Sundarbans Mangrove Forest, beside the painting of one of Natasha’s works).

Artists such as Natasha, have a whole world of inspiration within the natural world, from which to work from. Twists, curves, spheres, and other shapes are constant reminders of how visual nature is, in terms of our own interpretation. Though usually working on circular canvases, Natasha’s works displayed in Natural Motif are on rectangular canvases, alluding to the connection between her biomorphic shapes, to that of the classical Group of Seven trees, bent and curled due to wind, such as in A.Y. Jackson’s Arctic in the Summer (1961), or Arthur Lismer’s Georgian Bay Pines (1962).

Another inspiration to Natasha’s work, as mentioned during the artist talk for the exhibit, was that of Art Nouveau, which was influenced, at least in decorative terms, by the sudden movement of nature and new biological forms found with the improvement of scientific discovery. The paint on her canvases itself uses rich tones that are often found in Art Nouveau and nature, but with an ombré effect as if the painting is giving off light from the center. As if it was a life-force.

If you would like to see for yourself, the intricate details and natural patterns of Natasha’s work, it will be on display until March 17, 2013.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Nouveau Biomorphism

The art of Natasha Mazurka is currently on display at the Ottawa Art Gallery, in the exhibit entitled Natural Motif. Her work mimics that of, not only the Group of Seven, but biomorphic shapes of trees and microbes found in nature, and sometimes in landscape (like the image of the Sundarbans Mangrove Forest, beside the painting of one of Natasha’s works).

Artists such as Natasha, have a whole world of inspiration within the natural world, from which to work from. Twists, curves, spheres, and other shapes are constant reminders of how visual nature is, in terms of our own interpretation. Though usually working on circular canvases, Natasha’s works displayed in Natural Motif are on rectangular canvases, alluding to the connection between her biomorphic shapes, to that of the classical Group of Seven trees, bent and curled due to wind, such as in A.Y. Jackson’s Arctic in the Summer (1961), or Arthur Lismer’s Georgian Bay Pines (1962).

Another inspiration to Natasha’s work, as mentioned during the artist talk for the exhibit, was that of Art Nouveau, which was influenced, at least in decorative terms, by the sudden movement of nature and new biological forms found with the improvement of scientific discovery. The paint on her canvases itself uses rich tones that are often found in Art Nouveau and nature, but with an ombré effect as if the painting is giving off light from the center. As if it was a life-force.

If you would like to see for yourself, the intricate details and natural patterns of Natasha’s work, it will be on display until March 17, 2013.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)





  Posted on March 7, 2013

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