Hiroshi Sugimoto’s Lightning Fields
Perhaps best known for his series of seascapes photographed around the world, Hiroshi Sugimoto has been experimenting with the possibilities of photography as a medium for over 30 years.
Lightning Fields (2009) was created through a process that did not involve the use of a camera at all. Instead, in his darkroom, he relied on 400,000 volts of electricity produced from a Van der Graaf Generator as well as various electrical discharge devices of his own design. He also pursued aqueous discharge experiments with electrically charged film and saltwater baths, creating photographs whose subjects literally resemble lightning or primordial life forms.
- Rob Echlin
Hiroshi Sugimoto’s Lightning Fields
Perhaps best known for his series of seascapes photographed around the world, Hiroshi Sugimoto has been experimenting with the possibilities of photography as a medium for over 30 years.
Lightning Fields (2009) was created through a process that did not involve the use of a camera at all. Instead, in his darkroom, he relied on 400,000 volts of electricity produced from a Van der Graaf Generator as well as various electrical discharge devices of his own design. He also pursued aqueous discharge experiments with electrically charged film and saltwater baths, creating photographs whose subjects literally resemble lightning or primordial life forms.
- Rob Echlin
Hiroshi Sugimoto’s Lightning Fields
Perhaps best known for his series of seascapes photographed around the world, Hiroshi Sugimoto has been experimenting with the possibilities of photography as a medium for over 30 years.
Lightning Fields (2009) was created through a process that did not involve the use of a camera at all. Instead, in his darkroom, he relied on 400,000 volts of electricity produced from a Van der Graaf Generator as well as various electrical discharge devices of his own design. He also pursued aqueous discharge experiments with electrically charged film and saltwater baths, creating photographs whose subjects literally resemble lightning or primordial life forms.
- Rob Echlin
Hiroshi Sugimoto’s Lightning Fields
Perhaps best known for his series of seascapes photographed around the world, Hiroshi Sugimoto has been experimenting with the possibilities of photography as a medium for over 30 years.
Lightning Fields (2009) was created through a process that did not involve the use of a camera at all. Instead, in his darkroom, he relied on 400,000 volts of electricity produced from a Van der Graaf Generator as well as various electrical discharge devices of his own design. He also pursued aqueous discharge experiments with electrically charged film and saltwater baths, creating photographs whose subjects literally resemble lightning or primordial life forms.
- Rob Echlin
Hiroshi Sugimoto’s Lightning Fields
Perhaps best known for his series of seascapes photographed around the world, Hiroshi Sugimoto has been experimenting with the possibilities of photography as a medium for over 30 years.
Lightning Fields (2009) was created through a process that did not involve the use of a camera at all. Instead, in his darkroom, he relied on 400,000 volts of electricity produced from a Van der Graaf Generator as well as various electrical discharge devices of his own design. He also pursued aqueous discharge experiments with electrically charged film and saltwater baths, creating photographs whose subjects literally resemble lightning or primordial life forms.
- Rob Echlin

Hiroshi Sugimoto’s Lightning Fields

Perhaps best known for his series of seascapes photographed around the world, Hiroshi Sugimoto has been experimenting with the possibilities of photography as a medium for over 30 years.

Lightning Fields (2009) was created through a process that did not involve the use of a camera at all. Instead, in his darkroom, he relied on 400,000 volts of electricity produced from a Van der Graaf Generator as well as various electrical discharge devices of his own design. He also pursued aqueous discharge experiments with electrically charged film and saltwater baths, creating photographs whose subjects literally resemble lightning or primordial life forms.

- Rob Echlin

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Hiroshi Sugimoto’s Lightning Fields

Perhaps best known for his series of seascapes photographed around the world, Hiroshi Sugimoto has been experimenting with the possibilities of photography as a medium for over 30 years.

Lightning Fields (2009) was created through a process that did not involve the use of a camera at all. Instead, in his darkroom, he relied on 400,000 volts of electricity produced from a Van der Graaf Generator as well as various electrical discharge devices of his own design. He also pursued aqueous discharge experiments with electrically charged film and saltwater baths, creating photographs whose subjects literally resemble lightning or primordial life forms.

- Rob Echlin

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)





  Posted on June 7, 2013

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