Google Faces: Portraits of the Earth
Stars, clouds, grilled cheese – these are all places where humans have found imagery where there was none. At least, none of the imagery was deliberate. With our imagination, we humans often find symbols and meanings in ambiguous images. This psychological phenomenon, known as pareidolia, is the driving force behind Google Faces’s fascinating portraits of Earth.
Julia Laub and Cedric Kiefer, founders of the Berlin studio Onformative, were curious to see if a machine was capable of replicating pareidolia. The duo came across the idea while engaged in a different project using the same face recognition technology. In order to search for instances of pareidolia, a computer operates Google Maps while a robot uses an algorithm to detect faces on the Earth’s surface. With the aid of ofxBerkelium and a face tracking library made by Jason Saragih, Onformative’s Facetracker has produced a surprising number of viable images.
Onformative’s Facetracker has circled the planet several times and, although not all of its results produce obvious faces, the project has shown that machines are capable of replicating pareidolia.
To see more of Onformative’s landscape portraits, click here.
(Sources: Onformative/Fast Company/Wired

-Janine Truong
Google Faces: Portraits of the Earth
Stars, clouds, grilled cheese – these are all places where humans have found imagery where there was none. At least, none of the imagery was deliberate. With our imagination, we humans often find symbols and meanings in ambiguous images. This psychological phenomenon, known as pareidolia, is the driving force behind Google Faces’s fascinating portraits of Earth.
Julia Laub and Cedric Kiefer, founders of the Berlin studio Onformative, were curious to see if a machine was capable of replicating pareidolia. The duo came across the idea while engaged in a different project using the same face recognition technology. In order to search for instances of pareidolia, a computer operates Google Maps while a robot uses an algorithm to detect faces on the Earth’s surface. With the aid of ofxBerkelium and a face tracking library made by Jason Saragih, Onformative’s Facetracker has produced a surprising number of viable images.
Onformative’s Facetracker has circled the planet several times and, although not all of its results produce obvious faces, the project has shown that machines are capable of replicating pareidolia.
To see more of Onformative’s landscape portraits, click here.
(Sources: Onformative/Fast Company/Wired

-Janine Truong
Google Faces: Portraits of the Earth
Stars, clouds, grilled cheese – these are all places where humans have found imagery where there was none. At least, none of the imagery was deliberate. With our imagination, we humans often find symbols and meanings in ambiguous images. This psychological phenomenon, known as pareidolia, is the driving force behind Google Faces’s fascinating portraits of Earth.
Julia Laub and Cedric Kiefer, founders of the Berlin studio Onformative, were curious to see if a machine was capable of replicating pareidolia. The duo came across the idea while engaged in a different project using the same face recognition technology. In order to search for instances of pareidolia, a computer operates Google Maps while a robot uses an algorithm to detect faces on the Earth’s surface. With the aid of ofxBerkelium and a face tracking library made by Jason Saragih, Onformative’s Facetracker has produced a surprising number of viable images.
Onformative’s Facetracker has circled the planet several times and, although not all of its results produce obvious faces, the project has shown that machines are capable of replicating pareidolia.
To see more of Onformative’s landscape portraits, click here.
(Sources: Onformative/Fast Company/Wired

-Janine Truong
Google Faces: Portraits of the Earth
Stars, clouds, grilled cheese – these are all places where humans have found imagery where there was none. At least, none of the imagery was deliberate. With our imagination, we humans often find symbols and meanings in ambiguous images. This psychological phenomenon, known as pareidolia, is the driving force behind Google Faces’s fascinating portraits of Earth.
Julia Laub and Cedric Kiefer, founders of the Berlin studio Onformative, were curious to see if a machine was capable of replicating pareidolia. The duo came across the idea while engaged in a different project using the same face recognition technology. In order to search for instances of pareidolia, a computer operates Google Maps while a robot uses an algorithm to detect faces on the Earth’s surface. With the aid of ofxBerkelium and a face tracking library made by Jason Saragih, Onformative’s Facetracker has produced a surprising number of viable images.
Onformative’s Facetracker has circled the planet several times and, although not all of its results produce obvious faces, the project has shown that machines are capable of replicating pareidolia.
To see more of Onformative’s landscape portraits, click here.
(Sources: Onformative/Fast Company/Wired

-Janine Truong
Google Faces: Portraits of the Earth
Stars, clouds, grilled cheese – these are all places where humans have found imagery where there was none. At least, none of the imagery was deliberate. With our imagination, we humans often find symbols and meanings in ambiguous images. This psychological phenomenon, known as pareidolia, is the driving force behind Google Faces’s fascinating portraits of Earth.
Julia Laub and Cedric Kiefer, founders of the Berlin studio Onformative, were curious to see if a machine was capable of replicating pareidolia. The duo came across the idea while engaged in a different project using the same face recognition technology. In order to search for instances of pareidolia, a computer operates Google Maps while a robot uses an algorithm to detect faces on the Earth’s surface. With the aid of ofxBerkelium and a face tracking library made by Jason Saragih, Onformative’s Facetracker has produced a surprising number of viable images.
Onformative’s Facetracker has circled the planet several times and, although not all of its results produce obvious faces, the project has shown that machines are capable of replicating pareidolia.
To see more of Onformative’s landscape portraits, click here.
(Sources: Onformative/Fast Company/Wired

-Janine Truong

Google Faces: Portraits of the Earth

Stars, clouds, grilled cheese – these are all places where humans have found imagery where there was none. At least, none of the imagery was deliberate. With our imagination, we humans often find symbols and meanings in ambiguous images. This psychological phenomenon, known as pareidolia, is the driving force behind Google Faces’s fascinating portraits of Earth.

Julia Laub and Cedric Kiefer, founders of the Berlin studio Onformative, were curious to see if a machine was capable of replicating pareidolia. The duo came across the idea while engaged in a different project using the same face recognition technology. In order to search for instances of pareidolia, a computer operates Google Maps while a robot uses an algorithm to detect faces on the Earth’s surface. With the aid of ofxBerkelium and a face tracking library made by Jason Saragih, Onformative’s Facetracker has produced a surprising number of viable images.

Onformative’s Facetracker has circled the planet several times and, although not all of its results produce obvious faces, the project has shown that machines are capable of replicating pareidolia.

To see more of Onformative’s landscape portraits, click here.

(Sources: Onformative/Fast Company/Wired

-Janine Truong

Google Faces: Portraits of the Earth

Stars, clouds, grilled cheese – these are all places where humans have found imagery where there was none. At least, none of the imagery was deliberate. With our imagination, we humans often find symbols and meanings in ambiguous images. This psychological phenomenon, known as pareidolia, is the driving force behind Google Faces’s fascinating portraits of Earth.

Julia Laub and Cedric Kiefer, founders of the Berlin studio Onformative, were curious to see if a machine was capable of replicating pareidolia. The duo came across the idea while engaged in a different project using the same face recognition technology. In order to search for instances of pareidolia, a computer operates Google Maps while a robot uses an algorithm to detect faces on the Earth’s surface. With the aid of ofxBerkelium and a face tracking library made by Jason Saragih, Onformative’s Facetracker has produced a surprising number of viable images.

Onformative’s Facetracker has circled the planet several times and, although not all of its results produce obvious faces, the project has shown that machines are capable of replicating pareidolia.

To see more of Onformative’s landscape portraits, click here.

(Sources: Onformative/Fast Company/Wired

-Janine Truong





  Posted on June 10, 2013

Share this

173 Notes

  1. logan-to-government-center reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  2. principemestizo reblogged this from flakyislove
  3. flakyislove reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  4. calforga reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  5. artscicls reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  6. aequorum reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  7. neverinstudio reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  8. imperfectriot reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  9. deryn-sharpest reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  10. randomria reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  11. foto-jennic reblogged this from artandsciencejournal and added:
    Google Faces: Portraits of the Earth Stars, clouds, grilled cheese – these are all places where humans have found...
  12. repandrev reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  13. satanthor reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  14. capriciousalanya reblogged this from artandsciencejournal