Mythologies and Meanings: Masako Miki
Artists have often attributed qualities of the surreal “other” to the animal world. Our animal counterparts are seen by many as being devoid of cultural instincts that restrict and normalize behaviour. They are thus able to act out the lascivious instincts humans work to eradicate and symbolize myths of collisions between natural and human worlds. 
Drawing from this playbook of animal subjects and myth, California based artist Masako Miki establishes dreamlike identity narratives while toying with the psychology behind animal motifs in fine art. Her animal subjects become symbols through which our fantasies, desires, and vulnerabilities may be realized. Like Surrealist artists before her, Miki’s interest in exploring the dreamy and symbolic nature of animal life permits new mythologies in the dynamic relations between animals and humans to emerge. 
Moreover, through a very simple aesthetic, the animal motifs Miki explores in her delicate paintings - a combination of a variety of mixed media, including rainbow-hued embroidery thread, gouache, ink, and wool - receive a quirky and contemporary upgrade. No longer resembling grandiose historical nature paintings or cheesy, kitschy, oil-on-panel paintings found in your grandparents’ attic, Miki’s mediations on identity, folklore, and animalistic roles are visually simplified and accessible, resembling the visual quality of a peculiar and conversational painting found in the living room of a student apartment. 
Masako Miki is represented by the Swarm Gallery in Oakland, CA. 
- Victoria Nolte

Mythologies and Meanings: Masako Miki
Artists have often attributed qualities of the surreal “other” to the animal world. Our animal counterparts are seen by many as being devoid of cultural instincts that restrict and normalize behaviour. They are thus able to act out the lascivious instincts humans work to eradicate and symbolize myths of collisions between natural and human worlds. 
Drawing from this playbook of animal subjects and myth, California based artist Masako Miki establishes dreamlike identity narratives while toying with the psychology behind animal motifs in fine art. Her animal subjects become symbols through which our fantasies, desires, and vulnerabilities may be realized. Like Surrealist artists before her, Miki’s interest in exploring the dreamy and symbolic nature of animal life permits new mythologies in the dynamic relations between animals and humans to emerge. 
Moreover, through a very simple aesthetic, the animal motifs Miki explores in her delicate paintings - a combination of a variety of mixed media, including rainbow-hued embroidery thread, gouache, ink, and wool - receive a quirky and contemporary upgrade. No longer resembling grandiose historical nature paintings or cheesy, kitschy, oil-on-panel paintings found in your grandparents’ attic, Miki’s mediations on identity, folklore, and animalistic roles are visually simplified and accessible, resembling the visual quality of a peculiar and conversational painting found in the living room of a student apartment. 
Masako Miki is represented by the Swarm Gallery in Oakland, CA. 
- Victoria Nolte

Mythologies and Meanings: Masako Miki
Artists have often attributed qualities of the surreal “other” to the animal world. Our animal counterparts are seen by many as being devoid of cultural instincts that restrict and normalize behaviour. They are thus able to act out the lascivious instincts humans work to eradicate and symbolize myths of collisions between natural and human worlds. 
Drawing from this playbook of animal subjects and myth, California based artist Masako Miki establishes dreamlike identity narratives while toying with the psychology behind animal motifs in fine art. Her animal subjects become symbols through which our fantasies, desires, and vulnerabilities may be realized. Like Surrealist artists before her, Miki’s interest in exploring the dreamy and symbolic nature of animal life permits new mythologies in the dynamic relations between animals and humans to emerge. 
Moreover, through a very simple aesthetic, the animal motifs Miki explores in her delicate paintings - a combination of a variety of mixed media, including rainbow-hued embroidery thread, gouache, ink, and wool - receive a quirky and contemporary upgrade. No longer resembling grandiose historical nature paintings or cheesy, kitschy, oil-on-panel paintings found in your grandparents’ attic, Miki’s mediations on identity, folklore, and animalistic roles are visually simplified and accessible, resembling the visual quality of a peculiar and conversational painting found in the living room of a student apartment. 
Masako Miki is represented by the Swarm Gallery in Oakland, CA. 
- Victoria Nolte

Mythologies and Meanings: Masako Miki
Artists have often attributed qualities of the surreal “other” to the animal world. Our animal counterparts are seen by many as being devoid of cultural instincts that restrict and normalize behaviour. They are thus able to act out the lascivious instincts humans work to eradicate and symbolize myths of collisions between natural and human worlds. 
Drawing from this playbook of animal subjects and myth, California based artist Masako Miki establishes dreamlike identity narratives while toying with the psychology behind animal motifs in fine art. Her animal subjects become symbols through which our fantasies, desires, and vulnerabilities may be realized. Like Surrealist artists before her, Miki’s interest in exploring the dreamy and symbolic nature of animal life permits new mythologies in the dynamic relations between animals and humans to emerge. 
Moreover, through a very simple aesthetic, the animal motifs Miki explores in her delicate paintings - a combination of a variety of mixed media, including rainbow-hued embroidery thread, gouache, ink, and wool - receive a quirky and contemporary upgrade. No longer resembling grandiose historical nature paintings or cheesy, kitschy, oil-on-panel paintings found in your grandparents’ attic, Miki’s mediations on identity, folklore, and animalistic roles are visually simplified and accessible, resembling the visual quality of a peculiar and conversational painting found in the living room of a student apartment. 
Masako Miki is represented by the Swarm Gallery in Oakland, CA. 
- Victoria Nolte

Mythologies and Meanings: Masako Miki

Artists have often attributed qualities of the surreal “other” to the animal world. Our animal counterparts are seen by many as being devoid of cultural instincts that restrict and normalize behaviour. They are thus able to act out the lascivious instincts humans work to eradicate and symbolize myths of collisions between natural and human worlds. 

Drawing from this playbook of animal subjects and myth, California based artist Masako Miki establishes dreamlike identity narratives while toying with the psychology behind animal motifs in fine art. Her animal subjects become symbols through which our fantasies, desires, and vulnerabilities may be realized. Like Surrealist artists before her, Miki’s interest in exploring the dreamy and symbolic nature of animal life permits new mythologies in the dynamic relations between animals and humans to emerge. 

Moreover, through a very simple aesthetic, the animal motifs Miki explores in her delicate paintings - a combination of a variety of mixed media, including rainbow-hued embroidery thread, gouache, ink, and wool - receive a quirky and contemporary upgrade. No longer resembling grandiose historical nature paintings or cheesy, kitschy, oil-on-panel paintings found in your grandparents’ attic, Miki’s mediations on identity, folklore, and animalistic roles are visually simplified and accessible, resembling the visual quality of a peculiar and conversational painting found in the living room of a student apartment. 

Masako Miki is represented by the Swarm Gallery in Oakland, CA. 

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Mythologies and Meanings: Masako Miki

Artists have often attributed qualities of the surreal “other” to the animal world. Our animal counterparts are seen by many as being devoid of cultural instincts that restrict and normalize behaviour. They are thus able to act out the lascivious instincts humans work to eradicate and symbolize myths of collisions between natural and human worlds. 

Drawing from this playbook of animal subjects and myth, California based artist Masako Miki establishes dreamlike identity narratives while toying with the psychology behind animal motifs in fine art. Her animal subjects become symbols through which our fantasies, desires, and vulnerabilities may be realized. Like Surrealist artists before her, Miki’s interest in exploring the dreamy and symbolic nature of animal life permits new mythologies in the dynamic relations between animals and humans to emerge. 

Moreover, through a very simple aesthetic, the animal motifs Miki explores in her delicate paintings - a combination of a variety of mixed media, including rainbow-hued embroidery thread, gouache, ink, and wool - receive a quirky and contemporary upgrade. No longer resembling grandiose historical nature paintings or cheesy, kitschy, oil-on-panel paintings found in your grandparents’ attic, Miki’s mediations on identity, folklore, and animalistic roles are visually simplified and accessible, resembling the visual quality of a peculiar and conversational painting found in the living room of a student apartment. 

Masako Miki is represented by the Swarm Gallery in Oakland, CA. 

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)





  Posted on June 24, 2013

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