Your waste of time: Icelandic Glacier in New York
To give people an up-close and personal experience with the effects of climate change, Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson has brought chunks of glacial ice from Iceland to New York.
Eliasson’s display, titled Your waste of time, is made up of pieces of ice that have fallen from Iceland’s largest glacier, Vatnajökull. The ice chunks chosen are estimated to be about 800 years old.
The purpose behind Olafur’s exhibition is to bring people closer to the effects of climate change. Eliasson believes people are not in touch with the effects of climate change because they cannot see it for themselves. Thus, by bringing broken off pieces of glacier to New York, Eliasson hopes to connect people to the changes on our planet.
These chunks of ancient ice are currently on display at MoMA PS1’s EXPO 1:New York exhibit where they are being kept in a refrigerated room. Despite the display’s theme of environmental awareness, critics point out that it requires a great deal of energy to transport and preserve the ice. Regardless, the fragments of the Vatnajökull glacier represent the consequence of our ever-changing world.
The pieces of ice will be on display until September. Then, the fragments of glacier will do what they would have done naturally: melt.

-Janine TruongSource: (National Geographic)

Your waste of time: Icelandic Glacier in New York

To give people an up-close and personal experience with the effects of climate change, Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson has brought chunks of glacial ice from Iceland to New York.

Eliasson’s display, titled Your waste of time, is made up of pieces of ice that have fallen from Iceland’s largest glacier, Vatnajökull. The ice chunks chosen are estimated to be about 800 years old.

The purpose behind Olafur’s exhibition is to bring people closer to the effects of climate change. Eliasson believes people are not in touch with the effects of climate change because they cannot see it for themselves. Thus, by bringing broken off pieces of glacier to New York, Eliasson hopes to connect people to the changes on our planet.

These chunks of ancient ice are currently on display at MoMA PS1’s EXPO 1:New York exhibit where they are being kept in a refrigerated room. Despite the display’s theme of environmental awareness, critics point out that it requires a great deal of energy to transport and preserve the ice. Regardless, the fragments of the Vatnajökull glacier represent the consequence of our ever-changing world.

The pieces of ice will be on display until September. Then, the fragments of glacier will do what they would have done naturally: melt.

-Janine Truong

Source: (National Geographic)

Your waste of time: Icelandic Glacier in New York

To give people an up-close and personal experience with the effects of climate change, Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson has brought chunks of glacial ice from Iceland to New York.

Eliasson’s display, titled Your waste of time, is made up of pieces of ice that have fallen from Iceland’s largest glacier, Vatnajökull. The ice chunks chosen are estimated to be about 800 years old.

The purpose behind Olafur’s exhibition is to bring people closer to the effects of climate change. Eliasson believes people are not in touch with the effects of climate change because they cannot see it for themselves. Thus, by bringing broken off pieces of glacier to New York, Eliasson hopes to connect people to the changes on our planet.

These chunks of ancient ice are currently on display at MoMA PS1’s EXPO 1:New York exhibit where they are being kept in a refrigerated room. Despite the display’s theme of environmental awareness, critics point out that it requires a great deal of energy to transport and preserve the ice. Regardless, the fragments of the Vatnajökull glacier represent the consequence of our ever-changing world.

The pieces of ice will be on display until September. Then, the fragments of glacier will do what they would have done naturally: melt.

-Janine Truong

Source: (National Geographic)





  Posted on July 8, 2013

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