The Drawing Machines of Harvey Moon
Collaborations between artists are not uncommon, especially if two artists have different sets of talents, but share the same vision. What usually results is a finished, co-authored piece that both artists can take credit for. This notion of authorship within a collaborated work is questioned by new media artist Harvey Moon, who ‘extends the capabilities of his own system’ by collaborating with his Drawing Machines.
The Drawing Machine itself initially started off as a servo and two motors, run by an Arduino that is programmed with an algorithm telling it how to move the pen across the page. Moon has sophisticated his machines from the original model, using new algorithms to express himself in his unique works of art. Moon actually views himself as a producer more than as an artist; he creates the rules and systems in which the Drawing Machine can create, and then he lets the machine run as it pleases. The notion of relinquishing of artistic license to his robots is a concept that Moon is continually interested in.
Harvey Moon is currently using his drawing machine to create a series of works that takes satellite images from Google Earth. By drawing these places at random, and without knowing where it will draw next, the drawing machine is creating an ‘impossible map’ that is based off of the miscommunication between machines.
To view the interview with the artist and see the machines in action, check out this video here.
- Lea Hamilton
The Drawing Machines of Harvey Moon
Collaborations between artists are not uncommon, especially if two artists have different sets of talents, but share the same vision. What usually results is a finished, co-authored piece that both artists can take credit for. This notion of authorship within a collaborated work is questioned by new media artist Harvey Moon, who ‘extends the capabilities of his own system’ by collaborating with his Drawing Machines.
The Drawing Machine itself initially started off as a servo and two motors, run by an Arduino that is programmed with an algorithm telling it how to move the pen across the page. Moon has sophisticated his machines from the original model, using new algorithms to express himself in his unique works of art. Moon actually views himself as a producer more than as an artist; he creates the rules and systems in which the Drawing Machine can create, and then he lets the machine run as it pleases. The notion of relinquishing of artistic license to his robots is a concept that Moon is continually interested in.
Harvey Moon is currently using his drawing machine to create a series of works that takes satellite images from Google Earth. By drawing these places at random, and without knowing where it will draw next, the drawing machine is creating an ‘impossible map’ that is based off of the miscommunication between machines.
To view the interview with the artist and see the machines in action, check out this video here.
- Lea Hamilton
The Drawing Machines of Harvey Moon
Collaborations between artists are not uncommon, especially if two artists have different sets of talents, but share the same vision. What usually results is a finished, co-authored piece that both artists can take credit for. This notion of authorship within a collaborated work is questioned by new media artist Harvey Moon, who ‘extends the capabilities of his own system’ by collaborating with his Drawing Machines.
The Drawing Machine itself initially started off as a servo and two motors, run by an Arduino that is programmed with an algorithm telling it how to move the pen across the page. Moon has sophisticated his machines from the original model, using new algorithms to express himself in his unique works of art. Moon actually views himself as a producer more than as an artist; he creates the rules and systems in which the Drawing Machine can create, and then he lets the machine run as it pleases. The notion of relinquishing of artistic license to his robots is a concept that Moon is continually interested in.
Harvey Moon is currently using his drawing machine to create a series of works that takes satellite images from Google Earth. By drawing these places at random, and without knowing where it will draw next, the drawing machine is creating an ‘impossible map’ that is based off of the miscommunication between machines.
To view the interview with the artist and see the machines in action, check out this video here.
- Lea Hamilton
The Drawing Machines of Harvey Moon
Collaborations between artists are not uncommon, especially if two artists have different sets of talents, but share the same vision. What usually results is a finished, co-authored piece that both artists can take credit for. This notion of authorship within a collaborated work is questioned by new media artist Harvey Moon, who ‘extends the capabilities of his own system’ by collaborating with his Drawing Machines.
The Drawing Machine itself initially started off as a servo and two motors, run by an Arduino that is programmed with an algorithm telling it how to move the pen across the page. Moon has sophisticated his machines from the original model, using new algorithms to express himself in his unique works of art. Moon actually views himself as a producer more than as an artist; he creates the rules and systems in which the Drawing Machine can create, and then he lets the machine run as it pleases. The notion of relinquishing of artistic license to his robots is a concept that Moon is continually interested in.
Harvey Moon is currently using his drawing machine to create a series of works that takes satellite images from Google Earth. By drawing these places at random, and without knowing where it will draw next, the drawing machine is creating an ‘impossible map’ that is based off of the miscommunication between machines.
To view the interview with the artist and see the machines in action, check out this video here.
- Lea Hamilton

The Drawing Machines of Harvey Moon

Collaborations between artists are not uncommon, especially if two artists have different sets of talents, but share the same vision. What usually results is a finished, co-authored piece that both artists can take credit for. This notion of authorship within a collaborated work is questioned by new media artist Harvey Moon, who ‘extends the capabilities of his own system’ by collaborating with his Drawing Machines.

The Drawing Machine itself initially started off as a servo and two motors, run by an Arduino that is programmed with an algorithm telling it how to move the pen across the page. Moon has sophisticated his machines from the original model, using new algorithms to express himself in his unique works of art. Moon actually views himself as a producer more than as an artist; he creates the rules and systems in which the Drawing Machine can create, and then he lets the machine run as it pleases. The notion of relinquishing of artistic license to his robots is a concept that Moon is continually interested in.

Harvey Moon is currently using his drawing machine to create a series of works that takes satellite images from Google Earth. By drawing these places at random, and without knowing where it will draw next, the drawing machine is creating an ‘impossible map’ that is based off of the miscommunication between machines.

To view the interview with the artist and see the machines in action, check out this video here.

Lea Hamilton

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

The Drawing Machines of Harvey Moon

Collaborations between artists are not uncommon, especially if two artists have different sets of talents, but share the same vision. What usually results is a finished, co-authored piece that both artists can take credit for. This notion of authorship within a collaborated work is questioned by new media artist Harvey Moon, who ‘extends the capabilities of his own system’ by collaborating with his Drawing Machines.

The Drawing Machine itself initially started off as a servo and two motors, run by an Arduino that is programmed with an algorithm telling it how to move the pen across the page. Moon has sophisticated his machines from the original model, using new algorithms to express himself in his unique works of art. Moon actually views himself as a producer more than as an artist; he creates the rules and systems in which the Drawing Machine can create, and then he lets the machine run as it pleases. The notion of relinquishing of artistic license to his robots is a concept that Moon is continually interested in.

Harvey Moon is currently using his drawing machine to create a series of works that takes satellite images from Google Earth. By drawing these places at random, and without knowing where it will draw next, the drawing machine is creating an ‘impossible map’ that is based off of the miscommunication between machines.

To view the interview with the artist and see the machines in action, check out this video here.

Lea Hamilton

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)





  Posted on July 24, 2013

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    Awesome. Etch-a-sketch for adults!
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