At Street-Level 
Narrow, dizzying, and at times simultaneously hazardous and peaceful, streets are the arteries that pulsate life through the heart of a city. Life simply happens here: through daily routines enacted at street-level. At this vantage point, we are faced the gritty aspects of urban life. 
In his Street Scapes (2012) series, Austrian designer Jaak Kaevats contextualizes and visualizes cities at street-level. Using a technique that simultaneously gathers and visualizes urban data, Kaevats produces images that exemplify more natural demographic information. These visualizations capture content that more accurately demonstrates experiences at street-level, such as the speed and direction of the people in motion. 
Each visualization demonstrates a five minute timeline. The movements of the people walking in the street are plotted in one direction, highlighting their distances relative to each other. Objects not in motion are blurred in the background, making the representations of the people the dominant elements of the image. In contextualizing the data into an image, Kaevats excluded personalized information, leaving each figure in the image anonymous. This programatic gesture further authenticates the urban experience witnessed here, as street life generally allows urban dwellers to move through the street with easy anonymity. 
Visit Kaevats’s website for more information about his design work. 
- Victoria Nolte

At Street-Level 
Narrow, dizzying, and at times simultaneously hazardous and peaceful, streets are the arteries that pulsate life through the heart of a city. Life simply happens here: through daily routines enacted at street-level. At this vantage point, we are faced the gritty aspects of urban life. 
In his Street Scapes (2012) series, Austrian designer Jaak Kaevats contextualizes and visualizes cities at street-level. Using a technique that simultaneously gathers and visualizes urban data, Kaevats produces images that exemplify more natural demographic information. These visualizations capture content that more accurately demonstrates experiences at street-level, such as the speed and direction of the people in motion. 
Each visualization demonstrates a five minute timeline. The movements of the people walking in the street are plotted in one direction, highlighting their distances relative to each other. Objects not in motion are blurred in the background, making the representations of the people the dominant elements of the image. In contextualizing the data into an image, Kaevats excluded personalized information, leaving each figure in the image anonymous. This programatic gesture further authenticates the urban experience witnessed here, as street life generally allows urban dwellers to move through the street with easy anonymity. 
Visit Kaevats’s website for more information about his design work. 
- Victoria Nolte

At Street-Level 
Narrow, dizzying, and at times simultaneously hazardous and peaceful, streets are the arteries that pulsate life through the heart of a city. Life simply happens here: through daily routines enacted at street-level. At this vantage point, we are faced the gritty aspects of urban life. 
In his Street Scapes (2012) series, Austrian designer Jaak Kaevats contextualizes and visualizes cities at street-level. Using a technique that simultaneously gathers and visualizes urban data, Kaevats produces images that exemplify more natural demographic information. These visualizations capture content that more accurately demonstrates experiences at street-level, such as the speed and direction of the people in motion. 
Each visualization demonstrates a five minute timeline. The movements of the people walking in the street are plotted in one direction, highlighting their distances relative to each other. Objects not in motion are blurred in the background, making the representations of the people the dominant elements of the image. In contextualizing the data into an image, Kaevats excluded personalized information, leaving each figure in the image anonymous. This programatic gesture further authenticates the urban experience witnessed here, as street life generally allows urban dwellers to move through the street with easy anonymity. 
Visit Kaevats’s website for more information about his design work. 
- Victoria Nolte

At Street-Level 
Narrow, dizzying, and at times simultaneously hazardous and peaceful, streets are the arteries that pulsate life through the heart of a city. Life simply happens here: through daily routines enacted at street-level. At this vantage point, we are faced the gritty aspects of urban life. 
In his Street Scapes (2012) series, Austrian designer Jaak Kaevats contextualizes and visualizes cities at street-level. Using a technique that simultaneously gathers and visualizes urban data, Kaevats produces images that exemplify more natural demographic information. These visualizations capture content that more accurately demonstrates experiences at street-level, such as the speed and direction of the people in motion. 
Each visualization demonstrates a five minute timeline. The movements of the people walking in the street are plotted in one direction, highlighting their distances relative to each other. Objects not in motion are blurred in the background, making the representations of the people the dominant elements of the image. In contextualizing the data into an image, Kaevats excluded personalized information, leaving each figure in the image anonymous. This programatic gesture further authenticates the urban experience witnessed here, as street life generally allows urban dwellers to move through the street with easy anonymity. 
Visit Kaevats’s website for more information about his design work. 
- Victoria Nolte

At Street-Level 

Narrow, dizzying, and at times simultaneously hazardous and peaceful, streets are the arteries that pulsate life through the heart of a city. Life simply happens here: through daily routines enacted at street-level. At this vantage point, we are faced the gritty aspects of urban life. 

In his Street Scapes (2012) series, Austrian designer Jaak Kaevats contextualizes and visualizes cities at street-level. Using a technique that simultaneously gathers and visualizes urban data, Kaevats produces images that exemplify more natural demographic information. These visualizations capture content that more accurately demonstrates experiences at street-level, such as the speed and direction of the people in motion. 

Each visualization demonstrates a five minute timeline. The movements of the people walking in the street are plotted in one direction, highlighting their distances relative to each other. Objects not in motion are blurred in the background, making the representations of the people the dominant elements of the image. In contextualizing the data into an image, Kaevats excluded personalized information, leaving each figure in the image anonymous. This programatic gesture further authenticates the urban experience witnessed here, as street life generally allows urban dwellers to move through the street with easy anonymity. 

Visit Kaevats’s website for more information about his design work. 

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

At Street-Level 

Narrow, dizzying, and at times simultaneously hazardous and peaceful, streets are the arteries that pulsate life through the heart of a city. Life simply happens here: through daily routines enacted at street-level. At this vantage point, we are faced the gritty aspects of urban life. 

In his Street Scapes (2012) series, Austrian designer Jaak Kaevats contextualizes and visualizes cities at street-level. Using a technique that simultaneously gathers and visualizes urban data, Kaevats produces images that exemplify more natural demographic information. These visualizations capture content that more accurately demonstrates experiences at street-level, such as the speed and direction of the people in motion. 

Each visualization demonstrates a five minute timeline. The movements of the people walking in the street are plotted in one direction, highlighting their distances relative to each other. Objects not in motion are blurred in the background, making the representations of the people the dominant elements of the image. In contextualizing the data into an image, Kaevats excluded personalized information, leaving each figure in the image anonymous. This programatic gesture further authenticates the urban experience witnessed here, as street life generally allows urban dwellers to move through the street with easy anonymity. 

Visit Kaevats’s website for more information about his design work. 

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)





  Posted on August 20, 2013

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