Explosive Exposures
Dallas-based artist Nick Pacione’s explosive photographs of fireworks, appropriately tittles Explosions in the Sky were taken using a macro lens, via a technique called the rack focus on his camera. Instead of a typical shot of blurred specs of light falling to the sky that most of us capture on our cameras, the use of the macro lens warped the composition of the sparks into amazingly colourful abstract shapes. Light and colour are the mediums used in these light painting-esque works. Fireworks alone can be beautiful, but what Nick does is allow the viewer to experience these mundane occurrences in our lives (also known as the hundreds of photos posted on Facebook during the 4th of July, Canada Day, or any other typically firework appropriate event), through a different perspective.
Instead of the typical willow tree-like shapes associated to fireworks, the images morph into glass tubes, cactus quills, and some shapes even resemble the little pointy ends of beetroots. It is a fun experimentation of how not only our eyes, but our technology can perceive things differently, when seen through a new perspective. Or in this case, lens.
-Anna Paluch
Explosive Exposures
Dallas-based artist Nick Pacione’s explosive photographs of fireworks, appropriately tittles Explosions in the Sky were taken using a macro lens, via a technique called the rack focus on his camera. Instead of a typical shot of blurred specs of light falling to the sky that most of us capture on our cameras, the use of the macro lens warped the composition of the sparks into amazingly colourful abstract shapes. Light and colour are the mediums used in these light painting-esque works. Fireworks alone can be beautiful, but what Nick does is allow the viewer to experience these mundane occurrences in our lives (also known as the hundreds of photos posted on Facebook during the 4th of July, Canada Day, or any other typically firework appropriate event), through a different perspective.
Instead of the typical willow tree-like shapes associated to fireworks, the images morph into glass tubes, cactus quills, and some shapes even resemble the little pointy ends of beetroots. It is a fun experimentation of how not only our eyes, but our technology can perceive things differently, when seen through a new perspective. Or in this case, lens.
-Anna Paluch
Explosive Exposures
Dallas-based artist Nick Pacione’s explosive photographs of fireworks, appropriately tittles Explosions in the Sky were taken using a macro lens, via a technique called the rack focus on his camera. Instead of a typical shot of blurred specs of light falling to the sky that most of us capture on our cameras, the use of the macro lens warped the composition of the sparks into amazingly colourful abstract shapes. Light and colour are the mediums used in these light painting-esque works. Fireworks alone can be beautiful, but what Nick does is allow the viewer to experience these mundane occurrences in our lives (also known as the hundreds of photos posted on Facebook during the 4th of July, Canada Day, or any other typically firework appropriate event), through a different perspective.
Instead of the typical willow tree-like shapes associated to fireworks, the images morph into glass tubes, cactus quills, and some shapes even resemble the little pointy ends of beetroots. It is a fun experimentation of how not only our eyes, but our technology can perceive things differently, when seen through a new perspective. Or in this case, lens.
-Anna Paluch

Explosive Exposures


Dallas-based artist Nick Pacione’s explosive photographs of fireworks, appropriately tittles Explosions in the Sky were taken using a macro lens, via a technique called the rack focus on his camera. Instead of a typical shot of blurred specs of light falling to the sky that most of us capture on our cameras, the use of the macro lens warped the composition of the sparks into amazingly colourful abstract shapes. Light and colour are the mediums used in these light painting-esque works. Fireworks alone can be beautiful, but what Nick does is allow the viewer to experience these mundane occurrences in our lives (also known as the hundreds of photos posted on Facebook during the 4th of July, Canada Day, or any other typically firework appropriate event), through a different perspective.

Instead of the typical willow tree-like shapes associated to fireworks, the images morph into glass tubes, cactus quills, and some shapes even resemble the little pointy ends of beetroots. It is a fun experimentation of how not only our eyes, but our technology can perceive things differently, when seen through a new perspective. Or in this case, lens.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Explosive Exposures


Dallas-based artist Nick Pacione’s explosive photographs of fireworks, appropriately tittles Explosions in the Sky were taken using a macro lens, via a technique called the rack focus on his camera. Instead of a typical shot of blurred specs of light falling to the sky that most of us capture on our cameras, the use of the macro lens warped the composition of the sparks into amazingly colourful abstract shapes. Light and colour are the mediums used in these light painting-esque works. Fireworks alone can be beautiful, but what Nick does is allow the viewer to experience these mundane occurrences in our lives (also known as the hundreds of photos posted on Facebook during the 4th of July, Canada Day, or any other typically firework appropriate event), through a different perspective.

Instead of the typical willow tree-like shapes associated to fireworks, the images morph into glass tubes, cactus quills, and some shapes even resemble the little pointy ends of beetroots. It is a fun experimentation of how not only our eyes, but our technology can perceive things differently, when seen through a new perspective. Or in this case, lens.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)





  Posted on September 5, 2013

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