Incident Energy by Jacob Pander and Marne Lucas 
Currently showing at the Contemporary Art Centre of Portland, Incident Energy uses Range Phenomenology technology, developed for military use and surveillance, to remind viewers that our bodies are made of ancient stardust. Thermal imaging captures the body’s heat on film, where information on another’s body that is usually hidden is made public – cold hands, warm breath, large veins. In a way, the viewer is given a sixth sense; an otherwise unknown glimpse of those on screen. In doing so, the viewer is lead to realise the energy radiating within a human body.
In effect, thermal imaging turns the live human body to black and white – startling white for heat, and grey to black for cold. Thus, subtle changes in temperature can be easily viewed both in objects that are alive and objects that are inanimate. This raises another interesting connection between the living body and the rest of the world – a way of seeing that asks the viewer to consider what the differences really are between us and the inanimate as Other.
The artists, Jacob Pander and Marne Lucas, have teamed up with dancer and choreographer Jim McGinn to create footage that utilizes dance to juxtapose this alien understanding of people through heat, with raw and primal movement. Both Pander and Lucas are multi-disciplinary artists, but both tend to identify more with the visual – Jacob as a filmmaker and Lucas as a photographer.
- Alinta Krauth
Incident Energy by Jacob Pander and Marne Lucas 
Currently showing at the Contemporary Art Centre of Portland, Incident Energy uses Range Phenomenology technology, developed for military use and surveillance, to remind viewers that our bodies are made of ancient stardust. Thermal imaging captures the body’s heat on film, where information on another’s body that is usually hidden is made public – cold hands, warm breath, large veins. In a way, the viewer is given a sixth sense; an otherwise unknown glimpse of those on screen. In doing so, the viewer is lead to realise the energy radiating within a human body.
In effect, thermal imaging turns the live human body to black and white – startling white for heat, and grey to black for cold. Thus, subtle changes in temperature can be easily viewed both in objects that are alive and objects that are inanimate. This raises another interesting connection between the living body and the rest of the world – a way of seeing that asks the viewer to consider what the differences really are between us and the inanimate as Other.
The artists, Jacob Pander and Marne Lucas, have teamed up with dancer and choreographer Jim McGinn to create footage that utilizes dance to juxtapose this alien understanding of people through heat, with raw and primal movement. Both Pander and Lucas are multi-disciplinary artists, but both tend to identify more with the visual – Jacob as a filmmaker and Lucas as a photographer.
- Alinta Krauth
Incident Energy by Jacob Pander and Marne Lucas 
Currently showing at the Contemporary Art Centre of Portland, Incident Energy uses Range Phenomenology technology, developed for military use and surveillance, to remind viewers that our bodies are made of ancient stardust. Thermal imaging captures the body’s heat on film, where information on another’s body that is usually hidden is made public – cold hands, warm breath, large veins. In a way, the viewer is given a sixth sense; an otherwise unknown glimpse of those on screen. In doing so, the viewer is lead to realise the energy radiating within a human body.
In effect, thermal imaging turns the live human body to black and white – startling white for heat, and grey to black for cold. Thus, subtle changes in temperature can be easily viewed both in objects that are alive and objects that are inanimate. This raises another interesting connection between the living body and the rest of the world – a way of seeing that asks the viewer to consider what the differences really are between us and the inanimate as Other.
The artists, Jacob Pander and Marne Lucas, have teamed up with dancer and choreographer Jim McGinn to create footage that utilizes dance to juxtapose this alien understanding of people through heat, with raw and primal movement. Both Pander and Lucas are multi-disciplinary artists, but both tend to identify more with the visual – Jacob as a filmmaker and Lucas as a photographer.
- Alinta Krauth

Incident Energy by Jacob Pander and Marne Lucas 

Currently showing at the Contemporary Art Centre of Portland, Incident Energy uses Range Phenomenology technology, developed for military use and surveillance, to remind viewers that our bodies are made of ancient stardust. Thermal imaging captures the body’s heat on film, where information on another’s body that is usually hidden is made public – cold hands, warm breath, large veins. In a way, the viewer is given a sixth sense; an otherwise unknown glimpse of those on screen. In doing so, the viewer is lead to realise the energy radiating within a human body.

In effect, thermal imaging turns the live human body to black and white – startling white for heat, and grey to black for cold. Thus, subtle changes in temperature can be easily viewed both in objects that are alive and objects that are inanimate. This raises another interesting connection between the living body and the rest of the world – a way of seeing that asks the viewer to consider what the differences really are between us and the inanimate as Other.

The artists, Jacob Pander and Marne Lucas, have teamed up with dancer and choreographer Jim McGinn to create footage that utilizes dance to juxtapose this alien understanding of people through heat, with raw and primal movement. Both Pander and Lucas are multi-disciplinary artists, but both tend to identify more with the visual – Jacob as a filmmaker and Lucas as a photographer.

- Alinta Krauth

Incident Energy by Jacob Pander and Marne Lucas 

Currently showing at the Contemporary Art Centre of Portland, Incident Energy uses Range Phenomenology technology, developed for military use and surveillance, to remind viewers that our bodies are made of ancient stardust. Thermal imaging captures the body’s heat on film, where information on another’s body that is usually hidden is made public – cold hands, warm breath, large veins. In a way, the viewer is given a sixth sense; an otherwise unknown glimpse of those on screen. In doing so, the viewer is lead to realise the energy radiating within a human body.

In effect, thermal imaging turns the live human body to black and white – startling white for heat, and grey to black for cold. Thus, subtle changes in temperature can be easily viewed both in objects that are alive and objects that are inanimate. This raises another interesting connection between the living body and the rest of the world – a way of seeing that asks the viewer to consider what the differences really are between us and the inanimate as Other.

The artists, Jacob Pander and Marne Lucas, have teamed up with dancer and choreographer Jim McGinn to create footage that utilizes dance to juxtapose this alien understanding of people through heat, with raw and primal movement. Both Pander and Lucas are multi-disciplinary artists, but both tend to identify more with the visual – Jacob as a filmmaker and Lucas as a photographer.

- Alinta Krauth





  Posted on September 15, 2013

Share this

83 Notes

  1. kristarae777 reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  2. djillustration reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  3. carmokitty reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  4. thejrlima reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  5. e-rrratic reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  6. space-doctor reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  7. cosmicrosebuds reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  8. kammartinez reblogged this from stufftoblowyourmind
  9. potentiallyproblematicnargles reblogged this from stufftoblowyourmind
  10. scullymemes reblogged this from stufftoblowyourmind
  11. stufftoblowyourmind reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  12. accidentaldiscoveries reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  13. creativescarcity reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  14. kpopandindierock reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  15. visualages reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  16. e16onlyforart reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  17. yrossini reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  18. fiendir reblogged this from artandsciencejournal
  19. mywonderfuluneventfuladventures reblogged this from artandsciencejournal