Julia Buntaine
Bio-artist Julia Buntaine’s work juxtaposes the familiar with the unfamiliar - playful colors, subway maps, model high-rises, and simple wooden blocks. But look again and you see a world designed around aspects of biology and neuroscience. For Buntaine, this began as a fascination with psychology and mental illness that was broadened by studying biology in college. Her work aims to draw in those interested in the aesthetics of colors, maps, and shapes, but leave them with the same colorful and bright interest in neuroscience that Buntaine, herself, began with.
Her works have been inspired by fMRI images, circuit diagrams, and anatomical structures. One particular inspiration is the Brodmann map – a way of mapping the sections of the brain using color and numbers, making the brain look like a topographical surface that could potentially translate into a large space of land. Buntaine’s work brings this potential to life in her brain-city sculptures. Her pieces, such as those shown here, often use a biological shape made from diagrams depicting cities, thus symbolizing vast space inside the body and mind, and human-made achievements.
- Alinta Krauth
Julia Buntaine
Bio-artist Julia Buntaine’s work juxtaposes the familiar with the unfamiliar - playful colors, subway maps, model high-rises, and simple wooden blocks. But look again and you see a world designed around aspects of biology and neuroscience. For Buntaine, this began as a fascination with psychology and mental illness that was broadened by studying biology in college. Her work aims to draw in those interested in the aesthetics of colors, maps, and shapes, but leave them with the same colorful and bright interest in neuroscience that Buntaine, herself, began with.
Her works have been inspired by fMRI images, circuit diagrams, and anatomical structures. One particular inspiration is the Brodmann map – a way of mapping the sections of the brain using color and numbers, making the brain look like a topographical surface that could potentially translate into a large space of land. Buntaine’s work brings this potential to life in her brain-city sculptures. Her pieces, such as those shown here, often use a biological shape made from diagrams depicting cities, thus symbolizing vast space inside the body and mind, and human-made achievements.
- Alinta Krauth
Julia Buntaine
Bio-artist Julia Buntaine’s work juxtaposes the familiar with the unfamiliar - playful colors, subway maps, model high-rises, and simple wooden blocks. But look again and you see a world designed around aspects of biology and neuroscience. For Buntaine, this began as a fascination with psychology and mental illness that was broadened by studying biology in college. Her work aims to draw in those interested in the aesthetics of colors, maps, and shapes, but leave them with the same colorful and bright interest in neuroscience that Buntaine, herself, began with.
Her works have been inspired by fMRI images, circuit diagrams, and anatomical structures. One particular inspiration is the Brodmann map – a way of mapping the sections of the brain using color and numbers, making the brain look like a topographical surface that could potentially translate into a large space of land. Buntaine’s work brings this potential to life in her brain-city sculptures. Her pieces, such as those shown here, often use a biological shape made from diagrams depicting cities, thus symbolizing vast space inside the body and mind, and human-made achievements.
- Alinta Krauth

Julia Buntaine

Bio-artist Julia Buntaine’s work juxtaposes the familiar with the unfamiliar - playful colors, subway maps, model high-rises, and simple wooden blocks. But look again and you see a world designed around aspects of biology and neuroscience. For Buntaine, this began as a fascination with psychology and mental illness that was broadened by studying biology in college. Her work aims to draw in those interested in the aesthetics of colors, maps, and shapes, but leave them with the same colorful and bright interest in neuroscience that Buntaine, herself, began with.

Her works have been inspired by fMRI images, circuit diagrams, and anatomical structures. One particular inspiration is the Brodmann map – a way of mapping the sections of the brain using color and numbers, making the brain look like a topographical surface that could potentially translate into a large space of land. Buntaine’s work brings this potential to life in her brain-city sculptures. Her pieces, such as those shown here, often use a biological shape made from diagrams depicting cities, thus symbolizing vast space inside the body and mind, and human-made achievements.

- Alinta Krauth

Julia Buntaine

Bio-artist Julia Buntaine’s work juxtaposes the familiar with the unfamiliar - playful colors, subway maps, model high-rises, and simple wooden blocks. But look again and you see a world designed around aspects of biology and neuroscience. For Buntaine, this began as a fascination with psychology and mental illness that was broadened by studying biology in college. Her work aims to draw in those interested in the aesthetics of colors, maps, and shapes, but leave them with the same colorful and bright interest in neuroscience that Buntaine, herself, began with.

Her works have been inspired by fMRI images, circuit diagrams, and anatomical structures. One particular inspiration is the Brodmann map – a way of mapping the sections of the brain using color and numbers, making the brain look like a topographical surface that could potentially translate into a large space of land. Buntaine’s work brings this potential to life in her brain-city sculptures. Her pieces, such as those shown here, often use a biological shape made from diagrams depicting cities, thus symbolizing vast space inside the body and mind, and human-made achievements.

- Alinta Krauth





  Posted on September 18, 2013

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