Suzan Drummen’s Kaleidoscopes
Kaleidoscopes alone are fun optical illusions, but what happens when they influence art? The answer is Suzan Drummen’s large floor installations that recreate shapes and colour patterns often seen in those hand-held mini kaleidoscopes you find in toy stores.
By taking various materials, such as crystals, glass pebbles, mirrors, and various other eye-catching materials, the artist mimics the intricate patterns seen in kaleidoscopes. These patterns are fractal-like in nature, imitating both natural and computer-based programming forms. Stepping into a space with these works is like stumbling upon a projection of cells or microscopic entities, taking over the space with their near perfect geometric shapes. 
Or perhaps walking into this space, means walking into a homemade kaleidoscope, where instead of turning the cylinder around to view a different composition, the viewer has to move themselves around to experience a new perspective.What ever the case is, the artist’s work is still an impressive display that excites the visual senses!
-Anna Paluch
Suzan Drummen’s Kaleidoscopes
Kaleidoscopes alone are fun optical illusions, but what happens when they influence art? The answer is Suzan Drummen’s large floor installations that recreate shapes and colour patterns often seen in those hand-held mini kaleidoscopes you find in toy stores.
By taking various materials, such as crystals, glass pebbles, mirrors, and various other eye-catching materials, the artist mimics the intricate patterns seen in kaleidoscopes. These patterns are fractal-like in nature, imitating both natural and computer-based programming forms. Stepping into a space with these works is like stumbling upon a projection of cells or microscopic entities, taking over the space with their near perfect geometric shapes. 
Or perhaps walking into this space, means walking into a homemade kaleidoscope, where instead of turning the cylinder around to view a different composition, the viewer has to move themselves around to experience a new perspective.What ever the case is, the artist’s work is still an impressive display that excites the visual senses!
-Anna Paluch

Suzan Drummen’s Kaleidoscopes


Kaleidoscopes alone are fun optical illusions, but what happens when they influence art? The answer is Suzan Drummen’s large floor installations that recreate shapes and colour patterns often seen in those hand-held mini kaleidoscopes you find in toy stores.

By taking various materials, such as crystals, glass pebbles, mirrors, and various other eye-catching materials, the artist mimics the intricate patterns seen in kaleidoscopes. These patterns are fractal-like in nature, imitating both natural and computer-based programming forms. Stepping into a space with these works is like stumbling upon a projection of cells or microscopic entities, taking over the space with their near perfect geometric shapes. 

Or perhaps walking into this space, means walking into a homemade kaleidoscope, where instead of turning the cylinder around to view a different composition, the viewer has to move themselves around to experience a new perspective.

What ever the case is, the artist’s work is still an impressive display that excites the visual senses!

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Suzan Drummen’s Kaleidoscopes


Kaleidoscopes alone are fun optical illusions, but what happens when they influence art? The answer is Suzan Drummen’s large floor installations that recreate shapes and colour patterns often seen in those hand-held mini kaleidoscopes you find in toy stores.

By taking various materials, such as crystals, glass pebbles, mirrors, and various other eye-catching materials, the artist mimics the intricate patterns seen in kaleidoscopes. These patterns are fractal-like in nature, imitating both natural and computer-based programming forms. Stepping into a space with these works is like stumbling upon a projection of cells or microscopic entities, taking over the space with their near perfect geometric shapes. 

Or perhaps walking into this space, means walking into a homemade kaleidoscope, where instead of turning the cylinder around to view a different composition, the viewer has to move themselves around to experience a new perspective.

What ever the case is, the artist’s work is still an impressive display that excites the visual senses!

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)





  Posted on September 26, 2013

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