Telling (Nature’s) Stories Through Fabric
The works by textile artist Mister Finch resemble classical illustrations of flora and fauna come to life. There is also an element of fantasy; fabric spiders having a tea party, bees the size of a human head, or over-sized fungi. The artist takes images from nature, and in the cases of some of his moths and fungi, categorizes the pieces as if they were specimens found in the wild.
Mister Finch’s inspiration mainly comes from British folklore and the natural world around him. What makes this artist unique, other than the work itself, is that the majority of the materials used are found or recycled. To the artist, it is a way of sewing in the story of the reinvented material with the final story of the finished pieces.
Storytelling, fabric arts and nature come together to create works that bring to life fantasy worlds one would only find in storybooks. Anatomically correct flora and fauna, and woodland creatures similar to the ones found in storybook illustrations are consistent in his work, truly bringing the fantasy world to life in a tangible form. The appeal of his work is nostalgic; not only does the artist use found materials with their own stories, but builds with these materials onto existing stories that can be paired with those from our childhoods, while also bringing to life scientific illustrations of particular species of moths and plants.
If you would like to see more of Mister Finch’s work, he has many high-resolution photographs on his tumblr, as well as a store where you can purchase some of his pieces.
-Anna Paluch
Fabric Mushrooms, 2012, Mister Finch
Telling (Nature’s) Stories Through Fabric
The works by textile artist Mister Finch resemble classical illustrations of flora and fauna come to life. There is also an element of fantasy; fabric spiders having a tea party, bees the size of a human head, or over-sized fungi. The artist takes images from nature, and in the cases of some of his moths and fungi, categorizes the pieces as if they were specimens found in the wild.
Mister Finch’s inspiration mainly comes from British folklore and the natural world around him. What makes this artist unique, other than the work itself, is that the majority of the materials used are found or recycled. To the artist, it is a way of sewing in the story of the reinvented material with the final story of the finished pieces.
Storytelling, fabric arts and nature come together to create works that bring to life fantasy worlds one would only find in storybooks. Anatomically correct flora and fauna, and woodland creatures similar to the ones found in storybook illustrations are consistent in his work, truly bringing the fantasy world to life in a tangible form. The appeal of his work is nostalgic; not only does the artist use found materials with their own stories, but builds with these materials onto existing stories that can be paired with those from our childhoods, while also bringing to life scientific illustrations of particular species of moths and plants.
If you would like to see more of Mister Finch’s work, he has many high-resolution photographs on his tumblr, as well as a store where you can purchase some of his pieces.
-Anna Paluch
Textile Fungus, 2013, Mister Filch
Telling (Nature’s) Stories Through Fabric
The works by textile artist Mister Finch resemble classical illustrations of flora and fauna come to life. There is also an element of fantasy; fabric spiders having a tea party, bees the size of a human head, or over-sized fungi. The artist takes images from nature, and in the cases of some of his moths and fungi, categorizes the pieces as if they were specimens found in the wild.
Mister Finch’s inspiration mainly comes from British folklore and the natural world around him. What makes this artist unique, other than the work itself, is that the majority of the materials used are found or recycled. To the artist, it is a way of sewing in the story of the reinvented material with the final story of the finished pieces.
Storytelling, fabric arts and nature come together to create works that bring to life fantasy worlds one would only find in storybooks. Anatomically correct flora and fauna, and woodland creatures similar to the ones found in storybook illustrations are consistent in his work, truly bringing the fantasy world to life in a tangible form. The appeal of his work is nostalgic; not only does the artist use found materials with their own stories, but builds with these materials onto existing stories that can be paired with those from our childhoods, while also bringing to life scientific illustrations of particular species of moths and plants.
If you would like to see more of Mister Finch’s work, he has many high-resolution photographs on his tumblr, as well as a store where you can purchase some of his pieces.
-Anna Paluch
Textile Fungus, 2013, Mister Filch

Telling (Nature’s) Stories Through Fabric

The works by textile artist Mister Finch resemble classical illustrations of flora and fauna come to life. There is also an element of fantasy; fabric spiders having a tea party, bees the size of a human head, or over-sized fungi. The artist takes images from nature, and in the cases of some of his moths and fungi, categorizes the pieces as if they were specimens found in the wild.

Mister Finch’s inspiration mainly comes from British folklore and the natural world around him. What makes this artist unique, other than the work itself, is that the majority of the materials used are found or recycled. To the artist, it is a way of sewing in the story of the reinvented material with the final story of the finished pieces.

Storytelling, fabric arts and nature come together to create works that bring to life fantasy worlds one would only find in storybooks. Anatomically correct flora and fauna, and woodland creatures similar to the ones found in storybook illustrations are consistent in his work, truly bringing the fantasy world to life in a tangible form. The appeal of his work is nostalgic; not only does the artist use found materials with their own stories, but builds with these materials onto existing stories that can be paired with those from our childhoods, while also bringing to life scientific illustrations of particular species of moths and plants.

If you would like to see more of Mister Finch’s work, he has many high-resolution photographs on his tumblr, as well as a store where you can purchase some of his pieces.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Telling (Nature’s) Stories Through Fabric

The works by textile artist Mister Finch resemble classical illustrations of flora and fauna come to life. There is also an element of fantasy; fabric spiders having a tea party, bees the size of a human head, or over-sized fungi. The artist takes images from nature, and in the cases of some of his moths and fungi, categorizes the pieces as if they were specimens found in the wild.

Mister Finch’s inspiration mainly comes from British folklore and the natural world around him. What makes this artist unique, other than the work itself, is that the majority of the materials used are found or recycled. To the artist, it is a way of sewing in the story of the reinvented material with the final story of the finished pieces.

Storytelling, fabric arts and nature come together to create works that bring to life fantasy worlds one would only find in storybooks. Anatomically correct flora and fauna, and woodland creatures similar to the ones found in storybook illustrations are consistent in his work, truly bringing the fantasy world to life in a tangible form. The appeal of his work is nostalgic; not only does the artist use found materials with their own stories, but builds with these materials onto existing stories that can be paired with those from our childhoods, while also bringing to life scientific illustrations of particular species of moths and plants.

If you would like to see more of Mister Finch’s work, he has many high-resolution photographs on his tumblr, as well as a store where you can purchase some of his pieces.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)





  Posted on February 13, 2014

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