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The Birth and Death of Stars by Sanjeev Sivarulrasa
For Nuit Blanche Ottawa-Gatineau, Sanjeev Sivarulrasa will be showing his installation of six long-exposure astro-photographic works printed on aluminum. These images will depict star-birth and star-death regions of the night sky.
The images are from Sivarulrasa’s visits to Eastern Ontario. As he describes leaving the city: “For me, the pristine night sky is a meditative space that engages the senses and the mind. In cities, the night sky appears bland and almost featureless – most people don’t even bother to look up. That’s the reality of living under light pollution. By driving an hour or more away from the city lights of Ottawa, I get to see a panorama of stars from horizon to horizon, which invites observation and awareness.”
In his works, Sivalrurasa is interested in the subjective experience rather than the presumed objective reality. His tools are a telescope, lenses, oculars and a digital camera, but he captures his images over several hours, or sometimes even several nights, and then combines the images digitally in his studio to create the final composite work.
For Nuit Blanche on September 21st, his works will be on display at the Fritizi Gallery on Wellington Street.
- Lee Jones
The Birth and Death of Stars by Sanjeev Sivarulrasa
For Nuit Blanche Ottawa-Gatineau, Sanjeev Sivarulrasa will be showing his installation of six long-exposure astro-photographic works printed on aluminum. These images will depict star-birth and star-death regions of the night sky.
The images are from Sivarulrasa’s visits to Eastern Ontario. As he describes leaving the city: “For me, the pristine night sky is a meditative space that engages the senses and the mind. In cities, the night sky appears bland and almost featureless – most people don’t even bother to look up. That’s the reality of living under light pollution. By driving an hour or more away from the city lights of Ottawa, I get to see a panorama of stars from horizon to horizon, which invites observation and awareness.”
In his works, Sivalrurasa is interested in the subjective experience rather than the presumed objective reality. His tools are a telescope, lenses, oculars and a digital camera, but he captures his images over several hours, or sometimes even several nights, and then combines the images digitally in his studio to create the final composite work.
For Nuit Blanche on September 21st, his works will be on display at the Fritizi Gallery on Wellington Street.
- Lee Jones

The Birth and Death of Stars by Sanjeev Sivarulrasa

For Nuit Blanche Ottawa-Gatineau, Sanjeev Sivarulrasa will be showing his installation of six long-exposure astro-photographic works printed on aluminum. These images will depict star-birth and star-death regions of the night sky.

The images are from Sivarulrasa’s visits to Eastern Ontario. As he describes leaving the city: “For me, the pristine night sky is a meditative space that engages the senses and the mind. In cities, the night sky appears bland and almost featureless – most people don’t even bother to look up. That’s the reality of living under light pollution. By driving an hour or more away from the city lights of Ottawa, I get to see a panorama of stars from horizon to horizon, which invites observation and awareness.”

In his works, Sivalrurasa is interested in the subjective experience rather than the presumed objective reality. His tools are a telescope, lenses, oculars and a digital camera, but he captures his images over several hours, or sometimes even several nights, and then combines the images digitally in his studio to create the final composite work.

For Nuit Blanche on September 21st, his works will be on display at the Fritizi Gallery on Wellington Street.

- Lee Jones

2 Photos
/ ottawa art nuit blanche ottawa gatineau sanjeev sivarulrasa astronomy photography
In a photo lab far, far away…
Ottawa-based artist Dante Penman takes the traditional process of the photogram, and completely turns it around. With a bit of chemical manipulation, his photograms become chemigrams, a process invented in 1956 by Pierre Cordier. What this entails, is that the developing chemicals are not placed evenly on the photopaper. It is the Abstract Expressionism of photography (a connection which Penman made in his artists’ statement). Instead of just painting with developer, Penman adds three-dimensional botanical aspects, such as fern leaves, to mimic the effects of light from pictures in space.  Chemistry, botany and astronomy all play pivotal roles in his work.
Some of his works are even inspired by Science Fiction, the images alluding to lost worlds and alien wildlife. Not only does the viewer become lost in the multi-layers of leaves, debris and chemicals, but they can also become lost in the image, wondering how the artist put it together. The chemistry in it is like magic, and the images will surely put you under their spell. If you would like to see these chemigrams for yourself, Dante Penman’s work is currently on display at Bubblicity, 730 Somerset St. W., as part of Chinatown Remixed, until the 18th of June.-Anna Paluch

In a photo lab far, far away…

Ottawa-based artist Dante Penman takes the traditional process of the photogram, and completely turns it around. With a bit of chemical manipulation, his photograms become chemigrams, a process invented in 1956 by Pierre Cordier. What this entails, is that the developing chemicals are not placed evenly on the photopaper. It is the Abstract Expressionism of photography (a connection which Penman made in his artists’ statement). Instead of just painting with developer, Penman adds three-dimensional botanical aspects, such as fern leaves, to mimic the effects of light from pictures in space.

Chemistry, botany and astronomy all play pivotal roles in his work.

Some of his works are even inspired by Science Fiction, the images alluding to lost worlds and alien wildlife. Not only does the viewer become lost in the multi-layers of leaves, debris and chemicals, but they can also become lost in the image, wondering how the artist put it together. The chemistry in it is like magic, and the images will surely put you under their spell.

If you would like to see these chemigrams for yourself, Dante Penman’s work is currently on display at Bubblicity, 730 Somerset St. W., as part of Chinatown Remixed, until the 18th of June.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

dante penman chemigram pierre cordier photogram botany chemistry art science art and science journal abstract expressionism Astronomy science fiction
Galactic Poetry
The downfall of living in an urban center, is that all we get to see during the night are blankets of cloud (possibly smog), and if we’re lucky, a few stars. What artist Sanjeev Sivarulrasa is trying to show in his work, Night Light, is what we are missing out on; a magical world, swimming through space, with galaxies and nebulae bejeweling the cosmos.
It is visual poetry.
The artist uses astrophotography to capture the various forms and colours of the stars and planets outside of an observatory setting. According to journalist Becky Rynor, it is as if he is capturing the great masterpieces that our ancestors would see; a natural art. Space does not have to be sacred scientific ground; it can also be merely another aesthetic aspect of our lives, that inspires people to think about the greater world around us. The simple observer plays as big of a role, as the great scientist. When this right to observe is taken away from us, via artificial city lights, we have to make the effort to go to the sources such as countryside’s, forests, lakes, and mountains. We must go to the nature, to connect back to ancient ideas of aesthetic beauty, and renew the senses. Sanjeev’s astrophotographs are to be seen as meditative, bringing awareness to our daily surroundings, and that sometimes, we need to take a step back, and see the bigger picture.
Night Light is currently exhibited at Karsh-Masson Gallery, until the 5th of May, 2013, and there will be an artist talk on the 24th of March, 2013-Anna Paluch
Galactic Poetry
The downfall of living in an urban center, is that all we get to see during the night are blankets of cloud (possibly smog), and if we’re lucky, a few stars. What artist Sanjeev Sivarulrasa is trying to show in his work, Night Light, is what we are missing out on; a magical world, swimming through space, with galaxies and nebulae bejeweling the cosmos.
It is visual poetry.
The artist uses astrophotography to capture the various forms and colours of the stars and planets outside of an observatory setting. According to journalist Becky Rynor, it is as if he is capturing the great masterpieces that our ancestors would see; a natural art. Space does not have to be sacred scientific ground; it can also be merely another aesthetic aspect of our lives, that inspires people to think about the greater world around us. The simple observer plays as big of a role, as the great scientist. When this right to observe is taken away from us, via artificial city lights, we have to make the effort to go to the sources such as countryside’s, forests, lakes, and mountains. We must go to the nature, to connect back to ancient ideas of aesthetic beauty, and renew the senses. Sanjeev’s astrophotographs are to be seen as meditative, bringing awareness to our daily surroundings, and that sometimes, we need to take a step back, and see the bigger picture.
Night Light is currently exhibited at Karsh-Masson Gallery, until the 5th of May, 2013, and there will be an artist talk on the 24th of March, 2013-Anna Paluch
Galactic Poetry
The downfall of living in an urban center, is that all we get to see during the night are blankets of cloud (possibly smog), and if we’re lucky, a few stars. What artist Sanjeev Sivarulrasa is trying to show in his work, Night Light, is what we are missing out on; a magical world, swimming through space, with galaxies and nebulae bejeweling the cosmos.
It is visual poetry.
The artist uses astrophotography to capture the various forms and colours of the stars and planets outside of an observatory setting. According to journalist Becky Rynor, it is as if he is capturing the great masterpieces that our ancestors would see; a natural art. Space does not have to be sacred scientific ground; it can also be merely another aesthetic aspect of our lives, that inspires people to think about the greater world around us. The simple observer plays as big of a role, as the great scientist. When this right to observe is taken away from us, via artificial city lights, we have to make the effort to go to the sources such as countryside’s, forests, lakes, and mountains. We must go to the nature, to connect back to ancient ideas of aesthetic beauty, and renew the senses. Sanjeev’s astrophotographs are to be seen as meditative, bringing awareness to our daily surroundings, and that sometimes, we need to take a step back, and see the bigger picture.
Night Light is currently exhibited at Karsh-Masson Gallery, until the 5th of May, 2013, and there will be an artist talk on the 24th of March, 2013-Anna Paluch

Galactic Poetry


The downfall of living in an
urban center, is that all we get to see during the night are blankets of cloud (possibly smog), and if we’re lucky, a few stars. What artist Sanjeev Sivarulrasa is trying to show in his work, Night Light, is what we are missing out on; a magical world, swimming through space, with galaxies and nebulae bejeweling the cosmos.

It is visual poetry.

The artist uses astrophotography to capture the various forms and colours of the stars and planets outside of an observatory setting. According to journalist Becky Rynor, it is as if he is capturing the great masterpieces that our ancestors would see; a natural art. Space does not have to be sacred scientific ground; it can also be merely another aesthetic aspect of our lives, that inspires people to think about the greater world around us. The simple observer plays as big of a role, as the great scientist. When this right to observe is taken away from us, via artificial city lights, we have to make the effort to go to the sources such as countryside’s, forests, lakes, and mountains. We must go to the nature, to connect back to ancient ideas of aesthetic beauty, and renew the senses. Sanjeev’s astrophotographs are to be seen as meditative, bringing awareness to our daily surroundings, and that sometimes, we need to take a step back, and see the bigger picture.

Night Light is currently exhibited at Karsh-Masson Gallery, until the 5th of May, 2013, and there will be an artist talk on the 24th of March, 2013

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ Sanjeev Sivarulrasa Astronomy astrophotography galaxy space anna paluch art science art and science journal karsh-masson gallery
Nuit Noire at Cube Gallery, Ottawa - July 3 - 29
What it’s all about
A relatively young event, this year’s Nuit Noire is only the second to date, but Cube Gallery is already looking to make it an annual festival.
More than a conventional art exhibition, Nuit Noire seeks to create a dialogue between artists and scientists, as well as between these specialists and local residents. 
Drawing in visitors from all disciplines and interests (artists, photographers, astronomers, musicians, collectors and more), the event is a platform for otherwise disconnected communities to exchange thoughts and ideas about their interpretations of the night, about the beauty and awe it inspires. 
In this way, Nuit Noire appreciates the very natural – and often overlooked — intersections of art and science. What better way to humble both schools than to contemplate the universal wonder of the night sky – both a source of endless aesthetic inspiration, and the object of unrelenting scientific investigation? 
But the success of the theme speaks to the increasing rarity of the view itself, especially as growing light pollution threatens the darkness. 
Indeed, tomorrow night, an entire residential street will be turning out its lights (the first private street in Canada to do so) in a collective move to save energy and improve the view. Nuit Noire then also inspires a sense of responsibility: to preserve our view of the starscapes we’ve come to love.
- Erin Saunders
—————-
What the opening was like (and why you should visit)
This past Thursday,  Cube Gallery held the Nuit Noire vernissage and opening party. Artists, art-enthusiasts, Cube regulars, science nerds, and the Hintonburg elite (note: the types  I list are not mutually exclusive – especially not at Nuit Noire) gathered together to talk stars, eat Smartfood, and enjoy the festival’s eclectic array of artwork.  The crowd was notably diverse and extremely welcoming. I am generally not one to chat up strangers at art functions (although I find the notion totally romantic) – but I found myself sharing several pleasant and stimulating conversations with people I’d never met before. I truly feel that the theme of the event as well as the atmosphere that the gallery has created breed a friendly openness amongst everyone. 
Around 8, everyone gathered at the front of the gallery to hear Ottawa-based actor, John Koensgen, recite verse about the night sky alongside Scott Stuart’s violin accompaniment. It felt good to collectively reflect upon the rich history of humankind’s night-sky-musings, and it felt extremely classy to stand around an art gallery, listening to live violin and poetry.
Overall, I had an excellent time, and look forward to Nuit Noire’s Free Dark Sky Party and Lecture, tomorrow night (7pm – midnight). 
- Melissa Daly-Buajitti
Nuit Noire at Cube Gallery, Ottawa - July 3 - 29
What it’s all about
A relatively young event, this year’s Nuit Noire is only the second to date, but Cube Gallery is already looking to make it an annual festival.
More than a conventional art exhibition, Nuit Noire seeks to create a dialogue between artists and scientists, as well as between these specialists and local residents. 
Drawing in visitors from all disciplines and interests (artists, photographers, astronomers, musicians, collectors and more), the event is a platform for otherwise disconnected communities to exchange thoughts and ideas about their interpretations of the night, about the beauty and awe it inspires. 
In this way, Nuit Noire appreciates the very natural – and often overlooked — intersections of art and science. What better way to humble both schools than to contemplate the universal wonder of the night sky – both a source of endless aesthetic inspiration, and the object of unrelenting scientific investigation? 
But the success of the theme speaks to the increasing rarity of the view itself, especially as growing light pollution threatens the darkness. 
Indeed, tomorrow night, an entire residential street will be turning out its lights (the first private street in Canada to do so) in a collective move to save energy and improve the view. Nuit Noire then also inspires a sense of responsibility: to preserve our view of the starscapes we’ve come to love.
- Erin Saunders
—————-
What the opening was like (and why you should visit)
This past Thursday,  Cube Gallery held the Nuit Noire vernissage and opening party. Artists, art-enthusiasts, Cube regulars, science nerds, and the Hintonburg elite (note: the types  I list are not mutually exclusive – especially not at Nuit Noire) gathered together to talk stars, eat Smartfood, and enjoy the festival’s eclectic array of artwork.  The crowd was notably diverse and extremely welcoming. I am generally not one to chat up strangers at art functions (although I find the notion totally romantic) – but I found myself sharing several pleasant and stimulating conversations with people I’d never met before. I truly feel that the theme of the event as well as the atmosphere that the gallery has created breed a friendly openness amongst everyone. 
Around 8, everyone gathered at the front of the gallery to hear Ottawa-based actor, John Koensgen, recite verse about the night sky alongside Scott Stuart’s violin accompaniment. It felt good to collectively reflect upon the rich history of humankind’s night-sky-musings, and it felt extremely classy to stand around an art gallery, listening to live violin and poetry.
Overall, I had an excellent time, and look forward to Nuit Noire’s Free Dark Sky Party and Lecture, tomorrow night (7pm – midnight). 
- Melissa Daly-Buajitti
Nuit Noire at Cube Gallery, Ottawa - July 3 - 29
What it’s all about
A relatively young event, this year’s Nuit Noire is only the second to date, but Cube Gallery is already looking to make it an annual festival.
More than a conventional art exhibition, Nuit Noire seeks to create a dialogue between artists and scientists, as well as between these specialists and local residents. 
Drawing in visitors from all disciplines and interests (artists, photographers, astronomers, musicians, collectors and more), the event is a platform for otherwise disconnected communities to exchange thoughts and ideas about their interpretations of the night, about the beauty and awe it inspires. 
In this way, Nuit Noire appreciates the very natural – and often overlooked — intersections of art and science. What better way to humble both schools than to contemplate the universal wonder of the night sky – both a source of endless aesthetic inspiration, and the object of unrelenting scientific investigation? 
But the success of the theme speaks to the increasing rarity of the view itself, especially as growing light pollution threatens the darkness. 
Indeed, tomorrow night, an entire residential street will be turning out its lights (the first private street in Canada to do so) in a collective move to save energy and improve the view. Nuit Noire then also inspires a sense of responsibility: to preserve our view of the starscapes we’ve come to love.
- Erin Saunders
—————-
What the opening was like (and why you should visit)
This past Thursday,  Cube Gallery held the Nuit Noire vernissage and opening party. Artists, art-enthusiasts, Cube regulars, science nerds, and the Hintonburg elite (note: the types  I list are not mutually exclusive – especially not at Nuit Noire) gathered together to talk stars, eat Smartfood, and enjoy the festival’s eclectic array of artwork.  The crowd was notably diverse and extremely welcoming. I am generally not one to chat up strangers at art functions (although I find the notion totally romantic) – but I found myself sharing several pleasant and stimulating conversations with people I’d never met before. I truly feel that the theme of the event as well as the atmosphere that the gallery has created breed a friendly openness amongst everyone. 
Around 8, everyone gathered at the front of the gallery to hear Ottawa-based actor, John Koensgen, recite verse about the night sky alongside Scott Stuart’s violin accompaniment. It felt good to collectively reflect upon the rich history of humankind’s night-sky-musings, and it felt extremely classy to stand around an art gallery, listening to live violin and poetry.
Overall, I had an excellent time, and look forward to Nuit Noire’s Free Dark Sky Party and Lecture, tomorrow night (7pm – midnight). 
- Melissa Daly-Buajitti
Nuit Noire at Cube Gallery, Ottawa - July 3 - 29
What it’s all about
A relatively young event, this year’s Nuit Noire is only the second to date, but Cube Gallery is already looking to make it an annual festival.
More than a conventional art exhibition, Nuit Noire seeks to create a dialogue between artists and scientists, as well as between these specialists and local residents. 
Drawing in visitors from all disciplines and interests (artists, photographers, astronomers, musicians, collectors and more), the event is a platform for otherwise disconnected communities to exchange thoughts and ideas about their interpretations of the night, about the beauty and awe it inspires. 
In this way, Nuit Noire appreciates the very natural – and often overlooked — intersections of art and science. What better way to humble both schools than to contemplate the universal wonder of the night sky – both a source of endless aesthetic inspiration, and the object of unrelenting scientific investigation? 
But the success of the theme speaks to the increasing rarity of the view itself, especially as growing light pollution threatens the darkness. 
Indeed, tomorrow night, an entire residential street will be turning out its lights (the first private street in Canada to do so) in a collective move to save energy and improve the view. Nuit Noire then also inspires a sense of responsibility: to preserve our view of the starscapes we’ve come to love.
- Erin Saunders
—————-
What the opening was like (and why you should visit)
This past Thursday,  Cube Gallery held the Nuit Noire vernissage and opening party. Artists, art-enthusiasts, Cube regulars, science nerds, and the Hintonburg elite (note: the types  I list are not mutually exclusive – especially not at Nuit Noire) gathered together to talk stars, eat Smartfood, and enjoy the festival’s eclectic array of artwork.  The crowd was notably diverse and extremely welcoming. I am generally not one to chat up strangers at art functions (although I find the notion totally romantic) – but I found myself sharing several pleasant and stimulating conversations with people I’d never met before. I truly feel that the theme of the event as well as the atmosphere that the gallery has created breed a friendly openness amongst everyone. 
Around 8, everyone gathered at the front of the gallery to hear Ottawa-based actor, John Koensgen, recite verse about the night sky alongside Scott Stuart’s violin accompaniment. It felt good to collectively reflect upon the rich history of humankind’s night-sky-musings, and it felt extremely classy to stand around an art gallery, listening to live violin and poetry.
Overall, I had an excellent time, and look forward to Nuit Noire’s Free Dark Sky Party and Lecture, tomorrow night (7pm – midnight). 
- Melissa Daly-Buajitti
Nuit Noire at Cube Gallery, Ottawa - July 3 - 29
What it’s all about
A relatively young event, this year’s Nuit Noire is only the second to date, but Cube Gallery is already looking to make it an annual festival.
More than a conventional art exhibition, Nuit Noire seeks to create a dialogue between artists and scientists, as well as between these specialists and local residents. 
Drawing in visitors from all disciplines and interests (artists, photographers, astronomers, musicians, collectors and more), the event is a platform for otherwise disconnected communities to exchange thoughts and ideas about their interpretations of the night, about the beauty and awe it inspires. 
In this way, Nuit Noire appreciates the very natural – and often overlooked — intersections of art and science. What better way to humble both schools than to contemplate the universal wonder of the night sky – both a source of endless aesthetic inspiration, and the object of unrelenting scientific investigation? 
But the success of the theme speaks to the increasing rarity of the view itself, especially as growing light pollution threatens the darkness. 
Indeed, tomorrow night, an entire residential street will be turning out its lights (the first private street in Canada to do so) in a collective move to save energy and improve the view. Nuit Noire then also inspires a sense of responsibility: to preserve our view of the starscapes we’ve come to love.
- Erin Saunders
—————-
What the opening was like (and why you should visit)
This past Thursday,  Cube Gallery held the Nuit Noire vernissage and opening party. Artists, art-enthusiasts, Cube regulars, science nerds, and the Hintonburg elite (note: the types  I list are not mutually exclusive – especially not at Nuit Noire) gathered together to talk stars, eat Smartfood, and enjoy the festival’s eclectic array of artwork.  The crowd was notably diverse and extremely welcoming. I am generally not one to chat up strangers at art functions (although I find the notion totally romantic) – but I found myself sharing several pleasant and stimulating conversations with people I’d never met before. I truly feel that the theme of the event as well as the atmosphere that the gallery has created breed a friendly openness amongst everyone. 
Around 8, everyone gathered at the front of the gallery to hear Ottawa-based actor, John Koensgen, recite verse about the night sky alongside Scott Stuart’s violin accompaniment. It felt good to collectively reflect upon the rich history of humankind’s night-sky-musings, and it felt extremely classy to stand around an art gallery, listening to live violin and poetry.
Overall, I had an excellent time, and look forward to Nuit Noire’s Free Dark Sky Party and Lecture, tomorrow night (7pm – midnight). 
- Melissa Daly-Buajitti

Nuit Noire at Cube Gallery, Ottawa - July 3 - 29

What it’s all about

A relatively young event, this year’s Nuit Noire is only the second to date, but Cube Gallery is already looking to make it an annual festival.

More than a conventional art exhibition, Nuit Noire seeks to create a dialogue between artists and scientists, as well as between these specialists and local residents.

Drawing in visitors from all disciplines and interests (artists, photographers, astronomers, musicians, collectors and more), the event is a platform for otherwise disconnected communities to exchange thoughts and ideas about their interpretations of the night, about the beauty and awe it inspires.

In this way, Nuit Noire appreciates the very natural – and often overlooked — intersections of art and science. What better way to humble both schools than to contemplate the universal wonder of the night sky – both a source of endless aesthetic inspiration, and the object of unrelenting scientific investigation?

But the success of the theme speaks to the increasing rarity of the view itself, especially as growing light pollution threatens the darkness.

Indeed, tomorrow night, an entire residential street will be turning out its lights (the first private street in Canada to do so) in a collective move to save energy and improve the view. Nuit Noire then also inspires a sense of responsibility: to preserve our view of the starscapes we’ve come to love.

- Erin Saunders

—————-

What the opening was like (and why you should visit)

This past Thursday,  Cube Gallery held the Nuit Noire vernissage and opening party. Artists, art-enthusiasts, Cube regulars, science nerds, and the Hintonburg elite (note: the types  I list are not mutually exclusive – especially not at Nuit Noire) gathered together to talk stars, eat Smartfood, and enjoy the festival’s eclectic array of artwork.  The crowd was notably diverse and extremely welcoming. I am generally not one to chat up strangers at art functions (although I find the notion totally romantic) – but I found myself sharing several pleasant and stimulating conversations with people I’d never met before. I truly feel that the theme of the event as well as the atmosphere that the gallery has created breed a friendly openness amongst everyone. 

Around 8, everyone gathered at the front of the gallery to hear Ottawa-based actor, John Koensgen, recite verse about the night sky alongside Scott Stuart’s violin accompaniment. It felt good to collectively reflect upon the rich history of humankind’s night-sky-musings, and it felt extremely classy to stand around an art gallery, listening to live violin and poetry.

Overall, I had an excellent time, and look forward to Nuit Noire’s Free Dark Sky Party and Lecture, tomorrow night (7pm – midnight). 

- Melissa Daly-Buajitti

5 Photos
/ cube gallery ottawa astronomy art science party poetry ottawa art scene

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