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Doug Aitken's Mirror at the Seattle Art Museum

American multimedia and light artist Doug Aitken’s new installation Mirror strives to be a living museum, a dynamic representation of the constantly changing urban core of Seattle. Installed permanently on the north-west corner of the Seattle Art Museum, Mirror was unveiled this past Sunday and has since been received very warmly by the online community. 
Described as a “living kaleidoscope,” the installation responds to changes in weather conditions, pedestrian movement, and lighting conditions. Referring to its reservoir of hundreds of hours of video footage, the installation uses data from its sensors to compose these moving images, choreographing them in unexpected ways. Most interestingly, the installation has been programmed in such a way that the same sequence never occurs twice — it is constantly generating new sequences, all the while doing so in a way that responds to the unique changes in the city’s environmental conditions. The effect is a perpetually moving light show, an incessant video montage that is constantly reinventing itself.
The footage used was shot all around the region of Seattle, including but not limited to neighbouring mountain ranges and the city of Seattle itself. In this sense, Mirror is not merely a reflection of Seattle’s urban core — instead, it is a totalizing representation of the environment surrounding and affecting the very hustle and bustle of the city itself. Its constant visual manifestation of every minute of Seattle life calls into question philosophical notions of space and time, and its juxtaposition of rural and urban imagery provides a valuable reminder of the larger environment of which cities are a part. If Mirror is anything like Aitken’s past installations, it is sure to spark interesting dialogues, and hopefully some that delve deeper than the phrase “very cool,” the general consensus on the Internet thus far.
Although it may be a permanent fixture of the SAM, the installation is experimental at its core, so its very essence is its ability to grow and evolve over time. We will be watching the evolution of Mirror closely. If any of you happen upon this installation in real life, drop us a line — we’d love to hear about it! 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Doug Aitken's Mirror at the Seattle Art Museum

American multimedia and light artist Doug Aitken’s new installation Mirror strives to be a living museum, a dynamic representation of the constantly changing urban core of Seattle. Installed permanently on the north-west corner of the Seattle Art Museum, Mirror was unveiled this past Sunday and has since been received very warmly by the online community. 
Described as a “living kaleidoscope,” the installation responds to changes in weather conditions, pedestrian movement, and lighting conditions. Referring to its reservoir of hundreds of hours of video footage, the installation uses data from its sensors to compose these moving images, choreographing them in unexpected ways. Most interestingly, the installation has been programmed in such a way that the same sequence never occurs twice — it is constantly generating new sequences, all the while doing so in a way that responds to the unique changes in the city’s environmental conditions. The effect is a perpetually moving light show, an incessant video montage that is constantly reinventing itself.
The footage used was shot all around the region of Seattle, including but not limited to neighbouring mountain ranges and the city of Seattle itself. In this sense, Mirror is not merely a reflection of Seattle’s urban core — instead, it is a totalizing representation of the environment surrounding and affecting the very hustle and bustle of the city itself. Its constant visual manifestation of every minute of Seattle life calls into question philosophical notions of space and time, and its juxtaposition of rural and urban imagery provides a valuable reminder of the larger environment of which cities are a part. If Mirror is anything like Aitken’s past installations, it is sure to spark interesting dialogues, and hopefully some that delve deeper than the phrase “very cool,” the general consensus on the Internet thus far.
Although it may be a permanent fixture of the SAM, the installation is experimental at its core, so its very essence is its ability to grow and evolve over time. We will be watching the evolution of Mirror closely. If any of you happen upon this installation in real life, drop us a line — we’d love to hear about it! 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Doug Aitken's Mirror at the Seattle Art Museum

American multimedia and light artist Doug Aitken’s new installation Mirror strives to be a living museum, a dynamic representation of the constantly changing urban core of Seattle. Installed permanently on the north-west corner of the Seattle Art Museum, Mirror was unveiled this past Sunday and has since been received very warmly by the online community. 
Described as a “living kaleidoscope,” the installation responds to changes in weather conditions, pedestrian movement, and lighting conditions. Referring to its reservoir of hundreds of hours of video footage, the installation uses data from its sensors to compose these moving images, choreographing them in unexpected ways. Most interestingly, the installation has been programmed in such a way that the same sequence never occurs twice — it is constantly generating new sequences, all the while doing so in a way that responds to the unique changes in the city’s environmental conditions. The effect is a perpetually moving light show, an incessant video montage that is constantly reinventing itself.
The footage used was shot all around the region of Seattle, including but not limited to neighbouring mountain ranges and the city of Seattle itself. In this sense, Mirror is not merely a reflection of Seattle’s urban core — instead, it is a totalizing representation of the environment surrounding and affecting the very hustle and bustle of the city itself. Its constant visual manifestation of every minute of Seattle life calls into question philosophical notions of space and time, and its juxtaposition of rural and urban imagery provides a valuable reminder of the larger environment of which cities are a part. If Mirror is anything like Aitken’s past installations, it is sure to spark interesting dialogues, and hopefully some that delve deeper than the phrase “very cool,” the general consensus on the Internet thus far.
Although it may be a permanent fixture of the SAM, the installation is experimental at its core, so its very essence is its ability to grow and evolve over time. We will be watching the evolution of Mirror closely. If any of you happen upon this installation in real life, drop us a line — we’d love to hear about it! 
- Gabrielle Doiron

Doug Aitken's Mirror at the Seattle Art Museum

American multimedia and light artist Doug Aitken’s new installation Mirror strives to be a living museum, a dynamic representation of the constantly changing urban core of Seattle. Installed permanently on the north-west corner of the Seattle Art MuseumMirror was unveiled this past Sunday and has since been received very warmly by the online community. 

Described as a “living kaleidoscope,” the installation responds to changes in weather conditions, pedestrian movement, and lighting conditions. Referring to its reservoir of hundreds of hours of video footage, the installation uses data from its sensors to compose these moving images, choreographing them in unexpected ways. Most interestingly, the installation has been programmed in such a way that the same sequence never occurs twice — it is constantly generating new sequences, all the while doing so in a way that responds to the unique changes in the city’s environmental conditions. The effect is a perpetually moving light show, an incessant video montage that is constantly reinventing itself.

The footage used was shot all around the region of Seattle, including but not limited to neighbouring mountain ranges and the city of Seattle itself. In this sense, Mirror is not merely a reflection of Seattle’s urban core — instead, it is a totalizing representation of the environment surrounding and affecting the very hustle and bustle of the city itself. Its constant visual manifestation of every minute of Seattle life calls into question philosophical notions of space and time, and its juxtaposition of rural and urban imagery provides a valuable reminder of the larger environment of which cities are a part. If Mirror is anything like Aitken’s past installations, it is sure to spark interesting dialogues, and hopefully some that delve deeper than the phrase “very cool,” the general consensus on the Internet thus far.

Although it may be a permanent fixture of the SAM, the installation is experimental at its core, so its very essence is its ability to grow and evolve over time. We will be watching the evolution of Mirror closely. If any of you happen upon this installation in real life, drop us a line — we’d love to hear about it! 

Gabrielle Doiron

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ art architecture Seattle Doug Aitken technology video Gabrielle Doiron Seattle Art Museum
Mike Thompson’s Growing Pains 
In his project Growing Pains: Nurturing the Relationship Between Man & Object designer and researcher Mike Thompson toys with the notion of death, imagining a future wherein our bodies could cultivate an object that would represent us beyond the grave. If this design were possible, Thompson writes that “we would grow death inside of us, forcing us to interact with it on a daily basis whilst nurturing new material in preparation for our decay.”
Over the course of its growth process, we would shape the object under our skin through our physical interaction with it. Effectively, we would be designing our own death. 
 After our death, the object would be extracted from our body and passed onto a loved one as a physical and symbolic representation of ourselves. In the images above, we see Thompson’s imagined object: a simulated bone shaped into a pipe by its agent.
 Although imagined, Thompson’s project presents us with some challenging questions. If we were preparing for our death rather than attempting to run away from it, how might we live differently? If we could design our own death, what form would it take? How would we want to be remembered?  
For more information about this project and others by Thompson, visit his website.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Mike Thompson’s Growing Pains 
In his project Growing Pains: Nurturing the Relationship Between Man & Object designer and researcher Mike Thompson toys with the notion of death, imagining a future wherein our bodies could cultivate an object that would represent us beyond the grave. If this design were possible, Thompson writes that “we would grow death inside of us, forcing us to interact with it on a daily basis whilst nurturing new material in preparation for our decay.”
Over the course of its growth process, we would shape the object under our skin through our physical interaction with it. Effectively, we would be designing our own death. 
 After our death, the object would be extracted from our body and passed onto a loved one as a physical and symbolic representation of ourselves. In the images above, we see Thompson’s imagined object: a simulated bone shaped into a pipe by its agent.
 Although imagined, Thompson’s project presents us with some challenging questions. If we were preparing for our death rather than attempting to run away from it, how might we live differently? If we could design our own death, what form would it take? How would we want to be remembered?  
For more information about this project and others by Thompson, visit his website.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Mike Thompson’s Growing Pains 
In his project Growing Pains: Nurturing the Relationship Between Man & Object designer and researcher Mike Thompson toys with the notion of death, imagining a future wherein our bodies could cultivate an object that would represent us beyond the grave. If this design were possible, Thompson writes that “we would grow death inside of us, forcing us to interact with it on a daily basis whilst nurturing new material in preparation for our decay.”
Over the course of its growth process, we would shape the object under our skin through our physical interaction with it. Effectively, we would be designing our own death. 
 After our death, the object would be extracted from our body and passed onto a loved one as a physical and symbolic representation of ourselves. In the images above, we see Thompson’s imagined object: a simulated bone shaped into a pipe by its agent.
 Although imagined, Thompson’s project presents us with some challenging questions. If we were preparing for our death rather than attempting to run away from it, how might we live differently? If we could design our own death, what form would it take? How would we want to be remembered?  
For more information about this project and others by Thompson, visit his website.
- Gabrielle Doiron

Mike Thompson’s Growing Pains

In his project Growing Pains: Nurturing the Relationship Between Man & Object designer and researcher Mike Thompson toys with the notion of death, imagining a future wherein our bodies could cultivate an object that would represent us beyond the grave. If this design were possible, Thompson writes that “we would grow death inside of us, forcing us to interact with it on a daily basis whilst nurturing new material in preparation for our decay.”

Over the course of its growth process, we would shape the object under our skin through our physical interaction with it. Effectively, we would be designing our own death. 

After our death, the object would be extracted from our body and passed onto a loved one as a physical and symbolic representation of ourselves. In the images above, we see Thompson’s imagined object: a simulated bone shaped into a pipe by its agent.

Although imagined, Thompson’s project presents us with some challenging questions. If we were preparing for our death rather than attempting to run away from it, how might we live differently? If we could design our own death, what form would it take? How would we want to be remembered?  

For more information about this project and others by Thompson, visit his website.

- Gabrielle Doiron

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ art science design death Gabrielle Doiron Mike Thompson technology
Wendy: Dance and neutralize pollutants all in one space
Meet Wendy, a dynamic partyscape in Queens, NY that was designed with an environmental conscience. It provides an edgy, spacious, fun space to party in — all the while cleaning the air.
Architects Matthias Hollwich and Marc Kushner (HWKN), winners of this year’s MoMA Young Architects Program (a competition to build an outdoor partyscape for its PS1 location in Queen’s) were encouraged to work within guidelines that addressed issues of sustainability and recycling. As Hollwich said, “Architecture is entering a new period where buildings have personality, rights, and responsibility. Wendy is testing these grounds on a social, ecological, and humanisitic level.”
Their design consists of a ginormous scaffolding to support 1555 square yards of fabric coated in a solution of titania nanoparticles, which neutralizes airborne toxins. In this way, HWKN designed a rooftop partyscape that contributes some part in cleaning the air. As described by Hauke Jungjohann, director at Wendy’s structural engineering consultant firm, “Wendy is the perfect synergy of architectural aesthetics, systems efficiency and structural creativity. The magic of Wendy lies in the usage of something simple like a scaffolding system and reinventing its usage so that something new appears that has never been seen before.”
If you need any more proof that this is an awesome design, it is expected that Wendy’s impact on air pollution during the summer of 2012 will be equivalent to taking 260 cars off the road. And those spiky arms in the design? They shoot out blasts of cool air, music and water. With temperatures reaching the mid-thirties in Ottawa within the last few days, Wendy sounds like the awesomest summer party space ever.
To help fund the construction of this ambitious and complicated structure, HWKN worked with graphic designers to design merchandise (bags & T-shirts), all of which are also coated with the same pollution-neutralizing solution used on the structure itself. 
Click here to visit Wendy’s website, where you can learn more about the design, watch videos, and even buy some titania nanoparticle-soaked, pollution-fighting merch if you are so inclined. If you are near Queens at any point this summer, check out Wendy! We’d love to hear your opinions about it. 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Wendy: Dance and neutralize pollutants all in one space
Meet Wendy, a dynamic partyscape in Queens, NY that was designed with an environmental conscience. It provides an edgy, spacious, fun space to party in — all the while cleaning the air.
Architects Matthias Hollwich and Marc Kushner (HWKN), winners of this year’s MoMA Young Architects Program (a competition to build an outdoor partyscape for its PS1 location in Queen’s) were encouraged to work within guidelines that addressed issues of sustainability and recycling. As Hollwich said, “Architecture is entering a new period where buildings have personality, rights, and responsibility. Wendy is testing these grounds on a social, ecological, and humanisitic level.”
Their design consists of a ginormous scaffolding to support 1555 square yards of fabric coated in a solution of titania nanoparticles, which neutralizes airborne toxins. In this way, HWKN designed a rooftop partyscape that contributes some part in cleaning the air. As described by Hauke Jungjohann, director at Wendy’s structural engineering consultant firm, “Wendy is the perfect synergy of architectural aesthetics, systems efficiency and structural creativity. The magic of Wendy lies in the usage of something simple like a scaffolding system and reinventing its usage so that something new appears that has never been seen before.”
If you need any more proof that this is an awesome design, it is expected that Wendy’s impact on air pollution during the summer of 2012 will be equivalent to taking 260 cars off the road. And those spiky arms in the design? They shoot out blasts of cool air, music and water. With temperatures reaching the mid-thirties in Ottawa within the last few days, Wendy sounds like the awesomest summer party space ever.
To help fund the construction of this ambitious and complicated structure, HWKN worked with graphic designers to design merchandise (bags & T-shirts), all of which are also coated with the same pollution-neutralizing solution used on the structure itself. 
Click here to visit Wendy’s website, where you can learn more about the design, watch videos, and even buy some titania nanoparticle-soaked, pollution-fighting merch if you are so inclined. If you are near Queens at any point this summer, check out Wendy! We’d love to hear your opinions about it. 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Wendy: Dance and neutralize pollutants all in one space
Meet Wendy, a dynamic partyscape in Queens, NY that was designed with an environmental conscience. It provides an edgy, spacious, fun space to party in — all the while cleaning the air.
Architects Matthias Hollwich and Marc Kushner (HWKN), winners of this year’s MoMA Young Architects Program (a competition to build an outdoor partyscape for its PS1 location in Queen’s) were encouraged to work within guidelines that addressed issues of sustainability and recycling. As Hollwich said, “Architecture is entering a new period where buildings have personality, rights, and responsibility. Wendy is testing these grounds on a social, ecological, and humanisitic level.”
Their design consists of a ginormous scaffolding to support 1555 square yards of fabric coated in a solution of titania nanoparticles, which neutralizes airborne toxins. In this way, HWKN designed a rooftop partyscape that contributes some part in cleaning the air. As described by Hauke Jungjohann, director at Wendy’s structural engineering consultant firm, “Wendy is the perfect synergy of architectural aesthetics, systems efficiency and structural creativity. The magic of Wendy lies in the usage of something simple like a scaffolding system and reinventing its usage so that something new appears that has never been seen before.”
If you need any more proof that this is an awesome design, it is expected that Wendy’s impact on air pollution during the summer of 2012 will be equivalent to taking 260 cars off the road. And those spiky arms in the design? They shoot out blasts of cool air, music and water. With temperatures reaching the mid-thirties in Ottawa within the last few days, Wendy sounds like the awesomest summer party space ever.
To help fund the construction of this ambitious and complicated structure, HWKN worked with graphic designers to design merchandise (bags & T-shirts), all of which are also coated with the same pollution-neutralizing solution used on the structure itself. 
Click here to visit Wendy’s website, where you can learn more about the design, watch videos, and even buy some titania nanoparticle-soaked, pollution-fighting merch if you are so inclined. If you are near Queens at any point this summer, check out Wendy! We’d love to hear your opinions about it. 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Wendy: Dance and neutralize pollutants all in one space
Meet Wendy, a dynamic partyscape in Queens, NY that was designed with an environmental conscience. It provides an edgy, spacious, fun space to party in — all the while cleaning the air.
Architects Matthias Hollwich and Marc Kushner (HWKN), winners of this year’s MoMA Young Architects Program (a competition to build an outdoor partyscape for its PS1 location in Queen’s) were encouraged to work within guidelines that addressed issues of sustainability and recycling. As Hollwich said, “Architecture is entering a new period where buildings have personality, rights, and responsibility. Wendy is testing these grounds on a social, ecological, and humanisitic level.”
Their design consists of a ginormous scaffolding to support 1555 square yards of fabric coated in a solution of titania nanoparticles, which neutralizes airborne toxins. In this way, HWKN designed a rooftop partyscape that contributes some part in cleaning the air. As described by Hauke Jungjohann, director at Wendy’s structural engineering consultant firm, “Wendy is the perfect synergy of architectural aesthetics, systems efficiency and structural creativity. The magic of Wendy lies in the usage of something simple like a scaffolding system and reinventing its usage so that something new appears that has never been seen before.”
If you need any more proof that this is an awesome design, it is expected that Wendy’s impact on air pollution during the summer of 2012 will be equivalent to taking 260 cars off the road. And those spiky arms in the design? They shoot out blasts of cool air, music and water. With temperatures reaching the mid-thirties in Ottawa within the last few days, Wendy sounds like the awesomest summer party space ever.
To help fund the construction of this ambitious and complicated structure, HWKN worked with graphic designers to design merchandise (bags & T-shirts), all of which are also coated with the same pollution-neutralizing solution used on the structure itself. 
Click here to visit Wendy’s website, where you can learn more about the design, watch videos, and even buy some titania nanoparticle-soaked, pollution-fighting merch if you are so inclined. If you are near Queens at any point this summer, check out Wendy! We’d love to hear your opinions about it. 
- Gabrielle Doiron

Wendy: Dance and neutralize pollutants all in one space


Meet Wendy, a dynamic partyscape in Queens, NY that was designed with an environmental conscience. It provides an edgy, spacious, fun space to party in — all the while cleaning the air.

Architects Matthias Hollwich and Marc Kushner (HWKN), winners of this year’s MoMA Young Architects Program (a competition to build an outdoor partyscape for its PS1 location in Queen’s) were encouraged to work within guidelines that addressed issues of sustainability and recycling. As Hollwich said, “Architecture is entering a new period where buildings have personality, rights, and responsibility. Wendy is testing these grounds on a social, ecological, and humanisitic level.”

Their design consists of a ginormous scaffolding to support 1555 square yards of fabric coated in a solution of titania nanoparticles, which neutralizes airborne toxins. In this way, HWKN designed a rooftop partyscape that contributes some part in cleaning the air. As described by Hauke Jungjohann, director at Wendy’s structural engineering consultant firm, “Wendy is the perfect synergy of architectural aesthetics, systems efficiency and structural creativity. The magic of Wendy lies in the usage of something simple like a scaffolding system and reinventing its usage so that something new appears that has never been seen before.”

If you need any more proof that this is an awesome design, it is expected that Wendy’s impact on air pollution during the summer of 2012 will be equivalent to taking 260 cars off the road. And those spiky arms in the design? They shoot out blasts of cool air, music and water. With temperatures reaching the mid-thirties in Ottawa within the last few days, Wendy sounds like the awesomest summer party space ever.

To help fund the construction of this ambitious and complicated structure, HWKN worked with graphic designers to design merchandise (bags & T-shirts), all of which are also coated with the same pollution-neutralizing solution used on the structure itself.

Click here to visit Wendy’s website, where you can learn more about the design, watch videos, and even buy some titania nanoparticle-soaked, pollution-fighting merch if you are so inclined. If you are near Queens at any point this summer, check out Wendy! We’d love to hear your opinions about it.

- Gabrielle Doiron

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ MoMa New York Wendy architecture art art and science artscience design environment pollution summer sustainability water science Gabrielle Doiron
Leonid Tsvetkov
Amsterdam-based artist Leonid Tsvetkov’s cityscape models make use of old motherboards (or what is left after valuable metals are stripped from them) and other computer innards. These models, depicting oil refineries and cityscapes dominated by large industrial complexes in muted hues, illustrate a quasi-dystopian environment.
In some works, the metals are rusted and the paint is chipped, amplifying this theme of the eventual deterioration that renders modern technological materials useless. In another sense, however, by recycling these materials Tsvetkov is suggesting that they can be made to have other uses, suggesting a more resourceful future.
Some of his models are even submerged in aquariums of sorts, surrounded by mysterious fungi that grimly resemble clouds of dark smoke or even natural phenomena such as tornadoes. In this sense, Tsvetkov alludes to the organisms that exist around and that are affected by the technology and machine-centric environments that facilitate modern living. As Tsvetkov describes it, “My work focuses on reshaping cultural waste and exploration of social and physical processes. I am interested in the moments where the hard edge geometry of the city becomes organic or there random activity begins to take a highly organized form.”
What I like most about Tsvetkov’s works is how much meaning lies in his use of the materials themselves. Not only do the models depict harshly industrial complexes and lots, but they do so with materials that draw attention to the ever-advancing world of computer technology. By using now ineffective and useless materials, once essential to the function of a computer product, Tsvetkov’s works illustrate that the constant improvements in the world of technology come at the price of the fast and consequential incompetency (and decreasing quality) of technological products. 
Tsvetkov recently participated in the exhibit MärklinWorld at Kunsthal KAdE  in the Netherlands, in which forty international contemporary artists who shared a demonstrated interest in depicting urban and rural landscapes contributed their work. Tsvetkov’s work was featured around a 60-metre model railway layout, where a train with a camera attached travelled. This gave visitors, who otherwise could only see the models from a bird’s eye view, a way to experience the landscapes as though they were passengers on the railway themselves. 
Normally I’d suggest a site where you could learn more about Tsvetkov, but unfortunately there’s not much to pick from. If anyone has a tip-off on a biography or artist statement, send it our way! To see the article where I first found out about his work, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Leonid Tsvetkov
Amsterdam-based artist Leonid Tsvetkov’s cityscape models make use of old motherboards (or what is left after valuable metals are stripped from them) and other computer innards. These models, depicting oil refineries and cityscapes dominated by large industrial complexes in muted hues, illustrate a quasi-dystopian environment.
In some works, the metals are rusted and the paint is chipped, amplifying this theme of the eventual deterioration that renders modern technological materials useless. In another sense, however, by recycling these materials Tsvetkov is suggesting that they can be made to have other uses, suggesting a more resourceful future.
Some of his models are even submerged in aquariums of sorts, surrounded by mysterious fungi that grimly resemble clouds of dark smoke or even natural phenomena such as tornadoes. In this sense, Tsvetkov alludes to the organisms that exist around and that are affected by the technology and machine-centric environments that facilitate modern living. As Tsvetkov describes it, “My work focuses on reshaping cultural waste and exploration of social and physical processes. I am interested in the moments where the hard edge geometry of the city becomes organic or there random activity begins to take a highly organized form.”
What I like most about Tsvetkov’s works is how much meaning lies in his use of the materials themselves. Not only do the models depict harshly industrial complexes and lots, but they do so with materials that draw attention to the ever-advancing world of computer technology. By using now ineffective and useless materials, once essential to the function of a computer product, Tsvetkov’s works illustrate that the constant improvements in the world of technology come at the price of the fast and consequential incompetency (and decreasing quality) of technological products. 
Tsvetkov recently participated in the exhibit MärklinWorld at Kunsthal KAdE  in the Netherlands, in which forty international contemporary artists who shared a demonstrated interest in depicting urban and rural landscapes contributed their work. Tsvetkov’s work was featured around a 60-metre model railway layout, where a train with a camera attached travelled. This gave visitors, who otherwise could only see the models from a bird’s eye view, a way to experience the landscapes as though they were passengers on the railway themselves. 
Normally I’d suggest a site where you could learn more about Tsvetkov, but unfortunately there’s not much to pick from. If anyone has a tip-off on a biography or artist statement, send it our way! To see the article where I first found out about his work, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Leonid Tsvetkov
Amsterdam-based artist Leonid Tsvetkov’s cityscape models make use of old motherboards (or what is left after valuable metals are stripped from them) and other computer innards. These models, depicting oil refineries and cityscapes dominated by large industrial complexes in muted hues, illustrate a quasi-dystopian environment.
In some works, the metals are rusted and the paint is chipped, amplifying this theme of the eventual deterioration that renders modern technological materials useless. In another sense, however, by recycling these materials Tsvetkov is suggesting that they can be made to have other uses, suggesting a more resourceful future.
Some of his models are even submerged in aquariums of sorts, surrounded by mysterious fungi that grimly resemble clouds of dark smoke or even natural phenomena such as tornadoes. In this sense, Tsvetkov alludes to the organisms that exist around and that are affected by the technology and machine-centric environments that facilitate modern living. As Tsvetkov describes it, “My work focuses on reshaping cultural waste and exploration of social and physical processes. I am interested in the moments where the hard edge geometry of the city becomes organic or there random activity begins to take a highly organized form.”
What I like most about Tsvetkov’s works is how much meaning lies in his use of the materials themselves. Not only do the models depict harshly industrial complexes and lots, but they do so with materials that draw attention to the ever-advancing world of computer technology. By using now ineffective and useless materials, once essential to the function of a computer product, Tsvetkov’s works illustrate that the constant improvements in the world of technology come at the price of the fast and consequential incompetency (and decreasing quality) of technological products. 
Tsvetkov recently participated in the exhibit MärklinWorld at Kunsthal KAdE  in the Netherlands, in which forty international contemporary artists who shared a demonstrated interest in depicting urban and rural landscapes contributed their work. Tsvetkov’s work was featured around a 60-metre model railway layout, where a train with a camera attached travelled. This gave visitors, who otherwise could only see the models from a bird’s eye view, a way to experience the landscapes as though they were passengers on the railway themselves. 
Normally I’d suggest a site where you could learn more about Tsvetkov, but unfortunately there’s not much to pick from. If anyone has a tip-off on a biography or artist statement, send it our way! To see the article where I first found out about his work, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Leonid Tsvetkov
Amsterdam-based artist Leonid Tsvetkov’s cityscape models make use of old motherboards (or what is left after valuable metals are stripped from them) and other computer innards. These models, depicting oil refineries and cityscapes dominated by large industrial complexes in muted hues, illustrate a quasi-dystopian environment.
In some works, the metals are rusted and the paint is chipped, amplifying this theme of the eventual deterioration that renders modern technological materials useless. In another sense, however, by recycling these materials Tsvetkov is suggesting that they can be made to have other uses, suggesting a more resourceful future.
Some of his models are even submerged in aquariums of sorts, surrounded by mysterious fungi that grimly resemble clouds of dark smoke or even natural phenomena such as tornadoes. In this sense, Tsvetkov alludes to the organisms that exist around and that are affected by the technology and machine-centric environments that facilitate modern living. As Tsvetkov describes it, “My work focuses on reshaping cultural waste and exploration of social and physical processes. I am interested in the moments where the hard edge geometry of the city becomes organic or there random activity begins to take a highly organized form.”
What I like most about Tsvetkov’s works is how much meaning lies in his use of the materials themselves. Not only do the models depict harshly industrial complexes and lots, but they do so with materials that draw attention to the ever-advancing world of computer technology. By using now ineffective and useless materials, once essential to the function of a computer product, Tsvetkov’s works illustrate that the constant improvements in the world of technology come at the price of the fast and consequential incompetency (and decreasing quality) of technological products. 
Tsvetkov recently participated in the exhibit MärklinWorld at Kunsthal KAdE  in the Netherlands, in which forty international contemporary artists who shared a demonstrated interest in depicting urban and rural landscapes contributed their work. Tsvetkov’s work was featured around a 60-metre model railway layout, where a train with a camera attached travelled. This gave visitors, who otherwise could only see the models from a bird’s eye view, a way to experience the landscapes as though they were passengers on the railway themselves. 
Normally I’d suggest a site where you could learn more about Tsvetkov, but unfortunately there’s not much to pick from. If anyone has a tip-off on a biography or artist statement, send it our way! To see the article where I first found out about his work, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Leonid Tsvetkov
Amsterdam-based artist Leonid Tsvetkov’s cityscape models make use of old motherboards (or what is left after valuable metals are stripped from them) and other computer innards. These models, depicting oil refineries and cityscapes dominated by large industrial complexes in muted hues, illustrate a quasi-dystopian environment.
In some works, the metals are rusted and the paint is chipped, amplifying this theme of the eventual deterioration that renders modern technological materials useless. In another sense, however, by recycling these materials Tsvetkov is suggesting that they can be made to have other uses, suggesting a more resourceful future.
Some of his models are even submerged in aquariums of sorts, surrounded by mysterious fungi that grimly resemble clouds of dark smoke or even natural phenomena such as tornadoes. In this sense, Tsvetkov alludes to the organisms that exist around and that are affected by the technology and machine-centric environments that facilitate modern living. As Tsvetkov describes it, “My work focuses on reshaping cultural waste and exploration of social and physical processes. I am interested in the moments where the hard edge geometry of the city becomes organic or there random activity begins to take a highly organized form.”
What I like most about Tsvetkov’s works is how much meaning lies in his use of the materials themselves. Not only do the models depict harshly industrial complexes and lots, but they do so with materials that draw attention to the ever-advancing world of computer technology. By using now ineffective and useless materials, once essential to the function of a computer product, Tsvetkov’s works illustrate that the constant improvements in the world of technology come at the price of the fast and consequential incompetency (and decreasing quality) of technological products. 
Tsvetkov recently participated in the exhibit MärklinWorld at Kunsthal KAdE  in the Netherlands, in which forty international contemporary artists who shared a demonstrated interest in depicting urban and rural landscapes contributed their work. Tsvetkov’s work was featured around a 60-metre model railway layout, where a train with a camera attached travelled. This gave visitors, who otherwise could only see the models from a bird’s eye view, a way to experience the landscapes as though they were passengers on the railway themselves. 
Normally I’d suggest a site where you could learn more about Tsvetkov, but unfortunately there’s not much to pick from. If anyone has a tip-off on a biography or artist statement, send it our way! To see the article where I first found out about his work, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron

Leonid Tsvetkov


Amsterdam-based artist Leonid Tsvetkov’s cityscape models make use of old motherboards (or what is left after valuable metals are stripped from them) and other computer innards. These models, depicting oil refineries and cityscapes dominated by large industrial complexes in muted hues, illustrate a quasi-dystopian environment.

In some works, the metals are rusted and the paint is chipped, amplifying this theme of the eventual deterioration that renders modern technological materials useless. In another sense, however, by recycling these materials Tsvetkov is suggesting that they can be made to have other uses, suggesting a more resourceful future.

Some of his models are even submerged in aquariums of sorts, surrounded by mysterious fungi that grimly resemble clouds of dark smoke or even natural phenomena such as tornadoes. In this sense, Tsvetkov alludes to the organisms that exist around and that are affected by the technology and machine-centric environments that facilitate modern living. As Tsvetkov describes it, “My work focuses on reshaping cultural waste and exploration of social and physical processes. I am interested in the moments where the hard edge geometry of the city becomes organic or there random activity begins to take a highly organized form.”

What I like most about Tsvetkov’s works is how much meaning lies in his use of the materials themselves. Not only do the models depict harshly industrial complexes and lots, but they do so with materials that draw attention to the ever-advancing world of computer technology. By using now ineffective and useless materials, once essential to the function of a computer product, Tsvetkov’s works illustrate that the constant improvements in the world of technology come at the price of the fast and consequential incompetency (and decreasing quality) of technological products. 

Tsvetkov recently participated in the exhibit MärklinWorld at Kunsthal KAdE  in the Netherlands, in which forty international contemporary artists who shared a demonstrated interest in depicting urban and rural landscapes contributed their work. Tsvetkov’s work was featured around a 60-metre model railway layout, where a train with a camera attached travelled. This gave visitors, who otherwise could only see the models from a bird’s eye view, a way to experience the landscapes as though they were passengers on the railway themselves. 

Normally I’d suggest a site where you could learn more about Tsvetkov, but unfortunately there’s not much to pick from. If anyone has a tip-off on a biography or artist statement, send it our way! To see the article where I first found out about his work, click here.

- Gabrielle Doiron

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

5 Photos
/ Leonid Tsvetkov art art and science artscience computers environment industry models motherboards science technology waste Gabrielle Doiron
Philips Bio-Light: Bacteria as Energy Source
Philips’ newest Microbial Home concept is a resourceful and visually dynamic bio-light that uses bioluminescent bacteria, fed with methane and composted material (poop and waste) as an energy source. As you can see, this light is not only an achievement technologically and scientifically, but it is pretty impressive aesthetically as well.
For Philips, however, this is more than a light — it is a life-changing idea: “Potentially biological products could be self-energizing, adaptive, responsive, self-repairing, act as biological sensors to environmental conditions, and change the way we communicate information.”
So there’s waste, and then light, but how does it work? In scientific terms, bioluminescent organisms produce luciferase, an enzyme, which interacts with a molecule called a luciferin, which emits light. This type of light is produced at low temperatures (unlike incandescence, where light is produced as a result of high heat).
Luminescent light is consequently less intense, described as “more suitable for … ambience and indication than functional illumination”. It is slower than conventional light sources, and its functionality depends on the living material’s life itself. What’s cool about that, though, is that the light emitted is susceptible to change, and likely to react to its environmental setting. Essentially, it’s an ambiance-creating light source with a life of its own. 
Philips sees a more practical future for this concept in night-time road markings, warning strips on flights of stairs, informational markings on cultural institutions, and the like. As well, they see potential in its ability to create new genres of atmospheric interior lighting, that could potentially have therapeutic effects. All of this said, there are no plans to sell this light as a Philips product. Instead, it is intended to spark discussion: “this concept is testing a possible future — not prescribing one.” Oh well… we can dream! 
In the meantime, you can have a look at some other Philips Microbial Home concepts here. For more information on the bio-light, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Philips Bio-Light: Bacteria as Energy Source
Philips’ newest Microbial Home concept is a resourceful and visually dynamic bio-light that uses bioluminescent bacteria, fed with methane and composted material (poop and waste) as an energy source. As you can see, this light is not only an achievement technologically and scientifically, but it is pretty impressive aesthetically as well.
For Philips, however, this is more than a light — it is a life-changing idea: “Potentially biological products could be self-energizing, adaptive, responsive, self-repairing, act as biological sensors to environmental conditions, and change the way we communicate information.”
So there’s waste, and then light, but how does it work? In scientific terms, bioluminescent organisms produce luciferase, an enzyme, which interacts with a molecule called a luciferin, which emits light. This type of light is produced at low temperatures (unlike incandescence, where light is produced as a result of high heat).
Luminescent light is consequently less intense, described as “more suitable for … ambience and indication than functional illumination”. It is slower than conventional light sources, and its functionality depends on the living material’s life itself. What’s cool about that, though, is that the light emitted is susceptible to change, and likely to react to its environmental setting. Essentially, it’s an ambiance-creating light source with a life of its own. 
Philips sees a more practical future for this concept in night-time road markings, warning strips on flights of stairs, informational markings on cultural institutions, and the like. As well, they see potential in its ability to create new genres of atmospheric interior lighting, that could potentially have therapeutic effects. All of this said, there are no plans to sell this light as a Philips product. Instead, it is intended to spark discussion: “this concept is testing a possible future — not prescribing one.” Oh well… we can dream! 
In the meantime, you can have a look at some other Philips Microbial Home concepts here. For more information on the bio-light, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Philips Bio-Light: Bacteria as Energy Source
Philips’ newest Microbial Home concept is a resourceful and visually dynamic bio-light that uses bioluminescent bacteria, fed with methane and composted material (poop and waste) as an energy source. As you can see, this light is not only an achievement technologically and scientifically, but it is pretty impressive aesthetically as well.
For Philips, however, this is more than a light — it is a life-changing idea: “Potentially biological products could be self-energizing, adaptive, responsive, self-repairing, act as biological sensors to environmental conditions, and change the way we communicate information.”
So there’s waste, and then light, but how does it work? In scientific terms, bioluminescent organisms produce luciferase, an enzyme, which interacts with a molecule called a luciferin, which emits light. This type of light is produced at low temperatures (unlike incandescence, where light is produced as a result of high heat).
Luminescent light is consequently less intense, described as “more suitable for … ambience and indication than functional illumination”. It is slower than conventional light sources, and its functionality depends on the living material’s life itself. What’s cool about that, though, is that the light emitted is susceptible to change, and likely to react to its environmental setting. Essentially, it’s an ambiance-creating light source with a life of its own. 
Philips sees a more practical future for this concept in night-time road markings, warning strips on flights of stairs, informational markings on cultural institutions, and the like. As well, they see potential in its ability to create new genres of atmospheric interior lighting, that could potentially have therapeutic effects. All of this said, there are no plans to sell this light as a Philips product. Instead, it is intended to spark discussion: “this concept is testing a possible future — not prescribing one.” Oh well… we can dream! 
In the meantime, you can have a look at some other Philips Microbial Home concepts here. For more information on the bio-light, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron

Philips Bio-Light: Bacteria as Energy Source


Philips’ newest Microbial Home concept is a resourceful and visually dynamic bio-light that uses bioluminescent bacteria, fed with methane and composted material (poop and waste) as an energy source. As you can see, this light is not only an achievement technologically and scientifically, but it is pretty impressive aesthetically as well.

For Philips, however, this is more than a light — it is a life-changing idea: “Potentially biological products could be self-energizing, adaptive, responsive, self-repairing, act as biological sensors to environmental conditions, and change the way we communicate information.”

So there’s waste, and then light, but how does it work? In scientific terms, bioluminescent organisms produce luciferase, an enzyme, which interacts with a molecule called a luciferin, which emits light. This type of light is produced at low temperatures (unlike incandescence, where light is produced as a result of high heat).

Luminescent light is consequently less intense, described as “more suitable for … ambience and indication than functional illumination”. It is slower than conventional light sources, and its functionality depends on the living material’s life itself. What’s cool about that, though, is that the light emitted is susceptible to change, and likely to react to its environmental setting. Essentially, it’s an ambiance-creating light source with a life of its own. 

Philips sees a more practical future for this concept in night-time road markings, warning strips on flights of stairs, informational markings on cultural institutions, and the like. As well, they see potential in its ability to create new genres of atmospheric interior lighting, that could potentially have therapeutic effects. All of this said, there are no plans to sell this light as a Philips product. Instead, it is intended to spark discussion: “this concept is testing a possible future — not prescribing one.” Oh well… we can dream!

In the meantime, you can have a look at some other Philips Microbial Home concepts here. For more information on the bio-light, click here.

- Gabrielle Doiron

3 Photos
/ Microbial Home Philips art art and science artscience bacteria bio-light biology bioluminescence design environment future nature renewable energy science sustainability Gabrielle Doiron
Mathilde Roussel: Living Art
The works of Paris-based artist Mathilde Roussel revolve around the themes of life and decay in nature. Using vegetation and other living organisms as media in her work, Roussel explores the cycle of life and death.
Homo Arboretum is one of these living works, wrinkling and filling out with the changing weather conditions. Designed in the shape of human organs, it is a symbol of the lungs that breathe life into the heart of the city of Nashville. What is most heart-warming (no pun intended) about this piece is that it was a collaborative effort — it is composed of red clothing donated and stitched together by Nashville residents. It has received positive response in Nashville, and appeared so huggable to young children that the artist eventually had to have a guardrail built around it. (Can you blame the little ones? It is a veritable pillow play structure.)
In another work, entitled Echology, Roussel filled etched glass jars with natural substances that represented human body fluids and substances. With time, the living substances slowly changed, echoing the process of metamorphosis and decay that our own body parts, substances and fluids undergo when their life source is cut off. [To see the before and after shots of the substances, click here]
Similarly, her series Lives of Grass is another metaphor for the transformation of the human body over time. As described on her website, “Time sculpts the forms, makes them change and then decay”. These sculptures also draw attention to the fact that food (here represented by the wheat grass) has a profound impact on living beings, becoming a component of our body and affecting every single organ system once ingested. With this work, Roussel hopes to make viewers more sensitive to food and nature cycles and, on a greater scale, to the issues of abundance and famine, so that we may be more aware of our global reality.
For more fantastic living art, I encourage you to visit Roussel’s website here. 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Mathilde Roussel: Living Art
The works of Paris-based artist Mathilde Roussel revolve around the themes of life and decay in nature. Using vegetation and other living organisms as media in her work, Roussel explores the cycle of life and death.
Homo Arboretum is one of these living works, wrinkling and filling out with the changing weather conditions. Designed in the shape of human organs, it is a symbol of the lungs that breathe life into the heart of the city of Nashville. What is most heart-warming (no pun intended) about this piece is that it was a collaborative effort — it is composed of red clothing donated and stitched together by Nashville residents. It has received positive response in Nashville, and appeared so huggable to young children that the artist eventually had to have a guardrail built around it. (Can you blame the little ones? It is a veritable pillow play structure.)
In another work, entitled Echology, Roussel filled etched glass jars with natural substances that represented human body fluids and substances. With time, the living substances slowly changed, echoing the process of metamorphosis and decay that our own body parts, substances and fluids undergo when their life source is cut off. [To see the before and after shots of the substances, click here]
Similarly, her series Lives of Grass is another metaphor for the transformation of the human body over time. As described on her website, “Time sculpts the forms, makes them change and then decay”. These sculptures also draw attention to the fact that food (here represented by the wheat grass) has a profound impact on living beings, becoming a component of our body and affecting every single organ system once ingested. With this work, Roussel hopes to make viewers more sensitive to food and nature cycles and, on a greater scale, to the issues of abundance and famine, so that we may be more aware of our global reality.
For more fantastic living art, I encourage you to visit Roussel’s website here. 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Mathilde Roussel: Living Art
The works of Paris-based artist Mathilde Roussel revolve around the themes of life and decay in nature. Using vegetation and other living organisms as media in her work, Roussel explores the cycle of life and death.
Homo Arboretum is one of these living works, wrinkling and filling out with the changing weather conditions. Designed in the shape of human organs, it is a symbol of the lungs that breathe life into the heart of the city of Nashville. What is most heart-warming (no pun intended) about this piece is that it was a collaborative effort — it is composed of red clothing donated and stitched together by Nashville residents. It has received positive response in Nashville, and appeared so huggable to young children that the artist eventually had to have a guardrail built around it. (Can you blame the little ones? It is a veritable pillow play structure.)
In another work, entitled Echology, Roussel filled etched glass jars with natural substances that represented human body fluids and substances. With time, the living substances slowly changed, echoing the process of metamorphosis and decay that our own body parts, substances and fluids undergo when their life source is cut off. [To see the before and after shots of the substances, click here]
Similarly, her series Lives of Grass is another metaphor for the transformation of the human body over time. As described on her website, “Time sculpts the forms, makes them change and then decay”. These sculptures also draw attention to the fact that food (here represented by the wheat grass) has a profound impact on living beings, becoming a component of our body and affecting every single organ system once ingested. With this work, Roussel hopes to make viewers more sensitive to food and nature cycles and, on a greater scale, to the issues of abundance and famine, so that we may be more aware of our global reality.
For more fantastic living art, I encourage you to visit Roussel’s website here. 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Mathilde Roussel: Living Art
The works of Paris-based artist Mathilde Roussel revolve around the themes of life and decay in nature. Using vegetation and other living organisms as media in her work, Roussel explores the cycle of life and death.
Homo Arboretum is one of these living works, wrinkling and filling out with the changing weather conditions. Designed in the shape of human organs, it is a symbol of the lungs that breathe life into the heart of the city of Nashville. What is most heart-warming (no pun intended) about this piece is that it was a collaborative effort — it is composed of red clothing donated and stitched together by Nashville residents. It has received positive response in Nashville, and appeared so huggable to young children that the artist eventually had to have a guardrail built around it. (Can you blame the little ones? It is a veritable pillow play structure.)
In another work, entitled Echology, Roussel filled etched glass jars with natural substances that represented human body fluids and substances. With time, the living substances slowly changed, echoing the process of metamorphosis and decay that our own body parts, substances and fluids undergo when their life source is cut off. [To see the before and after shots of the substances, click here]
Similarly, her series Lives of Grass is another metaphor for the transformation of the human body over time. As described on her website, “Time sculpts the forms, makes them change and then decay”. These sculptures also draw attention to the fact that food (here represented by the wheat grass) has a profound impact on living beings, becoming a component of our body and affecting every single organ system once ingested. With this work, Roussel hopes to make viewers more sensitive to food and nature cycles and, on a greater scale, to the issues of abundance and famine, so that we may be more aware of our global reality.
For more fantastic living art, I encourage you to visit Roussel’s website here. 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Mathilde Roussel: Living Art
The works of Paris-based artist Mathilde Roussel revolve around the themes of life and decay in nature. Using vegetation and other living organisms as media in her work, Roussel explores the cycle of life and death.
Homo Arboretum is one of these living works, wrinkling and filling out with the changing weather conditions. Designed in the shape of human organs, it is a symbol of the lungs that breathe life into the heart of the city of Nashville. What is most heart-warming (no pun intended) about this piece is that it was a collaborative effort — it is composed of red clothing donated and stitched together by Nashville residents. It has received positive response in Nashville, and appeared so huggable to young children that the artist eventually had to have a guardrail built around it. (Can you blame the little ones? It is a veritable pillow play structure.)
In another work, entitled Echology, Roussel filled etched glass jars with natural substances that represented human body fluids and substances. With time, the living substances slowly changed, echoing the process of metamorphosis and decay that our own body parts, substances and fluids undergo when their life source is cut off. [To see the before and after shots of the substances, click here]
Similarly, her series Lives of Grass is another metaphor for the transformation of the human body over time. As described on her website, “Time sculpts the forms, makes them change and then decay”. These sculptures also draw attention to the fact that food (here represented by the wheat grass) has a profound impact on living beings, becoming a component of our body and affecting every single organ system once ingested. With this work, Roussel hopes to make viewers more sensitive to food and nature cycles and, on a greater scale, to the issues of abundance and famine, so that we may be more aware of our global reality.
For more fantastic living art, I encourage you to visit Roussel’s website here. 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Mathilde Roussel: Living Art
The works of Paris-based artist Mathilde Roussel revolve around the themes of life and decay in nature. Using vegetation and other living organisms as media in her work, Roussel explores the cycle of life and death.
Homo Arboretum is one of these living works, wrinkling and filling out with the changing weather conditions. Designed in the shape of human organs, it is a symbol of the lungs that breathe life into the heart of the city of Nashville. What is most heart-warming (no pun intended) about this piece is that it was a collaborative effort — it is composed of red clothing donated and stitched together by Nashville residents. It has received positive response in Nashville, and appeared so huggable to young children that the artist eventually had to have a guardrail built around it. (Can you blame the little ones? It is a veritable pillow play structure.)
In another work, entitled Echology, Roussel filled etched glass jars with natural substances that represented human body fluids and substances. With time, the living substances slowly changed, echoing the process of metamorphosis and decay that our own body parts, substances and fluids undergo when their life source is cut off. [To see the before and after shots of the substances, click here]
Similarly, her series Lives of Grass is another metaphor for the transformation of the human body over time. As described on her website, “Time sculpts the forms, makes them change and then decay”. These sculptures also draw attention to the fact that food (here represented by the wheat grass) has a profound impact on living beings, becoming a component of our body and affecting every single organ system once ingested. With this work, Roussel hopes to make viewers more sensitive to food and nature cycles and, on a greater scale, to the issues of abundance and famine, so that we may be more aware of our global reality.
For more fantastic living art, I encourage you to visit Roussel’s website here. 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Mathilde Roussel: Living Art
The works of Paris-based artist Mathilde Roussel revolve around the themes of life and decay in nature. Using vegetation and other living organisms as media in her work, Roussel explores the cycle of life and death.
Homo Arboretum is one of these living works, wrinkling and filling out with the changing weather conditions. Designed in the shape of human organs, it is a symbol of the lungs that breathe life into the heart of the city of Nashville. What is most heart-warming (no pun intended) about this piece is that it was a collaborative effort — it is composed of red clothing donated and stitched together by Nashville residents. It has received positive response in Nashville, and appeared so huggable to young children that the artist eventually had to have a guardrail built around it. (Can you blame the little ones? It is a veritable pillow play structure.)
In another work, entitled Echology, Roussel filled etched glass jars with natural substances that represented human body fluids and substances. With time, the living substances slowly changed, echoing the process of metamorphosis and decay that our own body parts, substances and fluids undergo when their life source is cut off. [To see the before and after shots of the substances, click here]
Similarly, her series Lives of Grass is another metaphor for the transformation of the human body over time. As described on her website, “Time sculpts the forms, makes them change and then decay”. These sculptures also draw attention to the fact that food (here represented by the wheat grass) has a profound impact on living beings, becoming a component of our body and affecting every single organ system once ingested. With this work, Roussel hopes to make viewers more sensitive to food and nature cycles and, on a greater scale, to the issues of abundance and famine, so that we may be more aware of our global reality.
For more fantastic living art, I encourage you to visit Roussel’s website here. 
- Gabrielle Doiron

Mathilde Roussel: Living Art


The works of Paris-based artist Mathilde Roussel revolve around the themes of life and decay in nature. Using vegetation and other living organisms as media in her work, Roussel explores the cycle of life and death.

Homo Arboretum is one of these living works, wrinkling and filling out with the changing weather conditions. Designed in the shape of human organs, it is a symbol of the lungs that breathe life into the heart of the city of Nashville. What is most heart-warming (no pun intended) about this piece is that it was a collaborative effort — it is composed of red clothing donated and stitched together by Nashville residents. It has received positive response in Nashville, and appeared so huggable to young children that the artist eventually had to have a guardrail built around it. (Can you blame the little ones? It is a veritable pillow play structure.)

In another work, entitled Echology, Roussel filled etched glass jars with natural substances that represented human body fluids and substances. With time, the living substances slowly changed, echoing the process of metamorphosis and decay that our own body parts, substances and fluids undergo when their life source is cut off. [To see the before and after shots of the substances, click here]

Similarly, her series Lives of Grass is another metaphor for the transformation of the human body over time. As described on her website, “Time sculpts the forms, makes them change and then decay”. These sculptures also draw attention to the fact that food (here represented by the wheat grass) has a profound impact on living beings, becoming a component of our body and affecting every single organ system once ingested. With this work, Roussel hopes to make viewers more sensitive to food and nature cycles and, on a greater scale, to the issues of abundance and famine, so that we may be more aware of our global reality.

For more fantastic living art, I encourage you to visit Roussel’s website here.

- Gabrielle Doiron

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

7 Photos
/ art science artscience art and science nature decay life environment sculpture conceptual art Nashville Mathilde Roussel Gabrielle Doiron
Nick Veasey
Although this is certainly not the first of posts in this journal that showcases works that make use of the x-ray, Nick Veasey’s approach to his work and overall sense of humour is so great that I could not resist sharing it. This artist x-rays everything, and finds unique meaning in applying this process to each subject. One of his most recent shows, entitled “Patriot Acts”, opened on September 11th, 2011, the 10th anniversary of 9/11. This was, of course, quite timely and appropriate, with the x-ray playing a big part in the enhanced security initiatives undertaken by western nations after the attacks.
On a superficial level, Veasey’s works reveal the intricacies of machines, toys, plants and other organisms. In the x-ray of the doll above, for example, the tube going from its mouth to between its legs is revealed (which allows it to “pee” the water you give it to “drink” like a “real” baby) and we get a glimpse of its inner structure. This unique perspective allows the viewer quite literally to see right through the subject, in such a way that may conceal intentions but that nevertheless shows every layer there is to see (like with the skeleton of a man with a gun tucked in his suit jacket).
To achieve the seamless, clean look in his works, Veasey x-rays pieces of the objects and then digitally assembles them to create a single image. His prints force the viewer to single in on the physical structure of an object, and to observe the qualities of organisms out of context. While some of his prints are tinted orange or blue, for example, the majority of them are black and white, giving them a haunting and clinical appearance. As Richard Chang puts it in ARTnews magazine, “Veasey lets light do the talking”. 
To see more of Veasey’s x-rayed subjects, ranging from beautiful to bizarre to unsettling, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Nick Veasey
Although this is certainly not the first of posts in this journal that showcases works that make use of the x-ray, Nick Veasey’s approach to his work and overall sense of humour is so great that I could not resist sharing it. This artist x-rays everything, and finds unique meaning in applying this process to each subject. One of his most recent shows, entitled “Patriot Acts”, opened on September 11th, 2011, the 10th anniversary of 9/11. This was, of course, quite timely and appropriate, with the x-ray playing a big part in the enhanced security initiatives undertaken by western nations after the attacks.
On a superficial level, Veasey’s works reveal the intricacies of machines, toys, plants and other organisms. In the x-ray of the doll above, for example, the tube going from its mouth to between its legs is revealed (which allows it to “pee” the water you give it to “drink” like a “real” baby) and we get a glimpse of its inner structure. This unique perspective allows the viewer quite literally to see right through the subject, in such a way that may conceal intentions but that nevertheless shows every layer there is to see (like with the skeleton of a man with a gun tucked in his suit jacket).
To achieve the seamless, clean look in his works, Veasey x-rays pieces of the objects and then digitally assembles them to create a single image. His prints force the viewer to single in on the physical structure of an object, and to observe the qualities of organisms out of context. While some of his prints are tinted orange or blue, for example, the majority of them are black and white, giving them a haunting and clinical appearance. As Richard Chang puts it in ARTnews magazine, “Veasey lets light do the talking”. 
To see more of Veasey’s x-rayed subjects, ranging from beautiful to bizarre to unsettling, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Nick Veasey
Although this is certainly not the first of posts in this journal that showcases works that make use of the x-ray, Nick Veasey’s approach to his work and overall sense of humour is so great that I could not resist sharing it. This artist x-rays everything, and finds unique meaning in applying this process to each subject. One of his most recent shows, entitled “Patriot Acts”, opened on September 11th, 2011, the 10th anniversary of 9/11. This was, of course, quite timely and appropriate, with the x-ray playing a big part in the enhanced security initiatives undertaken by western nations after the attacks.
On a superficial level, Veasey’s works reveal the intricacies of machines, toys, plants and other organisms. In the x-ray of the doll above, for example, the tube going from its mouth to between its legs is revealed (which allows it to “pee” the water you give it to “drink” like a “real” baby) and we get a glimpse of its inner structure. This unique perspective allows the viewer quite literally to see right through the subject, in such a way that may conceal intentions but that nevertheless shows every layer there is to see (like with the skeleton of a man with a gun tucked in his suit jacket).
To achieve the seamless, clean look in his works, Veasey x-rays pieces of the objects and then digitally assembles them to create a single image. His prints force the viewer to single in on the physical structure of an object, and to observe the qualities of organisms out of context. While some of his prints are tinted orange or blue, for example, the majority of them are black and white, giving them a haunting and clinical appearance. As Richard Chang puts it in ARTnews magazine, “Veasey lets light do the talking”. 
To see more of Veasey’s x-rayed subjects, ranging from beautiful to bizarre to unsettling, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Nick Veasey
Although this is certainly not the first of posts in this journal that showcases works that make use of the x-ray, Nick Veasey’s approach to his work and overall sense of humour is so great that I could not resist sharing it. This artist x-rays everything, and finds unique meaning in applying this process to each subject. One of his most recent shows, entitled “Patriot Acts”, opened on September 11th, 2011, the 10th anniversary of 9/11. This was, of course, quite timely and appropriate, with the x-ray playing a big part in the enhanced security initiatives undertaken by western nations after the attacks.
On a superficial level, Veasey’s works reveal the intricacies of machines, toys, plants and other organisms. In the x-ray of the doll above, for example, the tube going from its mouth to between its legs is revealed (which allows it to “pee” the water you give it to “drink” like a “real” baby) and we get a glimpse of its inner structure. This unique perspective allows the viewer quite literally to see right through the subject, in such a way that may conceal intentions but that nevertheless shows every layer there is to see (like with the skeleton of a man with a gun tucked in his suit jacket).
To achieve the seamless, clean look in his works, Veasey x-rays pieces of the objects and then digitally assembles them to create a single image. His prints force the viewer to single in on the physical structure of an object, and to observe the qualities of organisms out of context. While some of his prints are tinted orange or blue, for example, the majority of them are black and white, giving them a haunting and clinical appearance. As Richard Chang puts it in ARTnews magazine, “Veasey lets light do the talking”. 
To see more of Veasey’s x-rayed subjects, ranging from beautiful to bizarre to unsettling, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Nick Veasey
Although this is certainly not the first of posts in this journal that showcases works that make use of the x-ray, Nick Veasey’s approach to his work and overall sense of humour is so great that I could not resist sharing it. This artist x-rays everything, and finds unique meaning in applying this process to each subject. One of his most recent shows, entitled “Patriot Acts”, opened on September 11th, 2011, the 10th anniversary of 9/11. This was, of course, quite timely and appropriate, with the x-ray playing a big part in the enhanced security initiatives undertaken by western nations after the attacks.
On a superficial level, Veasey’s works reveal the intricacies of machines, toys, plants and other organisms. In the x-ray of the doll above, for example, the tube going from its mouth to between its legs is revealed (which allows it to “pee” the water you give it to “drink” like a “real” baby) and we get a glimpse of its inner structure. This unique perspective allows the viewer quite literally to see right through the subject, in such a way that may conceal intentions but that nevertheless shows every layer there is to see (like with the skeleton of a man with a gun tucked in his suit jacket).
To achieve the seamless, clean look in his works, Veasey x-rays pieces of the objects and then digitally assembles them to create a single image. His prints force the viewer to single in on the physical structure of an object, and to observe the qualities of organisms out of context. While some of his prints are tinted orange or blue, for example, the majority of them are black and white, giving them a haunting and clinical appearance. As Richard Chang puts it in ARTnews magazine, “Veasey lets light do the talking”. 
To see more of Veasey’s x-rayed subjects, ranging from beautiful to bizarre to unsettling, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron

Nick Veasey

Although this is certainly not the first of posts in this journal that showcases works that make use of the x-ray, Nick Veasey’s approach to his work and overall sense of humour is so great that I could not resist sharing it. This artist x-rays everything, and finds unique meaning in applying this process to each subject. One of his most recent shows, entitled “Patriot Acts”, opened on September 11th, 2011, the 10th anniversary of 9/11. This was, of course, quite timely and appropriate, with the x-ray playing a big part in the enhanced security initiatives undertaken by western nations after the attacks.

On a superficial level, Veasey’s works reveal the intricacies of machines, toys, plants and other organisms. In the x-ray of the doll above, for example, the tube going from its mouth to between its legs is revealed (which allows it to “pee” the water you give it to “drink” like a “real” baby) and we get a glimpse of its inner structure. This unique perspective allows the viewer quite literally to see right through the subject, in such a way that may conceal intentions but that nevertheless shows every layer there is to see (like with the skeleton of a man with a gun tucked in his suit jacket).

To achieve the seamless, clean look in his works, Veasey x-rays pieces of the objects and then digitally assembles them to create a single image. His prints force the viewer to single in on the physical structure of an object, and to observe the qualities of organisms out of context. While some of his prints are tinted orange or blue, for example, the majority of them are black and white, giving them a haunting and clinical appearance. As Richard Chang puts it in ARTnews magazine, “Veasey lets light do the talking”. 

To see more of Veasey’s x-rayed subjects, ranging from beautiful to bizarre to unsettling, click here.

- Gabrielle Doiron

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

5 Photos
/ art art and science nick veasey science x-ray Gabrielle Doiron
Susy Oliveira
Susy Oliveira, a Toronto-based multimedia artist, has been making a lot of online buzz with her photo-based constructions. Made from c-prints and foamcore, her works blend photography and sculpture, resulting in something that is at once imposing in its three-dimensionality and strikingly two-dimensional and angular. 
Her photographs are mounted on each face of a volume to restore the third dimension to the image that was lost through the photographic process. In this way, Oliveira repurposes the images, giving them a new form and life. The result is a pixelated effect similar to that of video game characters or computer graphics circa 1980. The shape of the subject is therefore both simplified and amplified, creating something that is neither reality nor fiction, but somewhere in between.
For Oliveira, her sculptures represent one aspect of our modern obsession with replacing nature with fabricated, manmade versions of things, and with mixing the virtual with the real. These sculptures create their own virtual world that, like other virtual environments, is identifiably different than (but uncomfortably close to) reality. 
For a look at Susy Oliveira’s other work, which includes more sculptures, paintings, and prints, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron 
Susy Oliveira
Susy Oliveira, a Toronto-based multimedia artist, has been making a lot of online buzz with her photo-based constructions. Made from c-prints and foamcore, her works blend photography and sculpture, resulting in something that is at once imposing in its three-dimensionality and strikingly two-dimensional and angular. 
Her photographs are mounted on each face of a volume to restore the third dimension to the image that was lost through the photographic process. In this way, Oliveira repurposes the images, giving them a new form and life. The result is a pixelated effect similar to that of video game characters or computer graphics circa 1980. The shape of the subject is therefore both simplified and amplified, creating something that is neither reality nor fiction, but somewhere in between.
For Oliveira, her sculptures represent one aspect of our modern obsession with replacing nature with fabricated, manmade versions of things, and with mixing the virtual with the real. These sculptures create their own virtual world that, like other virtual environments, is identifiably different than (but uncomfortably close to) reality. 
For a look at Susy Oliveira’s other work, which includes more sculptures, paintings, and prints, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron 
Susy Oliveira
Susy Oliveira, a Toronto-based multimedia artist, has been making a lot of online buzz with her photo-based constructions. Made from c-prints and foamcore, her works blend photography and sculpture, resulting in something that is at once imposing in its three-dimensionality and strikingly two-dimensional and angular. 
Her photographs are mounted on each face of a volume to restore the third dimension to the image that was lost through the photographic process. In this way, Oliveira repurposes the images, giving them a new form and life. The result is a pixelated effect similar to that of video game characters or computer graphics circa 1980. The shape of the subject is therefore both simplified and amplified, creating something that is neither reality nor fiction, but somewhere in between.
For Oliveira, her sculptures represent one aspect of our modern obsession with replacing nature with fabricated, manmade versions of things, and with mixing the virtual with the real. These sculptures create their own virtual world that, like other virtual environments, is identifiably different than (but uncomfortably close to) reality. 
For a look at Susy Oliveira’s other work, which includes more sculptures, paintings, and prints, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron 
Susy Oliveira
Susy Oliveira, a Toronto-based multimedia artist, has been making a lot of online buzz with her photo-based constructions. Made from c-prints and foamcore, her works blend photography and sculpture, resulting in something that is at once imposing in its three-dimensionality and strikingly two-dimensional and angular. 
Her photographs are mounted on each face of a volume to restore the third dimension to the image that was lost through the photographic process. In this way, Oliveira repurposes the images, giving them a new form and life. The result is a pixelated effect similar to that of video game characters or computer graphics circa 1980. The shape of the subject is therefore both simplified and amplified, creating something that is neither reality nor fiction, but somewhere in between.
For Oliveira, her sculptures represent one aspect of our modern obsession with replacing nature with fabricated, manmade versions of things, and with mixing the virtual with the real. These sculptures create their own virtual world that, like other virtual environments, is identifiably different than (but uncomfortably close to) reality. 
For a look at Susy Oliveira’s other work, which includes more sculptures, paintings, and prints, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron 
Matthew Brandt: Lakes and Reservoirs
From a photographer who will step on strangers’ balconies and hike to the top of hills to capture the perfect photograph comes Lakes and Reservoirs, a series of prints that were created using the water of the lakes photographed.
Matthew Brandt, an experimental photographer, is no stranger to taking more than his subjects’ images home with him after a day of photographing. Be it a friend, a tree, a bee or a lake — Brandt makes certain that the subject is as involved in the process of the development of the image as it is present in the image itself.
When capturing the images from his photographic series entitled “Lakes and Reservoirs” Brandt carried two things with him: his camera and a five-gallon jug to fill up with lake water. The process, quite simply, is as follows. After taking the photograph, collecting a generous water sample, and making his prints, Brandt pours the water into a large tray and submerges the print in the water. As he describes it, “from this point I wait for the water to break down its own photographic image. Depending on the image density and water, this breakdown time can take days or weeks”.
In addition to lake water, body fluids and bugs have also been used in his dark room. Brandt once made salted-paper prints of a portrait of his friend using the salt from the subject’s tears (I wonder how he made him cry?). In his series entitled Honeybees, Brandt used an emulsion of crushed bees as an ingredient to develop his photographs of the insects (to be clear, he did not kill the bees, but rather reportedly found hundreds of them dead and dying along the California shoreline).
In his work, Brandt aims to explore the idea that his images are mirrors of themselves, constituting themselves physically of the subject that they reflect visually. For Brandt, this series also attempts to parallel two examples of obsolescence— that of the lowering waterlines of the lakes (and consequently degrading water quality) and that of the c-prints he makes, outdated by more efficient photo printing technologies. 
In many of his images, the calm surface of the lake is violently distorted by the chemical constituents of the water, interrupting its seemingly flawless facade, and in some cases, obliterating more than half of the original image. Read into them what you will, but I would argue that there is something undeniable in these images that taps into our modern eco-consciousness. If the constituents of the water can cause such noticeable chemical reactions in the dark room, how does this affect the natural environment to which the water belongs? 
Matthew Brandt’s series “Lakes and Reservoirs” is currently featured in his exhibition “Lakes, Trees, and Honeybees” at the Yossi Milo Gallery in New York, NY. For more of Matthew Brandt’s work, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Matthew Brandt: Lakes and Reservoirs
From a photographer who will step on strangers’ balconies and hike to the top of hills to capture the perfect photograph comes Lakes and Reservoirs, a series of prints that were created using the water of the lakes photographed.
Matthew Brandt, an experimental photographer, is no stranger to taking more than his subjects’ images home with him after a day of photographing. Be it a friend, a tree, a bee or a lake — Brandt makes certain that the subject is as involved in the process of the development of the image as it is present in the image itself.
When capturing the images from his photographic series entitled “Lakes and Reservoirs” Brandt carried two things with him: his camera and a five-gallon jug to fill up with lake water. The process, quite simply, is as follows. After taking the photograph, collecting a generous water sample, and making his prints, Brandt pours the water into a large tray and submerges the print in the water. As he describes it, “from this point I wait for the water to break down its own photographic image. Depending on the image density and water, this breakdown time can take days or weeks”.
In addition to lake water, body fluids and bugs have also been used in his dark room. Brandt once made salted-paper prints of a portrait of his friend using the salt from the subject’s tears (I wonder how he made him cry?). In his series entitled Honeybees, Brandt used an emulsion of crushed bees as an ingredient to develop his photographs of the insects (to be clear, he did not kill the bees, but rather reportedly found hundreds of them dead and dying along the California shoreline).
In his work, Brandt aims to explore the idea that his images are mirrors of themselves, constituting themselves physically of the subject that they reflect visually. For Brandt, this series also attempts to parallel two examples of obsolescence— that of the lowering waterlines of the lakes (and consequently degrading water quality) and that of the c-prints he makes, outdated by more efficient photo printing technologies. 
In many of his images, the calm surface of the lake is violently distorted by the chemical constituents of the water, interrupting its seemingly flawless facade, and in some cases, obliterating more than half of the original image. Read into them what you will, but I would argue that there is something undeniable in these images that taps into our modern eco-consciousness. If the constituents of the water can cause such noticeable chemical reactions in the dark room, how does this affect the natural environment to which the water belongs? 
Matthew Brandt’s series “Lakes and Reservoirs” is currently featured in his exhibition “Lakes, Trees, and Honeybees” at the Yossi Milo Gallery in New York, NY. For more of Matthew Brandt’s work, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Matthew Brandt: Lakes and Reservoirs
From a photographer who will step on strangers’ balconies and hike to the top of hills to capture the perfect photograph comes Lakes and Reservoirs, a series of prints that were created using the water of the lakes photographed.
Matthew Brandt, an experimental photographer, is no stranger to taking more than his subjects’ images home with him after a day of photographing. Be it a friend, a tree, a bee or a lake — Brandt makes certain that the subject is as involved in the process of the development of the image as it is present in the image itself.
When capturing the images from his photographic series entitled “Lakes and Reservoirs” Brandt carried two things with him: his camera and a five-gallon jug to fill up with lake water. The process, quite simply, is as follows. After taking the photograph, collecting a generous water sample, and making his prints, Brandt pours the water into a large tray and submerges the print in the water. As he describes it, “from this point I wait for the water to break down its own photographic image. Depending on the image density and water, this breakdown time can take days or weeks”.
In addition to lake water, body fluids and bugs have also been used in his dark room. Brandt once made salted-paper prints of a portrait of his friend using the salt from the subject’s tears (I wonder how he made him cry?). In his series entitled Honeybees, Brandt used an emulsion of crushed bees as an ingredient to develop his photographs of the insects (to be clear, he did not kill the bees, but rather reportedly found hundreds of them dead and dying along the California shoreline).
In his work, Brandt aims to explore the idea that his images are mirrors of themselves, constituting themselves physically of the subject that they reflect visually. For Brandt, this series also attempts to parallel two examples of obsolescence— that of the lowering waterlines of the lakes (and consequently degrading water quality) and that of the c-prints he makes, outdated by more efficient photo printing technologies. 
In many of his images, the calm surface of the lake is violently distorted by the chemical constituents of the water, interrupting its seemingly flawless facade, and in some cases, obliterating more than half of the original image. Read into them what you will, but I would argue that there is something undeniable in these images that taps into our modern eco-consciousness. If the constituents of the water can cause such noticeable chemical reactions in the dark room, how does this affect the natural environment to which the water belongs? 
Matthew Brandt’s series “Lakes and Reservoirs” is currently featured in his exhibition “Lakes, Trees, and Honeybees” at the Yossi Milo Gallery in New York, NY. For more of Matthew Brandt’s work, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Matthew Brandt: Lakes and Reservoirs
From a photographer who will step on strangers’ balconies and hike to the top of hills to capture the perfect photograph comes Lakes and Reservoirs, a series of prints that were created using the water of the lakes photographed.
Matthew Brandt, an experimental photographer, is no stranger to taking more than his subjects’ images home with him after a day of photographing. Be it a friend, a tree, a bee or a lake — Brandt makes certain that the subject is as involved in the process of the development of the image as it is present in the image itself.
When capturing the images from his photographic series entitled “Lakes and Reservoirs” Brandt carried two things with him: his camera and a five-gallon jug to fill up with lake water. The process, quite simply, is as follows. After taking the photograph, collecting a generous water sample, and making his prints, Brandt pours the water into a large tray and submerges the print in the water. As he describes it, “from this point I wait for the water to break down its own photographic image. Depending on the image density and water, this breakdown time can take days or weeks”.
In addition to lake water, body fluids and bugs have also been used in his dark room. Brandt once made salted-paper prints of a portrait of his friend using the salt from the subject’s tears (I wonder how he made him cry?). In his series entitled Honeybees, Brandt used an emulsion of crushed bees as an ingredient to develop his photographs of the insects (to be clear, he did not kill the bees, but rather reportedly found hundreds of them dead and dying along the California shoreline).
In his work, Brandt aims to explore the idea that his images are mirrors of themselves, constituting themselves physically of the subject that they reflect visually. For Brandt, this series also attempts to parallel two examples of obsolescence— that of the lowering waterlines of the lakes (and consequently degrading water quality) and that of the c-prints he makes, outdated by more efficient photo printing technologies. 
In many of his images, the calm surface of the lake is violently distorted by the chemical constituents of the water, interrupting its seemingly flawless facade, and in some cases, obliterating more than half of the original image. Read into them what you will, but I would argue that there is something undeniable in these images that taps into our modern eco-consciousness. If the constituents of the water can cause such noticeable chemical reactions in the dark room, how does this affect the natural environment to which the water belongs? 
Matthew Brandt’s series “Lakes and Reservoirs” is currently featured in his exhibition “Lakes, Trees, and Honeybees” at the Yossi Milo Gallery in New York, NY. For more of Matthew Brandt’s work, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Matthew Brandt: Lakes and Reservoirs
From a photographer who will step on strangers’ balconies and hike to the top of hills to capture the perfect photograph comes Lakes and Reservoirs, a series of prints that were created using the water of the lakes photographed.
Matthew Brandt, an experimental photographer, is no stranger to taking more than his subjects’ images home with him after a day of photographing. Be it a friend, a tree, a bee or a lake — Brandt makes certain that the subject is as involved in the process of the development of the image as it is present in the image itself.
When capturing the images from his photographic series entitled “Lakes and Reservoirs” Brandt carried two things with him: his camera and a five-gallon jug to fill up with lake water. The process, quite simply, is as follows. After taking the photograph, collecting a generous water sample, and making his prints, Brandt pours the water into a large tray and submerges the print in the water. As he describes it, “from this point I wait for the water to break down its own photographic image. Depending on the image density and water, this breakdown time can take days or weeks”.
In addition to lake water, body fluids and bugs have also been used in his dark room. Brandt once made salted-paper prints of a portrait of his friend using the salt from the subject’s tears (I wonder how he made him cry?). In his series entitled Honeybees, Brandt used an emulsion of crushed bees as an ingredient to develop his photographs of the insects (to be clear, he did not kill the bees, but rather reportedly found hundreds of them dead and dying along the California shoreline).
In his work, Brandt aims to explore the idea that his images are mirrors of themselves, constituting themselves physically of the subject that they reflect visually. For Brandt, this series also attempts to parallel two examples of obsolescence— that of the lowering waterlines of the lakes (and consequently degrading water quality) and that of the c-prints he makes, outdated by more efficient photo printing technologies. 
In many of his images, the calm surface of the lake is violently distorted by the chemical constituents of the water, interrupting its seemingly flawless facade, and in some cases, obliterating more than half of the original image. Read into them what you will, but I would argue that there is something undeniable in these images that taps into our modern eco-consciousness. If the constituents of the water can cause such noticeable chemical reactions in the dark room, how does this affect the natural environment to which the water belongs? 
Matthew Brandt’s series “Lakes and Reservoirs” is currently featured in his exhibition “Lakes, Trees, and Honeybees” at the Yossi Milo Gallery in New York, NY. For more of Matthew Brandt’s work, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron

Matthew Brandt: Lakes and Reservoirs

From a photographer who will step on strangers’ balconies and hike to the top of hills to capture the perfect photograph comes Lakes and Reservoirs, a series of prints that were created using the water of the lakes photographed.

Matthew Brandt, an experimental photographer, is no stranger to taking more than his subjects’ images home with him after a day of photographing. Be it a friend, a tree, a bee or a lake — Brandt makes certain that the subject is as involved in the process of the development of the image as it is present in the image itself.

When capturing the images from his photographic series entitled “Lakes and Reservoirs” Brandt carried two things with him: his camera and a five-gallon jug to fill up with lake water. The process, quite simply, is as follows. After taking the photograph, collecting a generous water sample, and making his prints, Brandt pours the water into a large tray and submerges the print in the water. As he describes it, “from this point I wait for the water to break down its own photographic image. Depending on the image density and water, this breakdown time can take days or weeks”.

In addition to lake water, body fluids and bugs have also been used in his dark room. Brandt once made salted-paper prints of a portrait of his friend using the salt from the subject’s tears (I wonder how he made him cry?). In his series entitled Honeybees, Brandt used an emulsion of crushed bees as an ingredient to develop his photographs of the insects (to be clear, he did not kill the bees, but rather reportedly found hundreds of them dead and dying along the California shoreline).

In his work, Brandt aims to explore the idea that his images are mirrors of themselves, constituting themselves physically of the subject that they reflect visually. For Brandt, this series also attempts to parallel two examples of obsolescence— that of the lowering waterlines of the lakes (and consequently degrading water quality) and that of the c-prints he makes, outdated by more efficient photo printing technologies. 

In many of his images, the calm surface of the lake is violently distorted by the chemical constituents of the water, interrupting its seemingly flawless facade, and in some cases, obliterating more than half of the original image. Read into them what you will, but I would argue that there is something undeniable in these images that taps into our modern eco-consciousness. If the constituents of the water can cause such noticeable chemical reactions in the dark room, how does this affect the natural environment to which the water belongs? 

Matthew Brandt’s series “Lakes and Reservoirs” is currently featured in his exhibition “Lakes, Trees, and Honeybees” at the Yossi Milo Gallery in New York, NY. For more of Matthew Brandt’s work, click here.

- Gabrielle Doiron

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

5 Photos
/ art art and science art process artscience bees dark room environment nature photography science water Matthew Brandt America Gabrielle Doiron

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