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Eruptions of Audiovisual Illusions
Inspired by the societal influences volcanoes have on our lives, artist Joanie Lemercier created two projects “EYJAFJALLAJÖKULL” (2010) and “FUJI” (2014) using a combination of simple and complex audiovisual elements, playing with our depth of field and perception of the installation environment.
In both installations, the artist hand draws the wire-frame scenery to a wall, mimicking the topography of the respective volcanic landscapes. Stereoscopy and shading are used as the key elements which manipulate the audience’s perception of the image before them. The shadows created by the light projections give the illusion of depth within the ridges and points, even distance between mountains, aided by the fluid grid-lines and computer software. The artist himself describes this process as “modifying the perception of things…it is almost like modifying reality”. Lemercier “[plays] around with visual perception [to] trick the senses using optical illusions”, allowing the naturally flat surface and image to take on a three-dimensional forms.
Both examples of audiovisual mapping stem from events that have shaped certain societies, in small and large ways respectively; “EYJAFJALLAJÖKULL” was created in response to the eruption of the volcano in Iceland in 2010, which restricted travel in almost all of Europe. “FUJI” continues the artists’ exploration of volcanoes, this time Fujiyama in Japan, by incorporating elements of the legend of Kaguya Hime; a 10th-century folk-tale which the artist claims is “a key element in Japanese culture”.
Where the first installation focused on optical illusion and manipulation of audiovisual perception only, “FUJI” does the same, but with the added bonus of narrative. The projection becomes both optical illusion and poetry within its immersive environment.
-Anna Paluch
Eruptions of Audiovisual Illusions
Inspired by the societal influences volcanoes have on our lives, artist Joanie Lemercier created two projects “EYJAFJALLAJÖKULL” (2010) and “FUJI” (2014) using a combination of simple and complex audiovisual elements, playing with our depth of field and perception of the installation environment.
In both installations, the artist hand draws the wire-frame scenery to a wall, mimicking the topography of the respective volcanic landscapes. Stereoscopy and shading are used as the key elements which manipulate the audience’s perception of the image before them. The shadows created by the light projections give the illusion of depth within the ridges and points, even distance between mountains, aided by the fluid grid-lines and computer software. The artist himself describes this process as “modifying the perception of things…it is almost like modifying reality”. Lemercier “[plays] around with visual perception [to] trick the senses using optical illusions”, allowing the naturally flat surface and image to take on a three-dimensional forms.
Both examples of audiovisual mapping stem from events that have shaped certain societies, in small and large ways respectively; “EYJAFJALLAJÖKULL” was created in response to the eruption of the volcano in Iceland in 2010, which restricted travel in almost all of Europe. “FUJI” continues the artists’ exploration of volcanoes, this time Fujiyama in Japan, by incorporating elements of the legend of Kaguya Hime; a 10th-century folk-tale which the artist claims is “a key element in Japanese culture”.
Where the first installation focused on optical illusion and manipulation of audiovisual perception only, “FUJI” does the same, but with the added bonus of narrative. The projection becomes both optical illusion and poetry within its immersive environment.
-Anna Paluch
Eruptions of Audiovisual Illusions
Inspired by the societal influences volcanoes have on our lives, artist Joanie Lemercier created two projects “EYJAFJALLAJÖKULL” (2010) and “FUJI” (2014) using a combination of simple and complex audiovisual elements, playing with our depth of field and perception of the installation environment.
In both installations, the artist hand draws the wire-frame scenery to a wall, mimicking the topography of the respective volcanic landscapes. Stereoscopy and shading are used as the key elements which manipulate the audience’s perception of the image before them. The shadows created by the light projections give the illusion of depth within the ridges and points, even distance between mountains, aided by the fluid grid-lines and computer software. The artist himself describes this process as “modifying the perception of things…it is almost like modifying reality”. Lemercier “[plays] around with visual perception [to] trick the senses using optical illusions”, allowing the naturally flat surface and image to take on a three-dimensional forms.
Both examples of audiovisual mapping stem from events that have shaped certain societies, in small and large ways respectively; “EYJAFJALLAJÖKULL” was created in response to the eruption of the volcano in Iceland in 2010, which restricted travel in almost all of Europe. “FUJI” continues the artists’ exploration of volcanoes, this time Fujiyama in Japan, by incorporating elements of the legend of Kaguya Hime; a 10th-century folk-tale which the artist claims is “a key element in Japanese culture”.
Where the first installation focused on optical illusion and manipulation of audiovisual perception only, “FUJI” does the same, but with the added bonus of narrative. The projection becomes both optical illusion and poetry within its immersive environment.
-Anna Paluch

Eruptions of Audiovisual Illusions

Inspired by the societal influences volcanoes have on our lives, artist Joanie Lemercier created two projects “EYJAFJALLAJÖKULL” (2010) and “FUJI” (2014) using a combination of simple and complex audiovisual elements, playing with our depth of field and perception of the installation environment.

In both installations, the artist hand draws the wire-frame scenery to a wall, mimicking the topography of the respective volcanic landscapes. Stereoscopy and shading are used as the key elements which manipulate the audience’s perception of the image before them. The shadows created by the light projections give the illusion of depth within the ridges and points, even distance between mountains, aided by the fluid grid-lines and computer software. The artist himself describes this process as “modifying the perception of things…it is almost like modifying reality”. Lemercier “[plays] around with visual perception [to] trick the senses using optical illusions”, allowing the naturally flat surface and image to take on a three-dimensional forms.

Both examples of audiovisual mapping stem from events that have shaped certain societies, in small and large ways respectively; “EYJAFJALLAJÖKULL” was created in response to the eruption of the volcano in Iceland in 2010, which restricted travel in almost all of Europe. “FUJI” continues the artists’ exploration of volcanoes, this time Fujiyama in Japan, by incorporating elements of the legend of Kaguya Hime; a 10th-century folk-tale which the artist claims is “a key element in Japanese culture”.

Where the first installation focused on optical illusion and manipulation of audiovisual perception only, “FUJI” does the same, but with the added bonus of narrative. The projection becomes both optical illusion and poetry within its immersive environment.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ joanie lemercier anna paluch art science art and science journal stereoscopy optical illusion computer programing volcanoes audiovisual topography light projection sound art installation

Szymon Kaliski’s “Biomimesis: Hyphae”

Polish artist Szymon Kaliski’s video installation “Biomimesis: Hyphae” (2013) is an interactive motion censored video piece, heavily influenced by fungal growth and the relationship between biology and technology. 

The piece includes abstract lines and minimalist shapes as a representation of the fungus and it’s growths. This simulated fungal growth can be ‘maintained’ by standing in front of the screen. The viewer’s movements act as the food which helps the digital life-form stay alive; no movement means the digital life-form before you begins to decay, and even die. It is a piece that puts a heavy responsibility on the audience; they have the power to create or destroy life, symbolic of the impact we have on both technological advancements and natural devastation (and vice versa). 

The artist uses a modified space colonization algorithm from Cinder Library with a combination of a motion tracking program from OpenCV library to create this piece which combines “fungal growth with cold digital aesthetics”. Open source libraries are amazing wells of resources, and allows for artists of various backgrounds to learn new (and important) skills in our digital age.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

szymon kaliskibiomimesisbiologytechnologyanna paluchdigital artvideo artmotion censorfungal growthopen sourceinteractive artartscienceart and science journal
Dissolving the Photographic Medium

The materiality of developed film and photographs allows us to not only hold onto people and memories, but create the material objects themselves, connecting us even closer to what is displayed before us. But what happens when the image is purposefully destroyed or altered?

South Korean artist Seung Hwan Oh develops “film matter [with] organic matter” to create “distorted, psychedelic images” which are a result of bacteria interacting with the photo surface. By ‘destroying’ the image, the artist displays a sort of vulnerability of the photographic medium and our memories; if a photograph can be destroyed so easily, does it also destroy the memory it portrayed?

Where Seung Hwan Oh meant to distort the image through biological methods, artist Jennifer Bouchard uses chemicals from Polaroids to “decompose and ‘denaturalize’” the figurative image. Bouchard takes apart the Polaroids by elements, revealing the ‘barebones’ of the chemical reactions needed to create an image. The artist then processes the result to be displayed through digital means, allowing the image to be blown up to larger proportions, as if for study.

Aesthetically, Seung Hwan Oh’s ephemeral pieces look like a combination of digital works and paintings, while Jennifer Bouchard’s work includes a layer of optical dimensions, which makes it seems like strips of fabric have been used to alter the image, rather than chemicals.

These are only a few examples of how bacteria and chemicals have become an artistic medium within contemporary art practises.

Anna Paluch
Dissolving the Photographic Medium

The materiality of developed film and photographs allows us to not only hold onto people and memories, but create the material objects themselves, connecting us even closer to what is displayed before us. But what happens when the image is purposefully destroyed or altered?

South Korean artist Seung Hwan Oh develops “film matter [with] organic matter” to create “distorted, psychedelic images” which are a result of bacteria interacting with the photo surface. By ‘destroying’ the image, the artist displays a sort of vulnerability of the photographic medium and our memories; if a photograph can be destroyed so easily, does it also destroy the memory it portrayed?

Where Seung Hwan Oh meant to distort the image through biological methods, artist Jennifer Bouchard uses chemicals from Polaroids to “decompose and ‘denaturalize’” the figurative image. Bouchard takes apart the Polaroids by elements, revealing the ‘barebones’ of the chemical reactions needed to create an image. The artist then processes the result to be displayed through digital means, allowing the image to be blown up to larger proportions, as if for study.

Aesthetically, Seung Hwan Oh’s ephemeral pieces look like a combination of digital works and paintings, while Jennifer Bouchard’s work includes a layer of optical dimensions, which makes it seems like strips of fabric have been used to alter the image, rather than chemicals.

These are only a few examples of how bacteria and chemicals have become an artistic medium within contemporary art practises.

Anna Paluch
Dissolving the Photographic Medium

The materiality of developed film and photographs allows us to not only hold onto people and memories, but create the material objects themselves, connecting us even closer to what is displayed before us. But what happens when the image is purposefully destroyed or altered?

South Korean artist Seung Hwan Oh develops “film matter [with] organic matter” to create “distorted, psychedelic images” which are a result of bacteria interacting with the photo surface. By ‘destroying’ the image, the artist displays a sort of vulnerability of the photographic medium and our memories; if a photograph can be destroyed so easily, does it also destroy the memory it portrayed?

Where Seung Hwan Oh meant to distort the image through biological methods, artist Jennifer Bouchard uses chemicals from Polaroids to “decompose and ‘denaturalize’” the figurative image. Bouchard takes apart the Polaroids by elements, revealing the ‘barebones’ of the chemical reactions needed to create an image. The artist then processes the result to be displayed through digital means, allowing the image to be blown up to larger proportions, as if for study.

Aesthetically, Seung Hwan Oh’s ephemeral pieces look like a combination of digital works and paintings, while Jennifer Bouchard’s work includes a layer of optical dimensions, which makes it seems like strips of fabric have been used to alter the image, rather than chemicals.

These are only a few examples of how bacteria and chemicals have become an artistic medium within contemporary art practises.

Anna Paluch

Dissolving the Photographic Medium

The materiality of developed film and photographs allows us to not only hold onto people and memories, but create the material objects themselves, connecting us even closer to what is displayed before us. But what happens when the image is purposefully destroyed or altered?

South Korean artist Seung Hwan Oh develops “film matter [with] organic matter” to create “distorted, psychedelic images” which are a result of bacteria interacting with the photo surface. By ‘destroying’ the image, the artist displays a sort of vulnerability of the photographic medium and our memories; if a photograph can be destroyed so easily, does it also destroy the memory it portrayed?

Where Seung Hwan Oh meant to distort the image through biological methods, artist Jennifer Bouchard uses chemicals from Polaroids to “decompose and ‘denaturalize’” the figurative image. Bouchard takes apart the Polaroids by elements, revealing the ‘barebones’ of the chemical reactions needed to create an image. The artist then processes the result to be displayed through digital means, allowing the image to be blown up to larger proportions, as if for study.

Aesthetically, Seung Hwan Oh’s ephemeral pieces look like a combination of digital works and paintings, while Jennifer Bouchard’s work includes a layer of optical dimensions, which makes it seems like strips of fabric have been used to alter the image, rather than chemicals.

These are only a few examples of how bacteria and chemicals have become an artistic medium within contemporary art practises.

Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ Jennifer Bouchard seung hwan oh anna paluch Photography chemicals biology bacteria polaroids art science art and science journal
Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau 2014
The Nuit Blanche festivals, which happen in various cities all over the world throughout the year, are amazing opportunities to see innovative artists and a chance to bring the art to the streets, rather than hiding it away in a gallery. The cities of Ottawa and Gatineau made sure that their Nuit Blanche (NBOG) was both interactive and eclectic, encouraging audiences to not only look at the works, but be a part of their process.
What is unique about NBOG 2014 is that a majority of the interactive works focused on technology and engineering as artistic mediums.
Artists Christine Kim and Marcin Kedzior collaborated to design “PAPER ORBS" which visitors had to take off an intricate structure in order to wear in various fashions, creating a fluidity of the form. Similarly, Ingrid Dabringer also emphasized fluidity of form in her work with “Invisible Landscapes”, altering the structure of the works’ environment with string and optical illusion.
On the technological side, two artists focused primarily on the use of social media; 6artists and Jennifer Stewart. The collective known as 6artists performed the making of a sculpture, but the only communication between themselves and the audience all night was through Twitter. Jennifer Stewart also encouraged NBOG guests to communicate with her, but only through Snapchat. Another fun, interactive project was Krasimira Dimtchevska's “Free Speech & Free Art" which gave NBOG audiences free USB sticks of digital works created by the artist, a ‘souvenir’ piece, just like PAPER ORBS.
Interactive projections also were featured heavily in this year’s festival, such as Cheryl Pagurek's “Bodies of Water” (which appeared in her “Navigate" piece for NBOG), Galerie Montcalm's “PASSAGE PIXELLISÉ II”, Bear Witness' “Sentinels" which guarded the entrance to the Ottawa Art Gallery, and Jesse Stewart's “Passage”, to create unforgettable audio-visual experiences for all those attending NBOG.
As with every festival, there can be so much more to say. The eclectic mix of both professional and emerging artists, traditional arts and new media arts, made this year’s Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau among one of the most innovative and interactive Nuit Blanche festivals yet.
-Anna Paluch
Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau 2014
The Nuit Blanche festivals, which happen in various cities all over the world throughout the year, are amazing opportunities to see innovative artists and a chance to bring the art to the streets, rather than hiding it away in a gallery. The cities of Ottawa and Gatineau made sure that their Nuit Blanche (NBOG) was both interactive and eclectic, encouraging audiences to not only look at the works, but be a part of their process.
What is unique about NBOG 2014 is that a majority of the interactive works focused on technology and engineering as artistic mediums.
Artists Christine Kim and Marcin Kedzior collaborated to design “PAPER ORBS" which visitors had to take off an intricate structure in order to wear in various fashions, creating a fluidity of the form. Similarly, Ingrid Dabringer also emphasized fluidity of form in her work with “Invisible Landscapes”, altering the structure of the works’ environment with string and optical illusion.
On the technological side, two artists focused primarily on the use of social media; 6artists and Jennifer Stewart. The collective known as 6artists performed the making of a sculpture, but the only communication between themselves and the audience all night was through Twitter. Jennifer Stewart also encouraged NBOG guests to communicate with her, but only through Snapchat. Another fun, interactive project was Krasimira Dimtchevska's “Free Speech & Free Art" which gave NBOG audiences free USB sticks of digital works created by the artist, a ‘souvenir’ piece, just like PAPER ORBS.
Interactive projections also were featured heavily in this year’s festival, such as Cheryl Pagurek's “Bodies of Water” (which appeared in her “Navigate" piece for NBOG), Galerie Montcalm's “PASSAGE PIXELLISÉ II”, Bear Witness' “Sentinels" which guarded the entrance to the Ottawa Art Gallery, and Jesse Stewart's “Passage”, to create unforgettable audio-visual experiences for all those attending NBOG.
As with every festival, there can be so much more to say. The eclectic mix of both professional and emerging artists, traditional arts and new media arts, made this year’s Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau among one of the most innovative and interactive Nuit Blanche festivals yet.
-Anna Paluch
Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau 2014
The Nuit Blanche festivals, which happen in various cities all over the world throughout the year, are amazing opportunities to see innovative artists and a chance to bring the art to the streets, rather than hiding it away in a gallery. The cities of Ottawa and Gatineau made sure that their Nuit Blanche (NBOG) was both interactive and eclectic, encouraging audiences to not only look at the works, but be a part of their process.
What is unique about NBOG 2014 is that a majority of the interactive works focused on technology and engineering as artistic mediums.
Artists Christine Kim and Marcin Kedzior collaborated to design “PAPER ORBS" which visitors had to take off an intricate structure in order to wear in various fashions, creating a fluidity of the form. Similarly, Ingrid Dabringer also emphasized fluidity of form in her work with “Invisible Landscapes”, altering the structure of the works’ environment with string and optical illusion.
On the technological side, two artists focused primarily on the use of social media; 6artists and Jennifer Stewart. The collective known as 6artists performed the making of a sculpture, but the only communication between themselves and the audience all night was through Twitter. Jennifer Stewart also encouraged NBOG guests to communicate with her, but only through Snapchat. Another fun, interactive project was Krasimira Dimtchevska's “Free Speech & Free Art" which gave NBOG audiences free USB sticks of digital works created by the artist, a ‘souvenir’ piece, just like PAPER ORBS.
Interactive projections also were featured heavily in this year’s festival, such as Cheryl Pagurek's “Bodies of Water” (which appeared in her “Navigate" piece for NBOG), Galerie Montcalm's “PASSAGE PIXELLISÉ II”, Bear Witness' “Sentinels" which guarded the entrance to the Ottawa Art Gallery, and Jesse Stewart's “Passage”, to create unforgettable audio-visual experiences for all those attending NBOG.
As with every festival, there can be so much more to say. The eclectic mix of both professional and emerging artists, traditional arts and new media arts, made this year’s Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau among one of the most innovative and interactive Nuit Blanche festivals yet.
-Anna Paluch
Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau 2014
The Nuit Blanche festivals, which happen in various cities all over the world throughout the year, are amazing opportunities to see innovative artists and a chance to bring the art to the streets, rather than hiding it away in a gallery. The cities of Ottawa and Gatineau made sure that their Nuit Blanche (NBOG) was both interactive and eclectic, encouraging audiences to not only look at the works, but be a part of their process.
What is unique about NBOG 2014 is that a majority of the interactive works focused on technology and engineering as artistic mediums.
Artists Christine Kim and Marcin Kedzior collaborated to design “PAPER ORBS" which visitors had to take off an intricate structure in order to wear in various fashions, creating a fluidity of the form. Similarly, Ingrid Dabringer also emphasized fluidity of form in her work with “Invisible Landscapes”, altering the structure of the works’ environment with string and optical illusion.
On the technological side, two artists focused primarily on the use of social media; 6artists and Jennifer Stewart. The collective known as 6artists performed the making of a sculpture, but the only communication between themselves and the audience all night was through Twitter. Jennifer Stewart also encouraged NBOG guests to communicate with her, but only through Snapchat. Another fun, interactive project was Krasimira Dimtchevska's “Free Speech & Free Art" which gave NBOG audiences free USB sticks of digital works created by the artist, a ‘souvenir’ piece, just like PAPER ORBS.
Interactive projections also were featured heavily in this year’s festival, such as Cheryl Pagurek's “Bodies of Water” (which appeared in her “Navigate" piece for NBOG), Galerie Montcalm's “PASSAGE PIXELLISÉ II”, Bear Witness' “Sentinels" which guarded the entrance to the Ottawa Art Gallery, and Jesse Stewart's “Passage”, to create unforgettable audio-visual experiences for all those attending NBOG.
As with every festival, there can be so much more to say. The eclectic mix of both professional and emerging artists, traditional arts and new media arts, made this year’s Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau among one of the most innovative and interactive Nuit Blanche festivals yet.
-Anna Paluch
Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau 2014
The Nuit Blanche festivals, which happen in various cities all over the world throughout the year, are amazing opportunities to see innovative artists and a chance to bring the art to the streets, rather than hiding it away in a gallery. The cities of Ottawa and Gatineau made sure that their Nuit Blanche (NBOG) was both interactive and eclectic, encouraging audiences to not only look at the works, but be a part of their process.
What is unique about NBOG 2014 is that a majority of the interactive works focused on technology and engineering as artistic mediums.
Artists Christine Kim and Marcin Kedzior collaborated to design “PAPER ORBS" which visitors had to take off an intricate structure in order to wear in various fashions, creating a fluidity of the form. Similarly, Ingrid Dabringer also emphasized fluidity of form in her work with “Invisible Landscapes”, altering the structure of the works’ environment with string and optical illusion.
On the technological side, two artists focused primarily on the use of social media; 6artists and Jennifer Stewart. The collective known as 6artists performed the making of a sculpture, but the only communication between themselves and the audience all night was through Twitter. Jennifer Stewart also encouraged NBOG guests to communicate with her, but only through Snapchat. Another fun, interactive project was Krasimira Dimtchevska's “Free Speech & Free Art" which gave NBOG audiences free USB sticks of digital works created by the artist, a ‘souvenir’ piece, just like PAPER ORBS.
Interactive projections also were featured heavily in this year’s festival, such as Cheryl Pagurek's “Bodies of Water” (which appeared in her “Navigate" piece for NBOG), Galerie Montcalm's “PASSAGE PIXELLISÉ II”, Bear Witness' “Sentinels" which guarded the entrance to the Ottawa Art Gallery, and Jesse Stewart's “Passage”, to create unforgettable audio-visual experiences for all those attending NBOG.
As with every festival, there can be so much more to say. The eclectic mix of both professional and emerging artists, traditional arts and new media arts, made this year’s Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau among one of the most innovative and interactive Nuit Blanche festivals yet.
-Anna Paluch

Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau 2014

The Nuit Blanche festivals, which happen in various cities all over the world throughout the year, are amazing opportunities to see innovative artists and a chance to bring the art to the streets, rather than hiding it away in a gallery. The cities of Ottawa and Gatineau made sure that their Nuit Blanche (NBOG) was both interactive and eclectic, encouraging audiences to not only look at the works, but be a part of their process.

What is unique about NBOG 2014 is that a majority of the interactive works focused on technology and engineering as artistic mediums.

Artists Christine Kim and Marcin Kedzior collaborated to design “PAPER ORBS" which visitors had to take off an intricate structure in order to wear in various fashions, creating a fluidity of the form. Similarly, Ingrid Dabringer also emphasized fluidity of form in her work with “Invisible Landscapes”, altering the structure of the works’ environment with string and optical illusion.

On the technological side, two artists focused primarily on the use of social media; 6artists and Jennifer Stewart. The collective known as 6artists performed the making of a sculpture, but the only communication between themselves and the audience all night was through Twitter. Jennifer Stewart also encouraged NBOG guests to communicate with her, but only through Snapchat. Another fun, interactive project was Krasimira Dimtchevska's “Free Speech & Free Art" which gave NBOG audiences free USB sticks of digital works created by the artist, a ‘souvenir’ piece, just like PAPER ORBS.

Interactive projections also were featured heavily in this year’s festival, such as Cheryl Pagurek's “Bodies of Water” (which appeared in her “Navigate" piece for NBOG), Galerie Montcalm's “PASSAGE PIXELLISÉ II”, Bear Witness' “Sentinels" which guarded the entrance to the Ottawa Art Gallery, and Jesse Stewart's “Passage”, to create unforgettable audio-visual experiences for all those attending NBOG.

As with every festival, there can be so much more to say. The eclectic mix of both professional and emerging artists, traditional arts and new media arts, made this year’s Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau among one of the most innovative and interactive Nuit Blanche festivals yet.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

5 Photos
/ anna paluch Christine Kim Marcin Kedzior nbog14 nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau 6artists Jennifer Stewart Cheryl Pagurek Galerie Montcalm Bear Witness Jesse Stewart Krasimira Dimtchevska interactive art technology performance Projection social media engineering art science art and science journal local art ottawa art
Cyber TraditionsContemporary Odawa artist Barry Ace works with tradition and technology, creating inter-connectivity between history, tradition, and innovation, using computer components to speak to both electronic and cultural connections specifically among the Anishinaabeg. The artists’ work incorporates the machine into the manmade; natural motifs share the artists’ space with digital materials to stimulate cultural and social connections in order to “map out a new Anishinaabeg cyber-territory”. The works of Ace, such as “Urban Bustle” (2013), “Bandolier” (2011), “Healing Dance 2” (2013) , “Nigik Makizinan – Otter Moccasins” (2014) and “Parallel Tasking” (2000) all incorporate culturally specific designs with that of found computer parts to create cross-cultural assemblages. Through the process of traditional craft, the artist is able to bring a tangible representation of digital imagery, and a contemporary aesthetic to floral motifs normally made with glass beads, which have been replaced with circuits, transistors, capacitors and resistors.
“Parallel Tasking” is a work comprising of a fully beaded vest with computer parts and a headdress representing the Great Lakes cultures. The computer parts on the back of the vest are juxtaposed with traditional beadwork on the front creating a metaphor, as the artist states, of “electronic paths that link us as Anishinaabeg in the urban landscape”. “Bandolier” also incorporates the traditional, and sacred, with a digital aesthetic, commenting on the tenacity of the Anishinaabeg of adapting “to rapid change while maintaining a distinct and unique sensibility, aesthetic and spirituality”. The digital age in fact, does not destroy tradition and culture, but allows for a new aesthetic. The heart of the work is still there, such as in the work “Urban Bustle”. A replica of a traditional Plains dance bustle worn by powwow dancers uses found objects, natural materials, a digital screen, glass beads, and electronic components, to name a few. What is specifically significant about this piece is that the screen portrays a black and white, silent archival film from the 1920’s (from Library and Archives Canada) of a powwow from Wikiwemikong on Manitoulin Island. There is a text attached to the work which reads “an unadulterated cultural expression on borrowed colonial media” which is a direct jab at the anthropological idea that those who still uphold traditional practices are somehow “tainted…unauthentic” when using technology. On the contrary, Barry Ace’s works prove there is no cultural erasure with technology. The only erasure referenced in any of these works, is in “Nigik Makizinan – Otter Moccasins” which reference traditional otter moccasins that had trail dusters attached to the heel to wipe away the wearers footprints. The artist’s contemporary take symbolises rather, the erasure of digital identity, bringing up issues of surveillance and the cyber trail we leave behind. The traditional in this work is used as a starting point to talk about contemporary issues. Finally, the work “Healing Dance 2” presents traditional medicinal plants and flowers with strong healing qualities, alongside energy retaining capacitors, showing correlation between two cultures. “Healing Dance 2” creates a bridge between traditional cultures and the digital one.
The artist’s work allows us to see beauty in the mechanical, and also think about cultural innovations; how we do not have to sacrifice our identity in order to be contemporary and innovative. Tradition and technology can coexist together, both helping the other to flourish in today’s digital age.
-Anna Paluch
Cyber TraditionsContemporary Odawa artist Barry Ace works with tradition and technology, creating inter-connectivity between history, tradition, and innovation, using computer components to speak to both electronic and cultural connections specifically among the Anishinaabeg. The artists’ work incorporates the machine into the manmade; natural motifs share the artists’ space with digital materials to stimulate cultural and social connections in order to “map out a new Anishinaabeg cyber-territory”. The works of Ace, such as “Urban Bustle” (2013), “Bandolier” (2011), “Healing Dance 2” (2013) , “Nigik Makizinan – Otter Moccasins” (2014) and “Parallel Tasking” (2000) all incorporate culturally specific designs with that of found computer parts to create cross-cultural assemblages. Through the process of traditional craft, the artist is able to bring a tangible representation of digital imagery, and a contemporary aesthetic to floral motifs normally made with glass beads, which have been replaced with circuits, transistors, capacitors and resistors.
“Parallel Tasking” is a work comprising of a fully beaded vest with computer parts and a headdress representing the Great Lakes cultures. The computer parts on the back of the vest are juxtaposed with traditional beadwork on the front creating a metaphor, as the artist states, of “electronic paths that link us as Anishinaabeg in the urban landscape”. “Bandolier” also incorporates the traditional, and sacred, with a digital aesthetic, commenting on the tenacity of the Anishinaabeg of adapting “to rapid change while maintaining a distinct and unique sensibility, aesthetic and spirituality”. The digital age in fact, does not destroy tradition and culture, but allows for a new aesthetic. The heart of the work is still there, such as in the work “Urban Bustle”. A replica of a traditional Plains dance bustle worn by powwow dancers uses found objects, natural materials, a digital screen, glass beads, and electronic components, to name a few. What is specifically significant about this piece is that the screen portrays a black and white, silent archival film from the 1920’s (from Library and Archives Canada) of a powwow from Wikiwemikong on Manitoulin Island. There is a text attached to the work which reads “an unadulterated cultural expression on borrowed colonial media” which is a direct jab at the anthropological idea that those who still uphold traditional practices are somehow “tainted…unauthentic” when using technology. On the contrary, Barry Ace’s works prove there is no cultural erasure with technology. The only erasure referenced in any of these works, is in “Nigik Makizinan – Otter Moccasins” which reference traditional otter moccasins that had trail dusters attached to the heel to wipe away the wearers footprints. The artist’s contemporary take symbolises rather, the erasure of digital identity, bringing up issues of surveillance and the cyber trail we leave behind. The traditional in this work is used as a starting point to talk about contemporary issues. Finally, the work “Healing Dance 2” presents traditional medicinal plants and flowers with strong healing qualities, alongside energy retaining capacitors, showing correlation between two cultures. “Healing Dance 2” creates a bridge between traditional cultures and the digital one.
The artist’s work allows us to see beauty in the mechanical, and also think about cultural innovations; how we do not have to sacrifice our identity in order to be contemporary and innovative. Tradition and technology can coexist together, both helping the other to flourish in today’s digital age.
-Anna Paluch
Cyber TraditionsContemporary Odawa artist Barry Ace works with tradition and technology, creating inter-connectivity between history, tradition, and innovation, using computer components to speak to both electronic and cultural connections specifically among the Anishinaabeg. The artists’ work incorporates the machine into the manmade; natural motifs share the artists’ space with digital materials to stimulate cultural and social connections in order to “map out a new Anishinaabeg cyber-territory”. The works of Ace, such as “Urban Bustle” (2013), “Bandolier” (2011), “Healing Dance 2” (2013) , “Nigik Makizinan – Otter Moccasins” (2014) and “Parallel Tasking” (2000) all incorporate culturally specific designs with that of found computer parts to create cross-cultural assemblages. Through the process of traditional craft, the artist is able to bring a tangible representation of digital imagery, and a contemporary aesthetic to floral motifs normally made with glass beads, which have been replaced with circuits, transistors, capacitors and resistors.
“Parallel Tasking” is a work comprising of a fully beaded vest with computer parts and a headdress representing the Great Lakes cultures. The computer parts on the back of the vest are juxtaposed with traditional beadwork on the front creating a metaphor, as the artist states, of “electronic paths that link us as Anishinaabeg in the urban landscape”. “Bandolier” also incorporates the traditional, and sacred, with a digital aesthetic, commenting on the tenacity of the Anishinaabeg of adapting “to rapid change while maintaining a distinct and unique sensibility, aesthetic and spirituality”. The digital age in fact, does not destroy tradition and culture, but allows for a new aesthetic. The heart of the work is still there, such as in the work “Urban Bustle”. A replica of a traditional Plains dance bustle worn by powwow dancers uses found objects, natural materials, a digital screen, glass beads, and electronic components, to name a few. What is specifically significant about this piece is that the screen portrays a black and white, silent archival film from the 1920’s (from Library and Archives Canada) of a powwow from Wikiwemikong on Manitoulin Island. There is a text attached to the work which reads “an unadulterated cultural expression on borrowed colonial media” which is a direct jab at the anthropological idea that those who still uphold traditional practices are somehow “tainted…unauthentic” when using technology. On the contrary, Barry Ace’s works prove there is no cultural erasure with technology. The only erasure referenced in any of these works, is in “Nigik Makizinan – Otter Moccasins” which reference traditional otter moccasins that had trail dusters attached to the heel to wipe away the wearers footprints. The artist’s contemporary take symbolises rather, the erasure of digital identity, bringing up issues of surveillance and the cyber trail we leave behind. The traditional in this work is used as a starting point to talk about contemporary issues. Finally, the work “Healing Dance 2” presents traditional medicinal plants and flowers with strong healing qualities, alongside energy retaining capacitors, showing correlation between two cultures. “Healing Dance 2” creates a bridge between traditional cultures and the digital one.
The artist’s work allows us to see beauty in the mechanical, and also think about cultural innovations; how we do not have to sacrifice our identity in order to be contemporary and innovative. Tradition and technology can coexist together, both helping the other to flourish in today’s digital age.
-Anna Paluch
Cyber TraditionsContemporary Odawa artist Barry Ace works with tradition and technology, creating inter-connectivity between history, tradition, and innovation, using computer components to speak to both electronic and cultural connections specifically among the Anishinaabeg. The artists’ work incorporates the machine into the manmade; natural motifs share the artists’ space with digital materials to stimulate cultural and social connections in order to “map out a new Anishinaabeg cyber-territory”. The works of Ace, such as “Urban Bustle” (2013), “Bandolier” (2011), “Healing Dance 2” (2013) , “Nigik Makizinan – Otter Moccasins” (2014) and “Parallel Tasking” (2000) all incorporate culturally specific designs with that of found computer parts to create cross-cultural assemblages. Through the process of traditional craft, the artist is able to bring a tangible representation of digital imagery, and a contemporary aesthetic to floral motifs normally made with glass beads, which have been replaced with circuits, transistors, capacitors and resistors.
“Parallel Tasking” is a work comprising of a fully beaded vest with computer parts and a headdress representing the Great Lakes cultures. The computer parts on the back of the vest are juxtaposed with traditional beadwork on the front creating a metaphor, as the artist states, of “electronic paths that link us as Anishinaabeg in the urban landscape”. “Bandolier” also incorporates the traditional, and sacred, with a digital aesthetic, commenting on the tenacity of the Anishinaabeg of adapting “to rapid change while maintaining a distinct and unique sensibility, aesthetic and spirituality”. The digital age in fact, does not destroy tradition and culture, but allows for a new aesthetic. The heart of the work is still there, such as in the work “Urban Bustle”. A replica of a traditional Plains dance bustle worn by powwow dancers uses found objects, natural materials, a digital screen, glass beads, and electronic components, to name a few. What is specifically significant about this piece is that the screen portrays a black and white, silent archival film from the 1920’s (from Library and Archives Canada) of a powwow from Wikiwemikong on Manitoulin Island. There is a text attached to the work which reads “an unadulterated cultural expression on borrowed colonial media” which is a direct jab at the anthropological idea that those who still uphold traditional practices are somehow “tainted…unauthentic” when using technology. On the contrary, Barry Ace’s works prove there is no cultural erasure with technology. The only erasure referenced in any of these works, is in “Nigik Makizinan – Otter Moccasins” which reference traditional otter moccasins that had trail dusters attached to the heel to wipe away the wearers footprints. The artist’s contemporary take symbolises rather, the erasure of digital identity, bringing up issues of surveillance and the cyber trail we leave behind. The traditional in this work is used as a starting point to talk about contemporary issues. Finally, the work “Healing Dance 2” presents traditional medicinal plants and flowers with strong healing qualities, alongside energy retaining capacitors, showing correlation between two cultures. “Healing Dance 2” creates a bridge between traditional cultures and the digital one.
The artist’s work allows us to see beauty in the mechanical, and also think about cultural innovations; how we do not have to sacrifice our identity in order to be contemporary and innovative. Tradition and technology can coexist together, both helping the other to flourish in today’s digital age.
-Anna Paluch
Cyber TraditionsContemporary Odawa artist Barry Ace works with tradition and technology, creating inter-connectivity between history, tradition, and innovation, using computer components to speak to both electronic and cultural connections specifically among the Anishinaabeg. The artists’ work incorporates the machine into the manmade; natural motifs share the artists’ space with digital materials to stimulate cultural and social connections in order to “map out a new Anishinaabeg cyber-territory”. The works of Ace, such as “Urban Bustle” (2013), “Bandolier” (2011), “Healing Dance 2” (2013) , “Nigik Makizinan – Otter Moccasins” (2014) and “Parallel Tasking” (2000) all incorporate culturally specific designs with that of found computer parts to create cross-cultural assemblages. Through the process of traditional craft, the artist is able to bring a tangible representation of digital imagery, and a contemporary aesthetic to floral motifs normally made with glass beads, which have been replaced with circuits, transistors, capacitors and resistors.
“Parallel Tasking” is a work comprising of a fully beaded vest with computer parts and a headdress representing the Great Lakes cultures. The computer parts on the back of the vest are juxtaposed with traditional beadwork on the front creating a metaphor, as the artist states, of “electronic paths that link us as Anishinaabeg in the urban landscape”. “Bandolier” also incorporates the traditional, and sacred, with a digital aesthetic, commenting on the tenacity of the Anishinaabeg of adapting “to rapid change while maintaining a distinct and unique sensibility, aesthetic and spirituality”. The digital age in fact, does not destroy tradition and culture, but allows for a new aesthetic. The heart of the work is still there, such as in the work “Urban Bustle”. A replica of a traditional Plains dance bustle worn by powwow dancers uses found objects, natural materials, a digital screen, glass beads, and electronic components, to name a few. What is specifically significant about this piece is that the screen portrays a black and white, silent archival film from the 1920’s (from Library and Archives Canada) of a powwow from Wikiwemikong on Manitoulin Island. There is a text attached to the work which reads “an unadulterated cultural expression on borrowed colonial media” which is a direct jab at the anthropological idea that those who still uphold traditional practices are somehow “tainted…unauthentic” when using technology. On the contrary, Barry Ace’s works prove there is no cultural erasure with technology. The only erasure referenced in any of these works, is in “Nigik Makizinan – Otter Moccasins” which reference traditional otter moccasins that had trail dusters attached to the heel to wipe away the wearers footprints. The artist’s contemporary take symbolises rather, the erasure of digital identity, bringing up issues of surveillance and the cyber trail we leave behind. The traditional in this work is used as a starting point to talk about contemporary issues. Finally, the work “Healing Dance 2” presents traditional medicinal plants and flowers with strong healing qualities, alongside energy retaining capacitors, showing correlation between two cultures. “Healing Dance 2” creates a bridge between traditional cultures and the digital one.
The artist’s work allows us to see beauty in the mechanical, and also think about cultural innovations; how we do not have to sacrifice our identity in order to be contemporary and innovative. Tradition and technology can coexist together, both helping the other to flourish in today’s digital age.
-Anna Paluch

Cyber Traditions

Contemporary Odawa artist 
Barry Ace works with tradition and technology, creating inter-connectivity between history, tradition, and innovation, using computer components to speak to both electronic and cultural connections specifically among the Anishinaabeg. The artists’ work incorporates the machine into the manmade; natural motifs share the artists’ space with digital materials to stimulate cultural and social connections in order to “map out a new Anishinaabeg cyber-territory”. 

The works of Ace, such as “Urban Bustle” (2013), “Bandolier” (2011), “Healing Dance 2” (2013) , “Nigik Makizinan – Otter Moccasins” (2014) and “Parallel Tasking” (2000) all incorporate culturally specific designs with that of found computer parts to create cross-cultural assemblages. Through the process of traditional craft, the artist is able to bring a tangible representation of digital imagery, and a contemporary aesthetic to floral motifs normally made with glass beads, which have been replaced with circuits, transistors, capacitors and resistors.

“Parallel Tasking” is a work comprising of a fully beaded vest with computer parts and a headdress representing the Great Lakes cultures. The computer parts on the back of the vest are juxtaposed with traditional beadwork on the front creating a metaphor, as the artist states, of “electronic paths that link us as Anishinaabeg in the urban landscape”. “Bandolier” also incorporates the traditional, and sacred, with a digital aesthetic, commenting on the tenacity of the Anishinaabeg of adapting “to rapid change while maintaining a distinct and unique sensibility, aesthetic and spirituality”. The digital age in fact, does not destroy tradition and culture, but allows for a new aesthetic. The heart of the work is still there, such as in the work “Urban Bustle”. A replica of a traditional Plains dance bustle worn by powwow dancers uses found objects, natural materials, a digital screen, glass beads, and electronic components, to name a few. What is specifically significant about this piece is that the screen portrays a black and white, silent archival film from the 1920’s (from Library and Archives Canada) of a powwow from Wikiwemikong on Manitoulin Island. There is a text attached to the work which reads “an unadulterated cultural expression on borrowed colonial media” which is a direct jab at the anthropological idea that those who still uphold traditional practices are somehow “tainted…unauthentic” when using technology. On the contrary, Barry Ace’s works prove there is no cultural erasure with technology. The only erasure referenced in any of these works, is in “Nigik Makizinan – Otter Moccasins” which reference traditional otter moccasins that had trail dusters attached to the heel to wipe away the wearers footprints. The artist’s contemporary take symbolises rather, the erasure of digital identity, bringing up issues of surveillance and the cyber trail we leave behind. The traditional in this work is used as a starting point to talk about contemporary issues. Finally, the work “Healing Dance 2” presents traditional medicinal plants and flowers with strong healing qualities, alongside energy retaining capacitors, showing correlation between two cultures. “Healing Dance 2” creates a bridge between traditional cultures and the digital one.

The artist’s work allows us to see beauty in the mechanical, and also think about cultural innovations; how we do not have to sacrifice our identity in order to be contemporary and innovative. Tradition and technology can coexist together, both helping the other to flourish in today’s digital age.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

5 Photos
/ Barry Ace anna paluch computer art aboriginal art indigenous art Odawa Anishnaabeg canadian artist beadwork electronics tradition new media art science art and science journal cultural history digital media
Witness by Troy Moth

The eerie and somewhat dystopian works of Troy Moth in his “Witness” photo series mimics a sort of dreamlike world, foggy and mysterious. The true meaning behind Moth’s work is far less fantastical; the artist’s photos depict a world post-oil spill, directly referencing the devastating impact of such an occurrence on Canadian soil.

The artists work is meant to be a sobering reminder of what could be lost. Moth constructs tableaus of scenes, in which he searches for the beauty among the devastation, hoping, as the artist states, “that the earth is stronger than we give her credit for, and more persistent”. 

This environmentally themed work should help create discussions amongst, not only the environmentally conscious, but also amongst all those who would be effected by such a tragedy. Is it possible to transport fuel without a possibility of devastating the environment? Will the consequences to our ecosystem be irreversible? Perhaps even, Moth’s work can help continue the discussion of the benefits in using more sustainable energies.

 Moth’s work is currently being exhibited at Ottawa’s Studio Sixty Six until October 5.

-Anna Paluch
Witness by Troy Moth

The eerie and somewhat dystopian works of Troy Moth in his “Witness” photo series mimics a sort of dreamlike world, foggy and mysterious. The true meaning behind Moth’s work is far less fantastical; the artist’s photos depict a world post-oil spill, directly referencing the devastating impact of such an occurrence on Canadian soil.

The artists work is meant to be a sobering reminder of what could be lost. Moth constructs tableaus of scenes, in which he searches for the beauty among the devastation, hoping, as the artist states, “that the earth is stronger than we give her credit for, and more persistent”. 

This environmentally themed work should help create discussions amongst, not only the environmentally conscious, but also amongst all those who would be effected by such a tragedy. Is it possible to transport fuel without a possibility of devastating the environment? Will the consequences to our ecosystem be irreversible? Perhaps even, Moth’s work can help continue the discussion of the benefits in using more sustainable energies.

 Moth’s work is currently being exhibited at Ottawa’s Studio Sixty Six until October 5.

-Anna Paluch
Witness by Troy Moth

The eerie and somewhat dystopian works of Troy Moth in his “Witness” photo series mimics a sort of dreamlike world, foggy and mysterious. The true meaning behind Moth’s work is far less fantastical; the artist’s photos depict a world post-oil spill, directly referencing the devastating impact of such an occurrence on Canadian soil.

The artists work is meant to be a sobering reminder of what could be lost. Moth constructs tableaus of scenes, in which he searches for the beauty among the devastation, hoping, as the artist states, “that the earth is stronger than we give her credit for, and more persistent”. 

This environmentally themed work should help create discussions amongst, not only the environmentally conscious, but also amongst all those who would be effected by such a tragedy. Is it possible to transport fuel without a possibility of devastating the environment? Will the consequences to our ecosystem be irreversible? Perhaps even, Moth’s work can help continue the discussion of the benefits in using more sustainable energies.

 Moth’s work is currently being exhibited at Ottawa’s Studio Sixty Six until October 5.

-Anna Paluch

Witness by Troy Moth

The eerie and somewhat dystopian works of Troy Moth in his “Witness” photo series mimics a sort of dreamlike world, foggy and mysterious. The true meaning behind Moth’s work is far less fantastical; the artist’s photos depict a world post-oil spill, directly referencing the devastating impact of such an occurrence on Canadian soil.

The artists work is meant to be a sobering reminder of what could be lost. Moth constructs tableaus of scenes, in which he searches for the beauty among the devastation, hoping, as the artist states, “that the earth is stronger than we give her credit for, and more persistent”.

This environmentally themed work should help create discussions amongst, not only the environmentally conscious, but also amongst all those who would be effected by such a tragedy. Is it possible to transport fuel without a possibility of devastating the environment? Will the consequences to our ecosystem be irreversible? Perhaps even, Moth’s work can help continue the discussion of the benefits in using more sustainable energies.

Moth’s work is currently being exhibited at Ottawa’s Studio Sixty Six until October 5.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ Troy Moth anna paluch studio sixty six ottawa environmental art political art art science art and science journal environment
Cartographic Assemblages
Maps help us find our way in the world (or make us even more lost), but the concept of a map can also be applied when trying to organize together memories, identity, narrative and materiality.
Artist Lindsey Dunnagan explores the mapping of memories and identity in her series Mapping the Intangible, while in Mapping New Worlds, the artist focuses on manipulating topography, hinting at familiar places, but distorted in a way that the familiar becomes alien.
The materiality of Dunnagan’s work in Mapping the Intangible is significant because the watercolour is mixed with salt, allowing unexpected patterns to form, as if creating city limits, but also transform over time as the salt dries and flakes off. The artist focuses on locations that are familiar and important to her memories and identity, yet unrecognizable to the viewer because the maps juxtapose on one another, creating “false connections”, rather serving, as the artist states, “as an atlas of memory that informs identity”. The same kind of atlas, albeit abstract, can be found in Mapping New Worlds but rather than focusing just on identity and memory, the pieces in this series focus on “concepts of city development, communication, and abstracted” landscape. Familiar images such as cities and roads are obstructed by rivers or clouds, creating an almost mythological narrative of the geography.
Similar to Dunnagan’s work, is that of Scott W. Bradford’s, but rather than mapping out specific locations which focus on geography, Bradford pieces together various elements which map out a narrative through materiality. The artist states that he links “the materiality of the surface to the drawing itself, either metaphorically or in terms of the narrative” in order to emphasize that it is constructed; his maps are fiction. In both his series’ Blueshift and Journey to Nowhere, stories are being told.
Each piece maps out its own narrative, but when the series is presented as a whole, the works become a collection of stories, mapping out an overall narrative of materiality.
-Anna Paluch
Cartographic Assemblages
Maps help us find our way in the world (or make us even more lost), but the concept of a map can also be applied when trying to organize together memories, identity, narrative and materiality.
Artist Lindsey Dunnagan explores the mapping of memories and identity in her series Mapping the Intangible, while in Mapping New Worlds, the artist focuses on manipulating topography, hinting at familiar places, but distorted in a way that the familiar becomes alien.
The materiality of Dunnagan’s work in Mapping the Intangible is significant because the watercolour is mixed with salt, allowing unexpected patterns to form, as if creating city limits, but also transform over time as the salt dries and flakes off. The artist focuses on locations that are familiar and important to her memories and identity, yet unrecognizable to the viewer because the maps juxtapose on one another, creating “false connections”, rather serving, as the artist states, “as an atlas of memory that informs identity”. The same kind of atlas, albeit abstract, can be found in Mapping New Worlds but rather than focusing just on identity and memory, the pieces in this series focus on “concepts of city development, communication, and abstracted” landscape. Familiar images such as cities and roads are obstructed by rivers or clouds, creating an almost mythological narrative of the geography.
Similar to Dunnagan’s work, is that of Scott W. Bradford’s, but rather than mapping out specific locations which focus on geography, Bradford pieces together various elements which map out a narrative through materiality. The artist states that he links “the materiality of the surface to the drawing itself, either metaphorically or in terms of the narrative” in order to emphasize that it is constructed; his maps are fiction. In both his series’ Blueshift and Journey to Nowhere, stories are being told.
Each piece maps out its own narrative, but when the series is presented as a whole, the works become a collection of stories, mapping out an overall narrative of materiality.
-Anna Paluch
Cartographic Assemblages
Maps help us find our way in the world (or make us even more lost), but the concept of a map can also be applied when trying to organize together memories, identity, narrative and materiality.
Artist Lindsey Dunnagan explores the mapping of memories and identity in her series Mapping the Intangible, while in Mapping New Worlds, the artist focuses on manipulating topography, hinting at familiar places, but distorted in a way that the familiar becomes alien.
The materiality of Dunnagan’s work in Mapping the Intangible is significant because the watercolour is mixed with salt, allowing unexpected patterns to form, as if creating city limits, but also transform over time as the salt dries and flakes off. The artist focuses on locations that are familiar and important to her memories and identity, yet unrecognizable to the viewer because the maps juxtapose on one another, creating “false connections”, rather serving, as the artist states, “as an atlas of memory that informs identity”. The same kind of atlas, albeit abstract, can be found in Mapping New Worlds but rather than focusing just on identity and memory, the pieces in this series focus on “concepts of city development, communication, and abstracted” landscape. Familiar images such as cities and roads are obstructed by rivers or clouds, creating an almost mythological narrative of the geography.
Similar to Dunnagan’s work, is that of Scott W. Bradford’s, but rather than mapping out specific locations which focus on geography, Bradford pieces together various elements which map out a narrative through materiality. The artist states that he links “the materiality of the surface to the drawing itself, either metaphorically or in terms of the narrative” in order to emphasize that it is constructed; his maps are fiction. In both his series’ Blueshift and Journey to Nowhere, stories are being told.
Each piece maps out its own narrative, but when the series is presented as a whole, the works become a collection of stories, mapping out an overall narrative of materiality.
-Anna Paluch
Cartographic Assemblages
Maps help us find our way in the world (or make us even more lost), but the concept of a map can also be applied when trying to organize together memories, identity, narrative and materiality.
Artist Lindsey Dunnagan explores the mapping of memories and identity in her series Mapping the Intangible, while in Mapping New Worlds, the artist focuses on manipulating topography, hinting at familiar places, but distorted in a way that the familiar becomes alien.
The materiality of Dunnagan’s work in Mapping the Intangible is significant because the watercolour is mixed with salt, allowing unexpected patterns to form, as if creating city limits, but also transform over time as the salt dries and flakes off. The artist focuses on locations that are familiar and important to her memories and identity, yet unrecognizable to the viewer because the maps juxtapose on one another, creating “false connections”, rather serving, as the artist states, “as an atlas of memory that informs identity”. The same kind of atlas, albeit abstract, can be found in Mapping New Worlds but rather than focusing just on identity and memory, the pieces in this series focus on “concepts of city development, communication, and abstracted” landscape. Familiar images such as cities and roads are obstructed by rivers or clouds, creating an almost mythological narrative of the geography.
Similar to Dunnagan’s work, is that of Scott W. Bradford’s, but rather than mapping out specific locations which focus on geography, Bradford pieces together various elements which map out a narrative through materiality. The artist states that he links “the materiality of the surface to the drawing itself, either metaphorically or in terms of the narrative” in order to emphasize that it is constructed; his maps are fiction. In both his series’ Blueshift and Journey to Nowhere, stories are being told.
Each piece maps out its own narrative, but when the series is presented as a whole, the works become a collection of stories, mapping out an overall narrative of materiality.
-Anna Paluch
Cartographic Assemblages
Maps help us find our way in the world (or make us even more lost), but the concept of a map can also be applied when trying to organize together memories, identity, narrative and materiality.
Artist Lindsey Dunnagan explores the mapping of memories and identity in her series Mapping the Intangible, while in Mapping New Worlds, the artist focuses on manipulating topography, hinting at familiar places, but distorted in a way that the familiar becomes alien.
The materiality of Dunnagan’s work in Mapping the Intangible is significant because the watercolour is mixed with salt, allowing unexpected patterns to form, as if creating city limits, but also transform over time as the salt dries and flakes off. The artist focuses on locations that are familiar and important to her memories and identity, yet unrecognizable to the viewer because the maps juxtapose on one another, creating “false connections”, rather serving, as the artist states, “as an atlas of memory that informs identity”. The same kind of atlas, albeit abstract, can be found in Mapping New Worlds but rather than focusing just on identity and memory, the pieces in this series focus on “concepts of city development, communication, and abstracted” landscape. Familiar images such as cities and roads are obstructed by rivers or clouds, creating an almost mythological narrative of the geography.
Similar to Dunnagan’s work, is that of Scott W. Bradford’s, but rather than mapping out specific locations which focus on geography, Bradford pieces together various elements which map out a narrative through materiality. The artist states that he links “the materiality of the surface to the drawing itself, either metaphorically or in terms of the narrative” in order to emphasize that it is constructed; his maps are fiction. In both his series’ Blueshift and Journey to Nowhere, stories are being told.
Each piece maps out its own narrative, but when the series is presented as a whole, the works become a collection of stories, mapping out an overall narrative of materiality.
-Anna Paluch
Cartographic Assemblages
Maps help us find our way in the world (or make us even more lost), but the concept of a map can also be applied when trying to organize together memories, identity, narrative and materiality.
Artist Lindsey Dunnagan explores the mapping of memories and identity in her series Mapping the Intangible, while in Mapping New Worlds, the artist focuses on manipulating topography, hinting at familiar places, but distorted in a way that the familiar becomes alien.
The materiality of Dunnagan’s work in Mapping the Intangible is significant because the watercolour is mixed with salt, allowing unexpected patterns to form, as if creating city limits, but also transform over time as the salt dries and flakes off. The artist focuses on locations that are familiar and important to her memories and identity, yet unrecognizable to the viewer because the maps juxtapose on one another, creating “false connections”, rather serving, as the artist states, “as an atlas of memory that informs identity”. The same kind of atlas, albeit abstract, can be found in Mapping New Worlds but rather than focusing just on identity and memory, the pieces in this series focus on “concepts of city development, communication, and abstracted” landscape. Familiar images such as cities and roads are obstructed by rivers or clouds, creating an almost mythological narrative of the geography.
Similar to Dunnagan’s work, is that of Scott W. Bradford’s, but rather than mapping out specific locations which focus on geography, Bradford pieces together various elements which map out a narrative through materiality. The artist states that he links “the materiality of the surface to the drawing itself, either metaphorically or in terms of the narrative” in order to emphasize that it is constructed; his maps are fiction. In both his series’ Blueshift and Journey to Nowhere, stories are being told.
Each piece maps out its own narrative, but when the series is presented as a whole, the works become a collection of stories, mapping out an overall narrative of materiality.
-Anna Paluch

Cartographic Assemblages

Maps help us find our way in the world (or make us even more lost), but the concept of a map can also be applied when trying to organize together memories, identity, narrative and materiality.

Artist Lindsey Dunnagan explores the mapping of memories and identity in her series Mapping the Intangible, while in Mapping New Worlds, the artist focuses on manipulating topography, hinting at familiar places, but distorted in a way that the familiar becomes alien.

The materiality of Dunnagan’s work in Mapping the Intangible is significant because the watercolour is mixed with salt, allowing unexpected patterns to form, as if creating city limits, but also transform over time as the salt dries and flakes off. The artist focuses on locations that are familiar and important to her memories and identity, yet unrecognizable to the viewer because the maps juxtapose on one another, creating “false connections”, rather serving, as the artist states, “as an atlas of memory that informs identity”. The same kind of atlas, albeit abstract, can be found in Mapping New Worlds but rather than focusing just on identity and memory, the pieces in this series focus on “concepts of city development, communication, and abstracted” landscape. Familiar images such as cities and roads are obstructed by rivers or clouds, creating an almost mythological narrative of the geography.

Similar to Dunnagan’s work, is that of Scott W. Bradford’s, but rather than mapping out specific locations which focus on geography, Bradford pieces together various elements which map out a narrative through materiality. The artist states that he links “the materiality of the surface to the drawing itself, either metaphorically or in terms of the narrative” in order to emphasize that it is constructed; his maps are fiction. In both his series’ Blueshift and Journey to Nowhere, stories are being told.

Each piece maps out its own narrative, but when the series is presented as a whole, the works become a collection of stories, mapping out an overall narrative of materiality.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

6 Photos
/ lindsey dunnagan scott w. bradford anna paluch cartography mapping topography geography landscape narrative materiality constructions blueprint painting art science science fiction art and science journal identiy memory ottawa art texas art
On the Farm, Under the Microscope
Microscopic images can tell us a lot about organisms too small to observe with the naked eye, but studying these organisms does not give us a true image of their form, as lenses and lighting can distort certain elements. Artist Carina Profir focuses on this alteration of specimen by emulating the mechanisms and process of the microscopy in her series On the Farm (2013).
The artist tackles the issue of altered image by photographing livestock, mimicking the microscopic ‘point-of-view’, and stitching together photographs to create an organic flow of multiple specimens. Livestock are very important to studies in microbiology. Most notably, in 1937, veterinarian Max Sterne created a vaccine for live spore anthrax among livestock, which greatly lowered the risk of humans inhaling the bacteria. The photo compositions of Profir are themselves a direct references to slides taken of the Bacillus anthracis microbe. 

By seeing the cows and sheep in a new perspective, it alters our perception of depth and size. The artist herself states, that the work provides a “glimpse into scientific imaging and the expansive duality of scientific truth and fiction”. One can begin to wonder how true microscopic organisms might actually look, without the distortions provided by microscopes. 
-Anna Paluch
On the Farm, Under the Microscope
Microscopic images can tell us a lot about organisms too small to observe with the naked eye, but studying these organisms does not give us a true image of their form, as lenses and lighting can distort certain elements. Artist Carina Profir focuses on this alteration of specimen by emulating the mechanisms and process of the microscopy in her series On the Farm (2013).
The artist tackles the issue of altered image by photographing livestock, mimicking the microscopic ‘point-of-view’, and stitching together photographs to create an organic flow of multiple specimens. Livestock are very important to studies in microbiology. Most notably, in 1937, veterinarian Max Sterne created a vaccine for live spore anthrax among livestock, which greatly lowered the risk of humans inhaling the bacteria. The photo compositions of Profir are themselves a direct references to slides taken of the Bacillus anthracis microbe. 

By seeing the cows and sheep in a new perspective, it alters our perception of depth and size. The artist herself states, that the work provides a “glimpse into scientific imaging and the expansive duality of scientific truth and fiction”. One can begin to wonder how true microscopic organisms might actually look, without the distortions provided by microscopes. 
-Anna Paluch
On the Farm, Under the Microscope
Microscopic images can tell us a lot about organisms too small to observe with the naked eye, but studying these organisms does not give us a true image of their form, as lenses and lighting can distort certain elements. Artist Carina Profir focuses on this alteration of specimen by emulating the mechanisms and process of the microscopy in her series On the Farm (2013).
The artist tackles the issue of altered image by photographing livestock, mimicking the microscopic ‘point-of-view’, and stitching together photographs to create an organic flow of multiple specimens. Livestock are very important to studies in microbiology. Most notably, in 1937, veterinarian Max Sterne created a vaccine for live spore anthrax among livestock, which greatly lowered the risk of humans inhaling the bacteria. The photo compositions of Profir are themselves a direct references to slides taken of the Bacillus anthracis microbe. 

By seeing the cows and sheep in a new perspective, it alters our perception of depth and size. The artist herself states, that the work provides a “glimpse into scientific imaging and the expansive duality of scientific truth and fiction”. One can begin to wonder how true microscopic organisms might actually look, without the distortions provided by microscopes. 
-Anna Paluch
On the Farm, Under the Microscope
Microscopic images can tell us a lot about organisms too small to observe with the naked eye, but studying these organisms does not give us a true image of their form, as lenses and lighting can distort certain elements. Artist Carina Profir focuses on this alteration of specimen by emulating the mechanisms and process of the microscopy in her series On the Farm (2013).
The artist tackles the issue of altered image by photographing livestock, mimicking the microscopic ‘point-of-view’, and stitching together photographs to create an organic flow of multiple specimens. Livestock are very important to studies in microbiology. Most notably, in 1937, veterinarian Max Sterne created a vaccine for live spore anthrax among livestock, which greatly lowered the risk of humans inhaling the bacteria. The photo compositions of Profir are themselves a direct references to slides taken of the Bacillus anthracis microbe. 

By seeing the cows and sheep in a new perspective, it alters our perception of depth and size. The artist herself states, that the work provides a “glimpse into scientific imaging and the expansive duality of scientific truth and fiction”. One can begin to wonder how true microscopic organisms might actually look, without the distortions provided by microscopes. 
-Anna Paluch

On the Farm, Under the Microscope

Microscopic images can tell us a lot about organisms too small to observe with the naked eye, but studying these organisms does not give us a true image of their form, as lenses and lighting can distort certain elements. Artist Carina Profir focuses on this alteration of specimen by emulating the mechanisms and process of the microscopy in her series On the Farm (2013).

The artist tackles the issue of altered image by photographing livestock, mimicking the microscopic ‘point-of-view’, and stitching together photographs to create an organic flow of multiple specimens. Livestock are very important to studies in microbiology. Most notably, in 1937, veterinarian Max Sterne created a vaccine for live spore anthrax among livestock, which greatly lowered the risk of humans inhaling the bacteria. The photo compositions of Profir are themselves a direct references to slides taken of the Bacillus anthracis microbe.

By seeing the cows and sheep in a new perspective, it alters our perception of depth and size. The artist herself states, that the work provides a “glimpse into scientific imaging and the expansive duality of scientific truth and fiction”. One can begin to wonder how true microscopic organisms might actually look, without the distortions provided by microscopes. 

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ Carina Profir anna paluch Microscopy microbiology microscopic photography bacillus anthracis livestock Max Sterne Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Ottawa School of Art ottawa art scene ottawa art ottawa artists art science art and science journal farm
Personal Planets
When exploring the known universe, some might wonder what new planets we may discover, occupied or uninhabited. Two artists however, Wouter van Buuren and Zainab Hussain have created landscape photographs that turn our own cities into planets, with a Little Prince-esque aesthetic.
The planet-like compositions of van Buuren look like Super Mario Galaxy levels come to life, combining all visible forms into a perfect spherical shape. What was once the downtown core of one city (such as Weert or Shanghai) now becomes its own planet. This composition connotes ideas of our homes being the centre of the universe, where, like the Little Prince, these constructed worlds become our little asteroid or planet on which we live and experience.
Zainab Hussain however, creates more specific planets, such as “West Chapters Planet” (2012), which, according to the artist’s statement, explores “the strip mall environment in suburban areas and our relationship with it”. The artist also plays with the idea of these little worlds, being “first worlds”, existing only to provide convenience. Moving from van Buuren’s urban planets, into Hussain’s suburban planets, the mapping of cities and outlying areas plays on the ideas of comfort and convenience, engulfing us. Apart from planets, the artist has also created holes, inverse images of her planets, acting like voids which suck in all that surrounds them, such as “South Cineplex Hole” (2012). Now, what used to be 360 degrees of familiar comfort becomes 360 degrees of overwhelming commodity.
-Anna Paluch
Personal Planets
When exploring the known universe, some might wonder what new planets we may discover, occupied or uninhabited. Two artists however, Wouter van Buuren and Zainab Hussain have created landscape photographs that turn our own cities into planets, with a Little Prince-esque aesthetic.
The planet-like compositions of van Buuren look like Super Mario Galaxy levels come to life, combining all visible forms into a perfect spherical shape. What was once the downtown core of one city (such as Weert or Shanghai) now becomes its own planet. This composition connotes ideas of our homes being the centre of the universe, where, like the Little Prince, these constructed worlds become our little asteroid or planet on which we live and experience.
Zainab Hussain however, creates more specific planets, such as “West Chapters Planet” (2012), which, according to the artist’s statement, explores “the strip mall environment in suburban areas and our relationship with it”. The artist also plays with the idea of these little worlds, being “first worlds”, existing only to provide convenience. Moving from van Buuren’s urban planets, into Hussain’s suburban planets, the mapping of cities and outlying areas plays on the ideas of comfort and convenience, engulfing us. Apart from planets, the artist has also created holes, inverse images of her planets, acting like voids which suck in all that surrounds them, such as “South Cineplex Hole” (2012). Now, what used to be 360 degrees of familiar comfort becomes 360 degrees of overwhelming commodity.
-Anna Paluch
Personal Planets
When exploring the known universe, some might wonder what new planets we may discover, occupied or uninhabited. Two artists however, Wouter van Buuren and Zainab Hussain have created landscape photographs that turn our own cities into planets, with a Little Prince-esque aesthetic.
The planet-like compositions of van Buuren look like Super Mario Galaxy levels come to life, combining all visible forms into a perfect spherical shape. What was once the downtown core of one city (such as Weert or Shanghai) now becomes its own planet. This composition connotes ideas of our homes being the centre of the universe, where, like the Little Prince, these constructed worlds become our little asteroid or planet on which we live and experience.
Zainab Hussain however, creates more specific planets, such as “West Chapters Planet” (2012), which, according to the artist’s statement, explores “the strip mall environment in suburban areas and our relationship with it”. The artist also plays with the idea of these little worlds, being “first worlds”, existing only to provide convenience. Moving from van Buuren’s urban planets, into Hussain’s suburban planets, the mapping of cities and outlying areas plays on the ideas of comfort and convenience, engulfing us. Apart from planets, the artist has also created holes, inverse images of her planets, acting like voids which suck in all that surrounds them, such as “South Cineplex Hole” (2012). Now, what used to be 360 degrees of familiar comfort becomes 360 degrees of overwhelming commodity.
-Anna Paluch
Personal Planets
When exploring the known universe, some might wonder what new planets we may discover, occupied or uninhabited. Two artists however, Wouter van Buuren and Zainab Hussain have created landscape photographs that turn our own cities into planets, with a Little Prince-esque aesthetic.
The planet-like compositions of van Buuren look like Super Mario Galaxy levels come to life, combining all visible forms into a perfect spherical shape. What was once the downtown core of one city (such as Weert or Shanghai) now becomes its own planet. This composition connotes ideas of our homes being the centre of the universe, where, like the Little Prince, these constructed worlds become our little asteroid or planet on which we live and experience.
Zainab Hussain however, creates more specific planets, such as “West Chapters Planet” (2012), which, according to the artist’s statement, explores “the strip mall environment in suburban areas and our relationship with it”. The artist also plays with the idea of these little worlds, being “first worlds”, existing only to provide convenience. Moving from van Buuren’s urban planets, into Hussain’s suburban planets, the mapping of cities and outlying areas plays on the ideas of comfort and convenience, engulfing us. Apart from planets, the artist has also created holes, inverse images of her planets, acting like voids which suck in all that surrounds them, such as “South Cineplex Hole” (2012). Now, what used to be 360 degrees of familiar comfort becomes 360 degrees of overwhelming commodity.
-Anna Paluch

Personal Planets

When exploring the known universe, some might wonder what new planets we may discover, occupied or uninhabited. Two artists however, Wouter van Buuren and Zainab Hussain have created landscape photographs that turn our own cities into planets, with a Little Prince-esque aesthetic.

The planet-like compositions of van Buuren look like Super Mario Galaxy levels come to life, combining all visible forms into a perfect spherical shape. What was once the downtown core of one city (such as Weert or Shanghai) now becomes its own planet. This composition connotes ideas of our homes being the centre of the universe, where, like the Little Prince, these constructed worlds become our little asteroid or planet on which we live and experience.

Zainab Hussain however, creates more specific planets, such as “West Chapters Planet” (2012), which, according to the artist’s statement, explores “the strip mall environment in suburban areas and our relationship with it”. The artist also plays with the idea of these little worlds, being “first worlds”, existing only to provide convenience. Moving from van Buuren’s urban planets, into Hussain’s suburban planets, the mapping of cities and outlying areas plays on the ideas of comfort and convenience, engulfing us. Apart from planets, the artist has also created holes, inverse images of her planets, acting like voids which suck in all that surrounds them, such as “South Cineplex Hole” (2012). Now, what used to be 360 degrees of familiar comfort becomes 360 degrees of overwhelming commodity.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ anna paluch zainab hussain wouter van buuren photography landscape landscape photography planets optical illusion art science art and science journal
Landscape Photomontage
Photographing landscapes should not be limited to a simple point and click. There are many different capturing and editing techniques that artists, such as Matt Wisniewski, Keira Gruttner, and Fong Qi Wei, use in order to capture their surroundings through their unique perspectives and digital tools.
Matt Wisniewski is a collage artist based in New York who takes fashion photographs and manipulates them to fit into a specific geological element or landscape photograph. His “Landscape” Series turns mountain ranges into heads atop human shoulders, or trees on a hillside into cascading hair. His other series’ “Mineral Minds” and “My Home is the Sea” combine minerals and stones, and crashing waves (respectfully) with the models, acting as either extensions of their anatomy or wardrobe. His work is both landscape and portrait photography in one.
Keira Gruttner also uses collage to combine elements of landscape, but unlike Matt Wisniewski, Gruttner specifically focuses on nature. The artist states that her upbringing on the East Coast of Canada inspired her to create her collages. Her work is more tactile than other digital collages, as she first prints her landscapes and then carefully selects elements from each and assembles the pieces together, like a puzzle. She often repeats the process again through scanning the first collage, to then print and prepare for the final collage.
The work of Fong Qi Wei, “Time is a Dimension”, is also puzzle-like, connecting different time-periods of the day with urban skylines to show the daily changes in our atmosphere. In one picture, we are able to see both morning and evening, as if the two were always ongoing at the same time. The artist’s work plays with time and dimension, where the photograph is not only capturing one moment in time, but many times in, what is presented as, one moment. 
Each of these artists plays with our perceptions in terms of how we remember our surroundings and especially our relationship with the landscapes around us. Their works are refreshing examples of the new techniques in landscape photography.
-Anna Paluch
Landscape Photomontage
Photographing landscapes should not be limited to a simple point and click. There are many different capturing and editing techniques that artists, such as Matt Wisniewski, Keira Gruttner, and Fong Qi Wei, use in order to capture their surroundings through their unique perspectives and digital tools.
Matt Wisniewski is a collage artist based in New York who takes fashion photographs and manipulates them to fit into a specific geological element or landscape photograph. His “Landscape” Series turns mountain ranges into heads atop human shoulders, or trees on a hillside into cascading hair. His other series’ “Mineral Minds” and “My Home is the Sea” combine minerals and stones, and crashing waves (respectfully) with the models, acting as either extensions of their anatomy or wardrobe. His work is both landscape and portrait photography in one.
Keira Gruttner also uses collage to combine elements of landscape, but unlike Matt Wisniewski, Gruttner specifically focuses on nature. The artist states that her upbringing on the East Coast of Canada inspired her to create her collages. Her work is more tactile than other digital collages, as she first prints her landscapes and then carefully selects elements from each and assembles the pieces together, like a puzzle. She often repeats the process again through scanning the first collage, to then print and prepare for the final collage.
The work of Fong Qi Wei, “Time is a Dimension”, is also puzzle-like, connecting different time-periods of the day with urban skylines to show the daily changes in our atmosphere. In one picture, we are able to see both morning and evening, as if the two were always ongoing at the same time. The artist’s work plays with time and dimension, where the photograph is not only capturing one moment in time, but many times in, what is presented as, one moment. 
Each of these artists plays with our perceptions in terms of how we remember our surroundings and especially our relationship with the landscapes around us. Their works are refreshing examples of the new techniques in landscape photography.
-Anna Paluch
Landscape Photomontage
Photographing landscapes should not be limited to a simple point and click. There are many different capturing and editing techniques that artists, such as Matt Wisniewski, Keira Gruttner, and Fong Qi Wei, use in order to capture their surroundings through their unique perspectives and digital tools.
Matt Wisniewski is a collage artist based in New York who takes fashion photographs and manipulates them to fit into a specific geological element or landscape photograph. His “Landscape” Series turns mountain ranges into heads atop human shoulders, or trees on a hillside into cascading hair. His other series’ “Mineral Minds” and “My Home is the Sea” combine minerals and stones, and crashing waves (respectfully) with the models, acting as either extensions of their anatomy or wardrobe. His work is both landscape and portrait photography in one.
Keira Gruttner also uses collage to combine elements of landscape, but unlike Matt Wisniewski, Gruttner specifically focuses on nature. The artist states that her upbringing on the East Coast of Canada inspired her to create her collages. Her work is more tactile than other digital collages, as she first prints her landscapes and then carefully selects elements from each and assembles the pieces together, like a puzzle. She often repeats the process again through scanning the first collage, to then print and prepare for the final collage.
The work of Fong Qi Wei, “Time is a Dimension”, is also puzzle-like, connecting different time-periods of the day with urban skylines to show the daily changes in our atmosphere. In one picture, we are able to see both morning and evening, as if the two were always ongoing at the same time. The artist’s work plays with time and dimension, where the photograph is not only capturing one moment in time, but many times in, what is presented as, one moment. 
Each of these artists plays with our perceptions in terms of how we remember our surroundings and especially our relationship with the landscapes around us. Their works are refreshing examples of the new techniques in landscape photography.
-Anna Paluch
Landscape Photomontage
Photographing landscapes should not be limited to a simple point and click. There are many different capturing and editing techniques that artists, such as Matt Wisniewski, Keira Gruttner, and Fong Qi Wei, use in order to capture their surroundings through their unique perspectives and digital tools.
Matt Wisniewski is a collage artist based in New York who takes fashion photographs and manipulates them to fit into a specific geological element or landscape photograph. His “Landscape” Series turns mountain ranges into heads atop human shoulders, or trees on a hillside into cascading hair. His other series’ “Mineral Minds” and “My Home is the Sea” combine minerals and stones, and crashing waves (respectfully) with the models, acting as either extensions of their anatomy or wardrobe. His work is both landscape and portrait photography in one.
Keira Gruttner also uses collage to combine elements of landscape, but unlike Matt Wisniewski, Gruttner specifically focuses on nature. The artist states that her upbringing on the East Coast of Canada inspired her to create her collages. Her work is more tactile than other digital collages, as she first prints her landscapes and then carefully selects elements from each and assembles the pieces together, like a puzzle. She often repeats the process again through scanning the first collage, to then print and prepare for the final collage.
The work of Fong Qi Wei, “Time is a Dimension”, is also puzzle-like, connecting different time-periods of the day with urban skylines to show the daily changes in our atmosphere. In one picture, we are able to see both morning and evening, as if the two were always ongoing at the same time. The artist’s work plays with time and dimension, where the photograph is not only capturing one moment in time, but many times in, what is presented as, one moment. 
Each of these artists plays with our perceptions in terms of how we remember our surroundings and especially our relationship with the landscapes around us. Their works are refreshing examples of the new techniques in landscape photography.
-Anna Paluch

Landscape Photomontage


Photographing landscapes should not be limited to a simple point and click. There are many different capturing and editing techniques that artists, such as Matt Wisniewski, Keira Gruttner, and Fong Qi Wei, use in order to capture their surroundings through their unique perspectives and digital tools.

Matt Wisniewski is a collage artist based in New York who takes fashion photographs and manipulates them to fit into a specific geological element or landscape photograph. His “Landscape” Series turns mountain ranges into heads atop human shoulders, or trees on a hillside into cascading hair. His other series’ “Mineral Minds” and “My Home is the Sea” combine minerals and stones, and crashing waves (respectfully) with the models, acting as either extensions of their anatomy or wardrobe. His work is both landscape and portrait photography in one.

Keira Gruttner also uses collage to combine elements of landscape, but unlike Matt Wisniewski, Gruttner specifically focuses on nature. The artist states that her upbringing on the East Coast of Canada inspired her to create her collages. Her work is more tactile than other digital collages, as she first prints her landscapes and then carefully selects elements from each and assembles the pieces together, like a puzzle. She often repeats the process again through scanning the first collage, to then print and prepare for the final collage.

The work of Fong Qi Wei, “Time is a Dimension”, is also puzzle-like, connecting different time-periods of the day with urban skylines to show the daily changes in our atmosphere. In one picture, we are able to see both morning and evening, as if the two were always ongoing at the same time. The artist’s work plays with time and dimension, where the photograph is not only capturing one moment in time, but many times in, what is presented as, one moment. 

Each of these artists plays with our perceptions in terms of how we remember our surroundings and especially our relationship with the landscapes around us. Their works are refreshing examples of the new techniques in landscape photography.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ anna paluch keira gruttner fong qi wei matt wisniewski photography digital photography collage nature landscape art science anatomy art and science journal photomontage

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