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Penelope Umbrico’s ‘Suns from Flickr’

Upon searching the word ‘sunsets’ on flickr Penelope Umbrico discovered more than half a million photos of sunsets that had been shared by people from all around the world. Selecting a few hundred from this vast collection she created the ‘suns from Flickr’ installation in which the selected photos were placed side-by-side forming a huge wall of suns.

What I find most interesting about this piece are the questions it raises about technology as an artefact and our use of it (in all its varying forms) for the representation of natural phenomena. The sun in all its ubiquity has and continues to be photographed via the many different types of photograph technology; many of these photographs are then shared on the internet on websites like flickr, facebook and of course tumblr. Umbrico, whether intentionally or inadvertedly, lays emphasis on the underlying veneer of irony that characterises nature photography. Photography as a medium of artistic expression has indeed impressed upon us many of the often-fleeting splendours of the natural world, splendours that are sufficiently ephemeral to render the capturing of them in time, through photography, more of a worthwhile pursuit. The sun however is and will, to the best of my scientific knowledge, always be here – the giver of life and warmth so completely eternal, it begs the question: why are there so many photos of it?

‘Suns from Flickr’ is currently on display as part of the ‘Landmark: the Fields of Photography’ exhibition now on at Somerset House in London: http://www.somersethouse.org.uk/about/press/press-releases/landmark-the-fields-of-photography

 - Adrian Deen

Penelope Umbrico’s ‘Suns from Flickr’

Upon searching the word ‘sunsets’ on flickr Penelope Umbrico discovered more than half a million photos of sunsets that had been shared by people from all around the world. Selecting a few hundred from this vast collection she created the ‘suns from Flickr’ installation in which the selected photos were placed side-by-side forming a huge wall of suns.

What I find most interesting about this piece are the questions it raises about technology as an artefact and our use of it (in all its varying forms) for the representation of natural phenomena. The sun in all its ubiquity has and continues to be photographed via the many different types of photograph technology; many of these photographs are then shared on the internet on websites like flickr, facebook and of course tumblr. Umbrico, whether intentionally or inadvertedly, lays emphasis on the underlying veneer of irony that characterises nature photography. Photography as a medium of artistic expression has indeed impressed upon us many of the often-fleeting splendours of the natural world, splendours that are sufficiently ephemeral to render the capturing of them in time, through photography, more of a worthwhile pursuit. The sun however is and will, to the best of my scientific knowledge, always be here – the giver of life and warmth so completely eternal, it begs the question: why are there so many photos of it?

‘Suns from Flickr’ is currently on display as part of the ‘Landmark: the Fields of Photography’ exhibition now on at Somerset House in London: http://www.somersethouse.org.uk/about/press/press-releases/landmark-the-fields-of-photography

 - Adrian Deen

art science adrian deen penelope umbrico suns flickr photography
Chris Drury
 What’s quite interesting about Chris Drury’s work is how there appears to be an underlying paradoxical message in some of his pieces. In ‘Mushroom Cloud’ for example, acrylic-coated mushrooms joined together by nylon thread are suspended between a steel frame to form the shape of a mushroom cloud. The irony lay in the fact that mushrooms are symbolic of the cyclical nature of the natural world; as types of fungi they can mark the onset of death through the decomposition of matter in the soil, and it is by the organic products of this decay, that plant life springs forth. Mushroom clouds on the other hand – the resulting atmospheric effects of nuclear explosions, illustrate the part that humans have played throughout the course of history in causing death. Drury dangles this metaphor before us provoking thought in our humanitarian and ecological consciences.
 ‘Hand on Heart’, in which a bloody fingerprint is superimposed on an echocardiogram is a very literal depiction of the symbiosis that exists between the rhythms of the heart and the product of its pumping, each being the consequence and elicitor of the other.
 Chris Drury’s work is captivating, as each piece feels very familiar, the audience is continually reminded of things they’ve seen in fields, forests and even hospitals, thus emphasizing how loud artwork with scientific underpinnings can resonate.
 Chris Drury’s work can be found on his website here: http://chrisdrury.co.uk/
 - Adrian Deen
Chris Drury
 What’s quite interesting about Chris Drury’s work is how there appears to be an underlying paradoxical message in some of his pieces. In ‘Mushroom Cloud’ for example, acrylic-coated mushrooms joined together by nylon thread are suspended between a steel frame to form the shape of a mushroom cloud. The irony lay in the fact that mushrooms are symbolic of the cyclical nature of the natural world; as types of fungi they can mark the onset of death through the decomposition of matter in the soil, and it is by the organic products of this decay, that plant life springs forth. Mushroom clouds on the other hand – the resulting atmospheric effects of nuclear explosions, illustrate the part that humans have played throughout the course of history in causing death. Drury dangles this metaphor before us provoking thought in our humanitarian and ecological consciences.
 ‘Hand on Heart’, in which a bloody fingerprint is superimposed on an echocardiogram is a very literal depiction of the symbiosis that exists between the rhythms of the heart and the product of its pumping, each being the consequence and elicitor of the other.
 Chris Drury’s work is captivating, as each piece feels very familiar, the audience is continually reminded of things they’ve seen in fields, forests and even hospitals, thus emphasizing how loud artwork with scientific underpinnings can resonate.
 Chris Drury’s work can be found on his website here: http://chrisdrury.co.uk/
 - Adrian Deen
Chris Drury
 What’s quite interesting about Chris Drury’s work is how there appears to be an underlying paradoxical message in some of his pieces. In ‘Mushroom Cloud’ for example, acrylic-coated mushrooms joined together by nylon thread are suspended between a steel frame to form the shape of a mushroom cloud. The irony lay in the fact that mushrooms are symbolic of the cyclical nature of the natural world; as types of fungi they can mark the onset of death through the decomposition of matter in the soil, and it is by the organic products of this decay, that plant life springs forth. Mushroom clouds on the other hand – the resulting atmospheric effects of nuclear explosions, illustrate the part that humans have played throughout the course of history in causing death. Drury dangles this metaphor before us provoking thought in our humanitarian and ecological consciences.
 ‘Hand on Heart’, in which a bloody fingerprint is superimposed on an echocardiogram is a very literal depiction of the symbiosis that exists between the rhythms of the heart and the product of its pumping, each being the consequence and elicitor of the other.
 Chris Drury’s work is captivating, as each piece feels very familiar, the audience is continually reminded of things they’ve seen in fields, forests and even hospitals, thus emphasizing how loud artwork with scientific underpinnings can resonate.
 Chris Drury’s work can be found on his website here: http://chrisdrury.co.uk/
 - Adrian Deen
Chris Drury
 What’s quite interesting about Chris Drury’s work is how there appears to be an underlying paradoxical message in some of his pieces. In ‘Mushroom Cloud’ for example, acrylic-coated mushrooms joined together by nylon thread are suspended between a steel frame to form the shape of a mushroom cloud. The irony lay in the fact that mushrooms are symbolic of the cyclical nature of the natural world; as types of fungi they can mark the onset of death through the decomposition of matter in the soil, and it is by the organic products of this decay, that plant life springs forth. Mushroom clouds on the other hand – the resulting atmospheric effects of nuclear explosions, illustrate the part that humans have played throughout the course of history in causing death. Drury dangles this metaphor before us provoking thought in our humanitarian and ecological consciences.
 ‘Hand on Heart’, in which a bloody fingerprint is superimposed on an echocardiogram is a very literal depiction of the symbiosis that exists between the rhythms of the heart and the product of its pumping, each being the consequence and elicitor of the other.
 Chris Drury’s work is captivating, as each piece feels very familiar, the audience is continually reminded of things they’ve seen in fields, forests and even hospitals, thus emphasizing how loud artwork with scientific underpinnings can resonate.
 Chris Drury’s work can be found on his website here: http://chrisdrury.co.uk/
 - Adrian Deen

Chris Drury

 What’s quite interesting about Chris Drury’s work is how there appears to be an underlying paradoxical message in some of his pieces. In ‘Mushroom Cloud’ for example, acrylic-coated mushrooms joined together by nylon thread are suspended between a steel frame to form the shape of a mushroom cloud. The irony lay in the fact that mushrooms are symbolic of the cyclical nature of the natural world; as types of fungi they can mark the onset of death through the decomposition of matter in the soil, and it is by the organic products of this decay, that plant life springs forth. Mushroom clouds on the other hand – the resulting atmospheric effects of nuclear explosions, illustrate the part that humans have played throughout the course of history in causing death. Drury dangles this metaphor before us provoking thought in our humanitarian and ecological consciences.

 ‘Hand on Heart’, in which a bloody fingerprint is superimposed on an echocardiogram is a very literal depiction of the symbiosis that exists between the rhythms of the heart and the product of its pumping, each being the consequence and elicitor of the other.

 Chris Drury’s work is captivating, as each piece feels very familiar, the audience is continually reminded of things they’ve seen in fields, forests and even hospitals, thus emphasizing how loud artwork with scientific underpinnings can resonate.

 Chris Drury’s work can be found on his website here: http://chrisdrury.co.uk/

 - Adrian Deen

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ art science adrian deen chris drury mushrooms heart fingerprints
Twenty Three Pairs by Andrea Duncan 
Andrea Duncan spots the aesthetic and the more significantly idiosyncratic parallels between the 23 pairs of chromosomes in humans and pairs of old socks. Whilst a resident at King’s College Hospital in London she was struck by the differences in terminology used to explain the same medical conditions by doctors and patients alike. With this digital print, Andrea shows that the insularity of the scientific community with its complex terms explaining complex phenomenon can, in the right hands, be reduced to the simplest most palatable of mediums.

23 pairs of chromosomes each composed of entwined strands of DNA, portions of proteins and other bits of biological matter; each unique, each ‘tailored’ to meet the needs of the individual who possesses them. 23 pairs of worn socks replete with stray strands of hair, moisture from sweat and dustings of dead skin, each crumple and dent the result of the specifications of the life of the individual who has worn them.

- Adrian Deen
Sense by Annie Cattrell 
The five senses become personified as they sit majestically, suspended in glass cubes mounted on white plinths. Unassuming at first glance, a closer inspection reveals the true magnificence of the neurological functions they represent. Formed by magnetic resonance imaging of a subject’s brain as they experience each of the senses - Annie’ Cattrell’s glasswork is truly spectacular and especially significant in art-science progression. For her use of scientific methods and processes to artistically interpret scientific ideas assists in weakening the wall that separates the two disciplines.

Annie’s work is driven by the notion of ‘contemplating something you think you know but shouldn’t really be seeing that way’, an approach that is in many ways fundamentally scientific. For our curiosity in the bits of matter that make up our universe and the genes that code for the colours of the numerous follicles of hair on each of our heads is continuously stretched and expanded by new technologies that allow us to see the answers to these questions in ways we would never have expected. Her piece brings to the foreground an expression of a basal facet of our anatomical functionality (touching, smelling, tasting, hearing and seeing) that in the involuntary operations of our day-to-day we do not even consider. 

‘The elegant simplicity of the sculptures belies the complexity of the technology required to make them’ - indeed the expertise involved in converting the FMRI images into 3-dimensional amber resin structures is elaborate but more intricate even are the manoeuvres of the brain of which they are from. For here therein lays the crux of an art-science dialogue; art with its endless vocabulary is able to make the convolutions and complexities of science more available and accessible, grasping the attention of a wider audience than science otherwise would.

Annie Cattrell’s piece can be found as part of the ‘Medicine Now’ exhibition in the Wellcome Collection, London http://www.wellcomecollection.org/whats-on/exhibitions/medicine-now.aspx

- Adrian Deen
Sense by Annie Cattrell 
The five senses become personified as they sit majestically, suspended in glass cubes mounted on white plinths. Unassuming at first glance, a closer inspection reveals the true magnificence of the neurological functions they represent. Formed by magnetic resonance imaging of a subject’s brain as they experience each of the senses - Annie’ Cattrell’s glasswork is truly spectacular and especially significant in art-science progression. For her use of scientific methods and processes to artistically interpret scientific ideas assists in weakening the wall that separates the two disciplines.

Annie’s work is driven by the notion of ‘contemplating something you think you know but shouldn’t really be seeing that way’, an approach that is in many ways fundamentally scientific. For our curiosity in the bits of matter that make up our universe and the genes that code for the colours of the numerous follicles of hair on each of our heads is continuously stretched and expanded by new technologies that allow us to see the answers to these questions in ways we would never have expected. Her piece brings to the foreground an expression of a basal facet of our anatomical functionality (touching, smelling, tasting, hearing and seeing) that in the involuntary operations of our day-to-day we do not even consider. 

‘The elegant simplicity of the sculptures belies the complexity of the technology required to make them’ - indeed the expertise involved in converting the FMRI images into 3-dimensional amber resin structures is elaborate but more intricate even are the manoeuvres of the brain of which they are from. For here therein lays the crux of an art-science dialogue; art with its endless vocabulary is able to make the convolutions and complexities of science more available and accessible, grasping the attention of a wider audience than science otherwise would.

Annie Cattrell’s piece can be found as part of the ‘Medicine Now’ exhibition in the Wellcome Collection, London http://www.wellcomecollection.org/whats-on/exhibitions/medicine-now.aspx

- Adrian Deen

Sense by Annie Cattrell

The five senses become personified as they sit majestically, suspended in glass cubes mounted on white plinths. Unassuming at first glance, a closer inspection reveals the true magnificence of the neurological functions they represent. Formed by magnetic resonance imaging of a subject’s brain as they experience each of the senses - Annie’ Cattrell’s glasswork is truly spectacular and especially significant in art-science progression. For her use of scientific methods and processes to artistically interpret scientific ideas assists in weakening the wall that separates the two disciplines.

Annie’s work is driven by the notion of ‘contemplating something you think you know but shouldn’t really be seeing that way’, an approach that is in many ways fundamentally scientific. For our curiosity in the bits of matter that make up our universe and the genes that code for the colours of the numerous follicles of hair on each of our heads is continuously stretched and expanded by new technologies that allow us to see the answers to these questions in ways we would never have expected. Her piece brings to the foreground an expression of a basal facet of our anatomical functionality (touching, smelling, tasting, hearing and seeing) that in the involuntary operations of our day-to-day we do not even consider.

‘The elegant simplicity of the sculptures belies the complexity of the technology required to make them’ - indeed the expertise involved in converting the FMRI images into 3-dimensional amber resin structures is elaborate but more intricate even are the manoeuvres of the brain of which they are from. For here therein lays the crux of an art-science dialogue; art with its endless vocabulary is able to make the convolutions and complexities of science more available and accessible, grasping the attention of a wider audience than science otherwise would.

Annie Cattrell’s piece can be found as part of the ‘Medicine Now’ exhibition in the Wellcome Collection, London http://www.wellcomecollection.org/whats-on/exhibitions/medicine-now.aspx

- Adrian Deen

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ art science adrian deen annie cattrell brain senses wellcome collection glass sculptures FMRI
Memory Trace 
London appears on a backdrop of a cross-section of the brain, the dulled grey pleats do not merely serve to encase the many divisions within its hemispheres but also show the city’s landmarks – navigational points used by London taxi drivers to traverse its ‘cortexed’ landscape. Zhang Jiebin’s early 17thcentury ‘Acupuncture chart of the head’ is used to form a collage of Canary Wharf, likewise Charles Bell’s ‘Anatomy of the brain’ forms the immediately recognisable Shard; all as part of Gayle Chong Kwan’s panoramic piece: ‘Memory Trace’. For here changes that occur in the crevices and creases of the brain of a London taxi driver are concurrently illustrated on a tourist’s map of the city.
Our ability as humans to develop novel routes and shortcuts [cognitive maps] is one feature that distinguishes us from other animals. For the question of whether other animals possess cognitive maps has remained miasmic in scientific communities for the last 50 years. By working with Professor Eleanor Maguire, Gayle Kwan is able to show this unique ability in taxi drivers, who by using the location of prominent landmarks forced into their subconscious on their many journeys across London, develop novel routes that secure and quicken the simple task of getting from A to B.
In this photographic collage Kwan metaphorically likens the 25,000 London streets and ad hoc travel routes to the brains many winding and continually evolving neural passages. Professor Maguire also holds on to this metaphor conceding that the brain’s convolutions are indeed map-like in nature, guiding the way through experience and knowledge.
Gayle Chong Kwan’s collage can be seen in the window of the Wellcome Trust till the 13th of June 2013 http://gaylechongkwan.com/
- Adrian Deen
Memory Trace 
London appears on a backdrop of a cross-section of the brain, the dulled grey pleats do not merely serve to encase the many divisions within its hemispheres but also show the city’s landmarks – navigational points used by London taxi drivers to traverse its ‘cortexed’ landscape. Zhang Jiebin’s early 17thcentury ‘Acupuncture chart of the head’ is used to form a collage of Canary Wharf, likewise Charles Bell’s ‘Anatomy of the brain’ forms the immediately recognisable Shard; all as part of Gayle Chong Kwan’s panoramic piece: ‘Memory Trace’. For here changes that occur in the crevices and creases of the brain of a London taxi driver are concurrently illustrated on a tourist’s map of the city.
Our ability as humans to develop novel routes and shortcuts [cognitive maps] is one feature that distinguishes us from other animals. For the question of whether other animals possess cognitive maps has remained miasmic in scientific communities for the last 50 years. By working with Professor Eleanor Maguire, Gayle Kwan is able to show this unique ability in taxi drivers, who by using the location of prominent landmarks forced into their subconscious on their many journeys across London, develop novel routes that secure and quicken the simple task of getting from A to B.
In this photographic collage Kwan metaphorically likens the 25,000 London streets and ad hoc travel routes to the brains many winding and continually evolving neural passages. Professor Maguire also holds on to this metaphor conceding that the brain’s convolutions are indeed map-like in nature, guiding the way through experience and knowledge.
Gayle Chong Kwan’s collage can be seen in the window of the Wellcome Trust till the 13th of June 2013 http://gaylechongkwan.com/
- Adrian Deen

Memory Trace

London appears on a backdrop of a cross-section of the brain, the dulled grey pleats do not merely serve to encase the many divisions within its hemispheres but also show the city’s landmarks – navigational points used by London taxi drivers to traverse its ‘cortexed’ landscape. Zhang Jiebin’s early 17thcentury ‘Acupuncture chart of the head’ is used to form a collage of Canary Wharf, likewise Charles Bell’s ‘Anatomy of the brain’ forms the immediately recognisable Shard; all as part of Gayle Chong Kwan’s panoramic piece: ‘Memory Trace’. For here changes that occur in the crevices and creases of the brain of a London taxi driver are concurrently illustrated on a tourist’s map of the city.

Our ability as humans to develop novel routes and shortcuts [cognitive maps] is one feature that distinguishes us from other animals. For the question of whether other animals possess cognitive maps has remained miasmic in scientific communities for the last 50 years. By working with Professor Eleanor Maguire, Gayle Kwan is able to show this unique ability in taxi drivers, who by using the location of prominent landmarks forced into their subconscious on their many journeys across London, develop novel routes that secure and quicken the simple task of getting from A to B.

In this photographic collage Kwan metaphorically likens the 25,000 London streets and ad hoc travel routes to the brains many winding and continually evolving neural passages. Professor Maguire also holds on to this metaphor conceding that the brain’s convolutions are indeed map-like in nature, guiding the way through experience and knowledge.

Gayle Chong Kwan’s collage can be seen in the window of the Wellcome Trust till the 13th of June 2013 http://gaylechongkwan.com/

- Adrian Deen

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ art science adrian deen gayle chong kwan wellcome trust maps brain charles bell
From Rosemarie Trockel’s ‘A Cosmos’: Leopold and Rudolph Blaschka’s Glass Jellyfish
Rosemarie Trockel invites us into an almost paradoxical cosmos, for the universe this German artist has created does not appear at first sight to be ordered but instead a historical, mirrored storage space in which the reflections of artistic influence (artist on artist, politics on art, nature on art e.t.c.) can be seen. The graceful jellyfish models by Leopold and Rudolph Blaschka form a small yet striking part of this collection expounding on Trockel’s desire to ‘create a space for ideas to exist between different disciplines’.

The Blaschka’s blown-glass jellyfish models are some of the many biological specimens they made for the Natural History Museum of Boston in the late 19th century. The craftsmanship and expertise with which these models were made perfectly compliment the etherealness and fragility of a jellyfish; the apparent complexity of their wispy translucent tentacles appear to contradict their now known evolutionary ‘simplicity’. Trockel displays these specimens in a dark glass case, akin to the deep seas in which the living forms of them reside, thus, these stationary models appear to bob and glide as their prototypes would.

Trockel’s attempt to combine all her artistic inspiration in one space, unperturbed by contemporary expectations for a perfectly ‘coherent’ exhibition is a success. Science plays a huge role in this collection, with a photo of a skinhead with botanical tattoos, the aforementioned German jellyfish models and elaborate floral drawings by Trockel herself. In the room in which all these pieces are placed, Trockel manages to convince the viewer that artistic inspiration needn’t always come from complex human abstractions or social constructions but can instead ensue from the undirected vastness of the natural world.

‘A Cosmos’ is currently on at The Serpentine in London: http://www.serpentinegallery.org/2011/03/rosemarie_trockel_a_cosmos.html

Adrian Deen
From Rosemarie Trockel’s ‘A Cosmos’: Leopold and Rudolph Blaschka’s Glass Jellyfish
Rosemarie Trockel invites us into an almost paradoxical cosmos, for the universe this German artist has created does not appear at first sight to be ordered but instead a historical, mirrored storage space in which the reflections of artistic influence (artist on artist, politics on art, nature on art e.t.c.) can be seen. The graceful jellyfish models by Leopold and Rudolph Blaschka form a small yet striking part of this collection expounding on Trockel’s desire to ‘create a space for ideas to exist between different disciplines’.

The Blaschka’s blown-glass jellyfish models are some of the many biological specimens they made for the Natural History Museum of Boston in the late 19th century. The craftsmanship and expertise with which these models were made perfectly compliment the etherealness and fragility of a jellyfish; the apparent complexity of their wispy translucent tentacles appear to contradict their now known evolutionary ‘simplicity’. Trockel displays these specimens in a dark glass case, akin to the deep seas in which the living forms of them reside, thus, these stationary models appear to bob and glide as their prototypes would.

Trockel’s attempt to combine all her artistic inspiration in one space, unperturbed by contemporary expectations for a perfectly ‘coherent’ exhibition is a success. Science plays a huge role in this collection, with a photo of a skinhead with botanical tattoos, the aforementioned German jellyfish models and elaborate floral drawings by Trockel herself. In the room in which all these pieces are placed, Trockel manages to convince the viewer that artistic inspiration needn’t always come from complex human abstractions or social constructions but can instead ensue from the undirected vastness of the natural world.

‘A Cosmos’ is currently on at The Serpentine in London: http://www.serpentinegallery.org/2011/03/rosemarie_trockel_a_cosmos.html

Adrian Deen

From Rosemarie Trockel’s ‘A Cosmos’: Leopold and Rudolph Blaschka’s Glass Jellyfish

Rosemarie Trockel invites us into an almost paradoxical cosmos, for the universe this German artist has created does not appear at first sight to be ordered but instead a historical, mirrored storage space in which the reflections of artistic influence (artist on artist, politics on art, nature on art e.t.c.) can be seen. The graceful jellyfish models by Leopold and Rudolph Blaschka form a small yet striking part of this collection expounding on Trockel’s desire to ‘create a space for ideas to exist between different disciplines’.

The Blaschka’s blown-glass jellyfish models are some of the many biological specimens they made for the Natural History Museum of Boston in the late 19th century. The craftsmanship and expertise with which these models were made perfectly compliment the etherealness and fragility of a jellyfish; the apparent complexity of their wispy translucent tentacles appear to contradict their now known evolutionary ‘simplicity’. Trockel displays these specimens in a dark glass case, akin to the deep seas in which the living forms of them reside, thus, these stationary models appear to bob and glide as their prototypes would.

Trockel’s attempt to combine all her artistic inspiration in one space, unperturbed by contemporary expectations for a perfectly ‘coherent’ exhibition is a success. Science plays a huge role in this collection, with a photo of a skinhead with botanical tattoos, the aforementioned German jellyfish models and elaborate floral drawings by Trockel herself. In the room in which all these pieces are placed, Trockel manages to convince the viewer that artistic inspiration needn’t always come from complex human abstractions or social constructions but can instead ensue from the undirected vastness of the natural world.

‘A Cosmos’ is currently on at The Serpentine in London: http://www.serpentinegallery.org/2011/03/rosemarie_trockel_a_cosmos.html

Adrian Deen

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ art science rosemarie trockel the serpentine adrian deen jellyfish blaschka
The Invisible was made Visible 
The scientific merit of images produced by a PET scan or X-ray often overshadows the sentiments they incite as pictures of contemporary art in their own right. The 2012 ‘Making the invisible visible’ competition put on by Science magazine saw the wielding of visual media with such expertise, to produce images significantly superior to many computerized imagery of today, so much so, that in the absence of technological hindsight they could easily be thought to have emerged from Kubrick’s Space Oddity.

The image of the brain created using magnetic resonance is testament to the combined efforts of biologists, computer scientists and physicists alike. The somewhat eerie translucent display with its labyrinth network of blue, red and purple nerves is akin to Picassos’ spiralling light drawing for life Magazine in 1949. Maxim Chamberland, David Fortin and Maxime Descoteaux depict the tenuous nature of a cerebral infiltration, for if removed, the crimson cancerous mass on the right hemisphere threatens the integrity of the fibrous network of nerves in which it is entangled.

Likewise, the seed x-rays invoke as much bewilderment and excitement as a mammalian ultrasound image, for here the intricacy of what is effectively a plant foetus can be seen in all its convoluted wonder. These X-ray microradiographed pictures combine high-resolution, high-contrast x-ray radiography with images taken by microscopy, the results not only serve their purpose of showcasing the inner mechanics of a seed (and a brain), but also provide as much aesthetic draw as some of the best photographic images of our time.

These images along with those from other competition winners can be found on the guardian website: http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/gallery/2013/jan/31/science-engineering-visualisation-challenge-winners-pictures#/?picture=403319986&index=0

- Adrian Deen
The Invisible was made Visible 
The scientific merit of images produced by a PET scan or X-ray often overshadows the sentiments they incite as pictures of contemporary art in their own right. The 2012 ‘Making the invisible visible’ competition put on by Science magazine saw the wielding of visual media with such expertise, to produce images significantly superior to many computerized imagery of today, so much so, that in the absence of technological hindsight they could easily be thought to have emerged from Kubrick’s Space Oddity.

The image of the brain created using magnetic resonance is testament to the combined efforts of biologists, computer scientists and physicists alike. The somewhat eerie translucent display with its labyrinth network of blue, red and purple nerves is akin to Picassos’ spiralling light drawing for life Magazine in 1949. Maxim Chamberland, David Fortin and Maxime Descoteaux depict the tenuous nature of a cerebral infiltration, for if removed, the crimson cancerous mass on the right hemisphere threatens the integrity of the fibrous network of nerves in which it is entangled.

Likewise, the seed x-rays invoke as much bewilderment and excitement as a mammalian ultrasound image, for here the intricacy of what is effectively a plant foetus can be seen in all its convoluted wonder. These X-ray microradiographed pictures combine high-resolution, high-contrast x-ray radiography with images taken by microscopy, the results not only serve their purpose of showcasing the inner mechanics of a seed (and a brain), but also provide as much aesthetic draw as some of the best photographic images of our time.

These images along with those from other competition winners can be found on the guardian website: http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/gallery/2013/jan/31/science-engineering-visualisation-challenge-winners-pictures#/?picture=403319986&index=0

- Adrian Deen

The Invisible was made Visible

The scientific merit of images produced by a PET scan or X-ray often overshadows the sentiments they incite as pictures of contemporary art in their own right. The 2012 ‘Making the invisible visible’ competition put on by Science magazine saw the wielding of visual media with such expertise, to produce images significantly superior to many computerized imagery of today, so much so, that in the absence of technological hindsight they could easily be thought to have emerged from Kubrick’s Space Oddity.

The image of the brain created using magnetic resonance is testament to the combined efforts of biologists, computer scientists and physicists alike. The somewhat eerie translucent display with its labyrinth network of blue, red and purple nerves is akin to Picassos’ spiralling light drawing for life Magazine in 1949. Maxim Chamberland, David Fortin and Maxime Descoteaux depict the tenuous nature of a cerebral infiltration, for if removed, the crimson cancerous mass on the right hemisphere threatens the integrity of the fibrous network of nerves in which it is entangled.

Likewise, the seed x-rays invoke as much bewilderment and excitement as a mammalian ultrasound image, for here the intricacy of what is effectively a plant foetus can be seen in all its convoluted wonder. These X-ray microradiographed pictures combine high-resolution, high-contrast x-ray radiography with images taken by microscopy, the results not only serve their purpose of showcasing the inner mechanics of a seed (and a brain), but also provide as much aesthetic draw as some of the best photographic images of our time.

These images along with those from other competition winners can be found on the guardian website: http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/gallery/2013/jan/31/science-engineering-visualisation-challenge-winners-pictures#/?picture=403319986&index=0

- Adrian Deen

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ adrian deen art science x-rays microradiography guardian science magazine picasso kubrick
The Birds of America by John James Audubon 
One of the more classic examples of the relationship between art and science, Audubon’s 435-page, hand-coloured collection of American birds not only revolutionised natural history art, but more importantly helped to fortify efforts by scientists with artistic inclinations (and vice-versa), to show that the chasm that was thought to exist between the two disciplines was and is in fact a lot smaller than it previously appeared. Audubon’s work was initially met with much scepticism, as he was not found to possess the credentials that pre-Darwinian biologists of that era did.  Over time however his book was not only revered for its artistry but also for its significance as a piece of scientific research.
The Natural History Museum in London own two of the 120 copies of John Audubon’s book and has recently put it on display as part of its ‘Treasures’ exhibition. The book features paintings of some now extinct and other extant American birds illustrated in dramatic baroque-esque poses. The painting above shows the bald eagle, one of America’s most masterful bird predators after having caught its catfish prey. In the eyes of the eagle, Audubon nuanced brush stokes relays the urgency and ferocity with which the prey was caught. For again by painting these birds in action Audubon amplified the burgeoning appreciation for the breadth of behavioural traits that birds could exhibit. 
Paintings and sketches were the only way natural history could be visually presented in the 18th century; hence this interaction between art and science was initially more of a necessity rather than a mutually beneficial relationship. What John Audubon did through this book however, was to show that through the exploration of greater artistic prowess, science even, might be surprised by what it finds.
A complete collection of John James Audubon’s book can be found at the University of Pittsburgh: http://digital.library.pitt.edu/a/audubon/
- Adrian Deen

The Birds of America by John James Audubon

One of the more classic examples of the relationship between art and science, Audubon’s 435-page, hand-coloured collection of American birds not only revolutionised natural history art, but more importantly helped to fortify efforts by scientists with artistic inclinations (and vice-versa), to show that the chasm that was thought to exist between the two disciplines was and is in fact a lot smaller than it previously appeared. Audubon’s work was initially met with much scepticism, as he was not found to possess the credentials that pre-Darwinian biologists of that era did.  Over time however his book was not only revered for its artistry but also for its significance as a piece of scientific research.

The Natural History Museum in London own two of the 120 copies of John Audubon’s book and has recently put it on display as part of its ‘Treasures’ exhibition. The book features paintings of some now extinct and other extant American birds illustrated in dramatic baroque-esque poses. The painting above shows the bald eagle, one of America’s most masterful bird predators after having caught its catfish prey. In the eyes of the eagle, Audubon nuanced brush stokes relays the urgency and ferocity with which the prey was caught. For again by painting these birds in action Audubon amplified the burgeoning appreciation for the breadth of behavioural traits that birds could exhibit. 

Paintings and sketches were the only way natural history could be visually presented in the 18th century; hence this interaction between art and science was initially more of a necessity rather than a mutually beneficial relationship. What John Audubon did through this book however, was to show that through the exploration of greater artistic prowess, science even, might be surprised by what it finds.

A complete collection of John James Audubon’s book can be found at the University of Pittsburgh: http://digital.library.pitt.edu/a/audubon/

- Adrian Deen

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