Our Blog

Posts tagged anatomy

Categories:

Landscape Photomontage
Photographing landscapes should not be limited to a simple point and click. There are many different capturing and editing techniques that artists, such as Matt Wisniewski, Keira Gruttner, and Fong Qi Wei, use in order to capture their surroundings through their unique perspectives and digital tools.
Matt Wisniewski is a collage artist based in New York who takes fashion photographs and manipulates them to fit into a specific geological element or landscape photograph. His “Landscape” Series turns mountain ranges into heads atop human shoulders, or trees on a hillside into cascading hair. His other series’ “Mineral Minds” and “My Home is the Sea” combine minerals and stones, and crashing waves (respectfully) with the models, acting as either extensions of their anatomy or wardrobe. His work is both landscape and portrait photography in one.
Keira Gruttner also uses collage to combine elements of landscape, but unlike Matt Wisniewski, Gruttner specifically focuses on nature. The artist states that her upbringing on the East Coast of Canada inspired her to create her collages. Her work is more tactile than other digital collages, as she first prints her landscapes and then carefully selects elements from each and assembles the pieces together, like a puzzle. She often repeats the process again through scanning the first collage, to then print and prepare for the final collage.
The work of Fong Qi Wei, “Time is a Dimension”, is also puzzle-like, connecting different time-periods of the day with urban skylines to show the daily changes in our atmosphere. In one picture, we are able to see both morning and evening, as if the two were always ongoing at the same time. The artist’s work plays with time and dimension, where the photograph is not only capturing one moment in time, but many times in, what is presented as, one moment. 
Each of these artists plays with our perceptions in terms of how we remember our surroundings and especially our relationship with the landscapes around us. Their works are refreshing examples of the new techniques in landscape photography.
-Anna Paluch
Landscape Photomontage
Photographing landscapes should not be limited to a simple point and click. There are many different capturing and editing techniques that artists, such as Matt Wisniewski, Keira Gruttner, and Fong Qi Wei, use in order to capture their surroundings through their unique perspectives and digital tools.
Matt Wisniewski is a collage artist based in New York who takes fashion photographs and manipulates them to fit into a specific geological element or landscape photograph. His “Landscape” Series turns mountain ranges into heads atop human shoulders, or trees on a hillside into cascading hair. His other series’ “Mineral Minds” and “My Home is the Sea” combine minerals and stones, and crashing waves (respectfully) with the models, acting as either extensions of their anatomy or wardrobe. His work is both landscape and portrait photography in one.
Keira Gruttner also uses collage to combine elements of landscape, but unlike Matt Wisniewski, Gruttner specifically focuses on nature. The artist states that her upbringing on the East Coast of Canada inspired her to create her collages. Her work is more tactile than other digital collages, as she first prints her landscapes and then carefully selects elements from each and assembles the pieces together, like a puzzle. She often repeats the process again through scanning the first collage, to then print and prepare for the final collage.
The work of Fong Qi Wei, “Time is a Dimension”, is also puzzle-like, connecting different time-periods of the day with urban skylines to show the daily changes in our atmosphere. In one picture, we are able to see both morning and evening, as if the two were always ongoing at the same time. The artist’s work plays with time and dimension, where the photograph is not only capturing one moment in time, but many times in, what is presented as, one moment. 
Each of these artists plays with our perceptions in terms of how we remember our surroundings and especially our relationship with the landscapes around us. Their works are refreshing examples of the new techniques in landscape photography.
-Anna Paluch
Landscape Photomontage
Photographing landscapes should not be limited to a simple point and click. There are many different capturing and editing techniques that artists, such as Matt Wisniewski, Keira Gruttner, and Fong Qi Wei, use in order to capture their surroundings through their unique perspectives and digital tools.
Matt Wisniewski is a collage artist based in New York who takes fashion photographs and manipulates them to fit into a specific geological element or landscape photograph. His “Landscape” Series turns mountain ranges into heads atop human shoulders, or trees on a hillside into cascading hair. His other series’ “Mineral Minds” and “My Home is the Sea” combine minerals and stones, and crashing waves (respectfully) with the models, acting as either extensions of their anatomy or wardrobe. His work is both landscape and portrait photography in one.
Keira Gruttner also uses collage to combine elements of landscape, but unlike Matt Wisniewski, Gruttner specifically focuses on nature. The artist states that her upbringing on the East Coast of Canada inspired her to create her collages. Her work is more tactile than other digital collages, as she first prints her landscapes and then carefully selects elements from each and assembles the pieces together, like a puzzle. She often repeats the process again through scanning the first collage, to then print and prepare for the final collage.
The work of Fong Qi Wei, “Time is a Dimension”, is also puzzle-like, connecting different time-periods of the day with urban skylines to show the daily changes in our atmosphere. In one picture, we are able to see both morning and evening, as if the two were always ongoing at the same time. The artist’s work plays with time and dimension, where the photograph is not only capturing one moment in time, but many times in, what is presented as, one moment. 
Each of these artists plays with our perceptions in terms of how we remember our surroundings and especially our relationship with the landscapes around us. Their works are refreshing examples of the new techniques in landscape photography.
-Anna Paluch
Landscape Photomontage
Photographing landscapes should not be limited to a simple point and click. There are many different capturing and editing techniques that artists, such as Matt Wisniewski, Keira Gruttner, and Fong Qi Wei, use in order to capture their surroundings through their unique perspectives and digital tools.
Matt Wisniewski is a collage artist based in New York who takes fashion photographs and manipulates them to fit into a specific geological element or landscape photograph. His “Landscape” Series turns mountain ranges into heads atop human shoulders, or trees on a hillside into cascading hair. His other series’ “Mineral Minds” and “My Home is the Sea” combine minerals and stones, and crashing waves (respectfully) with the models, acting as either extensions of their anatomy or wardrobe. His work is both landscape and portrait photography in one.
Keira Gruttner also uses collage to combine elements of landscape, but unlike Matt Wisniewski, Gruttner specifically focuses on nature. The artist states that her upbringing on the East Coast of Canada inspired her to create her collages. Her work is more tactile than other digital collages, as she first prints her landscapes and then carefully selects elements from each and assembles the pieces together, like a puzzle. She often repeats the process again through scanning the first collage, to then print and prepare for the final collage.
The work of Fong Qi Wei, “Time is a Dimension”, is also puzzle-like, connecting different time-periods of the day with urban skylines to show the daily changes in our atmosphere. In one picture, we are able to see both morning and evening, as if the two were always ongoing at the same time. The artist’s work plays with time and dimension, where the photograph is not only capturing one moment in time, but many times in, what is presented as, one moment. 
Each of these artists plays with our perceptions in terms of how we remember our surroundings and especially our relationship with the landscapes around us. Their works are refreshing examples of the new techniques in landscape photography.
-Anna Paluch

Landscape Photomontage


Photographing landscapes should not be limited to a simple point and click. There are many different capturing and editing techniques that artists, such as Matt Wisniewski, Keira Gruttner, and Fong Qi Wei, use in order to capture their surroundings through their unique perspectives and digital tools.

Matt Wisniewski is a collage artist based in New York who takes fashion photographs and manipulates them to fit into a specific geological element or landscape photograph. His “Landscape” Series turns mountain ranges into heads atop human shoulders, or trees on a hillside into cascading hair. His other series’ “Mineral Minds” and “My Home is the Sea” combine minerals and stones, and crashing waves (respectfully) with the models, acting as either extensions of their anatomy or wardrobe. His work is both landscape and portrait photography in one.

Keira Gruttner also uses collage to combine elements of landscape, but unlike Matt Wisniewski, Gruttner specifically focuses on nature. The artist states that her upbringing on the East Coast of Canada inspired her to create her collages. Her work is more tactile than other digital collages, as she first prints her landscapes and then carefully selects elements from each and assembles the pieces together, like a puzzle. She often repeats the process again through scanning the first collage, to then print and prepare for the final collage.

The work of Fong Qi Wei, “Time is a Dimension”, is also puzzle-like, connecting different time-periods of the day with urban skylines to show the daily changes in our atmosphere. In one picture, we are able to see both morning and evening, as if the two were always ongoing at the same time. The artist’s work plays with time and dimension, where the photograph is not only capturing one moment in time, but many times in, what is presented as, one moment. 

Each of these artists plays with our perceptions in terms of how we remember our surroundings and especially our relationship with the landscapes around us. Their works are refreshing examples of the new techniques in landscape photography.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ anna paluch keira gruttner fong qi wei matt wisniewski photography digital photography collage nature landscape art science anatomy art and science journal photomontage
The Art of Our Bodies
The intricacies of the human body are explored in The New Cruelty’s work, where the production company based in Brooklyn took photographs of the famous BODIES: The Exhibition.
These photographs both fascinate and repulse, but most importantly, like the exhibit, they educate viewers, allowing us to get a glimpse of how our bodies function. After the initial shock of seeing our insides so exposed, viewers begin to discover the great detail in our veins and the spectrum of colour found just in and around the heart. Our bodies present themselves as works of art, in this case, exhibited and then photographed.
The aim of BODIES: The Exhibition is to “[allow] visitors to see the human body’s inner beauty in educational and awe-inspiring ways”, with bodies and organs preserved using “a revolutionary process called polymer preservation, in which human tissue is permanently preserved using liquid silicone rubber.” Every aspect of the body is covered, allowing curious minds to see up close that which most of us never get to see. 
The exhibit, and especially the pictures taken by The New Cruelty, shows just how much a part of nature we are; our whole-body vein system looks strikingly similar to the veins seen on leaves, and our pulmonary veins and arteries (attached to the heart) look more like coral reefs than human organs.
-Anna Paluch
The Art of Our Bodies
The intricacies of the human body are explored in The New Cruelty’s work, where the production company based in Brooklyn took photographs of the famous BODIES: The Exhibition.
These photographs both fascinate and repulse, but most importantly, like the exhibit, they educate viewers, allowing us to get a glimpse of how our bodies function. After the initial shock of seeing our insides so exposed, viewers begin to discover the great detail in our veins and the spectrum of colour found just in and around the heart. Our bodies present themselves as works of art, in this case, exhibited and then photographed.
The aim of BODIES: The Exhibition is to “[allow] visitors to see the human body’s inner beauty in educational and awe-inspiring ways”, with bodies and organs preserved using “a revolutionary process called polymer preservation, in which human tissue is permanently preserved using liquid silicone rubber.” Every aspect of the body is covered, allowing curious minds to see up close that which most of us never get to see. 
The exhibit, and especially the pictures taken by The New Cruelty, shows just how much a part of nature we are; our whole-body vein system looks strikingly similar to the veins seen on leaves, and our pulmonary veins and arteries (attached to the heart) look more like coral reefs than human organs.
-Anna Paluch

The Art of Our Bodies

The intricacies of the human body are explored in The New Cruelty’s work, where the production company based in Brooklyn took photographs of the famous BODIES: The Exhibition.

These photographs both fascinate and repulse, but most importantly, like the exhibit, they educate viewers, allowing us to get a glimpse of how our bodies function. After the initial shock of seeing our insides so exposed, viewers begin to discover the great detail in our veins and the spectrum of colour found just in and around the heart. Our bodies present themselves as works of art, in this case, exhibited and then photographed.

The aim of BODIES: The Exhibition is to “[allow] visitors to see the human body’s inner beauty in educational and awe-inspiring ways”, with bodies and organs preserved using “a revolutionary process called polymer preservation, in which human tissue is permanently preserved using liquid silicone rubber.” Every aspect of the body is covered, allowing curious minds to see up close that which most of us never get to see.

The exhibit, and especially the pictures taken by The New Cruelty, shows just how much a part of nature we are; our whole-body vein system looks strikingly similar to the veins seen on leaves, and our pulmonary veins and arteries (attached to the heart) look more like coral reefs than human organs.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ The New Cruelty James Bareham anna paluch BODIES: The Exhibition bodies anatomy body human body art science photography art and science journal

Q&A With Geoffrey Harrison: An Interview with the Art and Science Journal

Geoffrey Harrison is a painter specializing in figuration and anatomy that has recently discussed his residencies in London with us. Check out the video above (password is geoff) and the interview below to see what he has to share:

Lea Hamilton: Could you elaborate on your experience at your residency(ies?) What was it like to work with those specimens? Did you feel the environment influenced your body of work in the creative process itself as well as the content?

Geoffrey Harrison: I had been going into the Pathology Museum at St Bart’s for a while to look at the specimens and draw. I’d been working with anatomical images since I had a show at the Art Workers’ Guild in 2010 which was called ‘in the midst of life’. It was a series of paintings of dead animals. It sounds pretty grim, but was actually all about beauty and life. In some of the paintings it wasn’t clear whether the animal was alive or dead, while in others, it was pretty clear. I think these more explicitly visceral images led me towards the work I produced for the Bloomsbury Festival in 2011, which was an installation of very large drawings of ‘intestinal’ loops. I happened to be introduced to some people from the museum a huge nineteenth century, three story high, purpose built hall with galleried walkways on two upper levels. Somehow it is hidden away up a shabby staircase in a corner of the hospital. The shelves are crammed with specimens and the atmosphere is fairly unique but I was quite familiar by then with human specimens as both my parents had been Medical Illustrators, so I felt quite at home. It was a nice place to draw and the environment retained a Victorian atmosphere, which may have influenced me.

The more I discovered about the specimens however - the human aspect; the who and why and where and so on, the less I was at ease. I was pleased about that though. I didn’t want to get blasé about seeing such challenging things and really felt that it was important to still have an emotional response to the specimens. Much of the forensic collection have particularly sad and violent backstories, which brought a lot of that emotional content. I think that has carried through to the work I am doing now, which although not entirely focused on gross anatomy and specimens.

Working in both institutions has been really interesting experience. At the Museum, it was mainly a place for me to go and sketch and draw inspiration from. It was about the space and the contents. I ended up producing a series of work which I showed there and which has since been shown in a few other places and is due to travel overseas this year. The experience at the RVC has been more immersive and about the people and processes in the college as well as the objects that tend to attract my attention. In addition to producing artwork, I am involved in funding applications, public engagement and art teaching.

LH: How long has the concept of autopoiesis influenced your work?

GH: I started working with this concept perhaps before I realised it. I had long been in the habit of reducing the images I worked with to singular entities, which I eventually described as islands or archipelagos. In this way I was approaching this idea of margins and boundaries around things. I became a bit preoccupied with this idea of where one things ends and another begins and started to think about body parts and processes in this way. I think the work on islands really led to this because even though visually the things I was painting, animals, chairs, they were all surrogates for the human body, and by extension, the individual as a separate entity, self sufficient and isolated.

Of course, we are an interdependent species. We may kid ourselves that we are self-sufficient, and independent but like the hermit crabs I studied, we are actually totally dependent on a community and a bunch of other creatures. I have a compulsion to delineate and isolate, while at the same time recognising that the world doesn’t really work like that. Things are intricately linked and don’t necessarily end in crisp lines. Margins are blurred and diffuse as the seashore where the water percolates through the sand. You can’t really separate the two if you look closely enough. I recognise this and yet I am still drawn to delineate and classify. Is this cognitive dissonance?

Anyway, I wanted to somehow illustrate this paradox and create images of things that appear feasible as whole enclosed systems, but that aren’t possible. While doing some drawings of intestinal looking organs that were complete loops, like Mobius strips I was looking at M. C. Escher and I came across a book called ‘I am a Strange Loop’ by Douglas Hofstadter. His work led me to the concept of Autopoiesis, which I thought was an ideal description for my work and liked that it was relevant to mathematics and biology as well as philosophy and sociology.

LH: Both of your residencies (at Bart’s Pathology Museum and The Royal Veterinary College) are sort of hidden and tucked away. Given your interest in isolation, is that partly what drew you towards these residencies, or was it more based on past experience with anatomy and medical illustration?

GH: I’m not sure that I consciously made an effort to find places to work that were hidden away, but perhaps that made more more interested in them. I think I was fortunate enough to be introduced to these places as a result of similar work before, which yea, is probably all down to the Medical Illustration thing. It seems to be one continuum. Perhaps it will all loop back to the beginning at the end.

LH: How do you personally view the anatomical collections that you work with? Do they lean more toward being curiosities, or do they present themselves as preserved, perpetual objects?

GH: That’s a really interesting question. The nature of the ‘curious’ must depend on the viewer. I don’t see the specimens themselves as curious. Interesting and fantastic in some cases, yes, but I’d think I was being lazy if I stopped at curious, like I was simply noting an odd shaped vegetable. Some of the medical and veterinary specimens that I spend my time with are still relevant in a practical educational sense, while others are pretty much redundant in the face of trends of disease or medical progress. For some people, however, preserved specimens of unusual afflictions are gonna have a kind of ‘fairground sideshow’ quality and will remain curiosities, but if that inspires people to look beyond the bizarre and freakish and contemplate the ‘science’, that’s great.

Pickling and even plastination fundamentally change the nature of the specimen, so they aren’t really preserved verbatim. They are altered and won’t last forever anyway.

LH: I find it interesting that you have such great interest in self-sustaining objects, but the actual anatomical specimens that you study need to be carefully preserved and sustained by others. Is this boundary between sustaining and preserving blurred or disrupted by your interaction with the objects and subsequent created artworks? Do they become ‘fresh’ again, or is the boundary even relevant?

GH: Perhaps I am casting a fresh eye on the subject, which might give someone an alternative perspective, but I also think that while the specimens stay immutable (and this is not always the case) a med student, for example, may look at it one day and see one thing and the next something completely different according to the page they are on in their textbook. There are many ways to refresh a perspective. I think this boundary is totally relevant. That’s an intriguing boundary there. The point at which the world changes when we understand something about it. Secrets divulged, innocence lost. Hmmm.

I’m not sure this answers the question but I got intrigued by the idea of ‘fresh again’ when I was studying cane toads that had been squashed by traffic on an island where I used to live. The flattened corpses used to desiccate in the heat, but whenever it would rain, the amphibian hydrophilic skin would rehydrate and they’d become fresh again. In the end though, they’d disintegrate to nothing. The objects in the jar are in a very gradual state of deterioration. I think the fact that they continually need maintenance and care belies their ultimate impermanence. Someone will forget to top them up, they’ll spring a leak or get dropped. They are only going one way. Mind you, there is a pretty healthy looking specimen in the Barts’ collection that dates from the 1700s, so the journey to dust is longer for some than others…

- Lea Hamilton

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

art and science journalinterviewLea HamiltonGeoffrey Harrisonresidencieslondonanatomypainting
Camila Carlow’s Eye Heart Spleen
When we look at human organs, sometimes their imagery can be off-putting (though fascinating!) but artist Camila Carlow uses our organs, at least pictures of them, to create her intricate Eye Heart Spleen series; human organs made from foraged plants.
The artist combines different plants, such as flowers and leaves, already themselves unique living organisms, to create one piece, one organ, of another living organism; the human. It is interesting to look at her series in regards to the place of humans in the world; how we pick flowers, tear down trees and stomp around in the grass, only to then have our bodies be consumed by the earth, covered by flowers, trees and grass. The plants sustain us, as either food or helping to create oxygen, just like our organs, and just like plants, we sometimes too forget to take care of our organs. As the artist states, “regardless of whether we fill ourselves with toxins or nourishing food, whether we exercise or not - our organs sustain us, working away effortlessly and unnoticed”. Both plants and organs are delicate structures, and both need to be taken care of, in order for them to take care of us.
To learn more about Camila Carlow’s work, you can visit her website, or if you would like to purchase one of her prints, they are available on Etsy.
-Anna Paluch
Camila Carlow’s Eye Heart Spleen
When we look at human organs, sometimes their imagery can be off-putting (though fascinating!) but artist Camila Carlow uses our organs, at least pictures of them, to create her intricate Eye Heart Spleen series; human organs made from foraged plants.
The artist combines different plants, such as flowers and leaves, already themselves unique living organisms, to create one piece, one organ, of another living organism; the human. It is interesting to look at her series in regards to the place of humans in the world; how we pick flowers, tear down trees and stomp around in the grass, only to then have our bodies be consumed by the earth, covered by flowers, trees and grass. The plants sustain us, as either food or helping to create oxygen, just like our organs, and just like plants, we sometimes too forget to take care of our organs. As the artist states, “regardless of whether we fill ourselves with toxins or nourishing food, whether we exercise or not - our organs sustain us, working away effortlessly and unnoticed”. Both plants and organs are delicate structures, and both need to be taken care of, in order for them to take care of us.
To learn more about Camila Carlow’s work, you can visit her website, or if you would like to purchase one of her prints, they are available on Etsy.
-Anna Paluch
Camila Carlow’s Eye Heart Spleen
When we look at human organs, sometimes their imagery can be off-putting (though fascinating!) but artist Camila Carlow uses our organs, at least pictures of them, to create her intricate Eye Heart Spleen series; human organs made from foraged plants.
The artist combines different plants, such as flowers and leaves, already themselves unique living organisms, to create one piece, one organ, of another living organism; the human. It is interesting to look at her series in regards to the place of humans in the world; how we pick flowers, tear down trees and stomp around in the grass, only to then have our bodies be consumed by the earth, covered by flowers, trees and grass. The plants sustain us, as either food or helping to create oxygen, just like our organs, and just like plants, we sometimes too forget to take care of our organs. As the artist states, “regardless of whether we fill ourselves with toxins or nourishing food, whether we exercise or not - our organs sustain us, working away effortlessly and unnoticed”. Both plants and organs are delicate structures, and both need to be taken care of, in order for them to take care of us.
To learn more about Camila Carlow’s work, you can visit her website, or if you would like to purchase one of her prints, they are available on Etsy.
-Anna Paluch

Camila Carlow’s Eye Heart Spleen

When we look at human organs, sometimes their imagery can be off-putting (though fascinating!) but artist Camila Carlow uses our organs, at least pictures of them, to create her intricate Eye Heart Spleen series; human organs made from foraged plants.

The artist combines different plants, such as flowers and leaves, already themselves unique living organisms, to create one piece, one organ, of another living organism; the human. It is interesting to look at her series in regards to the place of humans in the world; how we pick flowers, tear down trees and stomp around in the grass, only to then have our bodies be consumed by the earth, covered by flowers, trees and grass. The plants sustain us, as either food or helping to create oxygen, just like our organs, and just like plants, we sometimes too forget to take care of our organs. As the artist states, “regardless of whether we fill ourselves with toxins or nourishing food, whether we exercise or not - our organs sustain us, working away effortlessly and unnoticed”. Both plants and organs are delicate structures, and both need to be taken care of, in order for them to take care of us.

To learn more about Camila Carlow’s work, you can visit her website, or if you would like to purchase one of her prints, they are available on Etsy.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ camila carlow eye heart spleen anatomy botany flowers plants organs human organs human body art science art and science journal anna paluch
Carly Wall
In this poster series, Fig. 3, Carly Wall focuses on the structures of animals. In these works, the start of what is to be a longer series, Wall uses elements of illustration inspired from 1950’s anatomy books. As she states,
"I recently became somewhat fascinated by animal anatomy. While visiting my grandparents I found a vintage 1950’s illustrated animal anatomy book, and that’s where it started. Fig 3. was inspired by an illustration series featured in the book, which I recreated digitally using a tablet. With inspiration from the book, I’m hoping to create a series of posters.”
Wall’s design work communicates through a combination of illustration and text. In another one of her works, Design, blocks create a staircase up to the piece’s title. As with most of her pieces, Fig. 3  is a quirky image that is both art and graphic design.  To see more you can visit her Society 6 page here, or her professional website here. 
- Lee Jones
Carly Wall
In this poster series, Fig. 3, Carly Wall focuses on the structures of animals. In these works, the start of what is to be a longer series, Wall uses elements of illustration inspired from 1950’s anatomy books. As she states,
"I recently became somewhat fascinated by animal anatomy. While visiting my grandparents I found a vintage 1950’s illustrated animal anatomy book, and that’s where it started. Fig 3. was inspired by an illustration series featured in the book, which I recreated digitally using a tablet. With inspiration from the book, I’m hoping to create a series of posters.”
Wall’s design work communicates through a combination of illustration and text. In another one of her works, Design, blocks create a staircase up to the piece’s title. As with most of her pieces, Fig. 3  is a quirky image that is both art and graphic design.  To see more you can visit her Society 6 page here, or her professional website here. 
- Lee Jones
Michele Parliament
In the about section of her website, Michele Parliament defines herself as an art school dropout. Despite this she’s had 25 shows so far and has an impressive body of work. In this series of digital collages on giclee prints, Parliament combines nature with images of the body. A healthcare professional by day, and an artist by night, Parliament makes work that show an anxiety about our state, and a hope to connect more with nature. Aside from the themes these works are stunning to look at. To see more of her works, click here.
- Lee Jones
Michele Parliament
In the about section of her website, Michele Parliament defines herself as an art school dropout. Despite this she’s had 25 shows so far and has an impressive body of work. In this series of digital collages on giclee prints, Parliament combines nature with images of the body. A healthcare professional by day, and an artist by night, Parliament makes work that show an anxiety about our state, and a hope to connect more with nature. Aside from the themes these works are stunning to look at. To see more of her works, click here.
- Lee Jones
Michele Parliament
In the about section of her website, Michele Parliament defines herself as an art school dropout. Despite this she’s had 25 shows so far and has an impressive body of work. In this series of digital collages on giclee prints, Parliament combines nature with images of the body. A healthcare professional by day, and an artist by night, Parliament makes work that show an anxiety about our state, and a hope to connect more with nature. Aside from the themes these works are stunning to look at. To see more of her works, click here.
- Lee Jones
Michele Parliament
In the about section of her website, Michele Parliament defines herself as an art school dropout. Despite this she’s had 25 shows so far and has an impressive body of work. In this series of digital collages on giclee prints, Parliament combines nature with images of the body. A healthcare professional by day, and an artist by night, Parliament makes work that show an anxiety about our state, and a hope to connect more with nature. Aside from the themes these works are stunning to look at. To see more of her works, click here.
- Lee Jones
Britt Wray DIY Body
Britt Wray, an artist with a background in biology, developed DIY Body as a participatory art project. Wray was inspired by DIY approaches to crafting and biology to create downloadable body patterns that crafters could then use to create their own body parts. The end result was a collection of awesome body pillows featured at the Ontario Science Centre this past year. As Wray describes some of the influences in her work,
"I’m really interested in the social implications of biotechnology, as genes are ever increasingly becoming a raw resource for more than just scientists to build things with. I’m interested in the never ending cultural shifts we endure and promote regarding the ways we construct the natural and technological worlds around us. For example, what does it mean to be a biohacker in our society, should people care about the implications of their work, or is their impact likely not much more than hot air? Also, what does it mean when you create organic life through inorganic means. Is that still Life with a capital "L" as we usually describe it?"
To see more of Wray’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Britt Wray DIY Body
Britt Wray, an artist with a background in biology, developed DIY Body as a participatory art project. Wray was inspired by DIY approaches to crafting and biology to create downloadable body patterns that crafters could then use to create their own body parts. The end result was a collection of awesome body pillows featured at the Ontario Science Centre this past year. As Wray describes some of the influences in her work,
"I’m really interested in the social implications of biotechnology, as genes are ever increasingly becoming a raw resource for more than just scientists to build things with. I’m interested in the never ending cultural shifts we endure and promote regarding the ways we construct the natural and technological worlds around us. For example, what does it mean to be a biohacker in our society, should people care about the implications of their work, or is their impact likely not much more than hot air? Also, what does it mean when you create organic life through inorganic means. Is that still Life with a capital "L" as we usually describe it?"
To see more of Wray’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Britt Wray DIY Body
Britt Wray, an artist with a background in biology, developed DIY Body as a participatory art project. Wray was inspired by DIY approaches to crafting and biology to create downloadable body patterns that crafters could then use to create their own body parts. The end result was a collection of awesome body pillows featured at the Ontario Science Centre this past year. As Wray describes some of the influences in her work,
"I’m really interested in the social implications of biotechnology, as genes are ever increasingly becoming a raw resource for more than just scientists to build things with. I’m interested in the never ending cultural shifts we endure and promote regarding the ways we construct the natural and technological worlds around us. For example, what does it mean to be a biohacker in our society, should people care about the implications of their work, or is their impact likely not much more than hot air? Also, what does it mean when you create organic life through inorganic means. Is that still Life with a capital "L" as we usually describe it?"
To see more of Wray’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Bianca Salvo
In this project, The only records of our ancestors are in their fossils, Bianca Salvo focuses on the tensions between our natural impulses and our view of ourselves as logical beings. As Salvo describes the series,
"It is a memento of a humanity struggling between civilization and primitivism, the logical and the mystical, between living as erect rational being and being destined to born and die according to the unknowable and inexplicable flow of primordial forces. The series is about the rediscovering of the primal and raw condition of human race through the demolition of what is visible, demonstrable and objectively quantifiable."
Salvo, currently working on an MA in Photography, likes to use photography as a hybrid medium. For this project she  combined still photographic images with organic materials, digital manipulations and archival medical  illustrations with the aim to destroy and expose the empirical order and the linearity of the pillars of civilization. for more of Salvo’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Bianca Salvo
In this project, The only records of our ancestors are in their fossils, Bianca Salvo focuses on the tensions between our natural impulses and our view of ourselves as logical beings. As Salvo describes the series,
"It is a memento of a humanity struggling between civilization and primitivism, the logical and the mystical, between living as erect rational being and being destined to born and die according to the unknowable and inexplicable flow of primordial forces. The series is about the rediscovering of the primal and raw condition of human race through the demolition of what is visible, demonstrable and objectively quantifiable."
Salvo, currently working on an MA in Photography, likes to use photography as a hybrid medium. For this project she  combined still photographic images with organic materials, digital manipulations and archival medical  illustrations with the aim to destroy and expose the empirical order and the linearity of the pillars of civilization. for more of Salvo’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Bianca Salvo
In this project, The only records of our ancestors are in their fossils, Bianca Salvo focuses on the tensions between our natural impulses and our view of ourselves as logical beings. As Salvo describes the series,
"It is a memento of a humanity struggling between civilization and primitivism, the logical and the mystical, between living as erect rational being and being destined to born and die according to the unknowable and inexplicable flow of primordial forces. The series is about the rediscovering of the primal and raw condition of human race through the demolition of what is visible, demonstrable and objectively quantifiable."
Salvo, currently working on an MA in Photography, likes to use photography as a hybrid medium. For this project she  combined still photographic images with organic materials, digital manipulations and archival medical  illustrations with the aim to destroy and expose the empirical order and the linearity of the pillars of civilization. for more of Salvo’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mark Powell
Mark Powell is a fine artist from Leeds who is known for his Biro pen drawings on envelopes. As he describes the process, he started making these types of works when he was given an envelope from the front lines of World War 1. On this envelope he drew what he imagined the sender may have looked like as an old man. The immense detail in his work comes from reference images he takes of people on the street. From these he makes the image and the envelope work together. Currently, Powell is working on larger drawings on vintage maps while continuing with the envelope work. To see his famous envelopes, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mark Powell
Mark Powell is a fine artist from Leeds who is known for his Biro pen drawings on envelopes. As he describes the process, he started making these types of works when he was given an envelope from the front lines of World War 1. On this envelope he drew what he imagined the sender may have looked like as an old man. The immense detail in his work comes from reference images he takes of people on the street. From these he makes the image and the envelope work together. Currently, Powell is working on larger drawings on vintage maps while continuing with the envelope work. To see his famous envelopes, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mark Powell
Mark Powell is a fine artist from Leeds who is known for his Biro pen drawings on envelopes. As he describes the process, he started making these types of works when he was given an envelope from the front lines of World War 1. On this envelope he drew what he imagined the sender may have looked like as an old man. The immense detail in his work comes from reference images he takes of people on the street. From these he makes the image and the envelope work together. Currently, Powell is working on larger drawings on vintage maps while continuing with the envelope work. To see his famous envelopes, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mark Powell
Mark Powell is a fine artist from Leeds who is known for his Biro pen drawings on envelopes. As he describes the process, he started making these types of works when he was given an envelope from the front lines of World War 1. On this envelope he drew what he imagined the sender may have looked like as an old man. The immense detail in his work comes from reference images he takes of people on the street. From these he makes the image and the envelope work together. Currently, Powell is working on larger drawings on vintage maps while continuing with the envelope work. To see his famous envelopes, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mark Powell
Mark Powell is a fine artist from Leeds who is known for his Biro pen drawings on envelopes. As he describes the process, he started making these types of works when he was given an envelope from the front lines of World War 1. On this envelope he drew what he imagined the sender may have looked like as an old man. The immense detail in his work comes from reference images he takes of people on the street. From these he makes the image and the envelope work together. Currently, Powell is working on larger drawings on vintage maps while continuing with the envelope work. To see his famous envelopes, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mark Powell
Mark Powell is a fine artist from Leeds who is known for his Biro pen drawings on envelopes. As he describes the process, he started making these types of works when he was given an envelope from the front lines of World War 1. On this envelope he drew what he imagined the sender may have looked like as an old man. The immense detail in his work comes from reference images he takes of people on the street. From these he makes the image and the envelope work together. Currently, Powell is working on larger drawings on vintage maps while continuing with the envelope work. To see his famous envelopes, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mark Powell
Mark Powell is a fine artist from Leeds who is known for his Biro pen drawings on envelopes. As he describes the process, he started making these types of works when he was given an envelope from the front lines of World War 1. On this envelope he drew what he imagined the sender may have looked like as an old man. The immense detail in his work comes from reference images he takes of people on the street. From these he makes the image and the envelope work together. Currently, Powell is working on larger drawings on vintage maps while continuing with the envelope work. To see his famous envelopes, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mark Powell
Mark Powell is a fine artist from Leeds who is known for his Biro pen drawings on envelopes. As he describes the process, he started making these types of works when he was given an envelope from the front lines of World War 1. On this envelope he drew what he imagined the sender may have looked like as an old man. The immense detail in his work comes from reference images he takes of people on the street. From these he makes the image and the envelope work together. Currently, Powell is working on larger drawings on vintage maps while continuing with the envelope work. To see his famous envelopes, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mark Powell
Mark Powell is a fine artist from Leeds who is known for his Biro pen drawings on envelopes. As he describes the process, he started making these types of works when he was given an envelope from the front lines of World War 1. On this envelope he drew what he imagined the sender may have looked like as an old man. The immense detail in his work comes from reference images he takes of people on the street. From these he makes the image and the envelope work together. Currently, Powell is working on larger drawings on vintage maps while continuing with the envelope work. To see his famous envelopes, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Objectify This: Female Anatomy Dissected and Displayed
Recently I was able to ask curator Vanessa Ruiz of the blog Street Anatomy about her art show Objectify This. The show starts today at Design Cloud Gallery.  Artists participating in the show include: Fernando Vicente, Jason Levesque, Cake, Michael Reedy, Danny Quirk, Emily Evans, Pole Ka, Tristan des Limbes, Amylin Loglisci.
How did you come up with the concept for the show?
The idea was an amalgamation of different influences from Street Anatomy and my personal life. I’ve been following the female anatomical art of Spanish painter and illustrator Fernando Vicente over the past couple of years. His recent series of paintings, titled VENUS, show these strong and somewhat edgy women in various states of anatomical undress. The response when I posted his work on Street Anatomy was massive and I knew that his work had a special attraction both objectively and subjectively.  


At the same time I began exploring the thriving burlesque scene in Chicago.  I enjoy burlesque for the fact that it can be so sensual and yet empowering for women at the same time. And so, I began envisioning a gallery show that could center around female anatomy and combine it with burlesque to create an overall experience of the female form.

What is the show about?
Historically, female anatomical illustration has evoked a multitude of feelings beyond simple academic representation.  It’s one of the reasons why the male form has always been the exemplum of the human body, with the female illustrated only as the variation in terms of reproductive organs and surface anatomy.  This exhibition seeks to portray female anatomy only in relation to other females.  The artists in the exhibition portray female anatomy in a variety of ways and there’s even quite a distinction between how male artists visualize it vs female artists.  The male artists show the underlying anatomy of these very seductive and sensual women, whereas the female artists almost deconstruct the anatomy and show more emotion through it.  
What are your goals for the show?
It will compel viewers to question the objectivity surrounding ‘female anatomy’ and define—or re-define—their own perceptions through the art, perspectives, literature, and live burlesque performances during the opening.  The main question I keep asking throughout preparing for this exhibition has bee, how can I get people to think past their initial reaction to ‘female anatomy’ and think of it for what it is—human gross anatomy?
For more of Vanessa Ruiz and Street Anatomy, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Objectify This: Female Anatomy Dissected and Displayed
Recently I was able to ask curator Vanessa Ruiz of the blog Street Anatomy about her art show Objectify This. The show starts today at Design Cloud Gallery.  Artists participating in the show include: Fernando Vicente, Jason Levesque, Cake, Michael Reedy, Danny Quirk, Emily Evans, Pole Ka, Tristan des Limbes, Amylin Loglisci.
How did you come up with the concept for the show?
The idea was an amalgamation of different influences from Street Anatomy and my personal life. I’ve been following the female anatomical art of Spanish painter and illustrator Fernando Vicente over the past couple of years. His recent series of paintings, titled VENUS, show these strong and somewhat edgy women in various states of anatomical undress. The response when I posted his work on Street Anatomy was massive and I knew that his work had a special attraction both objectively and subjectively.  


At the same time I began exploring the thriving burlesque scene in Chicago.  I enjoy burlesque for the fact that it can be so sensual and yet empowering for women at the same time. And so, I began envisioning a gallery show that could center around female anatomy and combine it with burlesque to create an overall experience of the female form.

What is the show about?
Historically, female anatomical illustration has evoked a multitude of feelings beyond simple academic representation.  It’s one of the reasons why the male form has always been the exemplum of the human body, with the female illustrated only as the variation in terms of reproductive organs and surface anatomy.  This exhibition seeks to portray female anatomy only in relation to other females.  The artists in the exhibition portray female anatomy in a variety of ways and there’s even quite a distinction between how male artists visualize it vs female artists.  The male artists show the underlying anatomy of these very seductive and sensual women, whereas the female artists almost deconstruct the anatomy and show more emotion through it.  
What are your goals for the show?
It will compel viewers to question the objectivity surrounding ‘female anatomy’ and define—or re-define—their own perceptions through the art, perspectives, literature, and live burlesque performances during the opening.  The main question I keep asking throughout preparing for this exhibition has bee, how can I get people to think past their initial reaction to ‘female anatomy’ and think of it for what it is—human gross anatomy?
For more of Vanessa Ruiz and Street Anatomy, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Objectify This: Female Anatomy Dissected and Displayed
Recently I was able to ask curator Vanessa Ruiz of the blog Street Anatomy about her art show Objectify This. The show starts today at Design Cloud Gallery.  Artists participating in the show include: Fernando Vicente, Jason Levesque, Cake, Michael Reedy, Danny Quirk, Emily Evans, Pole Ka, Tristan des Limbes, Amylin Loglisci.
How did you come up with the concept for the show?
The idea was an amalgamation of different influences from Street Anatomy and my personal life. I’ve been following the female anatomical art of Spanish painter and illustrator Fernando Vicente over the past couple of years. His recent series of paintings, titled VENUS, show these strong and somewhat edgy women in various states of anatomical undress. The response when I posted his work on Street Anatomy was massive and I knew that his work had a special attraction both objectively and subjectively.  


At the same time I began exploring the thriving burlesque scene in Chicago.  I enjoy burlesque for the fact that it can be so sensual and yet empowering for women at the same time. And so, I began envisioning a gallery show that could center around female anatomy and combine it with burlesque to create an overall experience of the female form.

What is the show about?
Historically, female anatomical illustration has evoked a multitude of feelings beyond simple academic representation.  It’s one of the reasons why the male form has always been the exemplum of the human body, with the female illustrated only as the variation in terms of reproductive organs and surface anatomy.  This exhibition seeks to portray female anatomy only in relation to other females.  The artists in the exhibition portray female anatomy in a variety of ways and there’s even quite a distinction between how male artists visualize it vs female artists.  The male artists show the underlying anatomy of these very seductive and sensual women, whereas the female artists almost deconstruct the anatomy and show more emotion through it.  
What are your goals for the show?
It will compel viewers to question the objectivity surrounding ‘female anatomy’ and define—or re-define—their own perceptions through the art, perspectives, literature, and live burlesque performances during the opening.  The main question I keep asking throughout preparing for this exhibition has bee, how can I get people to think past their initial reaction to ‘female anatomy’ and think of it for what it is—human gross anatomy?
For more of Vanessa Ruiz and Street Anatomy, click here. 
- Lee Jones

Objectify This: Female Anatomy Dissected and Displayed

Recently I was able to ask curator Vanessa Ruiz of the blog Street Anatomy about her art show Objectify This. The show starts today at Design Cloud Gallery.  Artists participating in the show include: Fernando VicenteJason LevesqueCakeMichael ReedyDanny QuirkEmily EvansPole KaTristan des LimbesAmylin Loglisci.

How did you come up with the concept for the show?

The idea was an amalgamation of different influences from Street Anatomy and my personal life. I’ve been following the female anatomical art of Spanish painter and illustrator Fernando Vicente over the past couple of years. His recent series of paintings, titled VENUS, show these strong and somewhat edgy women in various states of anatomical undress. The response when I posted his work on Street Anatomy was massive and I knew that his work had a special attraction both objectively and subjectively.  
At the same time I began exploring the thriving burlesque scene in Chicago.  I enjoy burlesque for the fact that it can be so sensual and yet empowering for women at the same time. And so, I began envisioning a gallery show that could center around female anatomy and combine it with burlesque to create an overall experience of the female form.

What is the show about?

Historically, female anatomical illustration has evoked a multitude of feelings beyond simple academic representation.  It’s one of the reasons why the male form has always been the exemplum of the human body, with the female illustrated only as the variation in terms of reproductive organs and surface anatomy.  This exhibition seeks to portray female anatomy only in relation to other females.  The artists in the exhibition portray female anatomy in a variety of ways and there’s even quite a distinction between how male artists visualize it vs female artists.  The male artists show the underlying anatomy of these very seductive and sensual women, whereas the female artists almost deconstruct the anatomy and show more emotion through it.  

What are your goals for the show?

It will compel viewers to question the objectivity surrounding ‘female anatomy’ and define—or re-define—their own perceptions through the art, perspectives, literature, and live burlesque performances during the opening.  The main question I keep asking throughout preparing for this exhibition has bee, how can I get people to think past their initial reaction to ‘female anatomy’ and think of it for what it is—human gross anatomy?

For more of Vanessa Ruiz and Street Anatomy, click here. 

- Lee Jones


(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ art science anatomy street anatomy design cloud gallery chicago lee jones

Contact Us

For submissions: please send images and a detailed description to our editor, Lee Jones, at leejones@artandsciencejournal.com.
Thank you and have a lovely day!