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Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch

Home Sweet Home

Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).

With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 

With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.

Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?

A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ aki inomata anna paluch hermit crabs animals shells plastic scanning technology 3D Printing art science art and science journal ct scan shelter home physiology architecture biology
Véronique Ducharme’s Encounters
Véronique Ducharme’s Encounters (2012-2013) is an unusual series of animal photographs: candid, uncanny, and at times startling. The hundreds of images, fauna from bears to does and deer, foxes and smaller mammals, were taken with a remote motion-detecting hunting camera that uses heat to trigger the photographic exposure. Ducharme’s artistic endeavour finds authority in the conceptualization of the project, however the artist relinquishes such charge by removing herself from the actual photo-taking process.
In their haphazard composition, over or under exposure, and blurred subjects, this suite of photographs subverts the aesthetic sensibilities of a wildlife photo-vernacular, providing instead an alternative view of the boreal spaces typically unpopulated by humankind. As such, the images afford a rare glimpse of animals at ease, unthreatened by the intimidating presence of humans.
As part of Le Mois de la Photo in Montreal, the series is continuous with the over-arching theme, Drone: the Automated Image. Here, the human is unmoored as the central productive agent, leaving wildlife and technology to mingle in the imaging process without the authoritative hand of the photographer. But unlike the militant drone, capable of wreaking remote havoc, Ducharme’s automation creates a productive space within which animals reign supreme and are bestowed with an agency otherwise denied.
The white piercing eyes, nonchalance and sincerity of the wildlife that populate Encounters provokes a reinterpretation of the proverbial falling tree: perhaps it is not a question of whether it makes a sound, but rather who hears it?
Encounters is on view until October 5 at Galerie B-312 as part of Montreal’s Le Mois de la Photo. 
-Natasha Chaykowski
Véronique Ducharme’s Encounters
Véronique Ducharme’s Encounters (2012-2013) is an unusual series of animal photographs: candid, uncanny, and at times startling. The hundreds of images, fauna from bears to does and deer, foxes and smaller mammals, were taken with a remote motion-detecting hunting camera that uses heat to trigger the photographic exposure. Ducharme’s artistic endeavour finds authority in the conceptualization of the project, however the artist relinquishes such charge by removing herself from the actual photo-taking process.
In their haphazard composition, over or under exposure, and blurred subjects, this suite of photographs subverts the aesthetic sensibilities of a wildlife photo-vernacular, providing instead an alternative view of the boreal spaces typically unpopulated by humankind. As such, the images afford a rare glimpse of animals at ease, unthreatened by the intimidating presence of humans.
As part of Le Mois de la Photo in Montreal, the series is continuous with the over-arching theme, Drone: the Automated Image. Here, the human is unmoored as the central productive agent, leaving wildlife and technology to mingle in the imaging process without the authoritative hand of the photographer. But unlike the militant drone, capable of wreaking remote havoc, Ducharme’s automation creates a productive space within which animals reign supreme and are bestowed with an agency otherwise denied.
The white piercing eyes, nonchalance and sincerity of the wildlife that populate Encounters provokes a reinterpretation of the proverbial falling tree: perhaps it is not a question of whether it makes a sound, but rather who hears it?
Encounters is on view until October 5 at Galerie B-312 as part of Montreal’s Le Mois de la Photo. 
-Natasha Chaykowski
Véronique Ducharme’s Encounters
Véronique Ducharme’s Encounters (2012-2013) is an unusual series of animal photographs: candid, uncanny, and at times startling. The hundreds of images, fauna from bears to does and deer, foxes and smaller mammals, were taken with a remote motion-detecting hunting camera that uses heat to trigger the photographic exposure. Ducharme’s artistic endeavour finds authority in the conceptualization of the project, however the artist relinquishes such charge by removing herself from the actual photo-taking process.
In their haphazard composition, over or under exposure, and blurred subjects, this suite of photographs subverts the aesthetic sensibilities of a wildlife photo-vernacular, providing instead an alternative view of the boreal spaces typically unpopulated by humankind. As such, the images afford a rare glimpse of animals at ease, unthreatened by the intimidating presence of humans.
As part of Le Mois de la Photo in Montreal, the series is continuous with the over-arching theme, Drone: the Automated Image. Here, the human is unmoored as the central productive agent, leaving wildlife and technology to mingle in the imaging process without the authoritative hand of the photographer. But unlike the militant drone, capable of wreaking remote havoc, Ducharme’s automation creates a productive space within which animals reign supreme and are bestowed with an agency otherwise denied.
The white piercing eyes, nonchalance and sincerity of the wildlife that populate Encounters provokes a reinterpretation of the proverbial falling tree: perhaps it is not a question of whether it makes a sound, but rather who hears it?
Encounters is on view until October 5 at Galerie B-312 as part of Montreal’s Le Mois de la Photo. 
-Natasha Chaykowski
Véronique Ducharme’s Encounters
Véronique Ducharme’s Encounters (2012-2013) is an unusual series of animal photographs: candid, uncanny, and at times startling. The hundreds of images, fauna from bears to does and deer, foxes and smaller mammals, were taken with a remote motion-detecting hunting camera that uses heat to trigger the photographic exposure. Ducharme’s artistic endeavour finds authority in the conceptualization of the project, however the artist relinquishes such charge by removing herself from the actual photo-taking process.
In their haphazard composition, over or under exposure, and blurred subjects, this suite of photographs subverts the aesthetic sensibilities of a wildlife photo-vernacular, providing instead an alternative view of the boreal spaces typically unpopulated by humankind. As such, the images afford a rare glimpse of animals at ease, unthreatened by the intimidating presence of humans.
As part of Le Mois de la Photo in Montreal, the series is continuous with the over-arching theme, Drone: the Automated Image. Here, the human is unmoored as the central productive agent, leaving wildlife and technology to mingle in the imaging process without the authoritative hand of the photographer. But unlike the militant drone, capable of wreaking remote havoc, Ducharme’s automation creates a productive space within which animals reign supreme and are bestowed with an agency otherwise denied.
The white piercing eyes, nonchalance and sincerity of the wildlife that populate Encounters provokes a reinterpretation of the proverbial falling tree: perhaps it is not a question of whether it makes a sound, but rather who hears it?
Encounters is on view until October 5 at Galerie B-312 as part of Montreal’s Le Mois de la Photo. 
-Natasha Chaykowski

Véronique Ducharme’s Encounters

Véronique Ducharme’s Encounters (2012-2013) is an unusual series of animal photographs: candid, uncanny, and at times startling. The hundreds of images, fauna from bears to does and deer, foxes and smaller mammals, were taken with a remote motion-detecting hunting camera that uses heat to trigger the photographic exposure. Ducharme’s artistic endeavour finds authority in the conceptualization of the project, however the artist relinquishes such charge by removing herself from the actual photo-taking process.

In their haphazard composition, over or under exposure, and blurred subjects, this suite of photographs subverts the aesthetic sensibilities of a wildlife photo-vernacular, providing instead an alternative view of the boreal spaces typically unpopulated by humankind. As such, the images afford a rare glimpse of animals at ease, unthreatened by the intimidating presence of humans.

As part of Le Mois de la Photo in Montreal, the series is continuous with the over-arching theme, Drone: the Automated Image. Here, the human is unmoored as the central productive agent, leaving wildlife and technology to mingle in the imaging process without the authoritative hand of the photographer. But unlike the militant drone, capable of wreaking remote havoc, Ducharme’s automation creates a productive space within which animals reign supreme and are bestowed with an agency otherwise denied.

The white piercing eyes, nonchalance and sincerity of the wildlife that populate Encounters provokes a reinterpretation of the proverbial falling tree: perhaps it is not a question of whether it makes a sound, but rather who hears it?

Encounters is on view until October 5 at Galerie B-312 as part of Montreal’s Le Mois de la Photo. 

-Natasha Chaykowski

4 Photos
/ art science nature animals night veronique ducharme encounters Natasha Chaykowski

Mythologies and Meanings: Masako Miki
Artists have often attributed qualities of the surreal “other” to the animal world. Our animal counterparts are seen by many as being devoid of cultural instincts that restrict and normalize behaviour. They are thus able to act out the lascivious instincts humans work to eradicate and symbolize myths of collisions between natural and human worlds. 
Drawing from this playbook of animal subjects and myth, California based artist Masako Miki establishes dreamlike identity narratives while toying with the psychology behind animal motifs in fine art. Her animal subjects become symbols through which our fantasies, desires, and vulnerabilities may be realized. Like Surrealist artists before her, Miki’s interest in exploring the dreamy and symbolic nature of animal life permits new mythologies in the dynamic relations between animals and humans to emerge. 
Moreover, through a very simple aesthetic, the animal motifs Miki explores in her delicate paintings - a combination of a variety of mixed media, including rainbow-hued embroidery thread, gouache, ink, and wool - receive a quirky and contemporary upgrade. No longer resembling grandiose historical nature paintings or cheesy, kitschy, oil-on-panel paintings found in your grandparents’ attic, Miki’s mediations on identity, folklore, and animalistic roles are visually simplified and accessible, resembling the visual quality of a peculiar and conversational painting found in the living room of a student apartment. 
Masako Miki is represented by the Swarm Gallery in Oakland, CA. 
- Victoria Nolte

Mythologies and Meanings: Masako Miki
Artists have often attributed qualities of the surreal “other” to the animal world. Our animal counterparts are seen by many as being devoid of cultural instincts that restrict and normalize behaviour. They are thus able to act out the lascivious instincts humans work to eradicate and symbolize myths of collisions between natural and human worlds. 
Drawing from this playbook of animal subjects and myth, California based artist Masako Miki establishes dreamlike identity narratives while toying with the psychology behind animal motifs in fine art. Her animal subjects become symbols through which our fantasies, desires, and vulnerabilities may be realized. Like Surrealist artists before her, Miki’s interest in exploring the dreamy and symbolic nature of animal life permits new mythologies in the dynamic relations between animals and humans to emerge. 
Moreover, through a very simple aesthetic, the animal motifs Miki explores in her delicate paintings - a combination of a variety of mixed media, including rainbow-hued embroidery thread, gouache, ink, and wool - receive a quirky and contemporary upgrade. No longer resembling grandiose historical nature paintings or cheesy, kitschy, oil-on-panel paintings found in your grandparents’ attic, Miki’s mediations on identity, folklore, and animalistic roles are visually simplified and accessible, resembling the visual quality of a peculiar and conversational painting found in the living room of a student apartment. 
Masako Miki is represented by the Swarm Gallery in Oakland, CA. 
- Victoria Nolte

Mythologies and Meanings: Masako Miki
Artists have often attributed qualities of the surreal “other” to the animal world. Our animal counterparts are seen by many as being devoid of cultural instincts that restrict and normalize behaviour. They are thus able to act out the lascivious instincts humans work to eradicate and symbolize myths of collisions between natural and human worlds. 
Drawing from this playbook of animal subjects and myth, California based artist Masako Miki establishes dreamlike identity narratives while toying with the psychology behind animal motifs in fine art. Her animal subjects become symbols through which our fantasies, desires, and vulnerabilities may be realized. Like Surrealist artists before her, Miki’s interest in exploring the dreamy and symbolic nature of animal life permits new mythologies in the dynamic relations between animals and humans to emerge. 
Moreover, through a very simple aesthetic, the animal motifs Miki explores in her delicate paintings - a combination of a variety of mixed media, including rainbow-hued embroidery thread, gouache, ink, and wool - receive a quirky and contemporary upgrade. No longer resembling grandiose historical nature paintings or cheesy, kitschy, oil-on-panel paintings found in your grandparents’ attic, Miki’s mediations on identity, folklore, and animalistic roles are visually simplified and accessible, resembling the visual quality of a peculiar and conversational painting found in the living room of a student apartment. 
Masako Miki is represented by the Swarm Gallery in Oakland, CA. 
- Victoria Nolte

Mythologies and Meanings: Masako Miki
Artists have often attributed qualities of the surreal “other” to the animal world. Our animal counterparts are seen by many as being devoid of cultural instincts that restrict and normalize behaviour. They are thus able to act out the lascivious instincts humans work to eradicate and symbolize myths of collisions between natural and human worlds. 
Drawing from this playbook of animal subjects and myth, California based artist Masako Miki establishes dreamlike identity narratives while toying with the psychology behind animal motifs in fine art. Her animal subjects become symbols through which our fantasies, desires, and vulnerabilities may be realized. Like Surrealist artists before her, Miki’s interest in exploring the dreamy and symbolic nature of animal life permits new mythologies in the dynamic relations between animals and humans to emerge. 
Moreover, through a very simple aesthetic, the animal motifs Miki explores in her delicate paintings - a combination of a variety of mixed media, including rainbow-hued embroidery thread, gouache, ink, and wool - receive a quirky and contemporary upgrade. No longer resembling grandiose historical nature paintings or cheesy, kitschy, oil-on-panel paintings found in your grandparents’ attic, Miki’s mediations on identity, folklore, and animalistic roles are visually simplified and accessible, resembling the visual quality of a peculiar and conversational painting found in the living room of a student apartment. 
Masako Miki is represented by the Swarm Gallery in Oakland, CA. 
- Victoria Nolte

Mythologies and Meanings: Masako Miki

Artists have often attributed qualities of the surreal “other” to the animal world. Our animal counterparts are seen by many as being devoid of cultural instincts that restrict and normalize behaviour. They are thus able to act out the lascivious instincts humans work to eradicate and symbolize myths of collisions between natural and human worlds. 

Drawing from this playbook of animal subjects and myth, California based artist Masako Miki establishes dreamlike identity narratives while toying with the psychology behind animal motifs in fine art. Her animal subjects become symbols through which our fantasies, desires, and vulnerabilities may be realized. Like Surrealist artists before her, Miki’s interest in exploring the dreamy and symbolic nature of animal life permits new mythologies in the dynamic relations between animals and humans to emerge. 

Moreover, through a very simple aesthetic, the animal motifs Miki explores in her delicate paintings - a combination of a variety of mixed media, including rainbow-hued embroidery thread, gouache, ink, and wool - receive a quirky and contemporary upgrade. No longer resembling grandiose historical nature paintings or cheesy, kitschy, oil-on-panel paintings found in your grandparents’ attic, Miki’s mediations on identity, folklore, and animalistic roles are visually simplified and accessible, resembling the visual quality of a peculiar and conversational painting found in the living room of a student apartment. 

Masako Miki is represented by the Swarm Gallery in Oakland, CA. 

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ art nature animals myth motif painting masako miki victoria nolte
Photo Friday with Tim Flach’s More than Human 
English photographer Tim Flach  thins the line between animals and humans with a stunning series called More than Human. He captures panthers, pandas, gorillas, and other animals, and demonstrates that they exhibit a depth of emotion that we may not have expected. These photos beg the questions of how different, if at all, are we from these animals. How different is the look of a bat when threatened and the expression we may have when on guard, or a baboon’s gaze of inquiry and our own expressed curiousity?
Flach further humanizes these animals by taking them out of the environment we are used to seeing them in and bringing them into a studio. Perhaps as any new subject, the animals express discomfort in this unnatural environment, and he placates them with music and by adjusting the temperature. There is a careful and patient process to these portraits because, as we may expect, the subjects are unpredictable and don’t take to direction in quite the same way.
As stated on the artist’s website, there is also a playfulness to these photos:
"Tim Flach’s bestiary evokes pathos, humour and an unmistakably intimate human empathy. Not only do we begin to find supposedly repellent creatures charming, but discover a sympathetic vulnerability, an unexpected lightness and humour in their gestures and attitudes, as if putting on a performance for our benefit in a readily accessible comedy of manners all their own."
Find more of Tim Flach’s series here.
-Rudayna Bahubeshi
Photo Friday with Tim Flach’s More than Human 
English photographer Tim Flach  thins the line between animals and humans with a stunning series called More than Human. He captures panthers, pandas, gorillas, and other animals, and demonstrates that they exhibit a depth of emotion that we may not have expected. These photos beg the questions of how different, if at all, are we from these animals. How different is the look of a bat when threatened and the expression we may have when on guard, or a baboon’s gaze of inquiry and our own expressed curiousity?
Flach further humanizes these animals by taking them out of the environment we are used to seeing them in and bringing them into a studio. Perhaps as any new subject, the animals express discomfort in this unnatural environment, and he placates them with music and by adjusting the temperature. There is a careful and patient process to these portraits because, as we may expect, the subjects are unpredictable and don’t take to direction in quite the same way.
As stated on the artist’s website, there is also a playfulness to these photos:
"Tim Flach’s bestiary evokes pathos, humour and an unmistakably intimate human empathy. Not only do we begin to find supposedly repellent creatures charming, but discover a sympathetic vulnerability, an unexpected lightness and humour in their gestures and attitudes, as if putting on a performance for our benefit in a readily accessible comedy of manners all their own."
Find more of Tim Flach’s series here.
-Rudayna Bahubeshi
Photo Friday with Tim Flach’s More than Human 
English photographer Tim Flach  thins the line between animals and humans with a stunning series called More than Human. He captures panthers, pandas, gorillas, and other animals, and demonstrates that they exhibit a depth of emotion that we may not have expected. These photos beg the questions of how different, if at all, are we from these animals. How different is the look of a bat when threatened and the expression we may have when on guard, or a baboon’s gaze of inquiry and our own expressed curiousity?
Flach further humanizes these animals by taking them out of the environment we are used to seeing them in and bringing them into a studio. Perhaps as any new subject, the animals express discomfort in this unnatural environment, and he placates them with music and by adjusting the temperature. There is a careful and patient process to these portraits because, as we may expect, the subjects are unpredictable and don’t take to direction in quite the same way.
As stated on the artist’s website, there is also a playfulness to these photos:
"Tim Flach’s bestiary evokes pathos, humour and an unmistakably intimate human empathy. Not only do we begin to find supposedly repellent creatures charming, but discover a sympathetic vulnerability, an unexpected lightness and humour in their gestures and attitudes, as if putting on a performance for our benefit in a readily accessible comedy of manners all their own."
Find more of Tim Flach’s series here.
-Rudayna Bahubeshi

Photo Friday with Tim Flach’s More than Human 

English photographer Tim Flach  thins the line between animals and humans with a stunning series called More than Human. He captures panthers, pandas, gorillas, and other animals, and demonstrates that they exhibit a depth of emotion that we may not have expected. These photos beg the questions of how different, if at all, are we from these animals. How different is the look of a bat when threatened and the expression we may have when on guard, or a baboon’s gaze of inquiry and our own expressed curiousity?

Flach further humanizes these animals by taking them out of the environment we are used to seeing them in and bringing them into a studio. Perhaps as any new subject, the animals express discomfort in this unnatural environment, and he placates them with music and by adjusting the temperature. There is a careful and patient process to these portraits because, as we may expect, the subjects are unpredictable and don’t take to direction in quite the same way.

As stated on the artist’s website, there is also a playfulness to these photos:

"Tim Flach’s bestiary evokes pathos, humour and an unmistakably intimate human empathy. Not only do we begin to find supposedly repellent creatures charming, but discover a sympathetic vulnerability, an unexpected lightness and humour in their gestures and attitudes, as if putting on a performance for our benefit in a readily accessible comedy of manners all their own."

Find more of Tim Flach’s series here.

-Rudayna Bahubeshi

3 Photos
/ photography wildlife art animals photo friday science rudayna bahubeshi tim flach
Amberlee Rosolowich
Amberlee Rosolowich’s most recent works have been influenced by her youth. As she describes, her “work is inspired by a hidden and quiet side of my childhood; juxtaposing peculiar and darker experiences with the imaginary protection of animals. Fearful moments, made brighter by sharing and understanding secrets with animal ‘friends’. These paintings of life moments are augmented and playfully set along with current stories of my present. In some pieces the animals themselves are able to share the emotions that often seem minute.” 
Rosolowich’s mother worked as a zookeeper and aquarium show diver, and the artist became interested in animal behaviour early on. As she states, “I imagined these animals as my chit-chat friends. I spent many of my younger years pretending they would protect me in opposing moments and that they could understand the parts of my mind and heart that I kept quiet.” Rosolowich’s works are at the same time fanciful and behaviour oriented. To see more of her works, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Amberlee Rosolowich
Amberlee Rosolowich’s most recent works have been influenced by her youth. As she describes, her “work is inspired by a hidden and quiet side of my childhood; juxtaposing peculiar and darker experiences with the imaginary protection of animals. Fearful moments, made brighter by sharing and understanding secrets with animal ‘friends’. These paintings of life moments are augmented and playfully set along with current stories of my present. In some pieces the animals themselves are able to share the emotions that often seem minute.” 
Rosolowich’s mother worked as a zookeeper and aquarium show diver, and the artist became interested in animal behaviour early on. As she states, “I imagined these animals as my chit-chat friends. I spent many of my younger years pretending they would protect me in opposing moments and that they could understand the parts of my mind and heart that I kept quiet.” Rosolowich’s works are at the same time fanciful and behaviour oriented. To see more of her works, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Amberlee Rosolowich
Amberlee Rosolowich’s most recent works have been influenced by her youth. As she describes, her “work is inspired by a hidden and quiet side of my childhood; juxtaposing peculiar and darker experiences with the imaginary protection of animals. Fearful moments, made brighter by sharing and understanding secrets with animal ‘friends’. These paintings of life moments are augmented and playfully set along with current stories of my present. In some pieces the animals themselves are able to share the emotions that often seem minute.” 
Rosolowich’s mother worked as a zookeeper and aquarium show diver, and the artist became interested in animal behaviour early on. As she states, “I imagined these animals as my chit-chat friends. I spent many of my younger years pretending they would protect me in opposing moments and that they could understand the parts of my mind and heart that I kept quiet.” Rosolowich’s works are at the same time fanciful and behaviour oriented. To see more of her works, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Amberlee Rosolowich
Amberlee Rosolowich’s most recent works have been influenced by her youth. As she describes, her “work is inspired by a hidden and quiet side of my childhood; juxtaposing peculiar and darker experiences with the imaginary protection of animals. Fearful moments, made brighter by sharing and understanding secrets with animal ‘friends’. These paintings of life moments are augmented and playfully set along with current stories of my present. In some pieces the animals themselves are able to share the emotions that often seem minute.” 
Rosolowich’s mother worked as a zookeeper and aquarium show diver, and the artist became interested in animal behaviour early on. As she states, “I imagined these animals as my chit-chat friends. I spent many of my younger years pretending they would protect me in opposing moments and that they could understand the parts of my mind and heart that I kept quiet.” Rosolowich’s works are at the same time fanciful and behaviour oriented. To see more of her works, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Jennilee Murray
In this series, Animalia/Victus, artist Jennilee Murray combines animals with food. As the artists describes this hybrid, “The series is a fanciful look at what-ifs and curiosities—documenting flora and fauna indigenous to the land of childhood fantasy.”
Murray’s work carries questions, “What if we harvested peas from the tail of a fennec fox? What if neither of these things were seen as food?” Animalis/Victus is not so much a dialogue on the current food situation or any specific way of eating, as it is an innocent, child-like search into the realm of impossibility and suspended disbelief. 
Murray is also interested in how we classify subjects. As she states, “I’ve always been interested in the science of life, and classification, and learning the specifics about many different types of things. I drool over books like Grey’s Anatomy and Audobon’s bird books, and beautiful illustrated children’s books, and thought how nice it would be to tie them all together.” To see more of Murray’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Jennilee Murray
In this series, Animalia/Victus, artist Jennilee Murray combines animals with food. As the artists describes this hybrid, “The series is a fanciful look at what-ifs and curiosities—documenting flora and fauna indigenous to the land of childhood fantasy.”
Murray’s work carries questions, “What if we harvested peas from the tail of a fennec fox? What if neither of these things were seen as food?” Animalis/Victus is not so much a dialogue on the current food situation or any specific way of eating, as it is an innocent, child-like search into the realm of impossibility and suspended disbelief. 
Murray is also interested in how we classify subjects. As she states, “I’ve always been interested in the science of life, and classification, and learning the specifics about many different types of things. I drool over books like Grey’s Anatomy and Audobon’s bird books, and beautiful illustrated children’s books, and thought how nice it would be to tie them all together.” To see more of Murray’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Jennilee Murray
In this series, Animalia/Victus, artist Jennilee Murray combines animals with food. As the artists describes this hybrid, “The series is a fanciful look at what-ifs and curiosities—documenting flora and fauna indigenous to the land of childhood fantasy.”
Murray’s work carries questions, “What if we harvested peas from the tail of a fennec fox? What if neither of these things were seen as food?” Animalis/Victus is not so much a dialogue on the current food situation or any specific way of eating, as it is an innocent, child-like search into the realm of impossibility and suspended disbelief. 
Murray is also interested in how we classify subjects. As she states, “I’ve always been interested in the science of life, and classification, and learning the specifics about many different types of things. I drool over books like Grey’s Anatomy and Audobon’s bird books, and beautiful illustrated children’s books, and thought how nice it would be to tie them all together.” To see more of Murray’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Jennilee Murray
In this series, Animalia/Victus, artist Jennilee Murray combines animals with food. As the artists describes this hybrid, “The series is a fanciful look at what-ifs and curiosities—documenting flora and fauna indigenous to the land of childhood fantasy.”
Murray’s work carries questions, “What if we harvested peas from the tail of a fennec fox? What if neither of these things were seen as food?” Animalis/Victus is not so much a dialogue on the current food situation or any specific way of eating, as it is an innocent, child-like search into the realm of impossibility and suspended disbelief. 
Murray is also interested in how we classify subjects. As she states, “I’ve always been interested in the science of life, and classification, and learning the specifics about many different types of things. I drool over books like Grey’s Anatomy and Audobon’s bird books, and beautiful illustrated children’s books, and thought how nice it would be to tie them all together.” To see more of Murray’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Jennilee Murray
In this series, Animalia/Victus, artist Jennilee Murray combines animals with food. As the artists describes this hybrid, “The series is a fanciful look at what-ifs and curiosities—documenting flora and fauna indigenous to the land of childhood fantasy.”
Murray’s work carries questions, “What if we harvested peas from the tail of a fennec fox? What if neither of these things were seen as food?” Animalis/Victus is not so much a dialogue on the current food situation or any specific way of eating, as it is an innocent, child-like search into the realm of impossibility and suspended disbelief. 
Murray is also interested in how we classify subjects. As she states, “I’ve always been interested in the science of life, and classification, and learning the specifics about many different types of things. I drool over books like Grey’s Anatomy and Audobon’s bird books, and beautiful illustrated children’s books, and thought how nice it would be to tie them all together.” To see more of Murray’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Peter Carrington
Peter Carrington, an illustrator from Manchester, makes artworks about  science, natural history and his struggle to gain knowledge. As Carrington states, 
"I’ve always had an interest in science and nature, and during my studies I decided to combine this with my practice. Through deeper research into different scientific areas it quickly became apparent that, due to having dyslexia, I was never going to get a grip of the topics to make work that wasn’t shallow and ill-informed. I became frustrated that I wouldn’t be able to use the visual language of the sciences that I had become obsessed with. It was at this point that this frustration became the forefront of the work and the drawings became a portrait of me and my struggle with dyslexia. I began using the visuals of science and natural history journals to create seemingly scientific illustrations."
Carrington’s work harkens back to the history of biology and botany, where drawing and labels were the key to all knowledge, then he adds his own bit of mystical influence. Now Carrington is focusing on the human need for order. Through labels and numbers he demonstrates our need to categorize. To see more of his work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Peter Carrington
Peter Carrington, an illustrator from Manchester, makes artworks about  science, natural history and his struggle to gain knowledge. As Carrington states, 
"I’ve always had an interest in science and nature, and during my studies I decided to combine this with my practice. Through deeper research into different scientific areas it quickly became apparent that, due to having dyslexia, I was never going to get a grip of the topics to make work that wasn’t shallow and ill-informed. I became frustrated that I wouldn’t be able to use the visual language of the sciences that I had become obsessed with. It was at this point that this frustration became the forefront of the work and the drawings became a portrait of me and my struggle with dyslexia. I began using the visuals of science and natural history journals to create seemingly scientific illustrations."
Carrington’s work harkens back to the history of biology and botany, where drawing and labels were the key to all knowledge, then he adds his own bit of mystical influence. Now Carrington is focusing on the human need for order. Through labels and numbers he demonstrates our need to categorize. To see more of his work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Peter Carrington
Peter Carrington, an illustrator from Manchester, makes artworks about  science, natural history and his struggle to gain knowledge. As Carrington states, 
"I’ve always had an interest in science and nature, and during my studies I decided to combine this with my practice. Through deeper research into different scientific areas it quickly became apparent that, due to having dyslexia, I was never going to get a grip of the topics to make work that wasn’t shallow and ill-informed. I became frustrated that I wouldn’t be able to use the visual language of the sciences that I had become obsessed with. It was at this point that this frustration became the forefront of the work and the drawings became a portrait of me and my struggle with dyslexia. I began using the visuals of science and natural history journals to create seemingly scientific illustrations."
Carrington’s work harkens back to the history of biology and botany, where drawing and labels were the key to all knowledge, then he adds his own bit of mystical influence. Now Carrington is focusing on the human need for order. Through labels and numbers he demonstrates our need to categorize. To see more of his work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Peter Carrington
Peter Carrington, an illustrator from Manchester, makes artworks about  science, natural history and his struggle to gain knowledge. As Carrington states, 
"I’ve always had an interest in science and nature, and during my studies I decided to combine this with my practice. Through deeper research into different scientific areas it quickly became apparent that, due to having dyslexia, I was never going to get a grip of the topics to make work that wasn’t shallow and ill-informed. I became frustrated that I wouldn’t be able to use the visual language of the sciences that I had become obsessed with. It was at this point that this frustration became the forefront of the work and the drawings became a portrait of me and my struggle with dyslexia. I began using the visuals of science and natural history journals to create seemingly scientific illustrations."
Carrington’s work harkens back to the history of biology and botany, where drawing and labels were the key to all knowledge, then he adds his own bit of mystical influence. Now Carrington is focusing on the human need for order. Through labels and numbers he demonstrates our need to categorize. To see more of his work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Peter Carrington
Peter Carrington, an illustrator from Manchester, makes artworks about  science, natural history and his struggle to gain knowledge. As Carrington states, 
"I’ve always had an interest in science and nature, and during my studies I decided to combine this with my practice. Through deeper research into different scientific areas it quickly became apparent that, due to having dyslexia, I was never going to get a grip of the topics to make work that wasn’t shallow and ill-informed. I became frustrated that I wouldn’t be able to use the visual language of the sciences that I had become obsessed with. It was at this point that this frustration became the forefront of the work and the drawings became a portrait of me and my struggle with dyslexia. I began using the visuals of science and natural history journals to create seemingly scientific illustrations."
Carrington’s work harkens back to the history of biology and botany, where drawing and labels were the key to all knowledge, then he adds his own bit of mystical influence. Now Carrington is focusing on the human need for order. Through labels and numbers he demonstrates our need to categorize. To see more of his work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Peter Carrington
Peter Carrington, an illustrator from Manchester, makes artworks about  science, natural history and his struggle to gain knowledge. As Carrington states, 
"I’ve always had an interest in science and nature, and during my studies I decided to combine this with my practice. Through deeper research into different scientific areas it quickly became apparent that, due to having dyslexia, I was never going to get a grip of the topics to make work that wasn’t shallow and ill-informed. I became frustrated that I wouldn’t be able to use the visual language of the sciences that I had become obsessed with. It was at this point that this frustration became the forefront of the work and the drawings became a portrait of me and my struggle with dyslexia. I began using the visuals of science and natural history journals to create seemingly scientific illustrations."
Carrington’s work harkens back to the history of biology and botany, where drawing and labels were the key to all knowledge, then he adds his own bit of mystical influence. Now Carrington is focusing on the human need for order. Through labels and numbers he demonstrates our need to categorize. To see more of his work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Moritz Resl’s Polytrauma
Moritz Resl, a multi-disciplinary artist who is currently enrolled in the MFA Art and Science at the University of Applied Arts Vienna, spent several months at the Research Institute of Wildlife Ecology in Vienna to create his series Polytrauma. As the artist describes the experience, 
“As an artist, entering a scientific environment, my goal was to become acquainted with the field and the specific everyday routine of the institute by using ethnographic research with an understanding of participatory observation. Within these months I was able to be part of several surgeries and pathological investigations.”
Resl’s pieces is a visual oscillation between understanding and questioning his observations and findings, especially the importance of using protocols during the production of scientific facts. How much of science is interpretation?
For more information on Resl’s series, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Moritz Resl’s Polytrauma
Moritz Resl, a multi-disciplinary artist who is currently enrolled in the MFA Art and Science at the University of Applied Arts Vienna, spent several months at the Research Institute of Wildlife Ecology in Vienna to create his series Polytrauma. As the artist describes the experience, 
“As an artist, entering a scientific environment, my goal was to become acquainted with the field and the specific everyday routine of the institute by using ethnographic research with an understanding of participatory observation. Within these months I was able to be part of several surgeries and pathological investigations.”
Resl’s pieces is a visual oscillation between understanding and questioning his observations and findings, especially the importance of using protocols during the production of scientific facts. How much of science is interpretation?
For more information on Resl’s series, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Moritz Resl’s Polytrauma
Moritz Resl, a multi-disciplinary artist who is currently enrolled in the MFA Art and Science at the University of Applied Arts Vienna, spent several months at the Research Institute of Wildlife Ecology in Vienna to create his series Polytrauma. As the artist describes the experience, 
“As an artist, entering a scientific environment, my goal was to become acquainted with the field and the specific everyday routine of the institute by using ethnographic research with an understanding of participatory observation. Within these months I was able to be part of several surgeries and pathological investigations.”
Resl’s pieces is a visual oscillation between understanding and questioning his observations and findings, especially the importance of using protocols during the production of scientific facts. How much of science is interpretation?
For more information on Resl’s series, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Moritz Resl’s Polytrauma
Moritz Resl, a multi-disciplinary artist who is currently enrolled in the MFA Art and Science at the University of Applied Arts Vienna, spent several months at the Research Institute of Wildlife Ecology in Vienna to create his series Polytrauma. As the artist describes the experience, 
“As an artist, entering a scientific environment, my goal was to become acquainted with the field and the specific everyday routine of the institute by using ethnographic research with an understanding of participatory observation. Within these months I was able to be part of several surgeries and pathological investigations.”
Resl’s pieces is a visual oscillation between understanding and questioning his observations and findings, especially the importance of using protocols during the production of scientific facts. How much of science is interpretation?
For more information on Resl’s series, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Charlotte Caron
In this series of portraits, Charlotte Caron focuses on the complexity of human nature. We are one part civilized and one part wild. As Caron cites the theories by Antoine Spire, we are attracted to human similarities in animals, and we are also attracted to the idea of the bestial human. 
The idea of using mixed media for a portrait is also a rather unique combination. As Caron describes these works,
"The goal is to ultimately create an osmosis between the two mediums [painting and photography], similar to that between the animal and the human."
Or as Marshall McLuhan would say, “the medium is the message.” For more on Charlotte Caron, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Charlotte Caron
In this series of portraits, Charlotte Caron focuses on the complexity of human nature. We are one part civilized and one part wild. As Caron cites the theories by Antoine Spire, we are attracted to human similarities in animals, and we are also attracted to the idea of the bestial human. 
The idea of using mixed media for a portrait is also a rather unique combination. As Caron describes these works,
"The goal is to ultimately create an osmosis between the two mediums [painting and photography], similar to that between the animal and the human."
Or as Marshall McLuhan would say, “the medium is the message.” For more on Charlotte Caron, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Charlotte Caron
In this series of portraits, Charlotte Caron focuses on the complexity of human nature. We are one part civilized and one part wild. As Caron cites the theories by Antoine Spire, we are attracted to human similarities in animals, and we are also attracted to the idea of the bestial human. 
The idea of using mixed media for a portrait is also a rather unique combination. As Caron describes these works,
"The goal is to ultimately create an osmosis between the two mediums [painting and photography], similar to that between the animal and the human."
Or as Marshall McLuhan would say, “the medium is the message.” For more on Charlotte Caron, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Charlotte Caron
In this series of portraits, Charlotte Caron focuses on the complexity of human nature. We are one part civilized and one part wild. As Caron cites the theories by Antoine Spire, we are attracted to human similarities in animals, and we are also attracted to the idea of the bestial human. 
The idea of using mixed media for a portrait is also a rather unique combination. As Caron describes these works,
"The goal is to ultimately create an osmosis between the two mediums [painting and photography], similar to that between the animal and the human."
Or as Marshall McLuhan would say, “the medium is the message.” For more on Charlotte Caron, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Charlotte Caron
In this series of portraits, Charlotte Caron focuses on the complexity of human nature. We are one part civilized and one part wild. As Caron cites the theories by Antoine Spire, we are attracted to human similarities in animals, and we are also attracted to the idea of the bestial human. 
The idea of using mixed media for a portrait is also a rather unique combination. As Caron describes these works,
"The goal is to ultimately create an osmosis between the two mediums [painting and photography], similar to that between the animal and the human."
Or as Marshall McLuhan would say, “the medium is the message.” For more on Charlotte Caron, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Charlotte Caron
In this series of portraits, Charlotte Caron focuses on the complexity of human nature. We are one part civilized and one part wild. As Caron cites the theories by Antoine Spire, we are attracted to human similarities in animals, and we are also attracted to the idea of the bestial human. 
The idea of using mixed media for a portrait is also a rather unique combination. As Caron describes these works,
"The goal is to ultimately create an osmosis between the two mediums [painting and photography], similar to that between the animal and the human."
Or as Marshall McLuhan would say, “the medium is the message.” For more on Charlotte Caron, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Charlotte Caron
In this series of portraits, Charlotte Caron focuses on the complexity of human nature. We are one part civilized and one part wild. As Caron cites the theories by Antoine Spire, we are attracted to human similarities in animals, and we are also attracted to the idea of the bestial human. 
The idea of using mixed media for a portrait is also a rather unique combination. As Caron describes these works,
"The goal is to ultimately create an osmosis between the two mediums [painting and photography], similar to that between the animal and the human."
Or as Marshall McLuhan would say, “the medium is the message.” For more on Charlotte Caron, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Charlotte Caron
In this series of portraits, Charlotte Caron focuses on the complexity of human nature. We are one part civilized and one part wild. As Caron cites the theories by Antoine Spire, we are attracted to human similarities in animals, and we are also attracted to the idea of the bestial human. 
The idea of using mixed media for a portrait is also a rather unique combination. As Caron describes these works,
"The goal is to ultimately create an osmosis between the two mediums [painting and photography], similar to that between the animal and the human."
Or as Marshall McLuhan would say, “the medium is the message.” For more on Charlotte Caron, click here. 
- Lee Jones

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