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Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch

Home Sweet Home

Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).

With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 

With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.

Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?

A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ aki inomata anna paluch hermit crabs animals shells plastic scanning technology 3D Printing art science art and science journal ct scan shelter home physiology architecture biology
Build and Repair: 3-D Printing

As we have already seen here with a t-rex, the human face and a lack of support, 3-D printing has already proven itself to be one of the most innovative and expansive technologies in the designing of art objects. It allows artists to construct any image they create through a series of algorithms, making the possibilities for creative output endless. However, two stories were released in the news this week that attest to the real-life uses for 3-D printing as well: the first ever 3-D printed room, and the first 3-D printed jaw transplant.

Firstly, the 3-D printed room is called Digital Grotesque, the result of a collaboration between two architects - Michael Hansmeyer and Benjamin Dillenburger. Their goal in the completion of the 16 square meter grotto was to craft an uncanny, chaotic space, existing between the binaries of the natural and the artificial. Made entirely out of sandstone and algorithms, the room also serves as an unique exploration of 3-D printing as a technology. The grotto itself is fantastic to behold, melding different types of imagery together - including human bone structures - to create a towering cathedral space. The architects involved think that 3-D printing might be the next step to restore historical buildings without damaging the original structure.

The second story that puts 3-D printing in the limelight is the world’s first 3-D printed jaw transplant. The recipient, an 83 year old woman, received the jaw after developing a chronic bone infection. The jaw itself is made of titanium, built layer by thousands of layers. The patient regained her ability to speak only a few hours after surgery. This development is majorly important for the future of artificial body parts; the printed ‘bones’ can be modified for each recipient and be accepted by the body.

To view the Digital Grotesque video, click here.

- Lea Hamilton

Sources: Popsci
Images: Digital Grotesque copyrighted to Hansmeyer/Dillenburger
Build and Repair: 3-D Printing

As we have already seen here with a t-rex, the human face and a lack of support, 3-D printing has already proven itself to be one of the most innovative and expansive technologies in the designing of art objects. It allows artists to construct any image they create through a series of algorithms, making the possibilities for creative output endless. However, two stories were released in the news this week that attest to the real-life uses for 3-D printing as well: the first ever 3-D printed room, and the first 3-D printed jaw transplant.

Firstly, the 3-D printed room is called Digital Grotesque, the result of a collaboration between two architects - Michael Hansmeyer and Benjamin Dillenburger. Their goal in the completion of the 16 square meter grotto was to craft an uncanny, chaotic space, existing between the binaries of the natural and the artificial. Made entirely out of sandstone and algorithms, the room also serves as an unique exploration of 3-D printing as a technology. The grotto itself is fantastic to behold, melding different types of imagery together - including human bone structures - to create a towering cathedral space. The architects involved think that 3-D printing might be the next step to restore historical buildings without damaging the original structure.

The second story that puts 3-D printing in the limelight is the world’s first 3-D printed jaw transplant. The recipient, an 83 year old woman, received the jaw after developing a chronic bone infection. The jaw itself is made of titanium, built layer by thousands of layers. The patient regained her ability to speak only a few hours after surgery. This development is majorly important for the future of artificial body parts; the printed ‘bones’ can be modified for each recipient and be accepted by the body.

To view the Digital Grotesque video, click here.

- Lea Hamilton

Sources: Popsci
Images: Digital Grotesque copyrighted to Hansmeyer/Dillenburger

Build and Repair: 3-D Printing


As we have already seen here with a t-rex, the human face and a lack of support, 3-D printing has already proven itself to be one of the most innovative and expansive technologies in the designing of art objects. It allows artists to construct any image they create through a series of algorithms, making the possibilities for creative output endless. However, two stories were released in the news this week that attest to the real-life uses for 3-D printing as well: the first ever 3-D printed room, and the first 3-D printed jaw transplant.

Firstly, the 3-D printed room is called Digital Grotesque, the result of a collaboration between two architects - Michael Hansmeyer and Benjamin Dillenburger. Their goal in the completion of the 16 square meter grotto was to craft an uncanny, chaotic space, existing between the binaries of the natural and the artificial. Made entirely out of sandstone and algorithms, the room also serves as an unique exploration of 3-D printing as a technology. The grotto itself is fantastic to behold, melding different types of imagery together - including human bone structures - to create a towering cathedral space. The architects involved think that 3-D printing might be the next step to restore historical buildings without damaging the original structure.

The second story that puts 3-D printing in the limelight is the world’s first 3-D printed jaw transplant. The recipient, an 83 year old woman, received the jaw after developing a chronic bone infection. The jaw itself is made of titanium, built layer by thousands of layers. The patient regained her ability to speak only a few hours after surgery. This development is majorly important for the future of artificial body parts; the printed ‘bones’ can be modified for each recipient and be accepted by the body.

To view the Digital Grotesque video, click here.

- Lea Hamilton


Sources: Popsci

Images: Digital Grotesque copyrighted to Hansmeyer/Dillenburger

2 Photos
/ Lea Hamilton 3-D printing architecture jaw mandible art science bioengineering Hansmeyer Dillenburger grotesque bones body cathedral building technology
Doug Aitken's Mirror at the Seattle Art Museum

American multimedia and light artist Doug Aitken’s new installation Mirror strives to be a living museum, a dynamic representation of the constantly changing urban core of Seattle. Installed permanently on the north-west corner of the Seattle Art Museum, Mirror was unveiled this past Sunday and has since been received very warmly by the online community. 
Described as a “living kaleidoscope,” the installation responds to changes in weather conditions, pedestrian movement, and lighting conditions. Referring to its reservoir of hundreds of hours of video footage, the installation uses data from its sensors to compose these moving images, choreographing them in unexpected ways. Most interestingly, the installation has been programmed in such a way that the same sequence never occurs twice — it is constantly generating new sequences, all the while doing so in a way that responds to the unique changes in the city’s environmental conditions. The effect is a perpetually moving light show, an incessant video montage that is constantly reinventing itself.
The footage used was shot all around the region of Seattle, including but not limited to neighbouring mountain ranges and the city of Seattle itself. In this sense, Mirror is not merely a reflection of Seattle’s urban core — instead, it is a totalizing representation of the environment surrounding and affecting the very hustle and bustle of the city itself. Its constant visual manifestation of every minute of Seattle life calls into question philosophical notions of space and time, and its juxtaposition of rural and urban imagery provides a valuable reminder of the larger environment of which cities are a part. If Mirror is anything like Aitken’s past installations, it is sure to spark interesting dialogues, and hopefully some that delve deeper than the phrase “very cool,” the general consensus on the Internet thus far.
Although it may be a permanent fixture of the SAM, the installation is experimental at its core, so its very essence is its ability to grow and evolve over time. We will be watching the evolution of Mirror closely. If any of you happen upon this installation in real life, drop us a line — we’d love to hear about it! 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Doug Aitken's Mirror at the Seattle Art Museum

American multimedia and light artist Doug Aitken’s new installation Mirror strives to be a living museum, a dynamic representation of the constantly changing urban core of Seattle. Installed permanently on the north-west corner of the Seattle Art Museum, Mirror was unveiled this past Sunday and has since been received very warmly by the online community. 
Described as a “living kaleidoscope,” the installation responds to changes in weather conditions, pedestrian movement, and lighting conditions. Referring to its reservoir of hundreds of hours of video footage, the installation uses data from its sensors to compose these moving images, choreographing them in unexpected ways. Most interestingly, the installation has been programmed in such a way that the same sequence never occurs twice — it is constantly generating new sequences, all the while doing so in a way that responds to the unique changes in the city’s environmental conditions. The effect is a perpetually moving light show, an incessant video montage that is constantly reinventing itself.
The footage used was shot all around the region of Seattle, including but not limited to neighbouring mountain ranges and the city of Seattle itself. In this sense, Mirror is not merely a reflection of Seattle’s urban core — instead, it is a totalizing representation of the environment surrounding and affecting the very hustle and bustle of the city itself. Its constant visual manifestation of every minute of Seattle life calls into question philosophical notions of space and time, and its juxtaposition of rural and urban imagery provides a valuable reminder of the larger environment of which cities are a part. If Mirror is anything like Aitken’s past installations, it is sure to spark interesting dialogues, and hopefully some that delve deeper than the phrase “very cool,” the general consensus on the Internet thus far.
Although it may be a permanent fixture of the SAM, the installation is experimental at its core, so its very essence is its ability to grow and evolve over time. We will be watching the evolution of Mirror closely. If any of you happen upon this installation in real life, drop us a line — we’d love to hear about it! 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Doug Aitken's Mirror at the Seattle Art Museum

American multimedia and light artist Doug Aitken’s new installation Mirror strives to be a living museum, a dynamic representation of the constantly changing urban core of Seattle. Installed permanently on the north-west corner of the Seattle Art Museum, Mirror was unveiled this past Sunday and has since been received very warmly by the online community. 
Described as a “living kaleidoscope,” the installation responds to changes in weather conditions, pedestrian movement, and lighting conditions. Referring to its reservoir of hundreds of hours of video footage, the installation uses data from its sensors to compose these moving images, choreographing them in unexpected ways. Most interestingly, the installation has been programmed in such a way that the same sequence never occurs twice — it is constantly generating new sequences, all the while doing so in a way that responds to the unique changes in the city’s environmental conditions. The effect is a perpetually moving light show, an incessant video montage that is constantly reinventing itself.
The footage used was shot all around the region of Seattle, including but not limited to neighbouring mountain ranges and the city of Seattle itself. In this sense, Mirror is not merely a reflection of Seattle’s urban core — instead, it is a totalizing representation of the environment surrounding and affecting the very hustle and bustle of the city itself. Its constant visual manifestation of every minute of Seattle life calls into question philosophical notions of space and time, and its juxtaposition of rural and urban imagery provides a valuable reminder of the larger environment of which cities are a part. If Mirror is anything like Aitken’s past installations, it is sure to spark interesting dialogues, and hopefully some that delve deeper than the phrase “very cool,” the general consensus on the Internet thus far.
Although it may be a permanent fixture of the SAM, the installation is experimental at its core, so its very essence is its ability to grow and evolve over time. We will be watching the evolution of Mirror closely. If any of you happen upon this installation in real life, drop us a line — we’d love to hear about it! 
- Gabrielle Doiron

Doug Aitken's Mirror at the Seattle Art Museum

American multimedia and light artist Doug Aitken’s new installation Mirror strives to be a living museum, a dynamic representation of the constantly changing urban core of Seattle. Installed permanently on the north-west corner of the Seattle Art MuseumMirror was unveiled this past Sunday and has since been received very warmly by the online community. 

Described as a “living kaleidoscope,” the installation responds to changes in weather conditions, pedestrian movement, and lighting conditions. Referring to its reservoir of hundreds of hours of video footage, the installation uses data from its sensors to compose these moving images, choreographing them in unexpected ways. Most interestingly, the installation has been programmed in such a way that the same sequence never occurs twice — it is constantly generating new sequences, all the while doing so in a way that responds to the unique changes in the city’s environmental conditions. The effect is a perpetually moving light show, an incessant video montage that is constantly reinventing itself.

The footage used was shot all around the region of Seattle, including but not limited to neighbouring mountain ranges and the city of Seattle itself. In this sense, Mirror is not merely a reflection of Seattle’s urban core — instead, it is a totalizing representation of the environment surrounding and affecting the very hustle and bustle of the city itself. Its constant visual manifestation of every minute of Seattle life calls into question philosophical notions of space and time, and its juxtaposition of rural and urban imagery provides a valuable reminder of the larger environment of which cities are a part. If Mirror is anything like Aitken’s past installations, it is sure to spark interesting dialogues, and hopefully some that delve deeper than the phrase “very cool,” the general consensus on the Internet thus far.

Although it may be a permanent fixture of the SAM, the installation is experimental at its core, so its very essence is its ability to grow and evolve over time. We will be watching the evolution of Mirror closely. If any of you happen upon this installation in real life, drop us a line — we’d love to hear about it! 

Gabrielle Doiron

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ art architecture Seattle Doug Aitken technology video Gabrielle Doiron Seattle Art Museum
Maya Lin
Maya Lin creates both art and architecture, and this is event in all of her works. Her works are inspired by landscapes and our natural environment. As her website states,
"She peers curiously at the landscape through a twenty-first century lens, merging rational and technological order with notions of beauty and the transcendental. Utilizing technological methods to study and visualize the natural world, Ms. Lin takes micro and macro views of the earth, sonar resonance scans, aerial and satellite mapping devices and translates that information into sculptures, drawings and environmental installations. Her works address how we relate and respond to the environment, and presents new ways of looking at the world around us."
For more of Lin’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Maya Lin
Maya Lin creates both art and architecture, and this is event in all of her works. Her works are inspired by landscapes and our natural environment. As her website states,
"She peers curiously at the landscape through a twenty-first century lens, merging rational and technological order with notions of beauty and the transcendental. Utilizing technological methods to study and visualize the natural world, Ms. Lin takes micro and macro views of the earth, sonar resonance scans, aerial and satellite mapping devices and translates that information into sculptures, drawings and environmental installations. Her works address how we relate and respond to the environment, and presents new ways of looking at the world around us."
For more of Lin’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
The James Stewart Centre for Mathematics
I recently came across images of the 2003 renovation of the James Stewart Centre for Mathematics at McMaster University in Hamilton. On the outside, the building looks like a typical Hogwarts-like castle, but on the inside it’s really something different. As Garth Zimmer, a member of the design team, describes the project,
“The objective was to strengthen the identity of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and to create a facility that recognizes the interactive nature of mathematics with spaces that promote team-based study and research. The design concept imposed a highly modern interior onto the historic Collegiate Gothic exterior. The interior demolition revealed the concrete post-and-beam construction. A new insulated envelope was inserted to preserve the original stone cladding of the exterior wall and the windows. Portions of the floor slabs were removed to create “the void”, which, articulated in blue glass, visually connects the building’s four storeys. Skylit openings at its east and west end allow natural light to be drawn deep into the interior spaces.”
This renovation gives a sense of identity to the building and faculty. The many chalkboards demonstrate Math’s creativity and the glass environment creates a sense of awe. What a beautiful and inspiring building! For more information, click here. 
- Lee Jones
The James Stewart Centre for Mathematics
I recently came across images of the 2003 renovation of the James Stewart Centre for Mathematics at McMaster University in Hamilton. On the outside, the building looks like a typical Hogwarts-like castle, but on the inside it’s really something different. As Garth Zimmer, a member of the design team, describes the project,
“The objective was to strengthen the identity of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and to create a facility that recognizes the interactive nature of mathematics with spaces that promote team-based study and research. The design concept imposed a highly modern interior onto the historic Collegiate Gothic exterior. The interior demolition revealed the concrete post-and-beam construction. A new insulated envelope was inserted to preserve the original stone cladding of the exterior wall and the windows. Portions of the floor slabs were removed to create “the void”, which, articulated in blue glass, visually connects the building’s four storeys. Skylit openings at its east and west end allow natural light to be drawn deep into the interior spaces.”
This renovation gives a sense of identity to the building and faculty. The many chalkboards demonstrate Math’s creativity and the glass environment creates a sense of awe. What a beautiful and inspiring building! For more information, click here. 
- Lee Jones
The James Stewart Centre for Mathematics
I recently came across images of the 2003 renovation of the James Stewart Centre for Mathematics at McMaster University in Hamilton. On the outside, the building looks like a typical Hogwarts-like castle, but on the inside it’s really something different. As Garth Zimmer, a member of the design team, describes the project,
“The objective was to strengthen the identity of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and to create a facility that recognizes the interactive nature of mathematics with spaces that promote team-based study and research. The design concept imposed a highly modern interior onto the historic Collegiate Gothic exterior. The interior demolition revealed the concrete post-and-beam construction. A new insulated envelope was inserted to preserve the original stone cladding of the exterior wall and the windows. Portions of the floor slabs were removed to create “the void”, which, articulated in blue glass, visually connects the building’s four storeys. Skylit openings at its east and west end allow natural light to be drawn deep into the interior spaces.”
This renovation gives a sense of identity to the building and faculty. The many chalkboards demonstrate Math’s creativity and the glass environment creates a sense of awe. What a beautiful and inspiring building! For more information, click here. 
- Lee Jones
The James Stewart Centre for Mathematics
I recently came across images of the 2003 renovation of the James Stewart Centre for Mathematics at McMaster University in Hamilton. On the outside, the building looks like a typical Hogwarts-like castle, but on the inside it’s really something different. As Garth Zimmer, a member of the design team, describes the project,
“The objective was to strengthen the identity of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and to create a facility that recognizes the interactive nature of mathematics with spaces that promote team-based study and research. The design concept imposed a highly modern interior onto the historic Collegiate Gothic exterior. The interior demolition revealed the concrete post-and-beam construction. A new insulated envelope was inserted to preserve the original stone cladding of the exterior wall and the windows. Portions of the floor slabs were removed to create “the void”, which, articulated in blue glass, visually connects the building’s four storeys. Skylit openings at its east and west end allow natural light to be drawn deep into the interior spaces.”
This renovation gives a sense of identity to the building and faculty. The many chalkboards demonstrate Math’s creativity and the glass environment creates a sense of awe. What a beautiful and inspiring building! For more information, click here. 
- Lee Jones
The James Stewart Centre for Mathematics
I recently came across images of the 2003 renovation of the James Stewart Centre for Mathematics at McMaster University in Hamilton. On the outside, the building looks like a typical Hogwarts-like castle, but on the inside it’s really something different. As Garth Zimmer, a member of the design team, describes the project,
“The objective was to strengthen the identity of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and to create a facility that recognizes the interactive nature of mathematics with spaces that promote team-based study and research. The design concept imposed a highly modern interior onto the historic Collegiate Gothic exterior. The interior demolition revealed the concrete post-and-beam construction. A new insulated envelope was inserted to preserve the original stone cladding of the exterior wall and the windows. Portions of the floor slabs were removed to create “the void”, which, articulated in blue glass, visually connects the building’s four storeys. Skylit openings at its east and west end allow natural light to be drawn deep into the interior spaces.”
This renovation gives a sense of identity to the building and faculty. The many chalkboards demonstrate Math’s creativity and the glass environment creates a sense of awe. What a beautiful and inspiring building! For more information, click here. 
- Lee Jones

The James Stewart Centre for Mathematics

I recently came across images of the 2003 renovation of the James Stewart Centre for Mathematics at McMaster University in Hamilton. On the outside, the building looks like a typical Hogwarts-like castle, but on the inside it’s really something different. As Garth Zimmer, a member of the design team, describes the project,

The objective was to strengthen the identity of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and to create a facility that recognizes the interactive nature of mathematics with spaces that promote team-based study and research. The design concept imposed a highly modern interior onto the historic Collegiate Gothic exterior. The interior demolition revealed the concrete post-and-beam construction. A new insulated envelope was inserted to preserve the original stone cladding of the exterior wall and the windows. Portions of the floor slabs were removed to create “the void”, which, articulated in blue glass, visually connects the building’s four storeys. Skylit openings at its east and west end allow natural light to be drawn deep into the interior spaces.”

This renovation gives a sense of identity to the building and faculty. The many chalkboards demonstrate Math’s creativity and the glass environment creates a sense of awe. What a beautiful and inspiring building! For more information, click here. 

- Lee Jones

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

5 Photos
/ art science math architecture McMaster University Hamilton lee jones
Jerry Wayne Downs
Artist Jerry Wayne Downs – a former animator for Disney – painted these interpretations of American landmarks for a series titled I Remember California. While these worlds certainly recall the disorienting effects of Escher’s mathematical prints as well as the dream-like atmospheres popularized by surrealists like Dali, one can safely assume that Downs’s career as an animator had a hand in his creative process.
Neither conclusively dystopian nor entirely utopian, Downs’s paintings still depict “topias” of other kinds. Themes of technology, ecology, and politics work their way into Downs’s imagined, futuristic worlds, prompting questions about the fragility of our present.
See more of Downs’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Jerry Wayne Downs
Artist Jerry Wayne Downs – a former animator for Disney – painted these interpretations of American landmarks for a series titled I Remember California. While these worlds certainly recall the disorienting effects of Escher’s mathematical prints as well as the dream-like atmospheres popularized by surrealists like Dali, one can safely assume that Downs’s career as an animator had a hand in his creative process.
Neither conclusively dystopian nor entirely utopian, Downs’s paintings still depict “topias” of other kinds. Themes of technology, ecology, and politics work their way into Downs’s imagined, futuristic worlds, prompting questions about the fragility of our present.
See more of Downs’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Jerry Wayne Downs
Artist Jerry Wayne Downs – a former animator for Disney – painted these interpretations of American landmarks for a series titled I Remember California. While these worlds certainly recall the disorienting effects of Escher’s mathematical prints as well as the dream-like atmospheres popularized by surrealists like Dali, one can safely assume that Downs’s career as an animator had a hand in his creative process.
Neither conclusively dystopian nor entirely utopian, Downs’s paintings still depict “topias” of other kinds. Themes of technology, ecology, and politics work their way into Downs’s imagined, futuristic worlds, prompting questions about the fragility of our present.
See more of Downs’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Jerry Wayne Downs
Artist Jerry Wayne Downs – a former animator for Disney – painted these interpretations of American landmarks for a series titled I Remember California. While these worlds certainly recall the disorienting effects of Escher’s mathematical prints as well as the dream-like atmospheres popularized by surrealists like Dali, one can safely assume that Downs’s career as an animator had a hand in his creative process.
Neither conclusively dystopian nor entirely utopian, Downs’s paintings still depict “topias” of other kinds. Themes of technology, ecology, and politics work their way into Downs’s imagined, futuristic worlds, prompting questions about the fragility of our present.
See more of Downs’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Jerry Wayne Downs
Artist Jerry Wayne Downs – a former animator for Disney – painted these interpretations of American landmarks for a series titled I Remember California. While these worlds certainly recall the disorienting effects of Escher’s mathematical prints as well as the dream-like atmospheres popularized by surrealists like Dali, one can safely assume that Downs’s career as an animator had a hand in his creative process.
Neither conclusively dystopian nor entirely utopian, Downs’s paintings still depict “topias” of other kinds. Themes of technology, ecology, and politics work their way into Downs’s imagined, futuristic worlds, prompting questions about the fragility of our present.
See more of Downs’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Jerry Wayne Downs
Artist Jerry Wayne Downs – a former animator for Disney – painted these interpretations of American landmarks for a series titled I Remember California. While these worlds certainly recall the disorienting effects of Escher’s mathematical prints as well as the dream-like atmospheres popularized by surrealists like Dali, one can safely assume that Downs’s career as an animator had a hand in his creative process.
Neither conclusively dystopian nor entirely utopian, Downs’s paintings still depict “topias” of other kinds. Themes of technology, ecology, and politics work their way into Downs’s imagined, futuristic worlds, prompting questions about the fragility of our present.
See more of Downs’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Jerry Wayne Downs
Artist Jerry Wayne Downs – a former animator for Disney – painted these interpretations of American landmarks for a series titled I Remember California. While these worlds certainly recall the disorienting effects of Escher’s mathematical prints as well as the dream-like atmospheres popularized by surrealists like Dali, one can safely assume that Downs’s career as an animator had a hand in his creative process.
Neither conclusively dystopian nor entirely utopian, Downs’s paintings still depict “topias” of other kinds. Themes of technology, ecology, and politics work their way into Downs’s imagined, futuristic worlds, prompting questions about the fragility of our present.
See more of Downs’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Jerry Wayne Downs
Artist Jerry Wayne Downs – a former animator for Disney – painted these interpretations of American landmarks for a series titled I Remember California. While these worlds certainly recall the disorienting effects of Escher’s mathematical prints as well as the dream-like atmospheres popularized by surrealists like Dali, one can safely assume that Downs’s career as an animator had a hand in his creative process.
Neither conclusively dystopian nor entirely utopian, Downs’s paintings still depict “topias” of other kinds. Themes of technology, ecology, and politics work their way into Downs’s imagined, futuristic worlds, prompting questions about the fragility of our present.
See more of Downs’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Luftschloss [Cloud Castle]
In this piece Anna Borgman and Candy Lenk combine art and architecture. As they describe the piece, which means Cloud Castle, they state,
"For us the installation oscillates between permanence and volatility, the grounded tectonics of a construction site and the placeless hovering of a cloud. This installation is about unrealised plans and the atmosphere of unfinished places. It is about an in between state that becomes permanent. We are interested in the transitional form as a final gestalt of object and place."
The work is visually stunning, but there’s a message behind the aesthetics. “It is a reaction of the atmosphere in a satellite town of Berlin. This town with the name Hellersdorf stands for one of East-Berlin‘s largest new housing developments started in 1979. By the time of the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, construction had not been completed; only 34.000 of 46.000 apartments were finished. During the 1990s the neighbourhood centre, Helle Mitte, was constructed to further develop the area. Most of the building construction had been completed by 1998. Due to the bankruptcy of the development agency and missing public funds, especially the planned improvements to the public realm remained incomplete and have shaped the unfinished image of  the place ever since.”
For more on their work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Luftschloss [Cloud Castle]
In this piece Anna Borgman and Candy Lenk combine art and architecture. As they describe the piece, which means Cloud Castle, they state,
"For us the installation oscillates between permanence and volatility, the grounded tectonics of a construction site and the placeless hovering of a cloud. This installation is about unrealised plans and the atmosphere of unfinished places. It is about an in between state that becomes permanent. We are interested in the transitional form as a final gestalt of object and place."
The work is visually stunning, but there’s a message behind the aesthetics. “It is a reaction of the atmosphere in a satellite town of Berlin. This town with the name Hellersdorf stands for one of East-Berlin‘s largest new housing developments started in 1979. By the time of the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, construction had not been completed; only 34.000 of 46.000 apartments were finished. During the 1990s the neighbourhood centre, Helle Mitte, was constructed to further develop the area. Most of the building construction had been completed by 1998. Due to the bankruptcy of the development agency and missing public funds, especially the planned improvements to the public realm remained incomplete and have shaped the unfinished image of  the place ever since.”
For more on their work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Luftschloss [Cloud Castle]
In this piece Anna Borgman and Candy Lenk combine art and architecture. As they describe the piece, which means Cloud Castle, they state,
"For us the installation oscillates between permanence and volatility, the grounded tectonics of a construction site and the placeless hovering of a cloud. This installation is about unrealised plans and the atmosphere of unfinished places. It is about an in between state that becomes permanent. We are interested in the transitional form as a final gestalt of object and place."
The work is visually stunning, but there’s a message behind the aesthetics. “It is a reaction of the atmosphere in a satellite town of Berlin. This town with the name Hellersdorf stands for one of East-Berlin‘s largest new housing developments started in 1979. By the time of the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, construction had not been completed; only 34.000 of 46.000 apartments were finished. During the 1990s the neighbourhood centre, Helle Mitte, was constructed to further develop the area. Most of the building construction had been completed by 1998. Due to the bankruptcy of the development agency and missing public funds, especially the planned improvements to the public realm remained incomplete and have shaped the unfinished image of  the place ever since.”
For more on their work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Luftschloss [Cloud Castle]
In this piece Anna Borgman and Candy Lenk combine art and architecture. As they describe the piece, which means Cloud Castle, they state,
"For us the installation oscillates between permanence and volatility, the grounded tectonics of a construction site and the placeless hovering of a cloud. This installation is about unrealised plans and the atmosphere of unfinished places. It is about an in between state that becomes permanent. We are interested in the transitional form as a final gestalt of object and place."
The work is visually stunning, but there’s a message behind the aesthetics. “It is a reaction of the atmosphere in a satellite town of Berlin. This town with the name Hellersdorf stands for one of East-Berlin‘s largest new housing developments started in 1979. By the time of the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, construction had not been completed; only 34.000 of 46.000 apartments were finished. During the 1990s the neighbourhood centre, Helle Mitte, was constructed to further develop the area. Most of the building construction had been completed by 1998. Due to the bankruptcy of the development agency and missing public funds, especially the planned improvements to the public realm remained incomplete and have shaped the unfinished image of  the place ever since.”
For more on their work, click here. 
- Lee Jones

Luftschloss [Cloud Castle]

In this piece Anna Borgman and Candy Lenk combine art and architecture. As they describe the piece, which means Cloud Castle, they state,

"For us the installation oscillates between permanence and volatility, the grounded tectonics of a construction site and the placeless hovering of a cloud. This installation is about unrealised plans and the atmosphere of unfinished places. It is about an in between state that becomes permanent. We are interested in the transitional form as a final gestalt of object and place."

The work is visually stunning, but there’s a message behind the aesthetics. “It is a reaction of the atmosphere in a satellite town of Berlin. This town with the name Hellersdorf stands for one of East-Berlin‘s largest new housing developments started in 1979. By the time of the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, construction had not been completed; only 34.000 of 46.000 apartments were finished. During the 1990s the neighbourhood centre, Helle Mitte, was constructed to further develop the area. Most of the building construction had been completed by 1998. Due to the bankruptcy of the development agency and missing public funds, especially the planned improvements to the public realm remained incomplete and have shaped the unfinished image of  the place ever since.”

For more on their work, click here. 

- Lee Jones

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ art science architecture social awareness installation cloud castle luftschloss
Ruin Academy
What gives a building presence, one that has been abandoned and inevitably caught up in the process of decay? The crumbling walls, broken glass panes, barred windows and doors speak to us in certain ways—some different than others. The question can be asked, how can we re-envision the uninhabited namely, the abandoned and forgotten (factories, apartment blocks, warehouses)—those that stand as testaments to industrial society?
What is Ruin Academy?
Ruin Academy is an independent architectural research center in Taipei city Taiwan. It is run in co-operation between the Casagrande Laboratory in Finland and JUT Foundation for Arts & Architecture Taiwan. Occupying a 5-storey apartment building, Ruin is equipped with large studio and sleeping space for teaching classes and visiting artists, gardens for growing food, and a traditional sauna for relaxation.   
Primarily, Ruin is founded upon the idea of decay meaning, the focus lies beyond the industrial and post-industrial city to that of the decomposing city. This process, or rather evolution is growth—growth from that which once was but can no longer be. Ruin is not an experiment that reflects the modern trend of home renovation or design, but a reaction to the existing conditions of an evolving city. Extracted from the website, “Ruin Academy does not rely on design, but hooks on to the Local Knowledge of the Taipei basin and reacts on this.” This demonstrates a sense of place brought about by the awareness of existing and potential future conditions of the local geographic region. It is focusing on what remains rather, than designing anew—for design itself can ultimately replace reality by concealing existing conditions.  
What are Third Generation cities?
Third Generation cities are those that have grown from the ruin of industrial society but lie beyond its fordist structure of social and economic organization. Elements of Third Generation cities include: Anarchist Gardening (the spontaneous and nomadic construction of community gardens and urban farms that operate outside official urban development), Urban Acupuncture (the design of architecture that is placed in positions throughout the city in order to act as “needles” for producing and increasing the urban Qi), and River Urbanism (a form of landscape urbanism).
Principally, Third Generation cities can be conceived of as rhizomatic in nature and ultimately, bound up with pre-existing and future conditions of human construction. Extracted from the website, “modernism is lost and the industrial machine will become organic. This happens in Taipei and this is what we study. Ruin Academy is an organic machine.” It would seem that it is the atrophy of the city that illumines the nature of the city and defines our age—what will we do with all of the buildings already built, considering by 2050 70% of the world’s population will be living in urban areas and “space” continues to become limited?
In the end, it may not only be a matter of design or perspective in terms of how we look at the city, but what actions we take alongside the natural processes that unfold and transform the spaces we have inhabited, do inhabit, and will come to inhabit. It would seem that the collective space Ruin Academy has created may be just the right start for building, dwelling and thinking.  
 - Lee-Michael J. Pronko
Ruin Academy
What gives a building presence, one that has been abandoned and inevitably caught up in the process of decay? The crumbling walls, broken glass panes, barred windows and doors speak to us in certain ways—some different than others. The question can be asked, how can we re-envision the uninhabited namely, the abandoned and forgotten (factories, apartment blocks, warehouses)—those that stand as testaments to industrial society?
What is Ruin Academy?
Ruin Academy is an independent architectural research center in Taipei city Taiwan. It is run in co-operation between the Casagrande Laboratory in Finland and JUT Foundation for Arts & Architecture Taiwan. Occupying a 5-storey apartment building, Ruin is equipped with large studio and sleeping space for teaching classes and visiting artists, gardens for growing food, and a traditional sauna for relaxation.   
Primarily, Ruin is founded upon the idea of decay meaning, the focus lies beyond the industrial and post-industrial city to that of the decomposing city. This process, or rather evolution is growth—growth from that which once was but can no longer be. Ruin is not an experiment that reflects the modern trend of home renovation or design, but a reaction to the existing conditions of an evolving city. Extracted from the website, “Ruin Academy does not rely on design, but hooks on to the Local Knowledge of the Taipei basin and reacts on this.” This demonstrates a sense of place brought about by the awareness of existing and potential future conditions of the local geographic region. It is focusing on what remains rather, than designing anew—for design itself can ultimately replace reality by concealing existing conditions.  
What are Third Generation cities?
Third Generation cities are those that have grown from the ruin of industrial society but lie beyond its fordist structure of social and economic organization. Elements of Third Generation cities include: Anarchist Gardening (the spontaneous and nomadic construction of community gardens and urban farms that operate outside official urban development), Urban Acupuncture (the design of architecture that is placed in positions throughout the city in order to act as “needles” for producing and increasing the urban Qi), and River Urbanism (a form of landscape urbanism).
Principally, Third Generation cities can be conceived of as rhizomatic in nature and ultimately, bound up with pre-existing and future conditions of human construction. Extracted from the website, “modernism is lost and the industrial machine will become organic. This happens in Taipei and this is what we study. Ruin Academy is an organic machine.” It would seem that it is the atrophy of the city that illumines the nature of the city and defines our age—what will we do with all of the buildings already built, considering by 2050 70% of the world’s population will be living in urban areas and “space” continues to become limited?
In the end, it may not only be a matter of design or perspective in terms of how we look at the city, but what actions we take alongside the natural processes that unfold and transform the spaces we have inhabited, do inhabit, and will come to inhabit. It would seem that the collective space Ruin Academy has created may be just the right start for building, dwelling and thinking.  
 - Lee-Michael J. Pronko
Ruin Academy
What gives a building presence, one that has been abandoned and inevitably caught up in the process of decay? The crumbling walls, broken glass panes, barred windows and doors speak to us in certain ways—some different than others. The question can be asked, how can we re-envision the uninhabited namely, the abandoned and forgotten (factories, apartment blocks, warehouses)—those that stand as testaments to industrial society?
What is Ruin Academy?
Ruin Academy is an independent architectural research center in Taipei city Taiwan. It is run in co-operation between the Casagrande Laboratory in Finland and JUT Foundation for Arts & Architecture Taiwan. Occupying a 5-storey apartment building, Ruin is equipped with large studio and sleeping space for teaching classes and visiting artists, gardens for growing food, and a traditional sauna for relaxation.   
Primarily, Ruin is founded upon the idea of decay meaning, the focus lies beyond the industrial and post-industrial city to that of the decomposing city. This process, or rather evolution is growth—growth from that which once was but can no longer be. Ruin is not an experiment that reflects the modern trend of home renovation or design, but a reaction to the existing conditions of an evolving city. Extracted from the website, “Ruin Academy does not rely on design, but hooks on to the Local Knowledge of the Taipei basin and reacts on this.” This demonstrates a sense of place brought about by the awareness of existing and potential future conditions of the local geographic region. It is focusing on what remains rather, than designing anew—for design itself can ultimately replace reality by concealing existing conditions.  
What are Third Generation cities?
Third Generation cities are those that have grown from the ruin of industrial society but lie beyond its fordist structure of social and economic organization. Elements of Third Generation cities include: Anarchist Gardening (the spontaneous and nomadic construction of community gardens and urban farms that operate outside official urban development), Urban Acupuncture (the design of architecture that is placed in positions throughout the city in order to act as “needles” for producing and increasing the urban Qi), and River Urbanism (a form of landscape urbanism).
Principally, Third Generation cities can be conceived of as rhizomatic in nature and ultimately, bound up with pre-existing and future conditions of human construction. Extracted from the website, “modernism is lost and the industrial machine will become organic. This happens in Taipei and this is what we study. Ruin Academy is an organic machine.” It would seem that it is the atrophy of the city that illumines the nature of the city and defines our age—what will we do with all of the buildings already built, considering by 2050 70% of the world’s population will be living in urban areas and “space” continues to become limited?
In the end, it may not only be a matter of design or perspective in terms of how we look at the city, but what actions we take alongside the natural processes that unfold and transform the spaces we have inhabited, do inhabit, and will come to inhabit. It would seem that the collective space Ruin Academy has created may be just the right start for building, dwelling and thinking.  
 - Lee-Michael J. Pronko
Ruin Academy
What gives a building presence, one that has been abandoned and inevitably caught up in the process of decay? The crumbling walls, broken glass panes, barred windows and doors speak to us in certain ways—some different than others. The question can be asked, how can we re-envision the uninhabited namely, the abandoned and forgotten (factories, apartment blocks, warehouses)—those that stand as testaments to industrial society?
What is Ruin Academy?
Ruin Academy is an independent architectural research center in Taipei city Taiwan. It is run in co-operation between the Casagrande Laboratory in Finland and JUT Foundation for Arts & Architecture Taiwan. Occupying a 5-storey apartment building, Ruin is equipped with large studio and sleeping space for teaching classes and visiting artists, gardens for growing food, and a traditional sauna for relaxation.   
Primarily, Ruin is founded upon the idea of decay meaning, the focus lies beyond the industrial and post-industrial city to that of the decomposing city. This process, or rather evolution is growth—growth from that which once was but can no longer be. Ruin is not an experiment that reflects the modern trend of home renovation or design, but a reaction to the existing conditions of an evolving city. Extracted from the website, “Ruin Academy does not rely on design, but hooks on to the Local Knowledge of the Taipei basin and reacts on this.” This demonstrates a sense of place brought about by the awareness of existing and potential future conditions of the local geographic region. It is focusing on what remains rather, than designing anew—for design itself can ultimately replace reality by concealing existing conditions.  
What are Third Generation cities?
Third Generation cities are those that have grown from the ruin of industrial society but lie beyond its fordist structure of social and economic organization. Elements of Third Generation cities include: Anarchist Gardening (the spontaneous and nomadic construction of community gardens and urban farms that operate outside official urban development), Urban Acupuncture (the design of architecture that is placed in positions throughout the city in order to act as “needles” for producing and increasing the urban Qi), and River Urbanism (a form of landscape urbanism).
Principally, Third Generation cities can be conceived of as rhizomatic in nature and ultimately, bound up with pre-existing and future conditions of human construction. Extracted from the website, “modernism is lost and the industrial machine will become organic. This happens in Taipei and this is what we study. Ruin Academy is an organic machine.” It would seem that it is the atrophy of the city that illumines the nature of the city and defines our age—what will we do with all of the buildings already built, considering by 2050 70% of the world’s population will be living in urban areas and “space” continues to become limited?
In the end, it may not only be a matter of design or perspective in terms of how we look at the city, but what actions we take alongside the natural processes that unfold and transform the spaces we have inhabited, do inhabit, and will come to inhabit. It would seem that the collective space Ruin Academy has created may be just the right start for building, dwelling and thinking.  
 - Lee-Michael J. Pronko
Ruin Academy
What gives a building presence, one that has been abandoned and inevitably caught up in the process of decay? The crumbling walls, broken glass panes, barred windows and doors speak to us in certain ways—some different than others. The question can be asked, how can we re-envision the uninhabited namely, the abandoned and forgotten (factories, apartment blocks, warehouses)—those that stand as testaments to industrial society?
What is Ruin Academy?
Ruin Academy is an independent architectural research center in Taipei city Taiwan. It is run in co-operation between the Casagrande Laboratory in Finland and JUT Foundation for Arts & Architecture Taiwan. Occupying a 5-storey apartment building, Ruin is equipped with large studio and sleeping space for teaching classes and visiting artists, gardens for growing food, and a traditional sauna for relaxation.   
Primarily, Ruin is founded upon the idea of decay meaning, the focus lies beyond the industrial and post-industrial city to that of the decomposing city. This process, or rather evolution is growth—growth from that which once was but can no longer be. Ruin is not an experiment that reflects the modern trend of home renovation or design, but a reaction to the existing conditions of an evolving city. Extracted from the website, “Ruin Academy does not rely on design, but hooks on to the Local Knowledge of the Taipei basin and reacts on this.” This demonstrates a sense of place brought about by the awareness of existing and potential future conditions of the local geographic region. It is focusing on what remains rather, than designing anew—for design itself can ultimately replace reality by concealing existing conditions.  
What are Third Generation cities?
Third Generation cities are those that have grown from the ruin of industrial society but lie beyond its fordist structure of social and economic organization. Elements of Third Generation cities include: Anarchist Gardening (the spontaneous and nomadic construction of community gardens and urban farms that operate outside official urban development), Urban Acupuncture (the design of architecture that is placed in positions throughout the city in order to act as “needles” for producing and increasing the urban Qi), and River Urbanism (a form of landscape urbanism).
Principally, Third Generation cities can be conceived of as rhizomatic in nature and ultimately, bound up with pre-existing and future conditions of human construction. Extracted from the website, “modernism is lost and the industrial machine will become organic. This happens in Taipei and this is what we study. Ruin Academy is an organic machine.” It would seem that it is the atrophy of the city that illumines the nature of the city and defines our age—what will we do with all of the buildings already built, considering by 2050 70% of the world’s population will be living in urban areas and “space” continues to become limited?
In the end, it may not only be a matter of design or perspective in terms of how we look at the city, but what actions we take alongside the natural processes that unfold and transform the spaces we have inhabited, do inhabit, and will come to inhabit. It would seem that the collective space Ruin Academy has created may be just the right start for building, dwelling and thinking.  
 - Lee-Michael J. Pronko
Ruin Academy
What gives a building presence, one that has been abandoned and inevitably caught up in the process of decay? The crumbling walls, broken glass panes, barred windows and doors speak to us in certain ways—some different than others. The question can be asked, how can we re-envision the uninhabited namely, the abandoned and forgotten (factories, apartment blocks, warehouses)—those that stand as testaments to industrial society?
What is Ruin Academy?
Ruin Academy is an independent architectural research center in Taipei city Taiwan. It is run in co-operation between the Casagrande Laboratory in Finland and JUT Foundation for Arts & Architecture Taiwan. Occupying a 5-storey apartment building, Ruin is equipped with large studio and sleeping space for teaching classes and visiting artists, gardens for growing food, and a traditional sauna for relaxation.   
Primarily, Ruin is founded upon the idea of decay meaning, the focus lies beyond the industrial and post-industrial city to that of the decomposing city. This process, or rather evolution is growth—growth from that which once was but can no longer be. Ruin is not an experiment that reflects the modern trend of home renovation or design, but a reaction to the existing conditions of an evolving city. Extracted from the website, “Ruin Academy does not rely on design, but hooks on to the Local Knowledge of the Taipei basin and reacts on this.” This demonstrates a sense of place brought about by the awareness of existing and potential future conditions of the local geographic region. It is focusing on what remains rather, than designing anew—for design itself can ultimately replace reality by concealing existing conditions.  
What are Third Generation cities?
Third Generation cities are those that have grown from the ruin of industrial society but lie beyond its fordist structure of social and economic organization. Elements of Third Generation cities include: Anarchist Gardening (the spontaneous and nomadic construction of community gardens and urban farms that operate outside official urban development), Urban Acupuncture (the design of architecture that is placed in positions throughout the city in order to act as “needles” for producing and increasing the urban Qi), and River Urbanism (a form of landscape urbanism).
Principally, Third Generation cities can be conceived of as rhizomatic in nature and ultimately, bound up with pre-existing and future conditions of human construction. Extracted from the website, “modernism is lost and the industrial machine will become organic. This happens in Taipei and this is what we study. Ruin Academy is an organic machine.” It would seem that it is the atrophy of the city that illumines the nature of the city and defines our age—what will we do with all of the buildings already built, considering by 2050 70% of the world’s population will be living in urban areas and “space” continues to become limited?
In the end, it may not only be a matter of design or perspective in terms of how we look at the city, but what actions we take alongside the natural processes that unfold and transform the spaces we have inhabited, do inhabit, and will come to inhabit. It would seem that the collective space Ruin Academy has created may be just the right start for building, dwelling and thinking.  
 - Lee-Michael J. Pronko

Ruin Academy

What gives a building presence, one that has been abandoned and inevitably caught up in the process of decay? The crumbling walls, broken glass panes, barred windows and doors speak to us in certain ways—some different than others. The question can be asked, how can we re-envision the uninhabited namely, the abandoned and forgotten (factories, apartment blocks, warehouses)—those that stand as testaments to industrial society?

What is Ruin Academy?

Ruin Academy is an independent architectural research center in Taipei city Taiwan. It is run in co-operation between the Casagrande Laboratory in Finland and JUT Foundation for Arts & Architecture Taiwan. Occupying a 5-storey apartment building, Ruin is equipped with large studio and sleeping space for teaching classes and visiting artists, gardens for growing food, and a traditional sauna for relaxation.   

Primarily, Ruin is founded upon the idea of decay meaning, the focus lies beyond the industrial and post-industrial city to that of the decomposing city. This process, or rather evolution is growth—growth from that which once was but can no longer be. Ruin is not an experiment that reflects the modern trend of home renovation or design, but a reaction to the existing conditions of an evolving city. Extracted from the website, “Ruin Academy does not rely on design, but hooks on to the Local Knowledge of the Taipei basin and reacts on this.” This demonstrates a sense of place brought about by the awareness of existing and potential future conditions of the local geographic region. It is focusing on what remains rather, than designing anew—for design itself can ultimately replace reality by concealing existing conditions.  

What are Third Generation cities?

Third Generation cities are those that have grown from the ruin of industrial society but lie beyond its fordist structure of social and economic organization. Elements of Third Generation cities include: Anarchist Gardening (the spontaneous and nomadic construction of community gardens and urban farms that operate outside official urban development), Urban Acupuncture (the design of architecture that is placed in positions throughout the city in order to act as “needles” for producing and increasing the urban Qi), and River Urbanism (a form of landscape urbanism).

Principally, Third Generation cities can be conceived of as rhizomatic in nature and ultimately, bound up with pre-existing and future conditions of human construction. Extracted from the website, “modernism is lost and the industrial machine will become organic. This happens in Taipei and this is what we study. Ruin Academy is an organic machine.” It would seem that it is the atrophy of the city that illumines the nature of the city and defines our age—what will we do with all of the buildings already built, considering by 2050 70% of the world’s population will be living in urban areas and “space” continues to become limited?

In the end, it may not only be a matter of design or perspective in terms of how we look at the city, but what actions we take alongside the natural processes that unfold and transform the spaces we have inhabited, do inhabit, and will come to inhabit. It would seem that the collective space Ruin Academy has created may be just the right start for building, dwelling and thinking.  

 Lee-Michael J. Pronko

6 Photos
/ Architecture Environmental Art Lee-Michael Pronko Ruin Academy Taiwan Third Generation Cities Urbanism Anarchist Gardener Organic Machine Atrophy
Takanori Aiba
Aiba, a former maze illustrator, founded his own company in 1981 and expanded his practice as an “art director for architectural spaces.” In this new role, Aiba showcases his knowledge of maze illustration and architecture by creating intricately detailed, miniature, worlds wrapped around bonsai trees, lighthouses, cliffs, and constructed on vertical islands. His works explore our involvement with the environment and his use of the bonsai recalls the Japanese tradition of the bonsai as a work of art. Expressing “the magnificence of nature,” Aiba’s inclusion of the bonsai in this series is seen as almost an act of updating history as various narratives can be drawn from each individual detail in his works. 
In addition, Aiba uses a variety of materials to craft these installations, including craft paper, plastic, plaster, and paint. 
For more information about Aiba’s work, please visit his website. 
- Victoria Nolte
Takanori Aiba
Aiba, a former maze illustrator, founded his own company in 1981 and expanded his practice as an “art director for architectural spaces.” In this new role, Aiba showcases his knowledge of maze illustration and architecture by creating intricately detailed, miniature, worlds wrapped around bonsai trees, lighthouses, cliffs, and constructed on vertical islands. His works explore our involvement with the environment and his use of the bonsai recalls the Japanese tradition of the bonsai as a work of art. Expressing “the magnificence of nature,” Aiba’s inclusion of the bonsai in this series is seen as almost an act of updating history as various narratives can be drawn from each individual detail in his works. 
In addition, Aiba uses a variety of materials to craft these installations, including craft paper, plastic, plaster, and paint. 
For more information about Aiba’s work, please visit his website. 
- Victoria Nolte
Takanori Aiba
Aiba, a former maze illustrator, founded his own company in 1981 and expanded his practice as an “art director for architectural spaces.” In this new role, Aiba showcases his knowledge of maze illustration and architecture by creating intricately detailed, miniature, worlds wrapped around bonsai trees, lighthouses, cliffs, and constructed on vertical islands. His works explore our involvement with the environment and his use of the bonsai recalls the Japanese tradition of the bonsai as a work of art. Expressing “the magnificence of nature,” Aiba’s inclusion of the bonsai in this series is seen as almost an act of updating history as various narratives can be drawn from each individual detail in his works. 
In addition, Aiba uses a variety of materials to craft these installations, including craft paper, plastic, plaster, and paint. 
For more information about Aiba’s work, please visit his website. 
- Victoria Nolte
Takanori Aiba
Aiba, a former maze illustrator, founded his own company in 1981 and expanded his practice as an “art director for architectural spaces.” In this new role, Aiba showcases his knowledge of maze illustration and architecture by creating intricately detailed, miniature, worlds wrapped around bonsai trees, lighthouses, cliffs, and constructed on vertical islands. His works explore our involvement with the environment and his use of the bonsai recalls the Japanese tradition of the bonsai as a work of art. Expressing “the magnificence of nature,” Aiba’s inclusion of the bonsai in this series is seen as almost an act of updating history as various narratives can be drawn from each individual detail in his works. 
In addition, Aiba uses a variety of materials to craft these installations, including craft paper, plastic, plaster, and paint. 
For more information about Aiba’s work, please visit his website. 
- Victoria Nolte
Wendy: Dance and neutralize pollutants all in one space
Meet Wendy, a dynamic partyscape in Queens, NY that was designed with an environmental conscience. It provides an edgy, spacious, fun space to party in — all the while cleaning the air.
Architects Matthias Hollwich and Marc Kushner (HWKN), winners of this year’s MoMA Young Architects Program (a competition to build an outdoor partyscape for its PS1 location in Queen’s) were encouraged to work within guidelines that addressed issues of sustainability and recycling. As Hollwich said, “Architecture is entering a new period where buildings have personality, rights, and responsibility. Wendy is testing these grounds on a social, ecological, and humanisitic level.”
Their design consists of a ginormous scaffolding to support 1555 square yards of fabric coated in a solution of titania nanoparticles, which neutralizes airborne toxins. In this way, HWKN designed a rooftop partyscape that contributes some part in cleaning the air. As described by Hauke Jungjohann, director at Wendy’s structural engineering consultant firm, “Wendy is the perfect synergy of architectural aesthetics, systems efficiency and structural creativity. The magic of Wendy lies in the usage of something simple like a scaffolding system and reinventing its usage so that something new appears that has never been seen before.”
If you need any more proof that this is an awesome design, it is expected that Wendy’s impact on air pollution during the summer of 2012 will be equivalent to taking 260 cars off the road. And those spiky arms in the design? They shoot out blasts of cool air, music and water. With temperatures reaching the mid-thirties in Ottawa within the last few days, Wendy sounds like the awesomest summer party space ever.
To help fund the construction of this ambitious and complicated structure, HWKN worked with graphic designers to design merchandise (bags & T-shirts), all of which are also coated with the same pollution-neutralizing solution used on the structure itself. 
Click here to visit Wendy’s website, where you can learn more about the design, watch videos, and even buy some titania nanoparticle-soaked, pollution-fighting merch if you are so inclined. If you are near Queens at any point this summer, check out Wendy! We’d love to hear your opinions about it. 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Wendy: Dance and neutralize pollutants all in one space
Meet Wendy, a dynamic partyscape in Queens, NY that was designed with an environmental conscience. It provides an edgy, spacious, fun space to party in — all the while cleaning the air.
Architects Matthias Hollwich and Marc Kushner (HWKN), winners of this year’s MoMA Young Architects Program (a competition to build an outdoor partyscape for its PS1 location in Queen’s) were encouraged to work within guidelines that addressed issues of sustainability and recycling. As Hollwich said, “Architecture is entering a new period where buildings have personality, rights, and responsibility. Wendy is testing these grounds on a social, ecological, and humanisitic level.”
Their design consists of a ginormous scaffolding to support 1555 square yards of fabric coated in a solution of titania nanoparticles, which neutralizes airborne toxins. In this way, HWKN designed a rooftop partyscape that contributes some part in cleaning the air. As described by Hauke Jungjohann, director at Wendy’s structural engineering consultant firm, “Wendy is the perfect synergy of architectural aesthetics, systems efficiency and structural creativity. The magic of Wendy lies in the usage of something simple like a scaffolding system and reinventing its usage so that something new appears that has never been seen before.”
If you need any more proof that this is an awesome design, it is expected that Wendy’s impact on air pollution during the summer of 2012 will be equivalent to taking 260 cars off the road. And those spiky arms in the design? They shoot out blasts of cool air, music and water. With temperatures reaching the mid-thirties in Ottawa within the last few days, Wendy sounds like the awesomest summer party space ever.
To help fund the construction of this ambitious and complicated structure, HWKN worked with graphic designers to design merchandise (bags & T-shirts), all of which are also coated with the same pollution-neutralizing solution used on the structure itself. 
Click here to visit Wendy’s website, where you can learn more about the design, watch videos, and even buy some titania nanoparticle-soaked, pollution-fighting merch if you are so inclined. If you are near Queens at any point this summer, check out Wendy! We’d love to hear your opinions about it. 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Wendy: Dance and neutralize pollutants all in one space
Meet Wendy, a dynamic partyscape in Queens, NY that was designed with an environmental conscience. It provides an edgy, spacious, fun space to party in — all the while cleaning the air.
Architects Matthias Hollwich and Marc Kushner (HWKN), winners of this year’s MoMA Young Architects Program (a competition to build an outdoor partyscape for its PS1 location in Queen’s) were encouraged to work within guidelines that addressed issues of sustainability and recycling. As Hollwich said, “Architecture is entering a new period where buildings have personality, rights, and responsibility. Wendy is testing these grounds on a social, ecological, and humanisitic level.”
Their design consists of a ginormous scaffolding to support 1555 square yards of fabric coated in a solution of titania nanoparticles, which neutralizes airborne toxins. In this way, HWKN designed a rooftop partyscape that contributes some part in cleaning the air. As described by Hauke Jungjohann, director at Wendy’s structural engineering consultant firm, “Wendy is the perfect synergy of architectural aesthetics, systems efficiency and structural creativity. The magic of Wendy lies in the usage of something simple like a scaffolding system and reinventing its usage so that something new appears that has never been seen before.”
If you need any more proof that this is an awesome design, it is expected that Wendy’s impact on air pollution during the summer of 2012 will be equivalent to taking 260 cars off the road. And those spiky arms in the design? They shoot out blasts of cool air, music and water. With temperatures reaching the mid-thirties in Ottawa within the last few days, Wendy sounds like the awesomest summer party space ever.
To help fund the construction of this ambitious and complicated structure, HWKN worked with graphic designers to design merchandise (bags & T-shirts), all of which are also coated with the same pollution-neutralizing solution used on the structure itself. 
Click here to visit Wendy’s website, where you can learn more about the design, watch videos, and even buy some titania nanoparticle-soaked, pollution-fighting merch if you are so inclined. If you are near Queens at any point this summer, check out Wendy! We’d love to hear your opinions about it. 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Wendy: Dance and neutralize pollutants all in one space
Meet Wendy, a dynamic partyscape in Queens, NY that was designed with an environmental conscience. It provides an edgy, spacious, fun space to party in — all the while cleaning the air.
Architects Matthias Hollwich and Marc Kushner (HWKN), winners of this year’s MoMA Young Architects Program (a competition to build an outdoor partyscape for its PS1 location in Queen’s) were encouraged to work within guidelines that addressed issues of sustainability and recycling. As Hollwich said, “Architecture is entering a new period where buildings have personality, rights, and responsibility. Wendy is testing these grounds on a social, ecological, and humanisitic level.”
Their design consists of a ginormous scaffolding to support 1555 square yards of fabric coated in a solution of titania nanoparticles, which neutralizes airborne toxins. In this way, HWKN designed a rooftop partyscape that contributes some part in cleaning the air. As described by Hauke Jungjohann, director at Wendy’s structural engineering consultant firm, “Wendy is the perfect synergy of architectural aesthetics, systems efficiency and structural creativity. The magic of Wendy lies in the usage of something simple like a scaffolding system and reinventing its usage so that something new appears that has never been seen before.”
If you need any more proof that this is an awesome design, it is expected that Wendy’s impact on air pollution during the summer of 2012 will be equivalent to taking 260 cars off the road. And those spiky arms in the design? They shoot out blasts of cool air, music and water. With temperatures reaching the mid-thirties in Ottawa within the last few days, Wendy sounds like the awesomest summer party space ever.
To help fund the construction of this ambitious and complicated structure, HWKN worked with graphic designers to design merchandise (bags & T-shirts), all of which are also coated with the same pollution-neutralizing solution used on the structure itself. 
Click here to visit Wendy’s website, where you can learn more about the design, watch videos, and even buy some titania nanoparticle-soaked, pollution-fighting merch if you are so inclined. If you are near Queens at any point this summer, check out Wendy! We’d love to hear your opinions about it. 
- Gabrielle Doiron

Wendy: Dance and neutralize pollutants all in one space


Meet Wendy, a dynamic partyscape in Queens, NY that was designed with an environmental conscience. It provides an edgy, spacious, fun space to party in — all the while cleaning the air.

Architects Matthias Hollwich and Marc Kushner (HWKN), winners of this year’s MoMA Young Architects Program (a competition to build an outdoor partyscape for its PS1 location in Queen’s) were encouraged to work within guidelines that addressed issues of sustainability and recycling. As Hollwich said, “Architecture is entering a new period where buildings have personality, rights, and responsibility. Wendy is testing these grounds on a social, ecological, and humanisitic level.”

Their design consists of a ginormous scaffolding to support 1555 square yards of fabric coated in a solution of titania nanoparticles, which neutralizes airborne toxins. In this way, HWKN designed a rooftop partyscape that contributes some part in cleaning the air. As described by Hauke Jungjohann, director at Wendy’s structural engineering consultant firm, “Wendy is the perfect synergy of architectural aesthetics, systems efficiency and structural creativity. The magic of Wendy lies in the usage of something simple like a scaffolding system and reinventing its usage so that something new appears that has never been seen before.”

If you need any more proof that this is an awesome design, it is expected that Wendy’s impact on air pollution during the summer of 2012 will be equivalent to taking 260 cars off the road. And those spiky arms in the design? They shoot out blasts of cool air, music and water. With temperatures reaching the mid-thirties in Ottawa within the last few days, Wendy sounds like the awesomest summer party space ever.

To help fund the construction of this ambitious and complicated structure, HWKN worked with graphic designers to design merchandise (bags & T-shirts), all of which are also coated with the same pollution-neutralizing solution used on the structure itself.

Click here to visit Wendy’s website, where you can learn more about the design, watch videos, and even buy some titania nanoparticle-soaked, pollution-fighting merch if you are so inclined. If you are near Queens at any point this summer, check out Wendy! We’d love to hear your opinions about it.

- Gabrielle Doiron

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

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