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Occupying the Arctic
While some people worry about alien species from outer space invading our planet, some scientists are more worried about local invasions, specifically that of plants invading territories not naturally theirs, and destroying the home plants. In the arctic, for example, human activity has introduced invasive ‘alien species’ that now call that region their home. Whether they live in harmony with native plants is unknown, as the arctic is such a vast geographical space, that some of these plants have probably never had the pleasure of getting to know each other.
How Canadian artist Tania Kitchell comments on this issue, is by recreating the exact species of these invasive plants in the arctic with abs plastic that has been formed with 3D modeling software and printed off on a 3D printer, in her piece Occupy (2012). Of course, photographs of these invasive plants were used as reference, but the proportions are all off, some plants being taller than they naturally are, in order to ask the question; does this distortion disconnect the viewer from the their perceptions of the arctic and its reality?
To help us find the answer, all the plants are placed on a 24-foot long table, allowing the viewer to ‘study’ these plants in the viewers’ natural habitat; an urban setting.
Fittingly, this piece was presented as part of the Anchorage Museums’ largest exhibition of 2012, titled, True North. The artist’s piece plays with both the title, and the issues raised by other artists in the exhibit, to really allow the public to rethink their romanticized views on the North.
-Anna Paluch
Occupying the Arctic
While some people worry about alien species from outer space invading our planet, some scientists are more worried about local invasions, specifically that of plants invading territories not naturally theirs, and destroying the home plants. In the arctic, for example, human activity has introduced invasive ‘alien species’ that now call that region their home. Whether they live in harmony with native plants is unknown, as the arctic is such a vast geographical space, that some of these plants have probably never had the pleasure of getting to know each other.
How Canadian artist Tania Kitchell comments on this issue, is by recreating the exact species of these invasive plants in the arctic with abs plastic that has been formed with 3D modeling software and printed off on a 3D printer, in her piece Occupy (2012). Of course, photographs of these invasive plants were used as reference, but the proportions are all off, some plants being taller than they naturally are, in order to ask the question; does this distortion disconnect the viewer from the their perceptions of the arctic and its reality?
To help us find the answer, all the plants are placed on a 24-foot long table, allowing the viewer to ‘study’ these plants in the viewers’ natural habitat; an urban setting.
Fittingly, this piece was presented as part of the Anchorage Museums’ largest exhibition of 2012, titled, True North. The artist’s piece plays with both the title, and the issues raised by other artists in the exhibit, to really allow the public to rethink their romanticized views on the North.
-Anna Paluch
Occupying the Arctic
While some people worry about alien species from outer space invading our planet, some scientists are more worried about local invasions, specifically that of plants invading territories not naturally theirs, and destroying the home plants. In the arctic, for example, human activity has introduced invasive ‘alien species’ that now call that region their home. Whether they live in harmony with native plants is unknown, as the arctic is such a vast geographical space, that some of these plants have probably never had the pleasure of getting to know each other.
How Canadian artist Tania Kitchell comments on this issue, is by recreating the exact species of these invasive plants in the arctic with abs plastic that has been formed with 3D modeling software and printed off on a 3D printer, in her piece Occupy (2012). Of course, photographs of these invasive plants were used as reference, but the proportions are all off, some plants being taller than they naturally are, in order to ask the question; does this distortion disconnect the viewer from the their perceptions of the arctic and its reality?
To help us find the answer, all the plants are placed on a 24-foot long table, allowing the viewer to ‘study’ these plants in the viewers’ natural habitat; an urban setting.
Fittingly, this piece was presented as part of the Anchorage Museums’ largest exhibition of 2012, titled, True North. The artist’s piece plays with both the title, and the issues raised by other artists in the exhibit, to really allow the public to rethink their romanticized views on the North.
-Anna Paluch

Occupying the Arctic

While some people worry about alien species from outer space invading our planet, some scientists are more worried about local invasions, specifically that of plants invading territories not naturally theirs, and destroying the home plants. In the arctic, for example, human activity has introduced invasive ‘alien species’ that now call that region their home. Whether they live in harmony with native plants is unknown, as the arctic is such a vast geographical space, that some of these plants have probably never had the pleasure of getting to know each other.

How Canadian artist Tania Kitchell comments on this issue, is by recreating the exact species of these invasive plants in the arctic with abs plastic that has been formed with 3D modeling software and printed off on a 3D printer, in her piece Occupy (2012). Of course, photographs of these invasive plants were used as reference, but the proportions are all off, some plants being taller than they naturally are, in order to ask the question; does this distortion disconnect the viewer from the their perceptions of the arctic and its reality?

To help us find the answer, all the plants are placed on a 24-foot long table, allowing the viewer to ‘study’ these plants in the viewers’ natural habitat; an urban setting.

Fittingly, this piece was presented as part of the Anchorage Museums’ largest exhibition of 2012, titled, True North. The artist’s piece plays with both the title, and the issues raised by other artists in the exhibit, to really allow the public to rethink their romanticized views on the North.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ tania kitchell art science art and science journal anna paluch arctic plants plastic 3D Printing true north anchorage museum
Geert Goiris
In his photographic series Whiteout, Geert Goiris explores the visual consequences of an unforgiving landscape: the Arctic. These images give the eye very little to latch onto, recalling the effect of snow blindless — also known as photokeratitis or ultraviolet keratitis — a painful condition that comes from unprotected eyes being exposed to too many ultraviolet rays. Our eyes begin to search the photo for the slightest of colour shifts so that we may at last resolve the image. Dark forms seem to cut the image abruptly while any suggestions of depth fade away.
Goiris’s work is accompanied by a short memoir titled Whiteness Report, in which he describes the rather fearful experience:
"Due to the incessant and totally uniform stimulation, my eyes were exhausted. I saw starts, and strained to surmise at least something of the trail in this luminous haze…The total absence of a horizon tricks you into wildly distorted perspectives. Suddenly we spotted two birds right in front of us, surprisingly, because we had left the coast far behind by now and on this plain there was nothing that could serve as food. We gazed at the stark white birds and when we came near they both took to the air. It took K and me a few seconds to realize that only one of te birds was actually flying. The second ran away flapping its wings, its movements betrayed it was still on ice…Light diffusion was perfect: wherever you looked brightness was equal. Front, back, up or down had lost their meaning. Only the men and the vehicles were present, everything around has ceased to exist." (Goiris, 2009)
See more of Geert Goiris’s work here.
- Erin Saunders
Geert Goiris
In his photographic series Whiteout, Geert Goiris explores the visual consequences of an unforgiving landscape: the Arctic. These images give the eye very little to latch onto, recalling the effect of snow blindless — also known as photokeratitis or ultraviolet keratitis — a painful condition that comes from unprotected eyes being exposed to too many ultraviolet rays. Our eyes begin to search the photo for the slightest of colour shifts so that we may at last resolve the image. Dark forms seem to cut the image abruptly while any suggestions of depth fade away.
Goiris’s work is accompanied by a short memoir titled Whiteness Report, in which he describes the rather fearful experience:
"Due to the incessant and totally uniform stimulation, my eyes were exhausted. I saw starts, and strained to surmise at least something of the trail in this luminous haze…The total absence of a horizon tricks you into wildly distorted perspectives. Suddenly we spotted two birds right in front of us, surprisingly, because we had left the coast far behind by now and on this plain there was nothing that could serve as food. We gazed at the stark white birds and when we came near they both took to the air. It took K and me a few seconds to realize that only one of te birds was actually flying. The second ran away flapping its wings, its movements betrayed it was still on ice…Light diffusion was perfect: wherever you looked brightness was equal. Front, back, up or down had lost their meaning. Only the men and the vehicles were present, everything around has ceased to exist." (Goiris, 2009)
See more of Geert Goiris’s work here.
- Erin Saunders
Geert Goiris
In his photographic series Whiteout, Geert Goiris explores the visual consequences of an unforgiving landscape: the Arctic. These images give the eye very little to latch onto, recalling the effect of snow blindless — also known as photokeratitis or ultraviolet keratitis — a painful condition that comes from unprotected eyes being exposed to too many ultraviolet rays. Our eyes begin to search the photo for the slightest of colour shifts so that we may at last resolve the image. Dark forms seem to cut the image abruptly while any suggestions of depth fade away.
Goiris’s work is accompanied by a short memoir titled Whiteness Report, in which he describes the rather fearful experience:
"Due to the incessant and totally uniform stimulation, my eyes were exhausted. I saw starts, and strained to surmise at least something of the trail in this luminous haze…The total absence of a horizon tricks you into wildly distorted perspectives. Suddenly we spotted two birds right in front of us, surprisingly, because we had left the coast far behind by now and on this plain there was nothing that could serve as food. We gazed at the stark white birds and when we came near they both took to the air. It took K and me a few seconds to realize that only one of te birds was actually flying. The second ran away flapping its wings, its movements betrayed it was still on ice…Light diffusion was perfect: wherever you looked brightness was equal. Front, back, up or down had lost their meaning. Only the men and the vehicles were present, everything around has ceased to exist." (Goiris, 2009)
See more of Geert Goiris’s work here.
- Erin Saunders
Geert Goiris
In his photographic series Whiteout, Geert Goiris explores the visual consequences of an unforgiving landscape: the Arctic. These images give the eye very little to latch onto, recalling the effect of snow blindless — also known as photokeratitis or ultraviolet keratitis — a painful condition that comes from unprotected eyes being exposed to too many ultraviolet rays. Our eyes begin to search the photo for the slightest of colour shifts so that we may at last resolve the image. Dark forms seem to cut the image abruptly while any suggestions of depth fade away.
Goiris’s work is accompanied by a short memoir titled Whiteness Report, in which he describes the rather fearful experience:
"Due to the incessant and totally uniform stimulation, my eyes were exhausted. I saw starts, and strained to surmise at least something of the trail in this luminous haze…The total absence of a horizon tricks you into wildly distorted perspectives. Suddenly we spotted two birds right in front of us, surprisingly, because we had left the coast far behind by now and on this plain there was nothing that could serve as food. We gazed at the stark white birds and when we came near they both took to the air. It took K and me a few seconds to realize that only one of te birds was actually flying. The second ran away flapping its wings, its movements betrayed it was still on ice…Light diffusion was perfect: wherever you looked brightness was equal. Front, back, up or down had lost their meaning. Only the men and the vehicles were present, everything around has ceased to exist." (Goiris, 2009)
See more of Geert Goiris’s work here.
- Erin Saunders
Geert Goiris
In his photographic series Whiteout, Geert Goiris explores the visual consequences of an unforgiving landscape: the Arctic. These images give the eye very little to latch onto, recalling the effect of snow blindless — also known as photokeratitis or ultraviolet keratitis — a painful condition that comes from unprotected eyes being exposed to too many ultraviolet rays. Our eyes begin to search the photo for the slightest of colour shifts so that we may at last resolve the image. Dark forms seem to cut the image abruptly while any suggestions of depth fade away.
Goiris’s work is accompanied by a short memoir titled Whiteness Report, in which he describes the rather fearful experience:
"Due to the incessant and totally uniform stimulation, my eyes were exhausted. I saw starts, and strained to surmise at least something of the trail in this luminous haze…The total absence of a horizon tricks you into wildly distorted perspectives. Suddenly we spotted two birds right in front of us, surprisingly, because we had left the coast far behind by now and on this plain there was nothing that could serve as food. We gazed at the stark white birds and when we came near they both took to the air. It took K and me a few seconds to realize that only one of te birds was actually flying. The second ran away flapping its wings, its movements betrayed it was still on ice…Light diffusion was perfect: wherever you looked brightness was equal. Front, back, up or down had lost their meaning. Only the men and the vehicles were present, everything around has ceased to exist." (Goiris, 2009)
See more of Geert Goiris’s work here.
- Erin Saunders

Geert Goiris

In his photographic series Whiteout, Geert Goiris explores the visual consequences of an unforgiving landscape: the Arctic. These images give the eye very little to latch onto, recalling the effect of snow blindless — also known as photokeratitis or ultraviolet keratitis — a painful condition that comes from unprotected eyes being exposed to too many ultraviolet rays. Our eyes begin to search the photo for the slightest of colour shifts so that we may at last resolve the image. Dark forms seem to cut the image abruptly while any suggestions of depth fade away.

Goiris’s work is accompanied by a short memoir titled Whiteness Report, in which he describes the rather fearful experience:

"Due to the incessant and totally uniform stimulation, my eyes were exhausted. I saw starts, and strained to surmise at least something of the trail in this luminous haze…The total absence of a horizon tricks you into wildly distorted perspectives. Suddenly we spotted two birds right in front of us, surprisingly, because we had left the coast far behind by now and on this plain there was nothing that could serve as food. We gazed at the stark white birds and when we came near they both took to the air. It took K and me a few seconds to realize that only one of te birds was actually flying. The second ran away flapping its wings, its movements betrayed it was still on ice…Light diffusion was perfect: wherever you looked brightness was equal. Front, back, up or down had lost their meaning. Only the men and the vehicles were present, everything around has ceased to exist." (Goiris, 2009)

See more of Geert Goiris’s work here.

- Erin Saunders

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

5 Photos
/ art science snow blindness geert goiris whiteout arctic snow

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