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Flower ‘Bulbs’
Though designers make pieces that are commodities of everyday use, a lot of the functional pieces created by designers can still be considered ‘art’ in their own way.
German designer Miriam Aust of Aust Amelung created the “Vase & Leuchte” (2011) table lamp that functions as both a lamp and vase. The act of combining the element of light and plants into the design is like an experiment, giving the piece a laboratory aesthetic. The plants are placed in the main bowl structure with water, and the light bulb is protected by a glass structure, similar to a laboratory glass beaker, in the middle of the bowl. This allows for the light to travel through the plants, highlighting unique elements such as the vascular tissue of leaves or reflecting root patterns onto walls. You can order your very own “Vase & Leuchte” at the dua shop.
Japanese product designer Yuma Kuno has created a slightly similar piece, involving light bulbs as vases. In 2007, Japan’s Ministry of Environment asked companies to stop using inefficient incandescent light bulbs. Kuno saw a chance to use these obsolete objects and change their function to something useful; the bulbs can hold small flowers, and even the filament is used as a stem holder.
Whether highlighting the aesthetic biology of a plant or merely being used as a simple holder for one, both the works of Miriam Aust and Yuma Kuno are great design ideas!

-Anna Paluch
Flower ‘Bulbs’
Though designers make pieces that are commodities of everyday use, a lot of the functional pieces created by designers can still be considered ‘art’ in their own way.
German designer Miriam Aust of Aust Amelung created the “Vase & Leuchte” (2011) table lamp that functions as both a lamp and vase. The act of combining the element of light and plants into the design is like an experiment, giving the piece a laboratory aesthetic. The plants are placed in the main bowl structure with water, and the light bulb is protected by a glass structure, similar to a laboratory glass beaker, in the middle of the bowl. This allows for the light to travel through the plants, highlighting unique elements such as the vascular tissue of leaves or reflecting root patterns onto walls. You can order your very own “Vase & Leuchte” at the dua shop.
Japanese product designer Yuma Kuno has created a slightly similar piece, involving light bulbs as vases. In 2007, Japan’s Ministry of Environment asked companies to stop using inefficient incandescent light bulbs. Kuno saw a chance to use these obsolete objects and change their function to something useful; the bulbs can hold small flowers, and even the filament is used as a stem holder.
Whether highlighting the aesthetic biology of a plant or merely being used as a simple holder for one, both the works of Miriam Aust and Yuma Kuno are great design ideas!

-Anna Paluch
Flower ‘Bulbs’
Though designers make pieces that are commodities of everyday use, a lot of the functional pieces created by designers can still be considered ‘art’ in their own way.
German designer Miriam Aust of Aust Amelung created the “Vase & Leuchte” (2011) table lamp that functions as both a lamp and vase. The act of combining the element of light and plants into the design is like an experiment, giving the piece a laboratory aesthetic. The plants are placed in the main bowl structure with water, and the light bulb is protected by a glass structure, similar to a laboratory glass beaker, in the middle of the bowl. This allows for the light to travel through the plants, highlighting unique elements such as the vascular tissue of leaves or reflecting root patterns onto walls. You can order your very own “Vase & Leuchte” at the dua shop.
Japanese product designer Yuma Kuno has created a slightly similar piece, involving light bulbs as vases. In 2007, Japan’s Ministry of Environment asked companies to stop using inefficient incandescent light bulbs. Kuno saw a chance to use these obsolete objects and change their function to something useful; the bulbs can hold small flowers, and even the filament is used as a stem holder.
Whether highlighting the aesthetic biology of a plant or merely being used as a simple holder for one, both the works of Miriam Aust and Yuma Kuno are great design ideas!

-Anna Paluch
Flower ‘Bulbs’
Though designers make pieces that are commodities of everyday use, a lot of the functional pieces created by designers can still be considered ‘art’ in their own way.
German designer Miriam Aust of Aust Amelung created the “Vase & Leuchte” (2011) table lamp that functions as both a lamp and vase. The act of combining the element of light and plants into the design is like an experiment, giving the piece a laboratory aesthetic. The plants are placed in the main bowl structure with water, and the light bulb is protected by a glass structure, similar to a laboratory glass beaker, in the middle of the bowl. This allows for the light to travel through the plants, highlighting unique elements such as the vascular tissue of leaves or reflecting root patterns onto walls. You can order your very own “Vase & Leuchte” at the dua shop.
Japanese product designer Yuma Kuno has created a slightly similar piece, involving light bulbs as vases. In 2007, Japan’s Ministry of Environment asked companies to stop using inefficient incandescent light bulbs. Kuno saw a chance to use these obsolete objects and change their function to something useful; the bulbs can hold small flowers, and even the filament is used as a stem holder.
Whether highlighting the aesthetic biology of a plant or merely being used as a simple holder for one, both the works of Miriam Aust and Yuma Kuno are great design ideas!

-Anna Paluch

Flower ‘Bulbs’

Though designers make pieces that are commodities of everyday use, a lot of the functional pieces created by designers can still be considered ‘art’ in their own way.

German designer Miriam Aust of Aust Amelung created the “Vase & Leuchte” (2011) table lamp that functions as both a lamp and vase. The act of combining the element of light and plants into the design is like an experiment, giving the piece a laboratory aesthetic. The plants are placed in the main bowl structure with water, and the light bulb is protected by a glass structure, similar to a laboratory glass beaker, in the middle of the bowl. This allows for the light to travel through the plants, highlighting unique elements such as the vascular tissue of leaves or reflecting root patterns onto walls. You can order your very own “Vase & Leuchte” at the dua shop.

Japanese product designer Yuma Kuno has created a slightly similar piece, involving light bulbs as vases. In 2007, Japan’s Ministry of Environment asked companies to stop using inefficient incandescent light bulbs. Kuno saw a chance to use these obsolete objects and change their function to something useful; the bulbs can hold small flowers, and even the filament is used as a stem holder.

Whether highlighting the aesthetic biology of a plant or merely being used as a simple holder for one, both the works of Miriam Aust and Yuma Kuno are great design ideas!

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ yuma kuno miriam aust anna paluch art science art and science journal light bulb plants flowers Environment recycle
Art of the Lepidoptera
Moths and fabric are often two words that not many people like to see together, but artist Yumi Okita actually makes moths (and butterflies!) out of various pieces of cotton fabric, embroidered and painted on for detail, with fake fur accents. The fabric sculptures average about six inches in height and nine inches in width for butterflies, and four inches in height and ten inches in width for moths, creating slightly larger copies of the insect’s real life counterparts.
These moths and butterflies (belonging to the order of insects known as Lepidoptera) are great tools for admiring the detail in the insects’ scales on their wings, or designs on their bodies.
There is another artist though, whose practice is to go even more into detail, by creating watercolour paintings of butterfly and moth wings up close; so close, that you can see every detail in the scales. Artist Chelsea H-A even makes custom watercolours, based off of an individual’s favourite colours or favourite species of moth and butterfly, yet still staying true to the aesthetic of these insect’s wings.
A cool idea would be to display a sculpture of Yumi Okita’s with a corresponding watercolour of Chelsea H-A’s, which you can do yourself, as both artists sell their art on their respective Etsy stores!
Check out more of Yumi Okita’s work here.
And have a look at Chelsea H-A’s work here.
-Anna Paluch
Art of the Lepidoptera
Moths and fabric are often two words that not many people like to see together, but artist Yumi Okita actually makes moths (and butterflies!) out of various pieces of cotton fabric, embroidered and painted on for detail, with fake fur accents. The fabric sculptures average about six inches in height and nine inches in width for butterflies, and four inches in height and ten inches in width for moths, creating slightly larger copies of the insect’s real life counterparts.
These moths and butterflies (belonging to the order of insects known as Lepidoptera) are great tools for admiring the detail in the insects’ scales on their wings, or designs on their bodies.
There is another artist though, whose practice is to go even more into detail, by creating watercolour paintings of butterfly and moth wings up close; so close, that you can see every detail in the scales. Artist Chelsea H-A even makes custom watercolours, based off of an individual’s favourite colours or favourite species of moth and butterfly, yet still staying true to the aesthetic of these insect’s wings.
A cool idea would be to display a sculpture of Yumi Okita’s with a corresponding watercolour of Chelsea H-A’s, which you can do yourself, as both artists sell their art on their respective Etsy stores!
Check out more of Yumi Okita’s work here.
And have a look at Chelsea H-A’s work here.
-Anna Paluch
Art of the Lepidoptera
Moths and fabric are often two words that not many people like to see together, but artist Yumi Okita actually makes moths (and butterflies!) out of various pieces of cotton fabric, embroidered and painted on for detail, with fake fur accents. The fabric sculptures average about six inches in height and nine inches in width for butterflies, and four inches in height and ten inches in width for moths, creating slightly larger copies of the insect’s real life counterparts.
These moths and butterflies (belonging to the order of insects known as Lepidoptera) are great tools for admiring the detail in the insects’ scales on their wings, or designs on their bodies.
There is another artist though, whose practice is to go even more into detail, by creating watercolour paintings of butterfly and moth wings up close; so close, that you can see every detail in the scales. Artist Chelsea H-A even makes custom watercolours, based off of an individual’s favourite colours or favourite species of moth and butterfly, yet still staying true to the aesthetic of these insect’s wings.
A cool idea would be to display a sculpture of Yumi Okita’s with a corresponding watercolour of Chelsea H-A’s, which you can do yourself, as both artists sell their art on their respective Etsy stores!
Check out more of Yumi Okita’s work here.
And have a look at Chelsea H-A’s work here.
-Anna Paluch
Art of the Lepidoptera
Moths and fabric are often two words that not many people like to see together, but artist Yumi Okita actually makes moths (and butterflies!) out of various pieces of cotton fabric, embroidered and painted on for detail, with fake fur accents. The fabric sculptures average about six inches in height and nine inches in width for butterflies, and four inches in height and ten inches in width for moths, creating slightly larger copies of the insect’s real life counterparts.
These moths and butterflies (belonging to the order of insects known as Lepidoptera) are great tools for admiring the detail in the insects’ scales on their wings, or designs on their bodies.
There is another artist though, whose practice is to go even more into detail, by creating watercolour paintings of butterfly and moth wings up close; so close, that you can see every detail in the scales. Artist Chelsea H-A even makes custom watercolours, based off of an individual’s favourite colours or favourite species of moth and butterfly, yet still staying true to the aesthetic of these insect’s wings.
A cool idea would be to display a sculpture of Yumi Okita’s with a corresponding watercolour of Chelsea H-A’s, which you can do yourself, as both artists sell their art on their respective Etsy stores!
Check out more of Yumi Okita’s work here.
And have a look at Chelsea H-A’s work here.
-Anna Paluch

Art of the Lepidoptera

Moths and fabric are often two words that not many people like to see together, but artist Yumi Okita actually makes moths (and butterflies!) out of various pieces of cotton fabric, embroidered and painted on for detail, with fake fur accents. The fabric sculptures average about six inches in height and nine inches in width for butterflies, and four inches in height and ten inches in width for moths, creating slightly larger copies of the insect’s real life counterparts.

These moths and butterflies (belonging to the order of insects known as Lepidoptera) are great tools for admiring the detail in the insects’ scales on their wings, or designs on their bodies.

There is another artist though, whose practice is to go even more into detail, by creating watercolour paintings of butterfly and moth wings up close; so close, that you can see every detail in the scales. Artist Chelsea H-A even makes custom watercolours, based off of an individual’s favourite colours or favourite species of moth and butterfly, yet still staying true to the aesthetic of these insect’s wings.

A cool idea would be to display a sculpture of Yumi Okita’s with a corresponding watercolour of Chelsea H-A’s, which you can do yourself, as both artists sell their art on their respective Etsy stores!

Check out more of Yumi Okita’s work here.

And have a look at Chelsea H-A’s work here.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ Yumi Okita Chelsea H-A anna paluch butterfly moth butterflies moths fabric art watercolour lepidoptera art science art and science journal
Camila Carlow’s Eye Heart Spleen
When we look at human organs, sometimes their imagery can be off-putting (though fascinating!) but artist Camila Carlow uses our organs, at least pictures of them, to create her intricate Eye Heart Spleen series; human organs made from foraged plants.
The artist combines different plants, such as flowers and leaves, already themselves unique living organisms, to create one piece, one organ, of another living organism; the human. It is interesting to look at her series in regards to the place of humans in the world; how we pick flowers, tear down trees and stomp around in the grass, only to then have our bodies be consumed by the earth, covered by flowers, trees and grass. The plants sustain us, as either food or helping to create oxygen, just like our organs, and just like plants, we sometimes too forget to take care of our organs. As the artist states, “regardless of whether we fill ourselves with toxins or nourishing food, whether we exercise or not - our organs sustain us, working away effortlessly and unnoticed”. Both plants and organs are delicate structures, and both need to be taken care of, in order for them to take care of us.
To learn more about Camila Carlow’s work, you can visit her website, or if you would like to purchase one of her prints, they are available on Etsy.
-Anna Paluch
Camila Carlow’s Eye Heart Spleen
When we look at human organs, sometimes their imagery can be off-putting (though fascinating!) but artist Camila Carlow uses our organs, at least pictures of them, to create her intricate Eye Heart Spleen series; human organs made from foraged plants.
The artist combines different plants, such as flowers and leaves, already themselves unique living organisms, to create one piece, one organ, of another living organism; the human. It is interesting to look at her series in regards to the place of humans in the world; how we pick flowers, tear down trees and stomp around in the grass, only to then have our bodies be consumed by the earth, covered by flowers, trees and grass. The plants sustain us, as either food or helping to create oxygen, just like our organs, and just like plants, we sometimes too forget to take care of our organs. As the artist states, “regardless of whether we fill ourselves with toxins or nourishing food, whether we exercise or not - our organs sustain us, working away effortlessly and unnoticed”. Both plants and organs are delicate structures, and both need to be taken care of, in order for them to take care of us.
To learn more about Camila Carlow’s work, you can visit her website, or if you would like to purchase one of her prints, they are available on Etsy.
-Anna Paluch
Camila Carlow’s Eye Heart Spleen
When we look at human organs, sometimes their imagery can be off-putting (though fascinating!) but artist Camila Carlow uses our organs, at least pictures of them, to create her intricate Eye Heart Spleen series; human organs made from foraged plants.
The artist combines different plants, such as flowers and leaves, already themselves unique living organisms, to create one piece, one organ, of another living organism; the human. It is interesting to look at her series in regards to the place of humans in the world; how we pick flowers, tear down trees and stomp around in the grass, only to then have our bodies be consumed by the earth, covered by flowers, trees and grass. The plants sustain us, as either food or helping to create oxygen, just like our organs, and just like plants, we sometimes too forget to take care of our organs. As the artist states, “regardless of whether we fill ourselves with toxins or nourishing food, whether we exercise or not - our organs sustain us, working away effortlessly and unnoticed”. Both plants and organs are delicate structures, and both need to be taken care of, in order for them to take care of us.
To learn more about Camila Carlow’s work, you can visit her website, or if you would like to purchase one of her prints, they are available on Etsy.
-Anna Paluch

Camila Carlow’s Eye Heart Spleen

When we look at human organs, sometimes their imagery can be off-putting (though fascinating!) but artist Camila Carlow uses our organs, at least pictures of them, to create her intricate Eye Heart Spleen series; human organs made from foraged plants.

The artist combines different plants, such as flowers and leaves, already themselves unique living organisms, to create one piece, one organ, of another living organism; the human. It is interesting to look at her series in regards to the place of humans in the world; how we pick flowers, tear down trees and stomp around in the grass, only to then have our bodies be consumed by the earth, covered by flowers, trees and grass. The plants sustain us, as either food or helping to create oxygen, just like our organs, and just like plants, we sometimes too forget to take care of our organs. As the artist states, “regardless of whether we fill ourselves with toxins or nourishing food, whether we exercise or not - our organs sustain us, working away effortlessly and unnoticed”. Both plants and organs are delicate structures, and both need to be taken care of, in order for them to take care of us.

To learn more about Camila Carlow’s work, you can visit her website, or if you would like to purchase one of her prints, they are available on Etsy.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ camila carlow eye heart spleen anatomy botany flowers plants organs human organs human body art science art and science journal anna paluch
Light Up the Skies
When two artists with different aesthetic backgrounds collaborate, they often create stunning pieces, and the collaboration between artist’s Aaron Koblin and Janet Echelman is no exception.
Janet Echelman, who has been featured already on Art & Science Journal, creates fishnet-like aerial sculptures that look as if they were floating entities in the sky. The nets’ shapes are manipulated to form anything from funnels to winged creatures. Aaron Koblin is an artist and designer who focuses on data and digital technologies, how this information relates to cultural trends and how people react to changing technologies.
These artists collaborated together on March 15, 2014 at TED 2014 to create “Skies Painted with Unnumbered Sparks” outside the Vancouver Convention Centre where the TED talks were being held. TED is integral to this installation, as the two artists met at TED 2011 after their talks. In order to make such an installation possible, Echelman needed the expertise of Autodesk, a 3D design engineering software that specializes in working with interesting design problems. The amazing feature about this outdoor installation is that passersby can choreograph the lights on the web with their smartphones, controlling the aesthetic nature of the piece through technology.
If you would like to see how a sculpture of this magnitude was imagined, and then installed, TED blog has a ‘making-of’ gallery.
The installation will be up in Vancouver until the 22nd of March, 2014.
-Anna Paluch
Light Up the Skies
When two artists with different aesthetic backgrounds collaborate, they often create stunning pieces, and the collaboration between artist’s Aaron Koblin and Janet Echelman is no exception.
Janet Echelman, who has been featured already on Art & Science Journal, creates fishnet-like aerial sculptures that look as if they were floating entities in the sky. The nets’ shapes are manipulated to form anything from funnels to winged creatures. Aaron Koblin is an artist and designer who focuses on data and digital technologies, how this information relates to cultural trends and how people react to changing technologies.
These artists collaborated together on March 15, 2014 at TED 2014 to create “Skies Painted with Unnumbered Sparks” outside the Vancouver Convention Centre where the TED talks were being held. TED is integral to this installation, as the two artists met at TED 2011 after their talks. In order to make such an installation possible, Echelman needed the expertise of Autodesk, a 3D design engineering software that specializes in working with interesting design problems. The amazing feature about this outdoor installation is that passersby can choreograph the lights on the web with their smartphones, controlling the aesthetic nature of the piece through technology.
If you would like to see how a sculpture of this magnitude was imagined, and then installed, TED blog has a ‘making-of’ gallery.
The installation will be up in Vancouver until the 22nd of March, 2014.
-Anna Paluch

Light Up the Skies

When two artists with different aesthetic backgrounds collaborate, they often create stunning pieces, and the collaboration between artist’s Aaron Koblin and Janet Echelman is no exception.

Janet Echelman, who has been featured already on Art & Science Journal, creates fishnet-like aerial sculptures that look as if they were floating entities in the sky. The nets’ shapes are manipulated to form anything from funnels to winged creatures. Aaron Koblin is an artist and designer who focuses on data and digital technologies, how this information relates to cultural trends and how people react to changing technologies.

These artists collaborated together on March 15, 2014 at TED 2014 to create “Skies Painted with Unnumbered Sparks” outside the Vancouver Convention Centre where the TED talks were being held. TED is integral to this installation, as the two artists met at TED 2011 after their talks. In order to make such an installation possible, Echelman needed the expertise of Autodesk, a 3D design engineering software that specializes in working with interesting design problems. The amazing feature about this outdoor installation is that passersby can choreograph the lights on the web with their smartphones, controlling the aesthetic nature of the piece through technology.

If you would like to see how a sculpture of this magnitude was imagined, and then installed, TED blog has a ‘making-of’ gallery.

The installation will be up in Vancouver until the 22nd of March, 2014.

-Anna Paluch

2 Photos
/ Janet Echelman Aarron Koblin TED Vancouver webs technology engineering anna paluch art science art and science journal autodesk

Water Light Graffiti by Antonin Fourneau

Graffiti art on its own is an amazing, albeit misunderstood art practice, but what happens when you swap concrete walls for LED lights and spray cans with a water gun? You get Water Light Graffiti! Created by Antonin Fourneau as part of his artist residency with Digitalarti Artlab, Water Light Graffiti is a wall of LED lights that is triggered to turn on selected lights, when they come into contact with water. It is fun for all ages! Months of testing went into making sure the LED lights turned on once in contact with water, but clearly all that work paid off.

Electronics and water are not often paired together, but because water is conductive, it reacts with specifically placed metal contacts on the circuit board of lights, decreasing resistance and allowing a current to flow. Christopher J. Woodall created his own version of this water-activated circuit, and with plenty of info-graphics and instructions, provides enough information for you to make your own!

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

antonin fourneauanna paluchwater light graffitielectricitywatergraffiticonductivitycodesLED lightsChristopher J. Woodallartscienceart and science journaldigitalarti artlab
Weaving the Invisible Thread: Urban Fiction 2.0 by Petra Gemeinboeck
Urban Fiction 2.0 is a participatory installation that deploys locative devices and social media. Enacted in Sydney, Australia, the installation is activated by participants through a special mobile app that allows them to “weave an imaginary lace over Sydney’s urban and social landscape.”

With the app, users can move through physical space and cause disturbances to the imaginary “lace” projected onto a GPS rendering of the city. As the app measures the movements of each participant in real time, any motion or disturbance caused will immediately alter the virtual lace.
Images of lace, fabric, and thread symbolize the urban and social sphere and point to the idea of each participant’s role as a networked actor, moving through the space and collectively tracing their paths. An example of locative art, Urban Fiction 2.0 allows users to feel a heightened sense of awareness of their positions in the imaginary lacy grid of the city and in the physical space they occupy. With a nod to the locative capabilities of Web 2.0 platforms, Urban Fiction 2.0 enables participants to “weave” their own experiences into the model of the city grid, issuing a sense of their actions in the broader context of a networked society.
For more information about Petra Gemeinboeck’s work, please visit her website here.
- Victoria Nolte
Weaving the Invisible Thread: Urban Fiction 2.0 by Petra Gemeinboeck
Urban Fiction 2.0 is a participatory installation that deploys locative devices and social media. Enacted in Sydney, Australia, the installation is activated by participants through a special mobile app that allows them to “weave an imaginary lace over Sydney’s urban and social landscape.”

With the app, users can move through physical space and cause disturbances to the imaginary “lace” projected onto a GPS rendering of the city. As the app measures the movements of each participant in real time, any motion or disturbance caused will immediately alter the virtual lace.
Images of lace, fabric, and thread symbolize the urban and social sphere and point to the idea of each participant’s role as a networked actor, moving through the space and collectively tracing their paths. An example of locative art, Urban Fiction 2.0 allows users to feel a heightened sense of awareness of their positions in the imaginary lacy grid of the city and in the physical space they occupy. With a nod to the locative capabilities of Web 2.0 platforms, Urban Fiction 2.0 enables participants to “weave” their own experiences into the model of the city grid, issuing a sense of their actions in the broader context of a networked society.
For more information about Petra Gemeinboeck’s work, please visit her website here.
- Victoria Nolte

Weaving the Invisible Thread: Urban Fiction 2.0 by Petra Gemeinboeck

Urban Fiction 2.0 is a participatory installation that deploys locative devices and social media. Enacted in Sydney, Australia, the installation is activated by participants through a special mobile app that allows them to “weave an imaginary lace over Sydney’s urban and social landscape.”

With the app, users can move through physical space and cause disturbances to the imaginary “lace” projected onto a GPS rendering of the city. As the app measures the movements of each participant in real time, any motion or disturbance caused will immediately alter the virtual lace.

Images of lace, fabric, and thread symbolize the urban and social sphere and point to the idea of each participant’s role as a networked actor, moving through the space and collectively tracing their paths. An example of locative art, Urban Fiction 2.0 allows users to feel a heightened sense of awareness of their positions in the imaginary lacy grid of the city and in the physical space they occupy. With a nod to the locative capabilities of Web 2.0 platforms, Urban Fiction 2.0 enables participants to “weave” their own experiences into the model of the city grid, issuing a sense of their actions in the broader context of a networked society.

For more information about Petra Gemeinboeck’s work, please visit her website here.

- Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ art technology urban fiction 2.0 petra gemeinboeck locative media participatory art installation victoria nolte

ArtSci Artists and Designers!

Don’t forget that you can submit your work for a feature on Art & Science Journal by sending in a detailed description, images, and a link to your website to submissions@artandsciencejournal.com We can’t wait to see your work! - Lee Jones
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Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones

Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?

The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.

With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.

Visit the MeMo website.

- Lee Jones

8 Photos
/ art design death jessica charlesworth MeMo technology
The Optical Illusions of Kohei Nawa
Using crystal beads and prism sheets, artist Kohei Nawa manipulates the audience’s perceptions of the images. In his PixCell (Beads) series (2005-2009), taxidermy animals are covered in clear crystal beads, obstructing our perception of the surface, and thus, the true image of the animal. In his PixCell (Prism) series (2003-2009), Nawa encases objects in acrylic boxes, but, with an added layer of prism sheets, that cut the light travelling into the boxes in two, and creating the illusion of multiples of the object, much like a hologram. In the latter work, the sculptural pieces are placed in a room that optically flattens the space and the works; the artist is taking already three-dimensional objects, flattening them by playing with the configuration of the space to appear two-dimensional, then placing prism sheets in the acrylic boxes to render the images three-dimensional by playing with the configuration in the smaller spaces of the boxes.
Distortion is a key element in the artists’ work. The skin of the animals in the PixCell (Beads) series is altered, creating a different view of the structure of the animal as a whole, and through each individual bead. The artist himself described the animals as being “replaced by ‘a husk of light’, and the new vision ‘the cell of an image’ (PixCell) is shown”, where the beads become the new ‘biological’ make-up of the animal. The random grouping of some of the beads can be seen as a direct commentary on how we perceive images, especially how the public is fed information, and the fact that sometimes even seeing the whole picture, with all the information, can still obscure the original intent of a piece. It is all in perception; two people seeing a piece will go away from it with two different perspectives on its intention or meaning.
-Anna Paluch
The Optical Illusions of Kohei Nawa
Using crystal beads and prism sheets, artist Kohei Nawa manipulates the audience’s perceptions of the images. In his PixCell (Beads) series (2005-2009), taxidermy animals are covered in clear crystal beads, obstructing our perception of the surface, and thus, the true image of the animal. In his PixCell (Prism) series (2003-2009), Nawa encases objects in acrylic boxes, but, with an added layer of prism sheets, that cut the light travelling into the boxes in two, and creating the illusion of multiples of the object, much like a hologram. In the latter work, the sculptural pieces are placed in a room that optically flattens the space and the works; the artist is taking already three-dimensional objects, flattening them by playing with the configuration of the space to appear two-dimensional, then placing prism sheets in the acrylic boxes to render the images three-dimensional by playing with the configuration in the smaller spaces of the boxes.
Distortion is a key element in the artists’ work. The skin of the animals in the PixCell (Beads) series is altered, creating a different view of the structure of the animal as a whole, and through each individual bead. The artist himself described the animals as being “replaced by ‘a husk of light’, and the new vision ‘the cell of an image’ (PixCell) is shown”, where the beads become the new ‘biological’ make-up of the animal. The random grouping of some of the beads can be seen as a direct commentary on how we perceive images, especially how the public is fed information, and the fact that sometimes even seeing the whole picture, with all the information, can still obscure the original intent of a piece. It is all in perception; two people seeing a piece will go away from it with two different perspectives on its intention or meaning.
-Anna Paluch
The Optical Illusions of Kohei Nawa
Using crystal beads and prism sheets, artist Kohei Nawa manipulates the audience’s perceptions of the images. In his PixCell (Beads) series (2005-2009), taxidermy animals are covered in clear crystal beads, obstructing our perception of the surface, and thus, the true image of the animal. In his PixCell (Prism) series (2003-2009), Nawa encases objects in acrylic boxes, but, with an added layer of prism sheets, that cut the light travelling into the boxes in two, and creating the illusion of multiples of the object, much like a hologram. In the latter work, the sculptural pieces are placed in a room that optically flattens the space and the works; the artist is taking already three-dimensional objects, flattening them by playing with the configuration of the space to appear two-dimensional, then placing prism sheets in the acrylic boxes to render the images three-dimensional by playing with the configuration in the smaller spaces of the boxes.
Distortion is a key element in the artists’ work. The skin of the animals in the PixCell (Beads) series is altered, creating a different view of the structure of the animal as a whole, and through each individual bead. The artist himself described the animals as being “replaced by ‘a husk of light’, and the new vision ‘the cell of an image’ (PixCell) is shown”, where the beads become the new ‘biological’ make-up of the animal. The random grouping of some of the beads can be seen as a direct commentary on how we perceive images, especially how the public is fed information, and the fact that sometimes even seeing the whole picture, with all the information, can still obscure the original intent of a piece. It is all in perception; two people seeing a piece will go away from it with two different perspectives on its intention or meaning.
-Anna Paluch

The Optical Illusions of Kohei Nawa

Using crystal beads and prism sheets, artist Kohei Nawa manipulates the audience’s perceptions of the images. In his PixCell (Beads) series (2005-2009), taxidermy animals are covered in clear crystal beads, obstructing our perception of the surface, and thus, the true image of the animal. In his PixCell (Prism) series (2003-2009), Nawa encases objects in acrylic boxes, but, with an added layer of prism sheets, that cut the light travelling into the boxes in two, and creating the illusion of multiples of the object, much like a hologram. In the latter work, the sculptural pieces are placed in a room that optically flattens the space and the works; the artist is taking already three-dimensional objects, flattening them by playing with the configuration of the space to appear two-dimensional, then placing prism sheets in the acrylic boxes to render the images three-dimensional by playing with the configuration in the smaller spaces of the boxes.

Distortion is a key element in the artists’ work. The skin of the animals in the PixCell (Beads) series is altered, creating a different view of the structure of the animal as a whole, and through each individual bead. The artist himself described the animals as being “replaced by ‘a husk of light’, and the new vision ‘the cell of an image’ (PixCell) is shown”, where the beads become the new ‘biological’ make-up of the animal. The random grouping of some of the beads can be seen as a direct commentary on how we perceive images, especially how the public is fed information, and the fact that sometimes even seeing the whole picture, with all the information, can still obscure the original intent of a piece. It is all in perception; two people seeing a piece will go away from it with two different perspectives on its intention or meaning.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ kohei nawa anna paluch optical illusion optics crystals prisms light art science art and science journal

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