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Plastic Bottles: The New Artistic Medium
Recycling has never been more fun!
Cubify and Coco-Cola have, respectfully, come up with innovative ways to cut waste through simple engineering. The soft drink company has created ‘caps’ with multi-functions to be placed over used plastic bottles, such as a water gun, sponge-brush for painting, sauce nozzle, and so much more!
Cubify on the other hand, has created a 3D printer, the Ekocycle Printer, that also uses plastic bottles, but in this case, as the printing material. One filament contains materials from three plastic bottles.
Unfortunately, the 3D printer is somewhat of a designer product, and the filaments are only available in black, red, white and natural, with the supposed intention of making your own accessories like jewelry or phone cases. The printer does though, come with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, so you can upload your design to any device. The idea is innovative and hopefully using plastic bottles to make useful objects will catch on with other major 3D printing companies.
There are however more grassroots organizations and individuals who use plastic waste in their 3D printing. Michigan Technological University’s Joshua Pearce is able to use milk jugs as filament for his 3D printer with the help of his RecycleBots. 
There was even a Kickstarter campaign to create the Filabot, which not only uses plastic bottles, but other plastic products as the printing filament.
If you prefer a more ‘designer’ aesthetic to your plastic recycling 3D printer, Cubify will be selling the Ekocycle Printers later this year.
-Anna Paluch

Plastic Bottles: The New Artistic Medium

Recycling has never been more fun!

Cubify and Coco-Cola have, respectfully, come up with innovative ways to cut waste through simple engineering. The soft drink company has created ‘caps’ with multi-functions to be placed over used plastic bottles, such as a water gun, sponge-brush for painting, sauce nozzle, and so much more!

Cubify on the other hand, has created a 3D printer, the Ekocycle Printer, that also uses plastic bottles, but in this case, as the printing material. One filament contains materials from three plastic bottles.

Unfortunately, the 3D printer is somewhat of a designer product, and the filaments are only available in black, red, white and natural, with the supposed intention of making your own accessories like jewelry or phone cases. The printer does though, come with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, so you can upload your design to any device. The idea is innovative and hopefully using plastic bottles to make useful objects will catch on with other major 3D printing companies.

There are however more grassroots organizations and individuals who use plastic waste in their 3D printing. Michigan Technological University’s Joshua Pearce is able to use milk jugs as filament for his 3D printer with the help of his RecycleBots. 

There was even a Kickstarter campaign to create the Filabot, which not only uses plastic bottles, but other plastic products as the printing filament.

If you prefer a more ‘designer’ aesthetic to your plastic recycling 3D printer, Cubify will be selling the Ekocycle Printers later this year.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3D Printing plastic recycle Cubify Ekocycle Coca-Cola Environment Joshua Pearce RecycleBot Filabot anna paluch art science art and science journal
Food For Thought: Art is Good For Your Brain!
A recent study by University Hospital Erlangen in Germany suggests that, other than relieving stress, coming into contact with art specifically by making art works or crafts, can create “a significant improvement in psychological resilience”. This is due to the excessive use of motor and cognitive processing in the brain, stimulating it. Such discoveries are beneficial especially to the elderly, as creating art keeps the brain healthy, which could help slow down the onslaught of memory loss. You can read more on the findings here.
Science, engineering and all other typically ‘non-artsy’ fields have artistic elements about them; in fact, mathematical equations, DNA and even microbiological elements can be seen as works of art all on their own, serving both aesthetic and educational purposes. Even bacteria, manipulated by scientists such as Eshel Ben-Jacob, can create psychedelic patterns based on natural formations due to change in temperature or environment. The results are truly groovy.
A certain amount of creativity and a sense of design were definitely needed to create “inFORM”, an invention from MIT which allows users to interact with objects through a screen (yes, the digital kind). This invention is capable of rendering 3D objects physically, allowing users to interact with each other no matter how far away they are.
Not only can our artistic side create new inventions or help us see the scientific world in a different light, but art can help keep the brain active and healthy for many decades, or in the case of Hal Lasko, almost a century. The 99 year old, who passed away this year, worked as a typographer in his youth, making fonts by hand. After becoming partially blind in his senior years, Lasko turned to digital mediums such as Microsoft Paint, creating over 150 digital pieces.
Art it seems is a lot more beneficial to us than merely another creative outlet and stress-reliever, and we have science to thank for reaching that conclusion!
-Anna Paluch
Food For Thought: Art is Good For Your Brain!
A recent study by University Hospital Erlangen in Germany suggests that, other than relieving stress, coming into contact with art specifically by making art works or crafts, can create “a significant improvement in psychological resilience”. This is due to the excessive use of motor and cognitive processing in the brain, stimulating it. Such discoveries are beneficial especially to the elderly, as creating art keeps the brain healthy, which could help slow down the onslaught of memory loss. You can read more on the findings here.
Science, engineering and all other typically ‘non-artsy’ fields have artistic elements about them; in fact, mathematical equations, DNA and even microbiological elements can be seen as works of art all on their own, serving both aesthetic and educational purposes. Even bacteria, manipulated by scientists such as Eshel Ben-Jacob, can create psychedelic patterns based on natural formations due to change in temperature or environment. The results are truly groovy.
A certain amount of creativity and a sense of design were definitely needed to create “inFORM”, an invention from MIT which allows users to interact with objects through a screen (yes, the digital kind). This invention is capable of rendering 3D objects physically, allowing users to interact with each other no matter how far away they are.
Not only can our artistic side create new inventions or help us see the scientific world in a different light, but art can help keep the brain active and healthy for many decades, or in the case of Hal Lasko, almost a century. The 99 year old, who passed away this year, worked as a typographer in his youth, making fonts by hand. After becoming partially blind in his senior years, Lasko turned to digital mediums such as Microsoft Paint, creating over 150 digital pieces.
Art it seems is a lot more beneficial to us than merely another creative outlet and stress-reliever, and we have science to thank for reaching that conclusion!
-Anna Paluch
Food For Thought: Art is Good For Your Brain!
A recent study by University Hospital Erlangen in Germany suggests that, other than relieving stress, coming into contact with art specifically by making art works or crafts, can create “a significant improvement in psychological resilience”. This is due to the excessive use of motor and cognitive processing in the brain, stimulating it. Such discoveries are beneficial especially to the elderly, as creating art keeps the brain healthy, which could help slow down the onslaught of memory loss. You can read more on the findings here.
Science, engineering and all other typically ‘non-artsy’ fields have artistic elements about them; in fact, mathematical equations, DNA and even microbiological elements can be seen as works of art all on their own, serving both aesthetic and educational purposes. Even bacteria, manipulated by scientists such as Eshel Ben-Jacob, can create psychedelic patterns based on natural formations due to change in temperature or environment. The results are truly groovy.
A certain amount of creativity and a sense of design were definitely needed to create “inFORM”, an invention from MIT which allows users to interact with objects through a screen (yes, the digital kind). This invention is capable of rendering 3D objects physically, allowing users to interact with each other no matter how far away they are.
Not only can our artistic side create new inventions or help us see the scientific world in a different light, but art can help keep the brain active and healthy for many decades, or in the case of Hal Lasko, almost a century. The 99 year old, who passed away this year, worked as a typographer in his youth, making fonts by hand. After becoming partially blind in his senior years, Lasko turned to digital mediums such as Microsoft Paint, creating over 150 digital pieces.
Art it seems is a lot more beneficial to us than merely another creative outlet and stress-reliever, and we have science to thank for reaching that conclusion!
-Anna Paluch

Food For Thought: Art is Good For Your Brain!

A recent study by University Hospital Erlangen in Germany suggests that, other than relieving stress, coming into contact with art specifically by making art works or crafts, can create “a significant improvement in psychological resilience”. This is due to the excessive use of motor and cognitive processing in the brain, stimulating it. Such discoveries are beneficial especially to the elderly, as creating art keeps the brain healthy, which could help slow down the onslaught of memory loss. You can read more on the findings here.

Science, engineering and all other typically ‘non-artsy’ fields have artistic elements about them; in fact, mathematical equations, DNA and even microbiological elements can be seen as works of art all on their own, serving both aesthetic and educational purposes. Even bacteria, manipulated by scientists such as Eshel Ben-Jacob, can create psychedelic patterns based on natural formations due to change in temperature or environment. The results are truly groovy.

A certain amount of creativity and a sense of design were definitely needed to create “inFORM”, an invention from MIT which allows users to interact with objects through a screen (yes, the digital kind). This invention is capable of rendering 3D objects physically, allowing users to interact with each other no matter how far away they are.

Not only can our artistic side create new inventions or help us see the scientific world in a different light, but art can help keep the brain active and healthy for many decades, or in the case of Hal Lasko, almost a century. The 99 year old, who passed away this year, worked as a typographer in his youth, making fonts by hand. After becoming partially blind in his senior years, Lasko turned to digital mediums such as Microsoft Paint, creating over 150 digital pieces.

Art it seems is a lot more beneficial to us than merely another creative outlet and stress-reliever, and we have science to thank for reaching that conclusion!

-Anna Paluch

3 Photos
/ University of Erlangen art stree brain health memory elderly Eshel Ben-Jacob bacteria inFORM MIT tehcnology engineering science Hal Lasko digital art digital painting anna paluch art and science journal
Recycling New Technologies
When the term ‘computer art’ is thrown around, it is safe to assume that some people automatically think about art that is created using digital mediums.
But what about ‘computer art’ as art that is made, literally, from parts of a computer?
Multimedia artist Leonard Ulian takes inspiration from traditional artistic practices such as sand mandalas and book binding, and combines this inspiration with various electrical components, computer parts and copper wire. Mimicking two time consuming traditional practices, Ulian’s work can be interpreted as creating a network between traditional and contemporary, or in the case of the mandalas specifically, comparing spiritual and ritualistic representations of the universe with the artist’s own fascination in how systems can be applied to the process of art making.
Similarly, mixed-media artist Anna Dabrowska, better known as Finnabair, takes inspiration from a Victorian-era style of art to create her ‘steampunk’ collages using found objects such as computer parts. The artist herself describe her practice as “industrial art, cyberpunk art, or artistic upcycling”, taking modern technologies that have been deemed obsolete, thrown out, and applying them to traditional art practices.
-Anna Paluch
Recycling New Technologies
When the term ‘computer art’ is thrown around, it is safe to assume that some people automatically think about art that is created using digital mediums.
But what about ‘computer art’ as art that is made, literally, from parts of a computer?
Multimedia artist Leonard Ulian takes inspiration from traditional artistic practices such as sand mandalas and book binding, and combines this inspiration with various electrical components, computer parts and copper wire. Mimicking two time consuming traditional practices, Ulian’s work can be interpreted as creating a network between traditional and contemporary, or in the case of the mandalas specifically, comparing spiritual and ritualistic representations of the universe with the artist’s own fascination in how systems can be applied to the process of art making.
Similarly, mixed-media artist Anna Dabrowska, better known as Finnabair, takes inspiration from a Victorian-era style of art to create her ‘steampunk’ collages using found objects such as computer parts. The artist herself describe her practice as “industrial art, cyberpunk art, or artistic upcycling”, taking modern technologies that have been deemed obsolete, thrown out, and applying them to traditional art practices.
-Anna Paluch
Recycling New Technologies
When the term ‘computer art’ is thrown around, it is safe to assume that some people automatically think about art that is created using digital mediums.
But what about ‘computer art’ as art that is made, literally, from parts of a computer?
Multimedia artist Leonard Ulian takes inspiration from traditional artistic practices such as sand mandalas and book binding, and combines this inspiration with various electrical components, computer parts and copper wire. Mimicking two time consuming traditional practices, Ulian’s work can be interpreted as creating a network between traditional and contemporary, or in the case of the mandalas specifically, comparing spiritual and ritualistic representations of the universe with the artist’s own fascination in how systems can be applied to the process of art making.
Similarly, mixed-media artist Anna Dabrowska, better known as Finnabair, takes inspiration from a Victorian-era style of art to create her ‘steampunk’ collages using found objects such as computer parts. The artist herself describe her practice as “industrial art, cyberpunk art, or artistic upcycling”, taking modern technologies that have been deemed obsolete, thrown out, and applying them to traditional art practices.
-Anna Paluch
Recycling New Technologies
When the term ‘computer art’ is thrown around, it is safe to assume that some people automatically think about art that is created using digital mediums.
But what about ‘computer art’ as art that is made, literally, from parts of a computer?
Multimedia artist Leonard Ulian takes inspiration from traditional artistic practices such as sand mandalas and book binding, and combines this inspiration with various electrical components, computer parts and copper wire. Mimicking two time consuming traditional practices, Ulian’s work can be interpreted as creating a network between traditional and contemporary, or in the case of the mandalas specifically, comparing spiritual and ritualistic representations of the universe with the artist’s own fascination in how systems can be applied to the process of art making.
Similarly, mixed-media artist Anna Dabrowska, better known as Finnabair, takes inspiration from a Victorian-era style of art to create her ‘steampunk’ collages using found objects such as computer parts. The artist herself describe her practice as “industrial art, cyberpunk art, or artistic upcycling”, taking modern technologies that have been deemed obsolete, thrown out, and applying them to traditional art practices.
-Anna Paluch

Recycling New Technologies

When the term ‘computer art’ is thrown around, it is safe to assume that some people automatically think about art that is created using digital mediums.

But what about ‘computer art’ as art that is made, literally, from parts of a computer?

Multimedia artist Leonard Ulian takes inspiration from traditional artistic practices such as sand mandalas and book binding, and combines this inspiration with various electrical components, computer parts and copper wire. Mimicking two time consuming traditional practices, Ulian’s work can be interpreted as creating a network between traditional and contemporary, or in the case of the mandalas specifically, comparing spiritual and ritualistic representations of the universe with the artist’s own fascination in how systems can be applied to the process of art making.

Similarly, mixed-media artist Anna Dabrowska, better known as Finnabair, takes inspiration from a Victorian-era style of art to create her ‘steampunk’ collages using found objects such as computer parts. The artist herself describe her practice as “industrial art, cyberpunk art, or artistic upcycling”, taking modern technologies that have been deemed obsolete, thrown out, and applying them to traditional art practices.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ Leonard Ulian Finnabair Anna Dabrowska computer art recycle art technology art science mandala book binding steampunk upcycling art and science journal
The Telegarden
Between the years of 1995 and 2004 the University of South Carolina, and subsequently the Ars Electronica Centre in Austria, were home to an innovative project called “The Telegarden”. This garden featured an area of dirt and plants inside a planter, which also held an industrial robot arm, which could be controlled through the internet.
How the garden worked, was that people from all over the world were able to observe the garden through a camera in the robot arm, but also, have the power to water and tend to the plants. If there was a free space the robot arm even allowed an individual, through the internet, the ability to plant a seed and take care of it. 
Professor Ken Goldberg explained that the decision to use a garden for this interactive project was that it is “very human, very immediate, very tactile”, a stark contrast to the idea of the internet and anything associated with it as complex, mathematical and machine-like. The internet is fast-paced, connecting us to other people and information in milliseconds, but the garden cannot be rushed, it must be cared for carefully,
As Randall Packer states:
“The Telegarden creates a physical garden as an environment to stage social interaction and community in virtual space. The Telegarden is a metaphor for the care and feeding of the delicate social ecology of the net." — San Jose Museum of Art, April 1998.

-Anna Paluch

The Telegarden

Between the years of 1995 and 2004 the University of South Carolina, and subsequently the Ars Electronica Centre in Austria, were home to an innovative project called “The Telegarden”. This garden featured an area of dirt and plants inside a planter, which also held an industrial robot arm, which could be controlled through the internet.

How the garden worked, was that people from all over the world were able to observe the garden through a camera in the robot arm, but also, have the power to water and tend to the plants. If there was a free space the robot arm even allowed an individual, through the internet, the ability to plant a seed and take care of it. 

Professor Ken Goldberg explained that the decision to use a garden for this interactive project was that it is “very human, very immediate, very tactile”, a stark contrast to the idea of the internet and anything associated with it as complex, mathematical and machine-like. The internet is fast-paced, connecting us to other people and information in milliseconds, but the garden cannot be rushed, it must be cared for carefully,

As Randall Packer states:

The Telegarden creates a physical garden as an environment to stage social interaction and community in virtual space. The Telegarden is a metaphor for the care and feeding of the delicate social ecology of the net." — San Jose Museum of Art, April 1998.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

The Telegarden university of south carolina ars electronica anna paluch art science art and science journal garden biology robotics engineering biodiversity
A Sweet 3-D Printing Project!
Bees are fascinating little creatures, having the capacity to build intricate structures. Marketing agencies, Sid Lee and The Ebeling Group decided to harness the bees building skills by manipulating the shape in which the they build their hives, creating organic sculptures for their client Dewar’s. 
The results include bottles and busts made purely from honeycomb; not chiseled or stuck together, but formed naturally by the bees themselves. With 3-D printing gaining popularity, it is wonderful to see natural examples of 3-D printing. The artists and bee keepers involved in the 3-D project are also able to study the process the bees go through to build their hives, as the outer shell is made of see-through plastic. 
Everything was taken into consideration to make the 80,000 bees as comfortable as possible; the base and see-through shell were designed to mimic the enclosed space of a normal bee hive. The bees were even helped in building their new hives, given ‘blueprints’ in order to collect pollen and nectarThis is a great example of thinking ‘outside the box’, and marketing done right!
There is a video of the process available here.
If you would like to read about other artists who work with bees to create natural honeycomb sculptures, check out Tomás Libertíny and Aganetha Dyck.
-Anna Paluch
A Sweet 3-D Printing Project!
Bees are fascinating little creatures, having the capacity to build intricate structures. Marketing agencies, Sid Lee and The Ebeling Group decided to harness the bees building skills by manipulating the shape in which the they build their hives, creating organic sculptures for their client Dewar’s. 
The results include bottles and busts made purely from honeycomb; not chiseled or stuck together, but formed naturally by the bees themselves. With 3-D printing gaining popularity, it is wonderful to see natural examples of 3-D printing. The artists and bee keepers involved in the 3-D project are also able to study the process the bees go through to build their hives, as the outer shell is made of see-through plastic. 
Everything was taken into consideration to make the 80,000 bees as comfortable as possible; the base and see-through shell were designed to mimic the enclosed space of a normal bee hive. The bees were even helped in building their new hives, given ‘blueprints’ in order to collect pollen and nectarThis is a great example of thinking ‘outside the box’, and marketing done right!
There is a video of the process available here.
If you would like to read about other artists who work with bees to create natural honeycomb sculptures, check out Tomás Libertíny and Aganetha Dyck.
-Anna Paluch

A Sweet 3-D Printing Project!

Bees are fascinating little creatures, having the capacity to build intricate structures. Marketing agencies, Sid Lee and The Ebeling Group decided to harness the bees building skills by manipulating the shape in which the they build their hives, creating organic sculptures for their client Dewar’s. 

The results include bottles and busts made purely from honeycomb; not chiseled or stuck together, but formed naturally by the bees themselves. With 3-D printing gaining popularity, it is wonderful to see natural examples of 3-D printing. The artists and bee keepers involved in the 3-D project are also able to study the process the bees go through to build their hives, as the outer shell is made of see-through plastic. 

Everything was taken into consideration to make the 80,000 bees as comfortable as possible; the base and see-through shell were designed to mimic the enclosed space of a normal bee hive. The bees were even helped in building their new hives, given ‘blueprints’ in order to collect pollen and nectar

This is a great example of thinking ‘outside the box’, and marketing done right!

There is a video of the process available here.

If you would like to read about other artists who work with bees to create natural honeycomb sculptures, check out Tomás Libertíny and Aganetha Dyck.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ bees honey 3D Printing nature engineering biology marketing Tomas libertiny aganetha dyck anna paluch art science art and science journal advertising
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch

Home Sweet Home

Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).

With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 

With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.

Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?

A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ aki inomata anna paluch hermit crabs animals shells plastic scanning technology 3D Printing art science art and science journal ct scan shelter home physiology architecture biology

Windswept by Charles Sowers

Though we cannot physically hold wind or see its swirling forms around us, we can definitely feel it.

In order to help visualize wind-currents, artist Charles Sowers created a kinetic installation consisting of 612 aluminum weather vanes called “Windswept” (2011). These were then meticulously placed on the side of the Randall Museum in San Francisco. Through this installation, we are able to see the patterns in the wind; where the currents go, how they turn, and sometimes how wind can abruptly change direction. This gives us a visual representation of the natural, invisible, force which moves around us, and sometimes with enough force, pushes and pulls us.

As the artist states:

Our ordinary experience of wind is as a solitary sample point of a very large invisible phenomenon. Windswept is a kind of large sensor array that samples the wind at its point of interaction with the Randall Museum building and reveals the complexity and structure of that interaction.

This sort of installation creates a better understanding, and appreciation, of the wind. It is not just one large gust; a single wave can be made up of smaller currents, going in their own directions from the main flow. A dialogue begins to form between the building and the wind, the weather vanes acting as translators.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Charles Sowersanna paluchwindweather vaneweatherRandall MuseumWindsweptscienceartart and science journal
Seismic Activities
Continuing the topic of last week’s post on earthquake inspired art, this post will highlight two more artists whose works are inspired by fault lines and our Earth’s movements.
Juan Geuer was an artist whose works resulted from a harmonious blend of art and science. The artists’ most well-known piece is “Al Asnaam” (1979), which permanently resides at the Ottawa Art Gallery.
The piece includes a highly sensitive horizontal pendulum, which reacts to movements on the Earth’s surface, later translating those movements through a laser-light which pierces the space to project itself onto the opposing wall. The room in which the piece resides becomes part of the installation, and the people walking around the piece inside the room help create very minute ‘earthquakes’ with every step they take; or what the piece reads as earthquakes. It is known as a “people participating seismometer”, which in turn helps audiences become aware of the effect that our daily movements have on the Earth’s surface.
Ken Goldberg is a professor and artist whose collaborative work “Bloom” (2013) utilizes his geographic location, almost a kilometre and a half away from California’s Hayward Fault line, to create an “Internet-based earthwork”. This work tracks the low-level movements of the fault line, showing that even when there is no massive quake, the ground below us is constantly moving, pulling different ways, and grumbling away unnoticed. The webpage that supports this work, broadcasts these movements live, translating them into bursts of vibrant colours.
The works of these two artists, help us to understand both how we impact our own Earth’s movements, and just how unpredictable those movements can be.
-Anna Paluch
Seismic Activities
Continuing the topic of last week’s post on earthquake inspired art, this post will highlight two more artists whose works are inspired by fault lines and our Earth’s movements.
Juan Geuer was an artist whose works resulted from a harmonious blend of art and science. The artists’ most well-known piece is “Al Asnaam” (1979), which permanently resides at the Ottawa Art Gallery.
The piece includes a highly sensitive horizontal pendulum, which reacts to movements on the Earth’s surface, later translating those movements through a laser-light which pierces the space to project itself onto the opposing wall. The room in which the piece resides becomes part of the installation, and the people walking around the piece inside the room help create very minute ‘earthquakes’ with every step they take; or what the piece reads as earthquakes. It is known as a “people participating seismometer”, which in turn helps audiences become aware of the effect that our daily movements have on the Earth’s surface.
Ken Goldberg is a professor and artist whose collaborative work “Bloom” (2013) utilizes his geographic location, almost a kilometre and a half away from California’s Hayward Fault line, to create an “Internet-based earthwork”. This work tracks the low-level movements of the fault line, showing that even when there is no massive quake, the ground below us is constantly moving, pulling different ways, and grumbling away unnoticed. The webpage that supports this work, broadcasts these movements live, translating them into bursts of vibrant colours.
The works of these two artists, help us to understand both how we impact our own Earth’s movements, and just how unpredictable those movements can be.
-Anna Paluch
Seismic Activities
Continuing the topic of last week’s post on earthquake inspired art, this post will highlight two more artists whose works are inspired by fault lines and our Earth’s movements.
Juan Geuer was an artist whose works resulted from a harmonious blend of art and science. The artists’ most well-known piece is “Al Asnaam” (1979), which permanently resides at the Ottawa Art Gallery.
The piece includes a highly sensitive horizontal pendulum, which reacts to movements on the Earth’s surface, later translating those movements through a laser-light which pierces the space to project itself onto the opposing wall. The room in which the piece resides becomes part of the installation, and the people walking around the piece inside the room help create very minute ‘earthquakes’ with every step they take; or what the piece reads as earthquakes. It is known as a “people participating seismometer”, which in turn helps audiences become aware of the effect that our daily movements have on the Earth’s surface.
Ken Goldberg is a professor and artist whose collaborative work “Bloom” (2013) utilizes his geographic location, almost a kilometre and a half away from California’s Hayward Fault line, to create an “Internet-based earthwork”. This work tracks the low-level movements of the fault line, showing that even when there is no massive quake, the ground below us is constantly moving, pulling different ways, and grumbling away unnoticed. The webpage that supports this work, broadcasts these movements live, translating them into bursts of vibrant colours.
The works of these two artists, help us to understand both how we impact our own Earth’s movements, and just how unpredictable those movements can be.
-Anna Paluch

Seismic Activities

Continuing the topic of last week’s post on earthquake inspired art, this post will highlight two more artists whose works are inspired by fault lines and our Earth’s movements.

Juan Geuer was an artist whose works resulted from a harmonious blend of art and science. The artists’ most well-known piece is “Al Asnaam” (1979), which permanently resides at the Ottawa Art Gallery.

The piece includes a highly sensitive horizontal pendulum, which reacts to movements on the Earth’s surface, later translating those movements through a laser-light which pierces the space to project itself onto the opposing wall. The room in which the piece resides becomes part of the installation, and the people walking around the piece inside the room help create very minute ‘earthquakes’ with every step they take; or what the piece reads as earthquakes. It is known as a “people participating seismometer”, which in turn helps audiences become aware of the effect that our daily movements have on the Earth’s surface.

Ken Goldberg is a professor and artist whose collaborative work “Bloom” (2013) utilizes his geographic location, almost a kilometre and a half away from California’s Hayward Fault line, to create an “Internet-based earthwork”. This work tracks the low-level movements of the fault line, showing that even when there is no massive quake, the ground below us is constantly moving, pulling different ways, and grumbling away unnoticed. The webpage that supports this work, broadcasts these movements live, translating them into bursts of vibrant colours.

The works of these two artists, help us to understand both how we impact our own Earth’s movements, and just how unpredictable those movements can be.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ juan geuer ken goldberg earthquake seismic activity Earth art science art and science journal anna paluch Ottawa Art Gallery

As artist Leo Selvaggio attests to in his video above, privacy is becoming a precious commodity. With the ever-increasing prevalence of technology and mobile devices, it’s difficult to maintain a low profile. Many of our actions, both online and out and about, are being recorded and surveilled, either on a camera or by virtually tracking our positions via mobile devices. This has driven Selvaggio to create a work of art and a hacking device that allows for its wearer to walk about undetected by the cameras that surveil them - URME Surveillance. Pronounced “you-are-me”, this device is a 3-D printed rubber mask manufactured by ThatsMyFace.com. The level of rendering is realistic enough to fool the facial recognition software, so that every person wearing the mask is recognized as Leo Selvaggio, not themselves.

Selvaggio has been living and working in Chicago, stating in his video that it is the most surveilled city in America - with over 25,000 cameras rigged with military-grade facial recognition software, it’s easy to see why Selvaggio would want to create some sort of bypass for those who would rather not be monitored. Instead of hiding the public’s face, Selvaggio is giving them a new one, “protecting the public from surveillance and creating a safe space to explore our digital identities.”

Aside from the rubber mask, URME Surveillance has two other products available to users: a paper mask, best worn in large groups, and a video encryption software that places Selvaggio’s face over those that appear in the video. Selvaggio is aware of the less savory activities that these masks could be used for, but insists that URME Surveillance is an “organized artistic intervention”, driven by a desire to allow an individual the ability to “assert themselves in a public space”. As such, it is expected that these devices are used responsibly by those who choose to wear them. 

To learn more about URME Surveillance or support its Indiegogo campaign, click here.

- Lea Hamilton 

(source)

URME SurveillanceLeo Selvaggioarthackingmask3d printingtechnologysurveillanceartandsciencejournalLea Hamilton
Art as Aftershock
Earthquakes are dangerous phenomena, yet two artists chose to present these natural disasters, in a way that makes viewers contemplate, rather than fear them.
Luke Jerram and Carlos Amorales created works that comment on the 2011 Japanese Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, and 1985 earthquake in Mexico City, respectively. Their works allow viewers to contemplate the nature of earthquakes with the help of visualizations through seismographic data.
In Jerram’s piece, the artist took the seismographic data from the Tōhoku earthquake, and rotated it using a computer program to see the data in three-dimensions, later printing it in those dimensions. The sculpture, made in 2011, represents nine minutes of the earthquake, allowing viewers to calculate, and imagine, the severity of the disaster on their own.
Amorales approaches the 1985 earthquake in a more theoretical presentation, in “Vertical Earthquake” (2010). Rather than using data, the artist creates his own fault lines and cracks on the walls, drawing epicentres around each. The artist chose to capture the chaos and emotion of the event. Within the installation, newspaper clippings of the disaster are displayed, with fault lines drawn on them as well. 
Where Jerram uses data to help visualize the severity of the earthquake in Japan, Morales plays with drama and emotion, creating a fragmented image which symbolically reflects the earthquake that he witnessed. Both pieces however, are sobering reminders of the immense power our Earth has over man-made constructions.
-Anna Paluch
Art as Aftershock
Earthquakes are dangerous phenomena, yet two artists chose to present these natural disasters, in a way that makes viewers contemplate, rather than fear them.
Luke Jerram and Carlos Amorales created works that comment on the 2011 Japanese Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, and 1985 earthquake in Mexico City, respectively. Their works allow viewers to contemplate the nature of earthquakes with the help of visualizations through seismographic data.
In Jerram’s piece, the artist took the seismographic data from the Tōhoku earthquake, and rotated it using a computer program to see the data in three-dimensions, later printing it in those dimensions. The sculpture, made in 2011, represents nine minutes of the earthquake, allowing viewers to calculate, and imagine, the severity of the disaster on their own.
Amorales approaches the 1985 earthquake in a more theoretical presentation, in “Vertical Earthquake” (2010). Rather than using data, the artist creates his own fault lines and cracks on the walls, drawing epicentres around each. The artist chose to capture the chaos and emotion of the event. Within the installation, newspaper clippings of the disaster are displayed, with fault lines drawn on them as well. 
Where Jerram uses data to help visualize the severity of the earthquake in Japan, Morales plays with drama and emotion, creating a fragmented image which symbolically reflects the earthquake that he witnessed. Both pieces however, are sobering reminders of the immense power our Earth has over man-made constructions.
-Anna Paluch
Art as Aftershock
Earthquakes are dangerous phenomena, yet two artists chose to present these natural disasters, in a way that makes viewers contemplate, rather than fear them.
Luke Jerram and Carlos Amorales created works that comment on the 2011 Japanese Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, and 1985 earthquake in Mexico City, respectively. Their works allow viewers to contemplate the nature of earthquakes with the help of visualizations through seismographic data.
In Jerram’s piece, the artist took the seismographic data from the Tōhoku earthquake, and rotated it using a computer program to see the data in three-dimensions, later printing it in those dimensions. The sculpture, made in 2011, represents nine minutes of the earthquake, allowing viewers to calculate, and imagine, the severity of the disaster on their own.
Amorales approaches the 1985 earthquake in a more theoretical presentation, in “Vertical Earthquake” (2010). Rather than using data, the artist creates his own fault lines and cracks on the walls, drawing epicentres around each. The artist chose to capture the chaos and emotion of the event. Within the installation, newspaper clippings of the disaster are displayed, with fault lines drawn on them as well. 
Where Jerram uses data to help visualize the severity of the earthquake in Japan, Morales plays with drama and emotion, creating a fragmented image which symbolically reflects the earthquake that he witnessed. Both pieces however, are sobering reminders of the immense power our Earth has over man-made constructions.
-Anna Paluch
Art as Aftershock
Earthquakes are dangerous phenomena, yet two artists chose to present these natural disasters, in a way that makes viewers contemplate, rather than fear them.
Luke Jerram and Carlos Amorales created works that comment on the 2011 Japanese Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, and 1985 earthquake in Mexico City, respectively. Their works allow viewers to contemplate the nature of earthquakes with the help of visualizations through seismographic data.
In Jerram’s piece, the artist took the seismographic data from the Tōhoku earthquake, and rotated it using a computer program to see the data in three-dimensions, later printing it in those dimensions. The sculpture, made in 2011, represents nine minutes of the earthquake, allowing viewers to calculate, and imagine, the severity of the disaster on their own.
Amorales approaches the 1985 earthquake in a more theoretical presentation, in “Vertical Earthquake” (2010). Rather than using data, the artist creates his own fault lines and cracks on the walls, drawing epicentres around each. The artist chose to capture the chaos and emotion of the event. Within the installation, newspaper clippings of the disaster are displayed, with fault lines drawn on them as well. 
Where Jerram uses data to help visualize the severity of the earthquake in Japan, Morales plays with drama and emotion, creating a fragmented image which symbolically reflects the earthquake that he witnessed. Both pieces however, are sobering reminders of the immense power our Earth has over man-made constructions.
-Anna Paluch

Art as Aftershock

Earthquakes are dangerous phenomena, yet two artists chose to present these natural disasters, in a way that makes viewers contemplate, rather than fear them.

Luke Jerram and Carlos Amorales created works that comment on the 2011 Japanese Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, and 1985 earthquake in Mexico City, respectively. Their works allow viewers to contemplate the nature of earthquakes with the help of visualizations through seismographic data.

In Jerram’s piece, the artist took the seismographic data from the Tōhoku earthquake, and rotated it using a computer program to see the data in three-dimensions, later printing it in those dimensions. The sculpture, made in 2011, represents nine minutes of the earthquake, allowing viewers to calculate, and imagine, the severity of the disaster on their own.

Amorales approaches the 1985 earthquake in a more theoretical presentation, in “Vertical Earthquake” (2010). Rather than using data, the artist creates his own fault lines and cracks on the walls, drawing epicentres around each. The artist chose to capture the chaos and emotion of the event. Within the installation, newspaper clippings of the disaster are displayed, with fault lines drawn on them as well.

Where Jerram uses data to help visualize the severity of the earthquake in Japan, Morales plays with drama and emotion, creating a fragmented image which symbolically reflects the earthquake that he witnessed. Both pieces however, are sobering reminders of the immense power our Earth has over man-made constructions.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ Luke Jerram Carlos Amorales anna paluch seismograph seismogam earthquake art science art and science journal sculpture installation Tohoko japan earthquake mexico city earthquake

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