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As artist Leo Selvaggio attests to in his video above, privacy is becoming a precious commodity. With the ever-increasing prevalence of technology and mobile devices, it’s difficult to maintain a low profile. Many of our actions, both online and out and about, are being recorded and surveilled, either on a camera or by virtually tracking our positions via mobile devices. This has driven Selvaggio to create a work of art and a hacking device that allows for its wearer to walk about undetected by the cameras that surveil them - URME Surveillance. Pronounced “you-are-me”, this device is a 3-D printed rubber mask manufactured by ThatsMyFace.com. The level of rendering is realistic enough to fool the facial recognition software, so that every person wearing the mask is recognized as Leo Selvaggio, not themselves.

Selvaggio has been living and working in Chicago, stating in his video that it is the most surveilled city in America - with over 25,000 cameras rigged with military-grade facial recognition software, it’s easy to see why Selvaggio would want to create some sort of bypass for those who would rather not be monitored. Instead of hiding the public’s face, Selvaggio is giving them a new one, “protecting the public from surveillance and creating a safe space to explore our digital identities.”

Aside from the rubber mask, URME Surveillance has two other products available to users: a paper mask, best worn in large groups, and a video encryption software that places Selvaggio’s face over those that appear in the video. Selvaggio is aware of the less savory activities that these masks could be used for, but insists that URME Surveillance is an “organized artistic intervention”, driven by a desire to allow an individual the ability to “assert themselves in a public space”. As such, it is expected that these devices are used responsibly by those who choose to wear them. 

To learn more about URME Surveillance or support its Indiegogo campaign, click here.

- Lea Hamilton 

(source)

URME SurveillanceLeo Selvaggioarthackingmask3d printingtechnologysurveillanceartandsciencejournalLea Hamilton
Local Coverage - PUSH: The New Printmakers
Contemporary printmaking practices live in an in-between space. As a medium, it is caught between its history and its relevance as a mode of expression. Printmaking is often thought of as a dying art, sometimes involving complicated processes and machinery that are no longer being manufactured. But, the relevance of printmaking as an art form is still present, as is shown by a new printmaking exhibition being held at Studio Sixty Six in Ottawa.

PUSH: The New Printmakers brings together several artists specializing in different types of printmaking. The works are comprised of linocuts, screen printing, woodcuts and relief prints.The artists included in the show are Melissa Blackman, Delphine Sullivan, Dante Penman, Claudia Gutierrez, Tegan Alston, Stéphanie St-Jean Aubre and Kimberly Edgar, all graduates from the Ottawa School of Art. While all the works are tied together by their medium and their black and white palette, each artist’s oeuvre addresses different artistic preoccupations, ranging from issues of identity, the idea of the specimen, to the relationship between landmarks and memory. 

For those who are interested in checking out the show, it will be open until June 26th. Click here for more information.
If you are interested in seeing interviews with the artists and gallery owner, click here.
-Lea Hamilton
Local Coverage - PUSH: The New Printmakers
Contemporary printmaking practices live in an in-between space. As a medium, it is caught between its history and its relevance as a mode of expression. Printmaking is often thought of as a dying art, sometimes involving complicated processes and machinery that are no longer being manufactured. But, the relevance of printmaking as an art form is still present, as is shown by a new printmaking exhibition being held at Studio Sixty Six in Ottawa.

PUSH: The New Printmakers brings together several artists specializing in different types of printmaking. The works are comprised of linocuts, screen printing, woodcuts and relief prints.The artists included in the show are Melissa Blackman, Delphine Sullivan, Dante Penman, Claudia Gutierrez, Tegan Alston, Stéphanie St-Jean Aubre and Kimberly Edgar, all graduates from the Ottawa School of Art. While all the works are tied together by their medium and their black and white palette, each artist’s oeuvre addresses different artistic preoccupations, ranging from issues of identity, the idea of the specimen, to the relationship between landmarks and memory. 

For those who are interested in checking out the show, it will be open until June 26th. Click here for more information.
If you are interested in seeing interviews with the artists and gallery owner, click here.
-Lea Hamilton
Local Coverage - PUSH: The New Printmakers
Contemporary printmaking practices live in an in-between space. As a medium, it is caught between its history and its relevance as a mode of expression. Printmaking is often thought of as a dying art, sometimes involving complicated processes and machinery that are no longer being manufactured. But, the relevance of printmaking as an art form is still present, as is shown by a new printmaking exhibition being held at Studio Sixty Six in Ottawa.

PUSH: The New Printmakers brings together several artists specializing in different types of printmaking. The works are comprised of linocuts, screen printing, woodcuts and relief prints.The artists included in the show are Melissa Blackman, Delphine Sullivan, Dante Penman, Claudia Gutierrez, Tegan Alston, Stéphanie St-Jean Aubre and Kimberly Edgar, all graduates from the Ottawa School of Art. While all the works are tied together by their medium and their black and white palette, each artist’s oeuvre addresses different artistic preoccupations, ranging from issues of identity, the idea of the specimen, to the relationship between landmarks and memory. 

For those who are interested in checking out the show, it will be open until June 26th. Click here for more information.
If you are interested in seeing interviews with the artists and gallery owner, click here.
-Lea Hamilton
Local Coverage - PUSH: The New Printmakers
Contemporary printmaking practices live in an in-between space. As a medium, it is caught between its history and its relevance as a mode of expression. Printmaking is often thought of as a dying art, sometimes involving complicated processes and machinery that are no longer being manufactured. But, the relevance of printmaking as an art form is still present, as is shown by a new printmaking exhibition being held at Studio Sixty Six in Ottawa.

PUSH: The New Printmakers brings together several artists specializing in different types of printmaking. The works are comprised of linocuts, screen printing, woodcuts and relief prints.The artists included in the show are Melissa Blackman, Delphine Sullivan, Dante Penman, Claudia Gutierrez, Tegan Alston, Stéphanie St-Jean Aubre and Kimberly Edgar, all graduates from the Ottawa School of Art. While all the works are tied together by their medium and their black and white palette, each artist’s oeuvre addresses different artistic preoccupations, ranging from issues of identity, the idea of the specimen, to the relationship between landmarks and memory. 

For those who are interested in checking out the show, it will be open until June 26th. Click here for more information.
If you are interested in seeing interviews with the artists and gallery owner, click here.
-Lea Hamilton
Isn’t Earth’s gravity a beautiful thing? That which goes up must come down. And indeed it is this folding of up and down, in and out, that makes Fabian Oefner’s ‘Orchid’ so visually stunning. 
 
Oefner invites us to see beauty in those things that we otherwise may have passed by, like the simple splash of water on concrete. ‘Orchid’,and Oefner’s previous works in his Action Paint series, incorporate the incredibly complex with the seemingly simple. Oefner uses a scientific approach “and a playful approach” to turn complex physical concepts such as gravity, spinning torque, centripetal force, and displacement into curious and beautiful abstract photographs. For the ‘Orchid’ series, by simply releasing a rock into a tank of paint, he captures what looks like the opening up of liquefied flowers. 
 
Oefner’s method for ‘Orchid’ involves the layering of different colored paints into a bucket, with the top layer being either black or white. The layered effect makes for the rainbow of color splashed out by the rock. But as simple as this may seem, it is a long and tedious paint pouring process, with much trial and error in-between. Though there is one part of the process where technology has offered an aid: Once the paint is ready, a microphone, connected to Oefner’s camera, tells the camera when the exact moment of impact occurs between rock and paint, at which point the camera snaps a series of pictures at the precise moment. Though, of course, this doesn’t always work as planned…
 
But perhaps one of the best principals that Oefner’s work embodies is chance. Though he may employ the same technique over and over, no splash will be the same, so we can always remain curious. 
 

The gravity of liquid… a beautiful thing.

- Alinta Krauth
Isn’t Earth’s gravity a beautiful thing? That which goes up must come down. And indeed it is this folding of up and down, in and out, that makes Fabian Oefner’s ‘Orchid’ so visually stunning. 
 
Oefner invites us to see beauty in those things that we otherwise may have passed by, like the simple splash of water on concrete. ‘Orchid’,and Oefner’s previous works in his Action Paint series, incorporate the incredibly complex with the seemingly simple. Oefner uses a scientific approach “and a playful approach” to turn complex physical concepts such as gravity, spinning torque, centripetal force, and displacement into curious and beautiful abstract photographs. For the ‘Orchid’ series, by simply releasing a rock into a tank of paint, he captures what looks like the opening up of liquefied flowers. 
 
Oefner’s method for ‘Orchid’ involves the layering of different colored paints into a bucket, with the top layer being either black or white. The layered effect makes for the rainbow of color splashed out by the rock. But as simple as this may seem, it is a long and tedious paint pouring process, with much trial and error in-between. Though there is one part of the process where technology has offered an aid: Once the paint is ready, a microphone, connected to Oefner’s camera, tells the camera when the exact moment of impact occurs between rock and paint, at which point the camera snaps a series of pictures at the precise moment. Though, of course, this doesn’t always work as planned…
 
But perhaps one of the best principals that Oefner’s work embodies is chance. Though he may employ the same technique over and over, no splash will be the same, so we can always remain curious. 
 

The gravity of liquid… a beautiful thing.

- Alinta Krauth
Isn’t Earth’s gravity a beautiful thing? That which goes up must come down. And indeed it is this folding of up and down, in and out, that makes Fabian Oefner’s ‘Orchid’ so visually stunning. 
 
Oefner invites us to see beauty in those things that we otherwise may have passed by, like the simple splash of water on concrete. ‘Orchid’,and Oefner’s previous works in his Action Paint series, incorporate the incredibly complex with the seemingly simple. Oefner uses a scientific approach “and a playful approach” to turn complex physical concepts such as gravity, spinning torque, centripetal force, and displacement into curious and beautiful abstract photographs. For the ‘Orchid’ series, by simply releasing a rock into a tank of paint, he captures what looks like the opening up of liquefied flowers. 
 
Oefner’s method for ‘Orchid’ involves the layering of different colored paints into a bucket, with the top layer being either black or white. The layered effect makes for the rainbow of color splashed out by the rock. But as simple as this may seem, it is a long and tedious paint pouring process, with much trial and error in-between. Though there is one part of the process where technology has offered an aid: Once the paint is ready, a microphone, connected to Oefner’s camera, tells the camera when the exact moment of impact occurs between rock and paint, at which point the camera snaps a series of pictures at the precise moment. Though, of course, this doesn’t always work as planned…
 
But perhaps one of the best principals that Oefner’s work embodies is chance. Though he may employ the same technique over and over, no splash will be the same, so we can always remain curious. 
 

The gravity of liquid… a beautiful thing.

- Alinta Krauth
Isn’t Earth’s gravity a beautiful thing? That which goes up must come down. And indeed it is this folding of up and down, in and out, that makes Fabian Oefner’s ‘Orchid’ so visually stunning. 
 
Oefner invites us to see beauty in those things that we otherwise may have passed by, like the simple splash of water on concrete. ‘Orchid’,and Oefner’s previous works in his Action Paint series, incorporate the incredibly complex with the seemingly simple. Oefner uses a scientific approach “and a playful approach” to turn complex physical concepts such as gravity, spinning torque, centripetal force, and displacement into curious and beautiful abstract photographs. For the ‘Orchid’ series, by simply releasing a rock into a tank of paint, he captures what looks like the opening up of liquefied flowers. 
 
Oefner’s method for ‘Orchid’ involves the layering of different colored paints into a bucket, with the top layer being either black or white. The layered effect makes for the rainbow of color splashed out by the rock. But as simple as this may seem, it is a long and tedious paint pouring process, with much trial and error in-between. Though there is one part of the process where technology has offered an aid: Once the paint is ready, a microphone, connected to Oefner’s camera, tells the camera when the exact moment of impact occurs between rock and paint, at which point the camera snaps a series of pictures at the precise moment. Though, of course, this doesn’t always work as planned…
 
But perhaps one of the best principals that Oefner’s work embodies is chance. Though he may employ the same technique over and over, no splash will be the same, so we can always remain curious. 
 

The gravity of liquid… a beautiful thing.

- Alinta Krauth

Isn’t Earth’s gravity a beautiful thing? That which goes up must come down. And indeed it is this folding of up and down, in and out, that makes Fabian Oefner’s ‘Orchid’ so visually stunning.

 

Oefner invites us to see beauty in those things that we otherwise may have passed by, like the simple splash of water on concrete. ‘Orchid’,and Oefner’s previous works in his Action Paint series, incorporate the incredibly complex with the seemingly simple. Oefner uses a scientific approach “and a playful approach” to turn complex physical concepts such as gravity, spinning torque, centripetal force, and displacement into curious and beautiful abstract photographs. For the ‘Orchid’ series, by simply releasing a rock into a tank of paint, he captures what looks like the opening up of liquefied flowers.

 

Oefner’s method for ‘Orchid’ involves the layering of different colored paints into a bucket, with the top layer being either black or white. The layered effect makes for the rainbow of color splashed out by the rock. But as simple as this may seem, it is a long and tedious paint pouring process, with much trial and error in-between. Though there is one part of the process where technology has offered an aid: Once the paint is ready, a microphone, connected to Oefner’s camera, tells the camera when the exact moment of impact occurs between rock and paint, at which point the camera snaps a series of pictures at the precise moment. Though, of course, this doesn’t always work as planned…

 

But perhaps one of the best principals that Oefner’s work embodies is chance. Though he may employ the same technique over and over, no splash will be the same, so we can always remain curious.

 

The gravity of liquid… a beautiful thing.

- Alinta Krauth

4 Photos
/ artandscience fabian oefner art science gravity alinta krauth artandsciencejournal
Sound Waves: Patterning Sonatas
If, at first, you are unsure as to what you are looking at, you are not alone. On their own, these fantastic drawings by Jorinde Voigt allow for several interpretations. One could presume that they are diagrams of wind patterns or ocean currents, or even the model for a physics equation gone awry. They are none of the above.
Actually, these undulating forms are a sort of graph. They are created through a combination of freehand intuition and emotional interpretation on the artist’s part. Each drawing represents the intonations and dynamic notations of Beethoven’s sonatas for solo piano, 1 through 32, extracted after translating from German to either English or Italian. The main structures of the drawings are built up from these translated intonations, or what Voigt calls ‘extracted progressions’.
The swooping lines all emerge from a series of epicenters, or ‘internal centres’, representing the inner compass of the piece. Each internal centre is connected through an axis that churns the lines into a vortex. All of the lines within each drawing are connected to this axis. The ‘external centres’, on the opposite end of the spectrum, refer to outside influences that have affected the creation of the piece: geographical or social changes that have altered the emotional interpretation of each sonata. These external influences, adapting with her own emotional reactions as she listens to the music, are what allow Voigt’s patterns to remain fresh and non-repetitive.
To view a zoom-friendly image of all the works together, click here.
-Lea Hamilton
Sound Waves: Patterning Sonatas
If, at first, you are unsure as to what you are looking at, you are not alone. On their own, these fantastic drawings by Jorinde Voigt allow for several interpretations. One could presume that they are diagrams of wind patterns or ocean currents, or even the model for a physics equation gone awry. They are none of the above.
Actually, these undulating forms are a sort of graph. They are created through a combination of freehand intuition and emotional interpretation on the artist’s part. Each drawing represents the intonations and dynamic notations of Beethoven’s sonatas for solo piano, 1 through 32, extracted after translating from German to either English or Italian. The main structures of the drawings are built up from these translated intonations, or what Voigt calls ‘extracted progressions’.
The swooping lines all emerge from a series of epicenters, or ‘internal centres’, representing the inner compass of the piece. Each internal centre is connected through an axis that churns the lines into a vortex. All of the lines within each drawing are connected to this axis. The ‘external centres’, on the opposite end of the spectrum, refer to outside influences that have affected the creation of the piece: geographical or social changes that have altered the emotional interpretation of each sonata. These external influences, adapting with her own emotional reactions as she listens to the music, are what allow Voigt’s patterns to remain fresh and non-repetitive.
To view a zoom-friendly image of all the works together, click here.
-Lea Hamilton
Sound Waves: Patterning Sonatas
If, at first, you are unsure as to what you are looking at, you are not alone. On their own, these fantastic drawings by Jorinde Voigt allow for several interpretations. One could presume that they are diagrams of wind patterns or ocean currents, or even the model for a physics equation gone awry. They are none of the above.
Actually, these undulating forms are a sort of graph. They are created through a combination of freehand intuition and emotional interpretation on the artist’s part. Each drawing represents the intonations and dynamic notations of Beethoven’s sonatas for solo piano, 1 through 32, extracted after translating from German to either English or Italian. The main structures of the drawings are built up from these translated intonations, or what Voigt calls ‘extracted progressions’.
The swooping lines all emerge from a series of epicenters, or ‘internal centres’, representing the inner compass of the piece. Each internal centre is connected through an axis that churns the lines into a vortex. All of the lines within each drawing are connected to this axis. The ‘external centres’, on the opposite end of the spectrum, refer to outside influences that have affected the creation of the piece: geographical or social changes that have altered the emotional interpretation of each sonata. These external influences, adapting with her own emotional reactions as she listens to the music, are what allow Voigt’s patterns to remain fresh and non-repetitive.
To view a zoom-friendly image of all the works together, click here.
-Lea Hamilton
Sound Waves: Patterning Sonatas
If, at first, you are unsure as to what you are looking at, you are not alone. On their own, these fantastic drawings by Jorinde Voigt allow for several interpretations. One could presume that they are diagrams of wind patterns or ocean currents, or even the model for a physics equation gone awry. They are none of the above.
Actually, these undulating forms are a sort of graph. They are created through a combination of freehand intuition and emotional interpretation on the artist’s part. Each drawing represents the intonations and dynamic notations of Beethoven’s sonatas for solo piano, 1 through 32, extracted after translating from German to either English or Italian. The main structures of the drawings are built up from these translated intonations, or what Voigt calls ‘extracted progressions’.
The swooping lines all emerge from a series of epicenters, or ‘internal centres’, representing the inner compass of the piece. Each internal centre is connected through an axis that churns the lines into a vortex. All of the lines within each drawing are connected to this axis. The ‘external centres’, on the opposite end of the spectrum, refer to outside influences that have affected the creation of the piece: geographical or social changes that have altered the emotional interpretation of each sonata. These external influences, adapting with her own emotional reactions as she listens to the music, are what allow Voigt’s patterns to remain fresh and non-repetitive.
To view a zoom-friendly image of all the works together, click here.
-Lea Hamilton

Sound Waves: Patterning Sonatas

If, at first, you are unsure as to what you are looking at, you are not alone. On their own, these fantastic drawings by Jorinde Voigt allow for several interpretations. One could presume that they are diagrams of wind patterns or ocean currents, or even the model for a physics equation gone awry. They are none of the above.

Actually, these undulating forms are a sort of graph. They are created through a combination of freehand intuition and emotional interpretation on the artist’s part. Each drawing represents the intonations and dynamic notations of Beethoven’s sonatas for solo piano, 1 through 32, extracted after translating from German to either English or Italian. The main structures of the drawings are built up from these translated intonations, or what Voigt calls ‘extracted progressions’.

The swooping lines all emerge from a series of epicenters, or ‘internal centres’, representing the inner compass of the piece. Each internal centre is connected through an axis that churns the lines into a vortex. All of the lines within each drawing are connected to this axis. The ‘external centres’, on the opposite end of the spectrum, refer to outside influences that have affected the creation of the piece: geographical or social changes that have altered the emotional interpretation of each sonata. These external influences, adapting with her own emotional reactions as she listens to the music, are what allow Voigt’s patterns to remain fresh and non-repetitive.

To view a zoom-friendly image of all the works together, click here.

-Lea Hamilton

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ art science physics music Beethoven sonata piano drawing Jorinde Voigt Lea Hamilton artandsciencejournal pattern sound composition method

Call for Submissions for Art & Science Journal Issue 3

Art & Science Journal is a website and biannual publication about artworks that deal with themes of science, nature and technology. If you are an artist or designer whose work deals with these themes we welcome you to submit to issue 3. To do so, send high-resolution images and include detailed descriptions of: - your project and your images - how you made the project (art process) - theoretical connections to science, nature or technology to submissions@artandsciencejournal.com. We thank all who submit, but only those selected will be notified.
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Human Webs
The traditional web design is being transformed to create amazing works of art. Artists such as Janet Echelman, Megan Geckler, and Marie-Josée Laframboise take string, netting, tape and various other materials to create their site specific installations that not only transform a room or city, but how we view these materials.
For Echelman, the beginning of her work started in India, when she used fishing net to create a last minute sculpture for her exhibition. The work was a success, and it led her to use lighter materials to create large-scale works in city centers, such as Sydney and Amsterdam. One of her works, 1.26 (2010-ongoing), was created originally in Denver, Colorado, and uses data taken from the 2011 earthquake off the coast of Chile, to ‘sculpt’ her piece in order to look like the wave pattern. It is a mesmerizing display of colour and form.
The work of Megan Geckler, on the other hand, does not move as fluidly as Echelman’s, nor is it as large, but Rewritten by machine on new technology (2012-2013) is still large-scale enough to engulf the viewer into a vortex of colour. Like Echelman, Geckler’s site-specific pieces work with the rooms that they are put in, playing with the architecture.
With Marie-Josée Laframboise, her work seems to be a mixture between the rigid geometry of Geckler’s works and the natural fluidity of Echelman’s works. Her webs are site specific, but there is little rigidity. Instead her work evokes the idea of a wave, engulfing the viewer, or even a web. It is not ominous, but enchanting.
These web-works demonstrate a fresh new take on what we can do with malleable materials, and the results, are truly spectacular.
-Anna Paluch
Human Webs
The traditional web design is being transformed to create amazing works of art. Artists such as Janet Echelman, Megan Geckler, and Marie-Josée Laframboise take string, netting, tape and various other materials to create their site specific installations that not only transform a room or city, but how we view these materials.
For Echelman, the beginning of her work started in India, when she used fishing net to create a last minute sculpture for her exhibition. The work was a success, and it led her to use lighter materials to create large-scale works in city centers, such as Sydney and Amsterdam. One of her works, 1.26 (2010-ongoing), was created originally in Denver, Colorado, and uses data taken from the 2011 earthquake off the coast of Chile, to ‘sculpt’ her piece in order to look like the wave pattern. It is a mesmerizing display of colour and form.
The work of Megan Geckler, on the other hand, does not move as fluidly as Echelman’s, nor is it as large, but Rewritten by machine on new technology (2012-2013) is still large-scale enough to engulf the viewer into a vortex of colour. Like Echelman, Geckler’s site-specific pieces work with the rooms that they are put in, playing with the architecture.
With Marie-Josée Laframboise, her work seems to be a mixture between the rigid geometry of Geckler’s works and the natural fluidity of Echelman’s works. Her webs are site specific, but there is little rigidity. Instead her work evokes the idea of a wave, engulfing the viewer, or even a web. It is not ominous, but enchanting.
These web-works demonstrate a fresh new take on what we can do with malleable materials, and the results, are truly spectacular.
-Anna Paluch
Human Webs
The traditional web design is being transformed to create amazing works of art. Artists such as Janet Echelman, Megan Geckler, and Marie-Josée Laframboise take string, netting, tape and various other materials to create their site specific installations that not only transform a room or city, but how we view these materials.
For Echelman, the beginning of her work started in India, when she used fishing net to create a last minute sculpture for her exhibition. The work was a success, and it led her to use lighter materials to create large-scale works in city centers, such as Sydney and Amsterdam. One of her works, 1.26 (2010-ongoing), was created originally in Denver, Colorado, and uses data taken from the 2011 earthquake off the coast of Chile, to ‘sculpt’ her piece in order to look like the wave pattern. It is a mesmerizing display of colour and form.
The work of Megan Geckler, on the other hand, does not move as fluidly as Echelman’s, nor is it as large, but Rewritten by machine on new technology (2012-2013) is still large-scale enough to engulf the viewer into a vortex of colour. Like Echelman, Geckler’s site-specific pieces work with the rooms that they are put in, playing with the architecture.
With Marie-Josée Laframboise, her work seems to be a mixture between the rigid geometry of Geckler’s works and the natural fluidity of Echelman’s works. Her webs are site specific, but there is little rigidity. Instead her work evokes the idea of a wave, engulfing the viewer, or even a web. It is not ominous, but enchanting.
These web-works demonstrate a fresh new take on what we can do with malleable materials, and the results, are truly spectacular.
-Anna Paluch
Human Webs
The traditional web design is being transformed to create amazing works of art. Artists such as Janet Echelman, Megan Geckler, and Marie-Josée Laframboise take string, netting, tape and various other materials to create their site specific installations that not only transform a room or city, but how we view these materials.
For Echelman, the beginning of her work started in India, when she used fishing net to create a last minute sculpture for her exhibition. The work was a success, and it led her to use lighter materials to create large-scale works in city centers, such as Sydney and Amsterdam. One of her works, 1.26 (2010-ongoing), was created originally in Denver, Colorado, and uses data taken from the 2011 earthquake off the coast of Chile, to ‘sculpt’ her piece in order to look like the wave pattern. It is a mesmerizing display of colour and form.
The work of Megan Geckler, on the other hand, does not move as fluidly as Echelman’s, nor is it as large, but Rewritten by machine on new technology (2012-2013) is still large-scale enough to engulf the viewer into a vortex of colour. Like Echelman, Geckler’s site-specific pieces work with the rooms that they are put in, playing with the architecture.
With Marie-Josée Laframboise, her work seems to be a mixture between the rigid geometry of Geckler’s works and the natural fluidity of Echelman’s works. Her webs are site specific, but there is little rigidity. Instead her work evokes the idea of a wave, engulfing the viewer, or even a web. It is not ominous, but enchanting.
These web-works demonstrate a fresh new take on what we can do with malleable materials, and the results, are truly spectacular.
-Anna Paluch
Human Webs
The traditional web design is being transformed to create amazing works of art. Artists such as Janet Echelman, Megan Geckler, and Marie-Josée Laframboise take string, netting, tape and various other materials to create their site specific installations that not only transform a room or city, but how we view these materials.
For Echelman, the beginning of her work started in India, when she used fishing net to create a last minute sculpture for her exhibition. The work was a success, and it led her to use lighter materials to create large-scale works in city centers, such as Sydney and Amsterdam. One of her works, 1.26 (2010-ongoing), was created originally in Denver, Colorado, and uses data taken from the 2011 earthquake off the coast of Chile, to ‘sculpt’ her piece in order to look like the wave pattern. It is a mesmerizing display of colour and form.
The work of Megan Geckler, on the other hand, does not move as fluidly as Echelman’s, nor is it as large, but Rewritten by machine on new technology (2012-2013) is still large-scale enough to engulf the viewer into a vortex of colour. Like Echelman, Geckler’s site-specific pieces work with the rooms that they are put in, playing with the architecture.
With Marie-Josée Laframboise, her work seems to be a mixture between the rigid geometry of Geckler’s works and the natural fluidity of Echelman’s works. Her webs are site specific, but there is little rigidity. Instead her work evokes the idea of a wave, engulfing the viewer, or even a web. It is not ominous, but enchanting.
These web-works demonstrate a fresh new take on what we can do with malleable materials, and the results, are truly spectacular.
-Anna Paluch

Human Webs

The traditional web design is being transformed to create amazing works of art. Artists such as Janet Echelman, Megan Geckler, and Marie-Josée Laframboise take string, netting, tape and various other materials to create their site specific installations that not only transform a room or city, but how we view these materials.

For Echelman, the beginning of her work started in India, when she used fishing net to create a last minute sculpture for her exhibition. The work was a success, and it led her to use lighter materials to create large-scale works in city centers, such as Sydney and Amsterdam. One of her works, 1.26 (2010-ongoing), was created originally in Denver, Colorado, and uses data taken from the 2011 earthquake off the coast of Chile, to ‘sculpt’ her piece in order to look like the wave pattern. It is a mesmerizing display of colour and form.

The work of Megan Geckler, on the other hand, does not move as fluidly as Echelman’s, nor is it as large, but Rewritten by machine on new technology (2012-2013) is still large-scale enough to engulf the viewer into a vortex of colour. Like Echelman, Geckler’s site-specific pieces work with the rooms that they are put in, playing with the architecture.

With Marie-Josée Laframboise, her work seems to be a mixture between the rigid geometry of Geckler’s works and the natural fluidity of Echelman’s works. Her webs are site specific, but there is little rigidity. Instead her work evokes the idea of a wave, engulfing the viewer, or even a web. It is not ominous, but enchanting.

These web-works demonstrate a fresh new take on what we can do with malleable materials, and the results, are truly spectacular.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

5 Photos
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Laura Splan - Doilies 
This is not just any old doily.
This is a virus doily.
The work of Laura Splan involves taking images of viruses, such as Influenza and SARS, and creating her own design, based on their basic anatomical structures, through a graphics editor. The images are then sent through computerized embroidering software, where it proceeds to create the stitches, and then the doily-viruses are born via the computerized sewing machine.
The delicacy of these doilies parallels that of the virus. They are such small forms; should be easy to destroy, and yet they have a great amount of destructive power. Only recent medicine has been able to partially subdue, if not completely eliminate, the side effects of viruses in our systems. According to the artist, the fact that these viruses are everywhere domesticates them. This is a status of domestication that is, for example, shared with a doily. 
The doily has traditionally depicted natural motifs within its threads, and was passed on through generations. As the virus is a natural entity, and has to be passed on from something in order for someone to get it, combining the two concepts of traditional craft and illness, into an art form, demonstrates our psychological acceptance of the viruses’ existence. It is only now that we choose to fight this ‘tradition’ of accepting the virus as our fate. Just recently, a child has been cured of HIV, a previously incurable disease caused by a virus.
And you also, you don’t see many people embroidering lace nowadays.-Anna Paluch

Laura Splan - Doilies

This is not just any old doily.

This is a virus doily.

The work of Laura Splan involves taking images of viruses, such as Influenza and SARS, and creating her own design, based on their basic anatomical structures, through a graphics editor. The images are then sent through computerized embroidering software, where it proceeds to create the stitches, and then the doily-viruses are born via the computerized sewing machine.

The delicacy of these doilies parallels that of the virus. They are such small forms; should be easy to destroy, and yet they have a great amount of destructive power. Only recent medicine has been able to partially subdue, if not completely eliminate, the side effects of viruses in our systems. According to the artist, the fact that these viruses are everywhere domesticates them. This is a status of domestication that is, for example, shared with a doily.

The doily has traditionally depicted natural motifs within its threads, and was passed on through generations. As the virus is a natural entity, and has to be passed on from something in order for someone to get it, combining the two concepts of traditional craft and illness, into an art form, demonstrates our psychological acceptance of the viruses’ existence. It is only now that we choose to fight this ‘tradition’ of accepting the virus as our fate. Just recently, a child has been cured of HIV, a previously incurable disease caused by a virus.

And you also, you don’t see many people embroidering lace nowadays.

-
Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

doilies virus viruses technology computers Laura Splan anna paluch art science artandsciencejournal
The Future of Nature in Art
The forms of nature are, in their own ways, works of art. For centuries, artists have mimicked natural phenomenon, such as the roughness of tree bark, and the vibrant colours of fruit, in oil paintings and even sculpture. Now, most artists are using new tools to attempt to control these forms, and in doing so, re-create the natural form. Artist Ken To, for example, uses metal wiring to create detailed and realistically sized bonsai trees. The easing twists of the metal perfectly mimic the tree bark, that ever so slightly curves up and outwards, creating branches. 
Even more extreme, artist Natalie Jeremijenko uses L-systems, which are algorithms created in order to mimic the cell growth of a tree. With the L-system technology, you could have your very own forest growing on your computers’ desktop! She has even created a whole art project called ONETREES, and she calls her virtual trees ‘e-trees’, or ‘electronic trees’. Not only that, the e-trees themselves can be manipulated to grow at certain rates when a CO2 reader is plugged into the USB ports of the computer. The virtual trees mimic the cell growth of natural trees, and they also react in a similar way that trees do when they come into contact with atmospheric changes. It is a revolutionary twist of artistic mimesis.
So whether you prefer a forest of trees on your desktop, or a little bonsai tree on top of your desk, there are many different mediums that you can explore in order to experience this new movement of nature mimesis in the 21st Century.-Anna Paluch

The Future of Nature in Art

The forms of nature are, in their own ways, works of art. For centuries, artists have mimicked natural phenomenon, such as the roughness of tree bark, and the vibrant colours of fruit, in oil paintings and even sculpture. Now, most artists are using new tools to attempt to control these forms, and in doing so, re-create the natural form. Artist Ken To, for example, uses metal wiring to create detailed and realistically sized bonsai trees. The easing twists of the metal perfectly mimic the tree bark, that ever so slightly curves up and outwards, creating branches.

Even more extreme, artist Natalie Jeremijenko uses L-systems, which are algorithms created in order to mimic the cell growth of a tree. With the L-system technology, you could have your very own forest growing on your computers’ desktop! She has even created a whole art project called ONETREES, and she calls her virtual trees ‘e-trees’, or ‘electronic trees’. Not only that, the e-trees themselves can be manipulated to grow at certain rates when a CO2 reader is plugged into the USB ports of the computer. The virtual trees mimic the cell growth of natural trees, and they also react in a similar way that trees do when they come into contact with atmospheric changes. It is a revolutionary twist of artistic mimesis.

So whether you prefer a forest of trees on your desktop, or a little bonsai tree on top of your desk, there are many different mediums that you can explore in order to experience this new movement of nature mimesis in the 21st Century.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

art science artandsciencejournal ken to natalie jeremijenko L-systems tree mimesis future nature bonsai sculpture screen Anna Paluch

Biofilms

Bacteria, just by the sheer fact that they duplicate very quickly, and because safety is mostly in numbers, tend to form what are called biofilms. But biofilms aren’t quite just an aggregate of cells. These cells adhere to each other and to the surface, and produce an extracellular substance containing extracellular DNA, proteins and polysaccharides, that are going to act as a protective and adhesive layer. Some biofilms have even been found to contain channels to help distribute nutrients and signalling molecules.

So bacteria may well be able to survive on their own, but they are also able to intelligently organize their mass when difficult times arise, and we’re just beginning to see which dangers this can hold. To show these organization skills, researchers have tagged differents lineages of Bacillus subtilis — rod shaped bacteria commonly found in soil —  with distinct fluorescent proteins (TagRFP-T, sfGFP, TagBFP, mKate2 and mOrange2). They then mixed the cells randomly on a petri dish. By looking at the culture with a confocal microscope, they can detect the different colors used to tag the cells. Surprisingly, what should be a random mix of colors actually looks like an incredible painting, full of discernible streaks. Indeed, as the bacteria grew, they were found to organize themselves into patterns, reproduciblepatterns that can be predicted with mathematical models (Computational Modeling of Synthetic Microbial Biofilms, ACS Synthetic Biology). Therefore is looks like bacteria can arrange themselves so that the biofilm is divided in regions where cells exhibit different patterns of gene expression, to increase both their metabolic efficiency and their resistance to changes in their local environment.

The study of biofilms has skyrocketed in recent years due to the increased awareness of its efficiency and its effect on natural, industrial systems and human health. And it is far from over.

Photo credit: Fernan Federici, Tim Rudge, PJ Steiner and Jim Haseloff,  Haseloff Lab, University of Cambridge
This beautiful work was one of the winners in this 2012 Wellcome Image Awards

- Agathe of Frontal Cortex
Biofilms


Bacteria, just by the sheer fact that they duplicate very quickly, and because safety is mostly in numbers, tend to form what are called biofilms. But biofilms aren’t quite just an aggregate of cells. These cells adhere to each other and to the surface, and produce an extracellular substance containing extracellular DNA, proteins and polysaccharides, that are going to act as a protective and adhesive layer. Some biofilms have even been found to contain channels to help distribute nutrients and signalling molecules.


So bacteria may well be able to survive on their own, but they are also able to intelligently organize their mass when difficult times arise, and we’re just beginning to see which dangers this can hold. To show these organization skills, researchers have tagged differents lineages of Bacillus subtilis — rod shaped bacteria commonly found in soil —  with distinct fluorescent proteins (TagRFP-T, sfGFP, TagBFP, mKate2 and mOrange2). They then mixed the cells randomly on a petri dish. By looking at the culture with a confocal microscope, they can detect the different colors used to tag the cells. Surprisingly, what should be a random mix of colors actually looks like an incredible painting, full of discernible streaks. Indeed, as the bacteria grew, they were found to organize themselves into patterns, reproduciblepatterns that can be predicted with mathematical models (Computational Modeling of Synthetic Microbial Biofilms, ACS Synthetic Biology). Therefore is looks like bacteria can arrange themselves so that the biofilm is divided in regions where cells exhibit different patterns of gene expression, to increase both their metabolic efficiency and their resistance to changes in their local environment.


The study of biofilms has skyrocketed in recent years due to the increased awareness of its efficiency and its effect on natural, industrial systems and human health. And it is far from over.


Photo credit: Fernan Federici, Tim Rudge, PJ Steiner and Jim Haseloff,  Haseloff Lab, University of Cambridge

This beautiful work was one of the winners in this 2012 Wellcome Image Awards


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