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Vince McKelvie’s 3D .gifs

The .gif is one of the most intriguing mediums used in net art. Lingering somewhere between video and picture, the .gif is neither one nor the other, but somehow both. Its perpetual motions are precisely hypnotic and purely mystical. Net artist Vince McKelvie maximises these qualities of the .gif in his work with intense pulsating 3D forms. These mesmerising .gifs – ranging from geometric to biomorphic – are submerged in overwhelming visual detail, appearing as if one could almost draw each from within the screen and into the palm of a hand. What is even more delightful is the psychedelic strobing of colours and the multiplication of the image when the .gif is moused over on the artist’s tumblr. McKelvie plays upon perception and visual engagement – these .gifs require the viewer to surrender themself wholly to the palpitations, to the harsh acidic colours, and to the carefully calculated hypnotic repetition.
The realm of net art is an unstable one. Its foundation is digital technology – a foundation that is arguably too certain of itself. In a world where we’ve built empires upon the virtual domain, the question persists: what will become of digital information generations from today when the technology will be unrecognisable? Net art – unlike the more traditional mediums of painting, sculpting, and even photography – is inseparable from the virtual space it occupies. A painting can be removed from a wall and placed on another. A digital photograph can be printed into its physical form. But a .gif relies on its digital foundation to exist; it cannot simply be printed as a moving image – at least not yet. Will this art still be accessible five hundred years from now? Net art also begs the question of ownership. Defying centuries of well-ingrained notions of the prestige of owning, collecting, and viewing art, net art is decidedly democratised. Anyone can look at it. Anyone can reproduce it. Anyone can use it as their own. Anyone who has access to the technology, that is. This phenomenon is even more so amplified with the use of tumblr, whose users feed parasitically off of one another by reblogging images. By choosing tumblr (and even by uploading his work online), McKelvie inserts himself into an ever-progressing, ever-transforming dialogue of image distribution.
- Leona Nikolic
(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)
Vince McKelvie’s 3D .gifs

The .gif is one of the most intriguing mediums used in net art. Lingering somewhere between video and picture, the .gif is neither one nor the other, but somehow both. Its perpetual motions are precisely hypnotic and purely mystical. Net artist Vince McKelvie maximises these qualities of the .gif in his work with intense pulsating 3D forms. These mesmerising .gifs – ranging from geometric to biomorphic – are submerged in overwhelming visual detail, appearing as if one could almost draw each from within the screen and into the palm of a hand. What is even more delightful is the psychedelic strobing of colours and the multiplication of the image when the .gif is moused over on the artist’s tumblr. McKelvie plays upon perception and visual engagement – these .gifs require the viewer to surrender themself wholly to the palpitations, to the harsh acidic colours, and to the carefully calculated hypnotic repetition.
The realm of net art is an unstable one. Its foundation is digital technology – a foundation that is arguably too certain of itself. In a world where we’ve built empires upon the virtual domain, the question persists: what will become of digital information generations from today when the technology will be unrecognisable? Net art – unlike the more traditional mediums of painting, sculpting, and even photography – is inseparable from the virtual space it occupies. A painting can be removed from a wall and placed on another. A digital photograph can be printed into its physical form. But a .gif relies on its digital foundation to exist; it cannot simply be printed as a moving image – at least not yet. Will this art still be accessible five hundred years from now? Net art also begs the question of ownership. Defying centuries of well-ingrained notions of the prestige of owning, collecting, and viewing art, net art is decidedly democratised. Anyone can look at it. Anyone can reproduce it. Anyone can use it as their own. Anyone who has access to the technology, that is. This phenomenon is even more so amplified with the use of tumblr, whose users feed parasitically off of one another by reblogging images. By choosing tumblr (and even by uploading his work online), McKelvie inserts himself into an ever-progressing, ever-transforming dialogue of image distribution.
- Leona Nikolic
(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)
Vince McKelvie’s 3D .gifs

The .gif is one of the most intriguing mediums used in net art. Lingering somewhere between video and picture, the .gif is neither one nor the other, but somehow both. Its perpetual motions are precisely hypnotic and purely mystical. Net artist Vince McKelvie maximises these qualities of the .gif in his work with intense pulsating 3D forms. These mesmerising .gifs – ranging from geometric to biomorphic – are submerged in overwhelming visual detail, appearing as if one could almost draw each from within the screen and into the palm of a hand. What is even more delightful is the psychedelic strobing of colours and the multiplication of the image when the .gif is moused over on the artist’s tumblr. McKelvie plays upon perception and visual engagement – these .gifs require the viewer to surrender themself wholly to the palpitations, to the harsh acidic colours, and to the carefully calculated hypnotic repetition.
The realm of net art is an unstable one. Its foundation is digital technology – a foundation that is arguably too certain of itself. In a world where we’ve built empires upon the virtual domain, the question persists: what will become of digital information generations from today when the technology will be unrecognisable? Net art – unlike the more traditional mediums of painting, sculpting, and even photography – is inseparable from the virtual space it occupies. A painting can be removed from a wall and placed on another. A digital photograph can be printed into its physical form. But a .gif relies on its digital foundation to exist; it cannot simply be printed as a moving image – at least not yet. Will this art still be accessible five hundred years from now? Net art also begs the question of ownership. Defying centuries of well-ingrained notions of the prestige of owning, collecting, and viewing art, net art is decidedly democratised. Anyone can look at it. Anyone can reproduce it. Anyone can use it as their own. Anyone who has access to the technology, that is. This phenomenon is even more so amplified with the use of tumblr, whose users feed parasitically off of one another by reblogging images. By choosing tumblr (and even by uploading his work online), McKelvie inserts himself into an ever-progressing, ever-transforming dialogue of image distribution.
- Leona Nikolic
(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Vince McKelvie’s 3D .gifs

The .gif is one of the most intriguing mediums used in net art. Lingering somewhere between video and picture, the .gif is neither one nor the other, but somehow both. Its perpetual motions are precisely hypnotic and purely mystical. Net artist Vince McKelvie maximises these qualities of the .gif in his work with intense pulsating 3D forms. These mesmerising .gifs – ranging from geometric to biomorphic – are submerged in overwhelming visual detail, appearing as if one could almost draw each from within the screen and into the palm of a hand. What is even more delightful is the psychedelic strobing of colours and the multiplication of the image when the .gif is moused over on the artist’s tumblr. McKelvie plays upon perception and visual engagement – these .gifs require the viewer to surrender themself wholly to the palpitations, to the harsh acidic colours, and to the carefully calculated hypnotic repetition.

The realm of net art is an unstable one. Its foundation is digital technology – a foundation that is arguably too certain of itself. In a world where we’ve built empires upon the virtual domain, the question persists: what will become of digital information generations from today when the technology will be unrecognisable? Net art – unlike the more traditional mediums of painting, sculpting, and even photography – is inseparable from the virtual space it occupies. A painting can be removed from a wall and placed on another. A digital photograph can be printed into its physical form. But a .gif relies on its digital foundation to exist; it cannot simply be printed as a moving image – at least not yet. Will this art still be accessible five hundred years from now? Net art also begs the question of ownership. Defying centuries of well-ingrained notions of the prestige of owning, collecting, and viewing art, net art is decidedly democratised. Anyone can look at it. Anyone can reproduce it. Anyone can use it as their own. Anyone who has access to the technology, that is. This phenomenon is even more so amplified with the use of tumblr, whose users feed parasitically off of one another by reblogging images. By choosing tumblr (and even by uploading his work online), McKelvie inserts himself into an ever-progressing, ever-transforming dialogue of image distribution.

- Leona Nikolic

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ art science ArtScience vince mckelvie .gifs gif 3d net art
Algaculture
Imagine having the ability to convert light into food. This, as we know, is photosynthesis and plants have been doing it for millennia. But what about humans? According to British artists Michael Burton and Michiko Nitta (aka Burton Nitta), this may be more of a reality than inconceivability. With their collaborative project, Algaculture, the two artists have created a wearable suit that not only is able to perform photosynthesis, but feeds its wearer with algae. Thus, the relationship between the human and food becomes a symbiotic one, in which the human and the algae depend on one another to exist. While algae may not seem like the most appetising meal, the Algaculture suit certainly presents an alternative method for fuelling the human body and perhaps even a solution to an escalating global food crisis.
The Algaculture suit operates by means of a series of small tubes connected to the mouth of the wearer that envelope the head, bust, arms, and upper back resulting in a sort of sci-fi helmet-backpack amalgamation. The algae are produced by light through a photosynthetic process and are fed by the carbon dioxide emitted by the human, thereby facilitating the symbiosis.
As an artistic vision, the suit rebels against the ever-persisting traditions of Western art production – it is not intended to be hung on a wall in a climate-controlled space to merely be gazed at. Rather, Burton Nitta’s creative project recalls the utilitarian traditions and principles of Aboriginal art practices where art and practicality are unquestioningly merged. Burton Nitta not only push the boundaries of biological processes with this project, but also set a precedent for redefining the landscape of contemporary art. Algaculture is at once a practical life-sustaining object, a scientific innovation, and an aesthetically intriguing work of art.
- Leona Nikolic
(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)
Algaculture
Imagine having the ability to convert light into food. This, as we know, is photosynthesis and plants have been doing it for millennia. But what about humans? According to British artists Michael Burton and Michiko Nitta (aka Burton Nitta), this may be more of a reality than inconceivability. With their collaborative project, Algaculture, the two artists have created a wearable suit that not only is able to perform photosynthesis, but feeds its wearer with algae. Thus, the relationship between the human and food becomes a symbiotic one, in which the human and the algae depend on one another to exist. While algae may not seem like the most appetising meal, the Algaculture suit certainly presents an alternative method for fuelling the human body and perhaps even a solution to an escalating global food crisis.
The Algaculture suit operates by means of a series of small tubes connected to the mouth of the wearer that envelope the head, bust, arms, and upper back resulting in a sort of sci-fi helmet-backpack amalgamation. The algae are produced by light through a photosynthetic process and are fed by the carbon dioxide emitted by the human, thereby facilitating the symbiosis.
As an artistic vision, the suit rebels against the ever-persisting traditions of Western art production – it is not intended to be hung on a wall in a climate-controlled space to merely be gazed at. Rather, Burton Nitta’s creative project recalls the utilitarian traditions and principles of Aboriginal art practices where art and practicality are unquestioningly merged. Burton Nitta not only push the boundaries of biological processes with this project, but also set a precedent for redefining the landscape of contemporary art. Algaculture is at once a practical life-sustaining object, a scientific innovation, and an aesthetically intriguing work of art.
- Leona Nikolic
(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Algaculture

Imagine having the ability to convert light into food. This, as we know, is photosynthesis and plants have been doing it for millennia. But what about humans? According to British artists Michael Burton and Michiko Nitta (aka Burton Nitta), this may be more of a reality than inconceivability. With their collaborative project, Algaculture, the two artists have created a wearable suit that not only is able to perform photosynthesis, but feeds its wearer with algae. Thus, the relationship between the human and food becomes a symbiotic one, in which the human and the algae depend on one another to exist. While algae may not seem like the most appetising meal, the Algaculture suit certainly presents an alternative method for fuelling the human body and perhaps even a solution to an escalating global food crisis.

The Algaculture suit operates by means of a series of small tubes connected to the mouth of the wearer that envelope the head, bust, arms, and upper back resulting in a sort of sci-fi helmet-backpack amalgamation. The algae are produced by light through a photosynthetic process and are fed by the carbon dioxide emitted by the human, thereby facilitating the symbiosis.

As an artistic vision, the suit rebels against the ever-persisting traditions of Western art production – it is not intended to be hung on a wall in a climate-controlled space to merely be gazed at. Rather, Burton Nitta’s creative project recalls the utilitarian traditions and principles of Aboriginal art practices where art and practicality are unquestioningly merged. Burton Nitta not only push the boundaries of biological processes with this project, but also set a precedent for redefining the landscape of contemporary art. Algaculture is at once a practical life-sustaining object, a scientific innovation, and an aesthetically intriguing work of art.

- Leona Nikolic

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ ArtScience art science design Michael Burton Michiko Nitta Burton Nitta algae photosynthesis symbiosis

Roxy Paine’s Structural Systems

American artist Roxy Paine does not purposefully strive to create realism in his artworks, although his sculptures appear as genuine imitations of natural systems, whether arboreal, neurological, industrial, vascular or mycological. Paine’s organic forms arise from his meticulous study of growth patterns in nature and his adherence to such structural principles. One Hundred Foot Line (2010) is a tall, winding sculpture currently standing outside the National Gallery of Canada. Made of stainless steel pipes and resembling a lightning bolt, it examines the vertical extension of a tree’s trunk. If we were to eliminate all leaves, twigs and branches except those following the most vertical line of a tree, we would be left with this simple stem. One Hundred Foot Line is part of Paine’s Dendroid series, which explores the collision of vascular networks, tree roots, fungal mycelia and industrial piping. From this same series, Neuron (2009) is a piece that depicts a different type of branch: that of a nerve cell. The similar patterns in One Hundred Foot Line and Neuron remind us that all things in nature are linked in the way they are structurally formed. Paine’s interest in stainless steel arises from its use in oil, gas, food and pharmaceutical industries. This choice of material also further emphasizes a major theme in his work: the relationship between nature and the man-made in our modern world. Often, Paine’s sculptures are imposters to their surrounding environment. Conjoined (2007), which depicts two trees with intertwined branches, was exhibited among the trees of Madison Square Garden in New York City.  Is this what the tree of the dystopian future will look like, once our natural world has been eradicated? Paine remarks how nature is increasingly intruded upon by our technology, also extending this notion into the realm of the human body. In Distillation (2010), a vascular system made from the same welded steel branches takes over and entire gallery space. A pair of metallic kidneys is found among a network of pressure valves, cylindrical pipes, glass vials and bolts. Pieces of human and industrial purification systems seemingly work together here, forcing us to ask ourselves how both can truly coexist. -Meriza Martel-Bryden
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The Art and Science of Linen
Cultural history and biology collide in this video artwork created by artists Anna Dumitriu and Alex May. With the aid of microbiologist Dr. John Paul, Dumitriu and May trace methods of linen production from the late nineteenth century and locate the precise culture of bacteria integral to this production. 

In “Le Microbiologie du Sol,” an influential text by pioneering microbiologist Sergei Winogradsky, the bacterium Clostridium pasteurianum is located as the prime bacterial culture responsible for the process of separating flax fibres from plant stems in linen production. May and Dumitriu build from this discovery in the above video, recreating the process to exemplify methods of production. 
This video can be seen as an act of preservation, with the focus on the textures of antique linens made from natural and cultivated resources a desire to uphold historical production and design traditions. The cultural importance the video places on this process of linen creation exhibits a disconnect with synthetic fibres used in contemporary clothing and textile design, demonstrating a rich artistic and biological history that synthetic fibres lack. 
Dumitriu and May are both artists whose art works focus on the blurred boundaries between art, science, and new technologies. By using a range of untraditional artistic mediums, such as bacteria, robotics, textiles, and digital media, both artists seek to demonstrate the perception of technology and reality. 
For more information about The Art and Science of Linen, please visit Alex May’s website here. 
- Victoria Nolte

The Art and Science of Linen
Cultural history and biology collide in this video artwork created by artists Anna Dumitriu and Alex May. With the aid of microbiologist Dr. John Paul, Dumitriu and May trace methods of linen production from the late nineteenth century and locate the precise culture of bacteria integral to this production. 

In “Le Microbiologie du Sol,” an influential text by pioneering microbiologist Sergei Winogradsky, the bacterium Clostridium pasteurianum is located as the prime bacterial culture responsible for the process of separating flax fibres from plant stems in linen production. May and Dumitriu build from this discovery in the above video, recreating the process to exemplify methods of production. 
This video can be seen as an act of preservation, with the focus on the textures of antique linens made from natural and cultivated resources a desire to uphold historical production and design traditions. The cultural importance the video places on this process of linen creation exhibits a disconnect with synthetic fibres used in contemporary clothing and textile design, demonstrating a rich artistic and biological history that synthetic fibres lack. 
Dumitriu and May are both artists whose art works focus on the blurred boundaries between art, science, and new technologies. By using a range of untraditional artistic mediums, such as bacteria, robotics, textiles, and digital media, both artists seek to demonstrate the perception of technology and reality. 
For more information about The Art and Science of Linen, please visit Alex May’s website here. 
- Victoria Nolte

The Art and Science of Linen
Cultural history and biology collide in this video artwork created by artists Anna Dumitriu and Alex May. With the aid of microbiologist Dr. John Paul, Dumitriu and May trace methods of linen production from the late nineteenth century and locate the precise culture of bacteria integral to this production. 

In “Le Microbiologie du Sol,” an influential text by pioneering microbiologist Sergei Winogradsky, the bacterium Clostridium pasteurianum is located as the prime bacterial culture responsible for the process of separating flax fibres from plant stems in linen production. May and Dumitriu build from this discovery in the above video, recreating the process to exemplify methods of production. 
This video can be seen as an act of preservation, with the focus on the textures of antique linens made from natural and cultivated resources a desire to uphold historical production and design traditions. The cultural importance the video places on this process of linen creation exhibits a disconnect with synthetic fibres used in contemporary clothing and textile design, demonstrating a rich artistic and biological history that synthetic fibres lack. 
Dumitriu and May are both artists whose art works focus on the blurred boundaries between art, science, and new technologies. By using a range of untraditional artistic mediums, such as bacteria, robotics, textiles, and digital media, both artists seek to demonstrate the perception of technology and reality. 
For more information about The Art and Science of Linen, please visit Alex May’s website here. 
- Victoria Nolte

The Art and Science of Linen

Cultural history and biology collide in this video artwork created by artists Anna Dumitriu and Alex May. With the aid of microbiologist Dr. John Paul, Dumitriu and May trace methods of linen production from the late nineteenth century and locate the precise culture of bacteria integral to this production. 

In “Le Microbiologie du Sol,” an influential text by pioneering microbiologist Sergei Winogradsky, the bacterium Clostridium pasteurianum is located as the prime bacterial culture responsible for the process of separating flax fibres from plant stems in linen production. May and Dumitriu build from this discovery in the above video, recreating the process to exemplify methods of production. 

This video can be seen as an act of preservation, with the focus on the textures of antique linens made from natural and cultivated resources a desire to uphold historical production and design traditions. The cultural importance the video places on this process of linen creation exhibits a disconnect with synthetic fibres used in contemporary clothing and textile design, demonstrating a rich artistic and biological history that synthetic fibres lack. 

Dumitriu and May are both artists whose art works focus on the blurred boundaries between art, science, and new technologies. By using a range of untraditional artistic mediums, such as bacteria, robotics, textiles, and digital media, both artists seek to demonstrate the perception of technology and reality. 

For more information about The Art and Science of Linen, please visit Alex May’s website here

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ artscience video bacteria linen cultural history anna dumitriu alex may victoria nolte bioart

Valerie Hegarty: Foreboding Nature
There is a certain uneasiness attributed to the works of installation artist Valerie Hegarty. The unsettling “end-of-the-world-cometh” feeling that continuously plays into so many of our nightmares. Does there exist a truly disparaging force that could annihilate humanity in the blink of an eye? 
In the works featured above, nature is seen as a destructive force, manipulated by Hegarty in a reconstruction and ultimate destruction of landscape, portraiture, and still life traditions. Hegarty’s extension of these mediums allows the natural elements of her work to take on a sculptural form; to perform bodily gestures that burst through faultily constructed canvases into gallery space. 
From her studio in New York, Hegarty collects objects with cultural significance, often recreating masterworks of landscape paintings or historical portraits, and applies various forces of the natural world to rearrange and, ultimately, destroy them. However, in this desolation occurs a sort of rebirth as Hegarty is able to expose important cultural truths and re-imagine elements of cultural history. 
In this sense, it would seem that Hegarty’s practice is to expose the triumph of nature over the oppressive forces of colonialism, historicism, and culture. In the destruction of these artefacts, Hegarty exposes the elements of our known history gone awry and proposes an alternate history of the justified prevail of nature over humanity. 
Hegarty’s current exhibition, Alternate Histories, which further explores the destruction of colonial historical artefacts, is currently open at the Brooklyn Museum until December 1, 2013. 
Please visit Hegarty’s website for more examples of her work. 
- Victoria Nolte

Valerie Hegarty: Foreboding Nature
There is a certain uneasiness attributed to the works of installation artist Valerie Hegarty. The unsettling “end-of-the-world-cometh” feeling that continuously plays into so many of our nightmares. Does there exist a truly disparaging force that could annihilate humanity in the blink of an eye? 
In the works featured above, nature is seen as a destructive force, manipulated by Hegarty in a reconstruction and ultimate destruction of landscape, portraiture, and still life traditions. Hegarty’s extension of these mediums allows the natural elements of her work to take on a sculptural form; to perform bodily gestures that burst through faultily constructed canvases into gallery space. 
From her studio in New York, Hegarty collects objects with cultural significance, often recreating masterworks of landscape paintings or historical portraits, and applies various forces of the natural world to rearrange and, ultimately, destroy them. However, in this desolation occurs a sort of rebirth as Hegarty is able to expose important cultural truths and re-imagine elements of cultural history. 
In this sense, it would seem that Hegarty’s practice is to expose the triumph of nature over the oppressive forces of colonialism, historicism, and culture. In the destruction of these artefacts, Hegarty exposes the elements of our known history gone awry and proposes an alternate history of the justified prevail of nature over humanity. 
Hegarty’s current exhibition, Alternate Histories, which further explores the destruction of colonial historical artefacts, is currently open at the Brooklyn Museum until December 1, 2013. 
Please visit Hegarty’s website for more examples of her work. 
- Victoria Nolte

Valerie Hegarty: Foreboding Nature
There is a certain uneasiness attributed to the works of installation artist Valerie Hegarty. The unsettling “end-of-the-world-cometh” feeling that continuously plays into so many of our nightmares. Does there exist a truly disparaging force that could annihilate humanity in the blink of an eye? 
In the works featured above, nature is seen as a destructive force, manipulated by Hegarty in a reconstruction and ultimate destruction of landscape, portraiture, and still life traditions. Hegarty’s extension of these mediums allows the natural elements of her work to take on a sculptural form; to perform bodily gestures that burst through faultily constructed canvases into gallery space. 
From her studio in New York, Hegarty collects objects with cultural significance, often recreating masterworks of landscape paintings or historical portraits, and applies various forces of the natural world to rearrange and, ultimately, destroy them. However, in this desolation occurs a sort of rebirth as Hegarty is able to expose important cultural truths and re-imagine elements of cultural history. 
In this sense, it would seem that Hegarty’s practice is to expose the triumph of nature over the oppressive forces of colonialism, historicism, and culture. In the destruction of these artefacts, Hegarty exposes the elements of our known history gone awry and proposes an alternate history of the justified prevail of nature over humanity. 
Hegarty’s current exhibition, Alternate Histories, which further explores the destruction of colonial historical artefacts, is currently open at the Brooklyn Museum until December 1, 2013. 
Please visit Hegarty’s website for more examples of her work. 
- Victoria Nolte

Valerie Hegarty: Foreboding Nature
There is a certain uneasiness attributed to the works of installation artist Valerie Hegarty. The unsettling “end-of-the-world-cometh” feeling that continuously plays into so many of our nightmares. Does there exist a truly disparaging force that could annihilate humanity in the blink of an eye? 
In the works featured above, nature is seen as a destructive force, manipulated by Hegarty in a reconstruction and ultimate destruction of landscape, portraiture, and still life traditions. Hegarty’s extension of these mediums allows the natural elements of her work to take on a sculptural form; to perform bodily gestures that burst through faultily constructed canvases into gallery space. 
From her studio in New York, Hegarty collects objects with cultural significance, often recreating masterworks of landscape paintings or historical portraits, and applies various forces of the natural world to rearrange and, ultimately, destroy them. However, in this desolation occurs a sort of rebirth as Hegarty is able to expose important cultural truths and re-imagine elements of cultural history. 
In this sense, it would seem that Hegarty’s practice is to expose the triumph of nature over the oppressive forces of colonialism, historicism, and culture. In the destruction of these artefacts, Hegarty exposes the elements of our known history gone awry and proposes an alternate history of the justified prevail of nature over humanity. 
Hegarty’s current exhibition, Alternate Histories, which further explores the destruction of colonial historical artefacts, is currently open at the Brooklyn Museum until December 1, 2013. 
Please visit Hegarty’s website for more examples of her work. 
- Victoria Nolte

Valerie Hegarty: Foreboding Nature
There is a certain uneasiness attributed to the works of installation artist Valerie Hegarty. The unsettling “end-of-the-world-cometh” feeling that continuously plays into so many of our nightmares. Does there exist a truly disparaging force that could annihilate humanity in the blink of an eye? 
In the works featured above, nature is seen as a destructive force, manipulated by Hegarty in a reconstruction and ultimate destruction of landscape, portraiture, and still life traditions. Hegarty’s extension of these mediums allows the natural elements of her work to take on a sculptural form; to perform bodily gestures that burst through faultily constructed canvases into gallery space. 
From her studio in New York, Hegarty collects objects with cultural significance, often recreating masterworks of landscape paintings or historical portraits, and applies various forces of the natural world to rearrange and, ultimately, destroy them. However, in this desolation occurs a sort of rebirth as Hegarty is able to expose important cultural truths and re-imagine elements of cultural history. 
In this sense, it would seem that Hegarty’s practice is to expose the triumph of nature over the oppressive forces of colonialism, historicism, and culture. In the destruction of these artefacts, Hegarty exposes the elements of our known history gone awry and proposes an alternate history of the justified prevail of nature over humanity. 
Hegarty’s current exhibition, Alternate Histories, which further explores the destruction of colonial historical artefacts, is currently open at the Brooklyn Museum until December 1, 2013. 
Please visit Hegarty’s website for more examples of her work. 
- Victoria Nolte

Valerie Hegarty: Foreboding Nature

There is a certain uneasiness attributed to the works of installation artist Valerie Hegarty. The unsettling “end-of-the-world-cometh” feeling that continuously plays into so many of our nightmares. Does there exist a truly disparaging force that could annihilate humanity in the blink of an eye? 

In the works featured above, nature is seen as a destructive force, manipulated by Hegarty in a reconstruction and ultimate destruction of landscape, portraiture, and still life traditions. Hegarty’s extension of these mediums allows the natural elements of her work to take on a sculptural form; to perform bodily gestures that burst through faultily constructed canvases into gallery space. 

From her studio in New York, Hegarty collects objects with cultural significance, often recreating masterworks of landscape paintings or historical portraits, and applies various forces of the natural world to rearrange and, ultimately, destroy them. However, in this desolation occurs a sort of rebirth as Hegarty is able to expose important cultural truths and re-imagine elements of cultural history. 

In this sense, it would seem that Hegarty’s practice is to expose the triumph of nature over the oppressive forces of colonialism, historicism, and culture. In the destruction of these artefacts, Hegarty exposes the elements of our known history gone awry and proposes an alternate history of the justified prevail of nature over humanity. 

Hegarty’s current exhibition, Alternate Histories, which further explores the destruction of colonial historical artefacts, is currently open at the Brooklyn Museum until December 1, 2013. 

Please visit Hegarty’s website for more examples of her work. 

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

5 Photos
/ art science nature artscience valerie hegarty installation victoria nolte
Tobias Klein’s Virtual Sunset 
The expansion of interconnectivity between people worldwide and its impact on artists and artists’ interaction with their audiences is a complex issue explored in the 2012 installation Virtual Sunset by Tobias Klein. The installation is composed of a large grid from which are suspended hundreds of tentacles of PVC tubing emitting a series of vivid colours from cadmium orange to lemon yellow to Cerulean blue. Viewers are encouraged to walk through the installation, a corporeal element juxtaposed with the otherwise visual connotations of the words ‘virtual’ and ‘sunset’; for the piece is a time-based compilation of photographs of sunsets taken by online participants and uploaded to the project’s website, which you can visit here.
The sunset is a natural occurrence common to the experience of every living being and yet can provoke powerful feelings in the beholder. Klein demonstrates the complexity of our growing dual-identity as natural beings and avatars, straddling the line between the realms of the material and immaterial. On the Tobias Klein Studio website, we are told that by uploading images of sunsets from across the world, we produce a “simulacra of a shared singular sunset”, a result which reflects the desire within online communities to produce a similarly shared (read common) yet personalized and ultimately paradoxical ‘universal’ experience. 
Klein’s installation uses subject matter common to us all, yet provided through a medium which is as versatile as its goods are intangible. Interestingly, the problems surrounding artworks relying on viewer participation over the internet are articulated in the format of the installation, since there is a negative correlation between the viewers’ comprehension of the function or implications of the piece and his or her proximity to the actual physical object. In other words, by way of the Internet I can, from across the world, not only understand the artist’s intent and process, but also manipulate his artwork. On the other hand, if I was merely (and I use this term fully understanding the irony) to visit the piece on-site, I would be at a loss to recognize the object’s purpose. 
There is, however, room for redemption; while the Internet-participator has the upper-hand in the sense of being more ‘informed’, the on-site viewer has the opportunity to interact with the work physically, becoming part of the virtual sunset in a corporeal way. Which experience can be said to be more ‘true’? How do we define shared experiences and how do we categorize levels of human interactivity? Can we? Whichever way you see it, Klein’s installation poses us these questions in a stirring and enticing manner. For more on Tobias Klein’s work, please visit the Studio website here.
-Stephanie Read
Tobias Klein’s Virtual Sunset 
The expansion of interconnectivity between people worldwide and its impact on artists and artists’ interaction with their audiences is a complex issue explored in the 2012 installation Virtual Sunset by Tobias Klein. The installation is composed of a large grid from which are suspended hundreds of tentacles of PVC tubing emitting a series of vivid colours from cadmium orange to lemon yellow to Cerulean blue. Viewers are encouraged to walk through the installation, a corporeal element juxtaposed with the otherwise visual connotations of the words ‘virtual’ and ‘sunset’; for the piece is a time-based compilation of photographs of sunsets taken by online participants and uploaded to the project’s website, which you can visit here.
The sunset is a natural occurrence common to the experience of every living being and yet can provoke powerful feelings in the beholder. Klein demonstrates the complexity of our growing dual-identity as natural beings and avatars, straddling the line between the realms of the material and immaterial. On the Tobias Klein Studio website, we are told that by uploading images of sunsets from across the world, we produce a “simulacra of a shared singular sunset”, a result which reflects the desire within online communities to produce a similarly shared (read common) yet personalized and ultimately paradoxical ‘universal’ experience. 
Klein’s installation uses subject matter common to us all, yet provided through a medium which is as versatile as its goods are intangible. Interestingly, the problems surrounding artworks relying on viewer participation over the internet are articulated in the format of the installation, since there is a negative correlation between the viewers’ comprehension of the function or implications of the piece and his or her proximity to the actual physical object. In other words, by way of the Internet I can, from across the world, not only understand the artist’s intent and process, but also manipulate his artwork. On the other hand, if I was merely (and I use this term fully understanding the irony) to visit the piece on-site, I would be at a loss to recognize the object’s purpose. 
There is, however, room for redemption; while the Internet-participator has the upper-hand in the sense of being more ‘informed’, the on-site viewer has the opportunity to interact with the work physically, becoming part of the virtual sunset in a corporeal way. Which experience can be said to be more ‘true’? How do we define shared experiences and how do we categorize levels of human interactivity? Can we? Whichever way you see it, Klein’s installation poses us these questions in a stirring and enticing manner. For more on Tobias Klein’s work, please visit the Studio website here.
-Stephanie Read

Tobias Klein’s Virtual Sunset

The expansion of interconnectivity between people worldwide and its impact on artists and artists’ interaction with their audiences is a complex issue explored in the 2012 installation Virtual Sunset by Tobias Klein. The installation is composed of a large grid from which are suspended hundreds of tentacles of PVC tubing emitting a series of vivid colours from cadmium orange to lemon yellow to Cerulean blue. Viewers are encouraged to walk through the installation, a corporeal element juxtaposed with the otherwise visual connotations of the words ‘virtual’ and ‘sunset’; for the piece is a time-based compilation of photographs of sunsets taken by online participants and uploaded to the project’s website, which you can visit here.

The sunset is a natural occurrence common to the experience of every living being and yet can provoke powerful feelings in the beholder. Klein demonstrates the complexity of our growing dual-identity as natural beings and avatars, straddling the line between the realms of the material and immaterial. On the Tobias Klein Studio website, we are told that by uploading images of sunsets from across the world, we produce a “simulacra of a shared singular sunset”, a result which reflects the desire within online communities to produce a similarly shared (read common) yet personalized and ultimately paradoxical ‘universal’ experience.

Klein’s installation uses subject matter common to us all, yet provided through a medium which is as versatile as its goods are intangible. Interestingly, the problems surrounding artworks relying on viewer participation over the internet are articulated in the format of the installation, since there is a negative correlation between the viewers’ comprehension of the function or implications of the piece and his or her proximity to the actual physical object. In other words, by way of the Internet I can, from across the world, not only understand the artist’s intent and process, but also manipulate his artwork. On the other hand, if I was merely (and I use this term fully understanding the irony) to visit the piece on-site, I would be at a loss to recognize the object’s purpose.

There is, however, room for redemption; while the Internet-participator has the upper-hand in the sense of being more ‘informed’, the on-site viewer has the opportunity to interact with the work physically, becoming part of the virtual sunset in a corporeal way. Which experience can be said to be more ‘true’? How do we define shared experiences and how do we categorize levels of human interactivity? Can we? Whichever way you see it, Klein’s installation poses us these questions in a stirring and enticing manner. For more on Tobias Klein’s work, please visit the Studio website here.

-Stephanie Read

2 Photos
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Azuma Makoto: Water and Bonsai

As an artform that can be traced back over two thousand years in Japanese history, the cultivation of the bonsai follows many horticultural and aesthetic properties that are said to evoke unique responses from different viewers. Traditionally grown small enough to fit inside a small pot, the bonsai generally symbolizes “the aesthetic qualities found in nature through balance, simplicity, and harmony,” with balance being a key element of the bonsai’s aesthetic qualities. 

In this installation, Water and Bonsai, self-proclaimed “botanical artist” Azuma Makoto submerges what appears to be a small bonsai tree in an aquarium filled with water. Upon further inspection, however, we learn that this bonsai is actually a piece of deadwood adorned with moss. The moss is kept alive with the aid of a filtration system and LED lights. 

As Makoto describes the work, 

Bonsai transforms its shape through [the] ages [and] now finds a life in water and continues to be alive. We can, continuously, admire its new appearance with plants from land and water within clear water.”

In this sense, Water and Bonsai seeks to redefine the tradition of the bonsai by exposing it to a new natural element: the water. The bonsai’s shifting appearance in the water further demonstrates its ability to achieve aesthetic balance and harmony by being “one with the water.” As a result, Makoto exposes us to a sort of miniaturized botanical ecosystem that showcases the beauty and complexity of the plant world. 

Azuma Makoto’s practice as a botanical artist involves the staging and creation of “botanical sculptures” and large scale art installations. For more information about Makoto’s other projects, visit his website here

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

artscienceartsciencebonsaibotanical installationwaterbotanyazuma makotovictoria nolte
Nalini Malani: In Search of Vanished Blood
This work, by Nalini Malani, was one of the highlights of dOCUMENTA 13, held this past summer in Kassel, Germany. 
Influenced by personal and cultural experiences as a refugee of the Partition of India, Malani’s work focuses on gender and displacement and incorporates cultural imagery alongside new media, projection, and shadow play. 
In Search of Vanished Blood is a colossal installation that features projections of light through revolving acrylic cylinders. The cylinders feature painted imagery and, as they spin, the painted imagery moves across the wall and creates an interesting dynamic of shadow. The images used in this installation feature various representations of female characters from the Hindu religion alongside Western icons. The result is a breathtaking, multi-dimensional installation that comments on such social issues as gender, violence, and religious fundamentalism. 
To see the installation in action, check out this video here. 
For more information about Malani’s work, please visit her website. 
- Victoria Nolte 
Nalini Malani: In Search of Vanished Blood
This work, by Nalini Malani, was one of the highlights of dOCUMENTA 13, held this past summer in Kassel, Germany. 
Influenced by personal and cultural experiences as a refugee of the Partition of India, Malani’s work focuses on gender and displacement and incorporates cultural imagery alongside new media, projection, and shadow play. 
In Search of Vanished Blood is a colossal installation that features projections of light through revolving acrylic cylinders. The cylinders feature painted imagery and, as they spin, the painted imagery moves across the wall and creates an interesting dynamic of shadow. The images used in this installation feature various representations of female characters from the Hindu religion alongside Western icons. The result is a breathtaking, multi-dimensional installation that comments on such social issues as gender, violence, and religious fundamentalism. 
To see the installation in action, check out this video here. 
For more information about Malani’s work, please visit her website. 
- Victoria Nolte 
Nalini Malani: In Search of Vanished Blood
This work, by Nalini Malani, was one of the highlights of dOCUMENTA 13, held this past summer in Kassel, Germany. 
Influenced by personal and cultural experiences as a refugee of the Partition of India, Malani’s work focuses on gender and displacement and incorporates cultural imagery alongside new media, projection, and shadow play. 
In Search of Vanished Blood is a colossal installation that features projections of light through revolving acrylic cylinders. The cylinders feature painted imagery and, as they spin, the painted imagery moves across the wall and creates an interesting dynamic of shadow. The images used in this installation feature various representations of female characters from the Hindu religion alongside Western icons. The result is a breathtaking, multi-dimensional installation that comments on such social issues as gender, violence, and religious fundamentalism. 
To see the installation in action, check out this video here. 
For more information about Malani’s work, please visit her website. 
- Victoria Nolte 
Nalini Malani: In Search of Vanished Blood
This work, by Nalini Malani, was one of the highlights of dOCUMENTA 13, held this past summer in Kassel, Germany. 
Influenced by personal and cultural experiences as a refugee of the Partition of India, Malani’s work focuses on gender and displacement and incorporates cultural imagery alongside new media, projection, and shadow play. 
In Search of Vanished Blood is a colossal installation that features projections of light through revolving acrylic cylinders. The cylinders feature painted imagery and, as they spin, the painted imagery moves across the wall and creates an interesting dynamic of shadow. The images used in this installation feature various representations of female characters from the Hindu religion alongside Western icons. The result is a breathtaking, multi-dimensional installation that comments on such social issues as gender, violence, and religious fundamentalism. 
To see the installation in action, check out this video here. 
For more information about Malani’s work, please visit her website. 
- Victoria Nolte 
Gravity by mrmama.tv
In this series of .gif’s (which you can see here, the files together were too large for tumblr!) mrmama.tv created an artwork for two environments, the gallery and the internet. Arek Nowakowski, a motion designer for the project, told us about Gravity. As he states,
"This is a variation on time and movement. A clash of various forces creates a visual performance that surrounds us every day. Gravity is one of these forces and looking at the achieved pictures we have a feeling that everything is immersed in it, like an insect immersed in amber. I decided to stop a very dynamic situation in order to have access to those moments that pass too quickly to have a good look at them. AnimGifs are such ambers with frozen moments in which we were immersed."
But how does it work? By using the time slice technique, the group took shots and then spun them in an endless loop using .gif’s. The end result is that the subjects appear to be flying in circles. But the images are not on par with the final project, so see them in full here. 
- Lee Jones
Gravity by mrmama.tv
In this series of .gif’s (which you can see here, the files together were too large for tumblr!) mrmama.tv created an artwork for two environments, the gallery and the internet. Arek Nowakowski, a motion designer for the project, told us about Gravity. As he states,
"This is a variation on time and movement. A clash of various forces creates a visual performance that surrounds us every day. Gravity is one of these forces and looking at the achieved pictures we have a feeling that everything is immersed in it, like an insect immersed in amber. I decided to stop a very dynamic situation in order to have access to those moments that pass too quickly to have a good look at them. AnimGifs are such ambers with frozen moments in which we were immersed."
But how does it work? By using the time slice technique, the group took shots and then spun them in an endless loop using .gif’s. The end result is that the subjects appear to be flying in circles. But the images are not on par with the final project, so see them in full here. 
- Lee Jones
Gravity by mrmama.tv
In this series of .gif’s (which you can see here, the files together were too large for tumblr!) mrmama.tv created an artwork for two environments, the gallery and the internet. Arek Nowakowski, a motion designer for the project, told us about Gravity. As he states,
"This is a variation on time and movement. A clash of various forces creates a visual performance that surrounds us every day. Gravity is one of these forces and looking at the achieved pictures we have a feeling that everything is immersed in it, like an insect immersed in amber. I decided to stop a very dynamic situation in order to have access to those moments that pass too quickly to have a good look at them. AnimGifs are such ambers with frozen moments in which we were immersed."
But how does it work? By using the time slice technique, the group took shots and then spun them in an endless loop using .gif’s. The end result is that the subjects appear to be flying in circles. But the images are not on par with the final project, so see them in full here. 
- Lee Jones
Gravity by mrmama.tv
In this series of .gif’s (which you can see here, the files together were too large for tumblr!) mrmama.tv created an artwork for two environments, the gallery and the internet. Arek Nowakowski, a motion designer for the project, told us about Gravity. As he states,
"This is a variation on time and movement. A clash of various forces creates a visual performance that surrounds us every day. Gravity is one of these forces and looking at the achieved pictures we have a feeling that everything is immersed in it, like an insect immersed in amber. I decided to stop a very dynamic situation in order to have access to those moments that pass too quickly to have a good look at them. AnimGifs are such ambers with frozen moments in which we were immersed."
But how does it work? By using the time slice technique, the group took shots and then spun them in an endless loop using .gif’s. The end result is that the subjects appear to be flying in circles. But the images are not on par with the final project, so see them in full here. 
- Lee Jones

Gravity by mrmama.tv

In this series of .gif’s (which you can see here, the files together were too large for tumblr!) mrmama.tv created an artwork for two environments, the gallery and the internet. Arek Nowakowski, a motion designer for the project, told us about Gravity. As he states,

"This is a variation on time and movement. A clash of various forces creates a visual performance that surrounds us every day. Gravity is one of these forces and looking at the achieved pictures we have a feeling that everything is immersed in it, like an insect immersed in amber. I decided to stop a very dynamic situation in order to have access to those moments that pass too quickly to have a good look at them. AnimGifs are such ambers with frozen moments in which we were immersed."

But how does it work? By using the time slice technique, the group took shots and then spun them in an endless loop using .gif’s. The end result is that the subjects appear to be flying in circles. But the images are not on par with the final project, so see them in full here. 

- Lee Jones

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ art science artscience gif technology mrmama lee jones
All Possible Photons: The Feynman Diagrams of Edward Tufte
It is little wonder that Edward Tufte has a lingering fascination with Feynman: both men bring to their work an instinctive understanding of the connection between sight, thought, and perception. Tufte, whom the New York Times described as “the da Vinci of data” for his elegant, polymathic approach to data visualization, has since become fascinated by the extra dimensionality that sculpture affords. In his latest exhibit, Tufte’s stainless steel sculptures pay tribute to Richard Feynman, whose eponymous diagrams revolutionized theoretical physics. As described in the show’s catalogue:
“Feynman diagrams depict the space-time patterns of particles and waves of quantum electrodynamics. These mathematically derived and empirically verified visualizations represent the space-time paths taken by all subatomic particles in the universe.
The resulting conceptual and cognitive art is both beautiful and true… Gathered together, as in the 120 diagrams showing all possible space-time paths of 6-photon scattering, the stainless steel lines (and their variable shadow, airspace, light, color, form) reveal the endless complexities that result from multiplying and varying fundamental elements.”
You can see more of Tufte’s work here; a (relatively) simple explanation of Feynman diagrams can be found here.   
- Alex Tesar

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