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Food For Thought: Art is Good For Your Brain!
A recent study by University Hospital Erlangen in Germany suggests that, other than relieving stress, coming into contact with art specifically by making art works or crafts, can create “a significant improvement in psychological resilience”. This is due to the excessive use of motor and cognitive processing in the brain, stimulating it. Such discoveries are beneficial especially to the elderly, as creating art keeps the brain healthy, which could help slow down the onslaught of memory loss. You can read more on the findings here.
Science, engineering and all other typically ‘non-artsy’ fields have artistic elements about them; in fact, mathematical equations, DNA and even microbiological elements can be seen as works of art all on their own, serving both aesthetic and educational purposes. Even bacteria, manipulated by scientists such as Eshel Ben-Jacob, can create psychedelic patterns based on natural formations due to change in temperature or environment. The results are truly groovy.
A certain amount of creativity and a sense of design were definitely needed to create “inFORM”, an invention from MIT which allows users to interact with objects through a screen (yes, the digital kind). This invention is capable of rendering 3D objects physically, allowing users to interact with each other no matter how far away they are.
Not only can our artistic side create new inventions or help us see the scientific world in a different light, but art can help keep the brain active and healthy for many decades, or in the case of Hal Lasko, almost a century. The 99 year old, who passed away this year, worked as a typographer in his youth, making fonts by hand. After becoming partially blind in his senior years, Lasko turned to digital mediums such as Microsoft Paint, creating over 150 digital pieces.
Art it seems is a lot more beneficial to us than merely another creative outlet and stress-reliever, and we have science to thank for reaching that conclusion!
-Anna Paluch
Food For Thought: Art is Good For Your Brain!
A recent study by University Hospital Erlangen in Germany suggests that, other than relieving stress, coming into contact with art specifically by making art works or crafts, can create “a significant improvement in psychological resilience”. This is due to the excessive use of motor and cognitive processing in the brain, stimulating it. Such discoveries are beneficial especially to the elderly, as creating art keeps the brain healthy, which could help slow down the onslaught of memory loss. You can read more on the findings here.
Science, engineering and all other typically ‘non-artsy’ fields have artistic elements about them; in fact, mathematical equations, DNA and even microbiological elements can be seen as works of art all on their own, serving both aesthetic and educational purposes. Even bacteria, manipulated by scientists such as Eshel Ben-Jacob, can create psychedelic patterns based on natural formations due to change in temperature or environment. The results are truly groovy.
A certain amount of creativity and a sense of design were definitely needed to create “inFORM”, an invention from MIT which allows users to interact with objects through a screen (yes, the digital kind). This invention is capable of rendering 3D objects physically, allowing users to interact with each other no matter how far away they are.
Not only can our artistic side create new inventions or help us see the scientific world in a different light, but art can help keep the brain active and healthy for many decades, or in the case of Hal Lasko, almost a century. The 99 year old, who passed away this year, worked as a typographer in his youth, making fonts by hand. After becoming partially blind in his senior years, Lasko turned to digital mediums such as Microsoft Paint, creating over 150 digital pieces.
Art it seems is a lot more beneficial to us than merely another creative outlet and stress-reliever, and we have science to thank for reaching that conclusion!
-Anna Paluch
Food For Thought: Art is Good For Your Brain!
A recent study by University Hospital Erlangen in Germany suggests that, other than relieving stress, coming into contact with art specifically by making art works or crafts, can create “a significant improvement in psychological resilience”. This is due to the excessive use of motor and cognitive processing in the brain, stimulating it. Such discoveries are beneficial especially to the elderly, as creating art keeps the brain healthy, which could help slow down the onslaught of memory loss. You can read more on the findings here.
Science, engineering and all other typically ‘non-artsy’ fields have artistic elements about them; in fact, mathematical equations, DNA and even microbiological elements can be seen as works of art all on their own, serving both aesthetic and educational purposes. Even bacteria, manipulated by scientists such as Eshel Ben-Jacob, can create psychedelic patterns based on natural formations due to change in temperature or environment. The results are truly groovy.
A certain amount of creativity and a sense of design were definitely needed to create “inFORM”, an invention from MIT which allows users to interact with objects through a screen (yes, the digital kind). This invention is capable of rendering 3D objects physically, allowing users to interact with each other no matter how far away they are.
Not only can our artistic side create new inventions or help us see the scientific world in a different light, but art can help keep the brain active and healthy for many decades, or in the case of Hal Lasko, almost a century. The 99 year old, who passed away this year, worked as a typographer in his youth, making fonts by hand. After becoming partially blind in his senior years, Lasko turned to digital mediums such as Microsoft Paint, creating over 150 digital pieces.
Art it seems is a lot more beneficial to us than merely another creative outlet and stress-reliever, and we have science to thank for reaching that conclusion!
-Anna Paluch

Food For Thought: Art is Good For Your Brain!

A recent study by University Hospital Erlangen in Germany suggests that, other than relieving stress, coming into contact with art specifically by making art works or crafts, can create “a significant improvement in psychological resilience”. This is due to the excessive use of motor and cognitive processing in the brain, stimulating it. Such discoveries are beneficial especially to the elderly, as creating art keeps the brain healthy, which could help slow down the onslaught of memory loss. You can read more on the findings here.

Science, engineering and all other typically ‘non-artsy’ fields have artistic elements about them; in fact, mathematical equations, DNA and even microbiological elements can be seen as works of art all on their own, serving both aesthetic and educational purposes. Even bacteria, manipulated by scientists such as Eshel Ben-Jacob, can create psychedelic patterns based on natural formations due to change in temperature or environment. The results are truly groovy.

A certain amount of creativity and a sense of design were definitely needed to create “inFORM”, an invention from MIT which allows users to interact with objects through a screen (yes, the digital kind). This invention is capable of rendering 3D objects physically, allowing users to interact with each other no matter how far away they are.

Not only can our artistic side create new inventions or help us see the scientific world in a different light, but art can help keep the brain active and healthy for many decades, or in the case of Hal Lasko, almost a century. The 99 year old, who passed away this year, worked as a typographer in his youth, making fonts by hand. After becoming partially blind in his senior years, Lasko turned to digital mediums such as Microsoft Paint, creating over 150 digital pieces.

Art it seems is a lot more beneficial to us than merely another creative outlet and stress-reliever, and we have science to thank for reaching that conclusion!

-Anna Paluch

3 Photos
/ University of Erlangen art stree brain health memory elderly Eshel Ben-Jacob bacteria inFORM MIT tehcnology engineering science Hal Lasko digital art digital painting anna paluch art and science journal

The Art and Science of Linen
Cultural history and biology collide in this video artwork created by artists Anna Dumitriu and Alex May. With the aid of microbiologist Dr. John Paul, Dumitriu and May trace methods of linen production from the late nineteenth century and locate the precise culture of bacteria integral to this production. 

In “Le Microbiologie du Sol,” an influential text by pioneering microbiologist Sergei Winogradsky, the bacterium Clostridium pasteurianum is located as the prime bacterial culture responsible for the process of separating flax fibres from plant stems in linen production. May and Dumitriu build from this discovery in the above video, recreating the process to exemplify methods of production. 
This video can be seen as an act of preservation, with the focus on the textures of antique linens made from natural and cultivated resources a desire to uphold historical production and design traditions. The cultural importance the video places on this process of linen creation exhibits a disconnect with synthetic fibres used in contemporary clothing and textile design, demonstrating a rich artistic and biological history that synthetic fibres lack. 
Dumitriu and May are both artists whose art works focus on the blurred boundaries between art, science, and new technologies. By using a range of untraditional artistic mediums, such as bacteria, robotics, textiles, and digital media, both artists seek to demonstrate the perception of technology and reality. 
For more information about The Art and Science of Linen, please visit Alex May’s website here. 
- Victoria Nolte

The Art and Science of Linen
Cultural history and biology collide in this video artwork created by artists Anna Dumitriu and Alex May. With the aid of microbiologist Dr. John Paul, Dumitriu and May trace methods of linen production from the late nineteenth century and locate the precise culture of bacteria integral to this production. 

In “Le Microbiologie du Sol,” an influential text by pioneering microbiologist Sergei Winogradsky, the bacterium Clostridium pasteurianum is located as the prime bacterial culture responsible for the process of separating flax fibres from plant stems in linen production. May and Dumitriu build from this discovery in the above video, recreating the process to exemplify methods of production. 
This video can be seen as an act of preservation, with the focus on the textures of antique linens made from natural and cultivated resources a desire to uphold historical production and design traditions. The cultural importance the video places on this process of linen creation exhibits a disconnect with synthetic fibres used in contemporary clothing and textile design, demonstrating a rich artistic and biological history that synthetic fibres lack. 
Dumitriu and May are both artists whose art works focus on the blurred boundaries between art, science, and new technologies. By using a range of untraditional artistic mediums, such as bacteria, robotics, textiles, and digital media, both artists seek to demonstrate the perception of technology and reality. 
For more information about The Art and Science of Linen, please visit Alex May’s website here. 
- Victoria Nolte

The Art and Science of Linen
Cultural history and biology collide in this video artwork created by artists Anna Dumitriu and Alex May. With the aid of microbiologist Dr. John Paul, Dumitriu and May trace methods of linen production from the late nineteenth century and locate the precise culture of bacteria integral to this production. 

In “Le Microbiologie du Sol,” an influential text by pioneering microbiologist Sergei Winogradsky, the bacterium Clostridium pasteurianum is located as the prime bacterial culture responsible for the process of separating flax fibres from plant stems in linen production. May and Dumitriu build from this discovery in the above video, recreating the process to exemplify methods of production. 
This video can be seen as an act of preservation, with the focus on the textures of antique linens made from natural and cultivated resources a desire to uphold historical production and design traditions. The cultural importance the video places on this process of linen creation exhibits a disconnect with synthetic fibres used in contemporary clothing and textile design, demonstrating a rich artistic and biological history that synthetic fibres lack. 
Dumitriu and May are both artists whose art works focus on the blurred boundaries between art, science, and new technologies. By using a range of untraditional artistic mediums, such as bacteria, robotics, textiles, and digital media, both artists seek to demonstrate the perception of technology and reality. 
For more information about The Art and Science of Linen, please visit Alex May’s website here. 
- Victoria Nolte

The Art and Science of Linen

Cultural history and biology collide in this video artwork created by artists Anna Dumitriu and Alex May. With the aid of microbiologist Dr. John Paul, Dumitriu and May trace methods of linen production from the late nineteenth century and locate the precise culture of bacteria integral to this production. 

In “Le Microbiologie du Sol,” an influential text by pioneering microbiologist Sergei Winogradsky, the bacterium Clostridium pasteurianum is located as the prime bacterial culture responsible for the process of separating flax fibres from plant stems in linen production. May and Dumitriu build from this discovery in the above video, recreating the process to exemplify methods of production. 

This video can be seen as an act of preservation, with the focus on the textures of antique linens made from natural and cultivated resources a desire to uphold historical production and design traditions. The cultural importance the video places on this process of linen creation exhibits a disconnect with synthetic fibres used in contemporary clothing and textile design, demonstrating a rich artistic and biological history that synthetic fibres lack. 

Dumitriu and May are both artists whose art works focus on the blurred boundaries between art, science, and new technologies. By using a range of untraditional artistic mediums, such as bacteria, robotics, textiles, and digital media, both artists seek to demonstrate the perception of technology and reality. 

For more information about The Art and Science of Linen, please visit Alex May’s website here

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ artscience video bacteria linen cultural history anna dumitriu alex may victoria nolte bioart
Simon F. Park
A Senior Lecturer in Molecular Bacteriology at University of Surrey, Simon F. Park’s artworks are driven by a need to correct the common misconception that microbiological life is primitive and always detrimental. As Park states,  
"I hope that through my art, and collaborations with artists, that the real and sublime nature of the microbiological world can be revealed. I also find the interface between arts and science to be a powerfully pluripotent one, that can occasionally give rise to outliers and thus new avenues of scientific investigation."
As a microbiologist, Park works mostly with microorganisms and uses them to explore the inherent creativity of the natural world and to reveal its subtle, and usually hidden, narratives. But, rather than imposing any strict human-centred design upon the organisms that he works with, he prefers to evoke them as  co-authors in the creative process so that important events that many of us often overlook, or fail to consider intimately, become manifest. To see more of Park’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Simon F. Park
A Senior Lecturer in Molecular Bacteriology at University of Surrey, Simon F. Park’s artworks are driven by a need to correct the common misconception that microbiological life is primitive and always detrimental. As Park states,  
"I hope that through my art, and collaborations with artists, that the real and sublime nature of the microbiological world can be revealed. I also find the interface between arts and science to be a powerfully pluripotent one, that can occasionally give rise to outliers and thus new avenues of scientific investigation."
As a microbiologist, Park works mostly with microorganisms and uses them to explore the inherent creativity of the natural world and to reveal its subtle, and usually hidden, narratives. But, rather than imposing any strict human-centred design upon the organisms that he works with, he prefers to evoke them as  co-authors in the creative process so that important events that many of us often overlook, or fail to consider intimately, become manifest. To see more of Park’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Simon F. Park
A Senior Lecturer in Molecular Bacteriology at University of Surrey, Simon F. Park’s artworks are driven by a need to correct the common misconception that microbiological life is primitive and always detrimental. As Park states,  
"I hope that through my art, and collaborations with artists, that the real and sublime nature of the microbiological world can be revealed. I also find the interface between arts and science to be a powerfully pluripotent one, that can occasionally give rise to outliers and thus new avenues of scientific investigation."
As a microbiologist, Park works mostly with microorganisms and uses them to explore the inherent creativity of the natural world and to reveal its subtle, and usually hidden, narratives. But, rather than imposing any strict human-centred design upon the organisms that he works with, he prefers to evoke them as  co-authors in the creative process so that important events that many of us often overlook, or fail to consider intimately, become manifest. To see more of Park’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Simon F. Park
A Senior Lecturer in Molecular Bacteriology at University of Surrey, Simon F. Park’s artworks are driven by a need to correct the common misconception that microbiological life is primitive and always detrimental. As Park states,  
"I hope that through my art, and collaborations with artists, that the real and sublime nature of the microbiological world can be revealed. I also find the interface between arts and science to be a powerfully pluripotent one, that can occasionally give rise to outliers and thus new avenues of scientific investigation."
As a microbiologist, Park works mostly with microorganisms and uses them to explore the inherent creativity of the natural world and to reveal its subtle, and usually hidden, narratives. But, rather than imposing any strict human-centred design upon the organisms that he works with, he prefers to evoke them as  co-authors in the creative process so that important events that many of us often overlook, or fail to consider intimately, become manifest. To see more of Park’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Philips Bio-Light: Bacteria as Energy Source
Philips’ newest Microbial Home concept is a resourceful and visually dynamic bio-light that uses bioluminescent bacteria, fed with methane and composted material (poop and waste) as an energy source. As you can see, this light is not only an achievement technologically and scientifically, but it is pretty impressive aesthetically as well.
For Philips, however, this is more than a light — it is a life-changing idea: “Potentially biological products could be self-energizing, adaptive, responsive, self-repairing, act as biological sensors to environmental conditions, and change the way we communicate information.”
So there’s waste, and then light, but how does it work? In scientific terms, bioluminescent organisms produce luciferase, an enzyme, which interacts with a molecule called a luciferin, which emits light. This type of light is produced at low temperatures (unlike incandescence, where light is produced as a result of high heat).
Luminescent light is consequently less intense, described as “more suitable for … ambience and indication than functional illumination”. It is slower than conventional light sources, and its functionality depends on the living material’s life itself. What’s cool about that, though, is that the light emitted is susceptible to change, and likely to react to its environmental setting. Essentially, it’s an ambiance-creating light source with a life of its own. 
Philips sees a more practical future for this concept in night-time road markings, warning strips on flights of stairs, informational markings on cultural institutions, and the like. As well, they see potential in its ability to create new genres of atmospheric interior lighting, that could potentially have therapeutic effects. All of this said, there are no plans to sell this light as a Philips product. Instead, it is intended to spark discussion: “this concept is testing a possible future — not prescribing one.” Oh well… we can dream! 
In the meantime, you can have a look at some other Philips Microbial Home concepts here. For more information on the bio-light, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Philips Bio-Light: Bacteria as Energy Source
Philips’ newest Microbial Home concept is a resourceful and visually dynamic bio-light that uses bioluminescent bacteria, fed with methane and composted material (poop and waste) as an energy source. As you can see, this light is not only an achievement technologically and scientifically, but it is pretty impressive aesthetically as well.
For Philips, however, this is more than a light — it is a life-changing idea: “Potentially biological products could be self-energizing, adaptive, responsive, self-repairing, act as biological sensors to environmental conditions, and change the way we communicate information.”
So there’s waste, and then light, but how does it work? In scientific terms, bioluminescent organisms produce luciferase, an enzyme, which interacts with a molecule called a luciferin, which emits light. This type of light is produced at low temperatures (unlike incandescence, where light is produced as a result of high heat).
Luminescent light is consequently less intense, described as “more suitable for … ambience and indication than functional illumination”. It is slower than conventional light sources, and its functionality depends on the living material’s life itself. What’s cool about that, though, is that the light emitted is susceptible to change, and likely to react to its environmental setting. Essentially, it’s an ambiance-creating light source with a life of its own. 
Philips sees a more practical future for this concept in night-time road markings, warning strips on flights of stairs, informational markings on cultural institutions, and the like. As well, they see potential in its ability to create new genres of atmospheric interior lighting, that could potentially have therapeutic effects. All of this said, there are no plans to sell this light as a Philips product. Instead, it is intended to spark discussion: “this concept is testing a possible future — not prescribing one.” Oh well… we can dream! 
In the meantime, you can have a look at some other Philips Microbial Home concepts here. For more information on the bio-light, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Philips Bio-Light: Bacteria as Energy Source
Philips’ newest Microbial Home concept is a resourceful and visually dynamic bio-light that uses bioluminescent bacteria, fed with methane and composted material (poop and waste) as an energy source. As you can see, this light is not only an achievement technologically and scientifically, but it is pretty impressive aesthetically as well.
For Philips, however, this is more than a light — it is a life-changing idea: “Potentially biological products could be self-energizing, adaptive, responsive, self-repairing, act as biological sensors to environmental conditions, and change the way we communicate information.”
So there’s waste, and then light, but how does it work? In scientific terms, bioluminescent organisms produce luciferase, an enzyme, which interacts with a molecule called a luciferin, which emits light. This type of light is produced at low temperatures (unlike incandescence, where light is produced as a result of high heat).
Luminescent light is consequently less intense, described as “more suitable for … ambience and indication than functional illumination”. It is slower than conventional light sources, and its functionality depends on the living material’s life itself. What’s cool about that, though, is that the light emitted is susceptible to change, and likely to react to its environmental setting. Essentially, it’s an ambiance-creating light source with a life of its own. 
Philips sees a more practical future for this concept in night-time road markings, warning strips on flights of stairs, informational markings on cultural institutions, and the like. As well, they see potential in its ability to create new genres of atmospheric interior lighting, that could potentially have therapeutic effects. All of this said, there are no plans to sell this light as a Philips product. Instead, it is intended to spark discussion: “this concept is testing a possible future — not prescribing one.” Oh well… we can dream! 
In the meantime, you can have a look at some other Philips Microbial Home concepts here. For more information on the bio-light, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron

Philips Bio-Light: Bacteria as Energy Source


Philips’ newest Microbial Home concept is a resourceful and visually dynamic bio-light that uses bioluminescent bacteria, fed with methane and composted material (poop and waste) as an energy source. As you can see, this light is not only an achievement technologically and scientifically, but it is pretty impressive aesthetically as well.

For Philips, however, this is more than a light — it is a life-changing idea: “Potentially biological products could be self-energizing, adaptive, responsive, self-repairing, act as biological sensors to environmental conditions, and change the way we communicate information.”

So there’s waste, and then light, but how does it work? In scientific terms, bioluminescent organisms produce luciferase, an enzyme, which interacts with a molecule called a luciferin, which emits light. This type of light is produced at low temperatures (unlike incandescence, where light is produced as a result of high heat).

Luminescent light is consequently less intense, described as “more suitable for … ambience and indication than functional illumination”. It is slower than conventional light sources, and its functionality depends on the living material’s life itself. What’s cool about that, though, is that the light emitted is susceptible to change, and likely to react to its environmental setting. Essentially, it’s an ambiance-creating light source with a life of its own. 

Philips sees a more practical future for this concept in night-time road markings, warning strips on flights of stairs, informational markings on cultural institutions, and the like. As well, they see potential in its ability to create new genres of atmospheric interior lighting, that could potentially have therapeutic effects. All of this said, there are no plans to sell this light as a Philips product. Instead, it is intended to spark discussion: “this concept is testing a possible future — not prescribing one.” Oh well… we can dream!

In the meantime, you can have a look at some other Philips Microbial Home concepts here. For more information on the bio-light, click here.

- Gabrielle Doiron

3 Photos
/ Microbial Home Philips art art and science artscience bacteria bio-light biology bioluminescence design environment future nature renewable energy science sustainability Gabrielle Doiron

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