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The Telegarden
Between the years of 1995 and 2004 the University of South Carolina, and subsequently the Ars Electronica Centre in Austria, were home to an innovative project called “The Telegarden”. This garden featured an area of dirt and plants inside a planter, which also held an industrial robot arm, which could be controlled through the internet.
How the garden worked, was that people from all over the world were able to observe the garden through a camera in the robot arm, but also, have the power to water and tend to the plants. If there was a free space the robot arm even allowed an individual, through the internet, the ability to plant a seed and take care of it. 
Professor Ken Goldberg explained that the decision to use a garden for this interactive project was that it is “very human, very immediate, very tactile”, a stark contrast to the idea of the internet and anything associated with it as complex, mathematical and machine-like. The internet is fast-paced, connecting us to other people and information in milliseconds, but the garden cannot be rushed, it must be cared for carefully,
As Randall Packer states:
“The Telegarden creates a physical garden as an environment to stage social interaction and community in virtual space. The Telegarden is a metaphor for the care and feeding of the delicate social ecology of the net." — San Jose Museum of Art, April 1998.

-Anna Paluch

The Telegarden

Between the years of 1995 and 2004 the University of South Carolina, and subsequently the Ars Electronica Centre in Austria, were home to an innovative project called “The Telegarden”. This garden featured an area of dirt and plants inside a planter, which also held an industrial robot arm, which could be controlled through the internet.

How the garden worked, was that people from all over the world were able to observe the garden through a camera in the robot arm, but also, have the power to water and tend to the plants. If there was a free space the robot arm even allowed an individual, through the internet, the ability to plant a seed and take care of it. 

Professor Ken Goldberg explained that the decision to use a garden for this interactive project was that it is “very human, very immediate, very tactile”, a stark contrast to the idea of the internet and anything associated with it as complex, mathematical and machine-like. The internet is fast-paced, connecting us to other people and information in milliseconds, but the garden cannot be rushed, it must be cared for carefully,

As Randall Packer states:

The Telegarden creates a physical garden as an environment to stage social interaction and community in virtual space. The Telegarden is a metaphor for the care and feeding of the delicate social ecology of the net." — San Jose Museum of Art, April 1998.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

The Telegarden university of south carolina ars electronica anna paluch art science art and science journal garden biology robotics engineering biodiversity
A Sweet 3-D Printing Project!
Bees are fascinating little creatures, having the capacity to build intricate structures. Marketing agencies, Sid Lee and The Ebeling Group decided to harness the bees building skills by manipulating the shape in which the they build their hives, creating organic sculptures for their client Dewar’s. 
The results include bottles and busts made purely from honeycomb; not chiseled or stuck together, but formed naturally by the bees themselves. With 3-D printing gaining popularity, it is wonderful to see natural examples of 3-D printing. The artists and bee keepers involved in the 3-D project are also able to study the process the bees go through to build their hives, as the outer shell is made of see-through plastic. 
Everything was taken into consideration to make the 80,000 bees as comfortable as possible; the base and see-through shell were designed to mimic the enclosed space of a normal bee hive. The bees were even helped in building their new hives, given ‘blueprints’ in order to collect pollen and nectarThis is a great example of thinking ‘outside the box’, and marketing done right!
There is a video of the process available here.
If you would like to read about other artists who work with bees to create natural honeycomb sculptures, check out Tomás Libertíny and Aganetha Dyck.
-Anna Paluch
A Sweet 3-D Printing Project!
Bees are fascinating little creatures, having the capacity to build intricate structures. Marketing agencies, Sid Lee and The Ebeling Group decided to harness the bees building skills by manipulating the shape in which the they build their hives, creating organic sculptures for their client Dewar’s. 
The results include bottles and busts made purely from honeycomb; not chiseled or stuck together, but formed naturally by the bees themselves. With 3-D printing gaining popularity, it is wonderful to see natural examples of 3-D printing. The artists and bee keepers involved in the 3-D project are also able to study the process the bees go through to build their hives, as the outer shell is made of see-through plastic. 
Everything was taken into consideration to make the 80,000 bees as comfortable as possible; the base and see-through shell were designed to mimic the enclosed space of a normal bee hive. The bees were even helped in building their new hives, given ‘blueprints’ in order to collect pollen and nectarThis is a great example of thinking ‘outside the box’, and marketing done right!
There is a video of the process available here.
If you would like to read about other artists who work with bees to create natural honeycomb sculptures, check out Tomás Libertíny and Aganetha Dyck.
-Anna Paluch

A Sweet 3-D Printing Project!

Bees are fascinating little creatures, having the capacity to build intricate structures. Marketing agencies, Sid Lee and The Ebeling Group decided to harness the bees building skills by manipulating the shape in which the they build their hives, creating organic sculptures for their client Dewar’s. 

The results include bottles and busts made purely from honeycomb; not chiseled or stuck together, but formed naturally by the bees themselves. With 3-D printing gaining popularity, it is wonderful to see natural examples of 3-D printing. The artists and bee keepers involved in the 3-D project are also able to study the process the bees go through to build their hives, as the outer shell is made of see-through plastic. 

Everything was taken into consideration to make the 80,000 bees as comfortable as possible; the base and see-through shell were designed to mimic the enclosed space of a normal bee hive. The bees were even helped in building their new hives, given ‘blueprints’ in order to collect pollen and nectar

This is a great example of thinking ‘outside the box’, and marketing done right!

There is a video of the process available here.

If you would like to read about other artists who work with bees to create natural honeycomb sculptures, check out Tomás Libertíny and Aganetha Dyck.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ bees honey 3D Printing nature engineering biology marketing Tomas libertiny aganetha dyck anna paluch art science art and science journal advertising
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch

Home Sweet Home

Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).

With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 

With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.

Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?

A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ aki inomata anna paluch hermit crabs animals shells plastic scanning technology 3D Printing art science art and science journal ct scan shelter home physiology architecture biology
Taking A Closer Look: Photomicrography
Photography has been used for decades to capture the images that we see with our eyes, but, it can also help us to see things that we could never see with just the naked eye.
Photomicrographers are those who photograph the microscopic world around us. With the help of special cameras, we can now see cell nuclei or the intestines of fruit flies if we so wanted to. There are hundreds of photomicrographers in the world, each with their own unique specialization or style; like artists, they present to us their own interpretations of microscopic objects, using various techniques, such as two-photon excitation microscopy, which “provides distinct advantages for three-dimensional imaging”. This process is used for “imaging of living cells, especially within intact tissues such as brain slices, embryos, whole organs, and even entire animals”, making Dr. Paul Appleton’s pictures both studies of biological components of organisms, but also aesthetically, vibrant, geometric abstractions. 
Claudia Buttera creates similar pieces, most of them cells under stress, and frames them to be placed in a gallery setting, where both the science of the subject and aesthetic of the overall piece is appreciated for as a work of art. The muse is nature, the artist Buttera.
Nikola Rahme moves slightly further away from the subjects, revealing the actual features and body parts of wasps and beetles, instead of merely the puzzle pieces of their anatomy known as cells. Works such as Rahme’s help viewers put a ‘face’ to the cluster of shapes that the aforementioned photomicrographers capture.

-Anna Paluch
Taking A Closer Look: Photomicrography
Photography has been used for decades to capture the images that we see with our eyes, but, it can also help us to see things that we could never see with just the naked eye.
Photomicrographers are those who photograph the microscopic world around us. With the help of special cameras, we can now see cell nuclei or the intestines of fruit flies if we so wanted to. There are hundreds of photomicrographers in the world, each with their own unique specialization or style; like artists, they present to us their own interpretations of microscopic objects, using various techniques, such as two-photon excitation microscopy, which “provides distinct advantages for three-dimensional imaging”. This process is used for “imaging of living cells, especially within intact tissues such as brain slices, embryos, whole organs, and even entire animals”, making Dr. Paul Appleton’s pictures both studies of biological components of organisms, but also aesthetically, vibrant, geometric abstractions. 
Claudia Buttera creates similar pieces, most of them cells under stress, and frames them to be placed in a gallery setting, where both the science of the subject and aesthetic of the overall piece is appreciated for as a work of art. The muse is nature, the artist Buttera.
Nikola Rahme moves slightly further away from the subjects, revealing the actual features and body parts of wasps and beetles, instead of merely the puzzle pieces of their anatomy known as cells. Works such as Rahme’s help viewers put a ‘face’ to the cluster of shapes that the aforementioned photomicrographers capture.

-Anna Paluch
Taking A Closer Look: Photomicrography
Photography has been used for decades to capture the images that we see with our eyes, but, it can also help us to see things that we could never see with just the naked eye.
Photomicrographers are those who photograph the microscopic world around us. With the help of special cameras, we can now see cell nuclei or the intestines of fruit flies if we so wanted to. There are hundreds of photomicrographers in the world, each with their own unique specialization or style; like artists, they present to us their own interpretations of microscopic objects, using various techniques, such as two-photon excitation microscopy, which “provides distinct advantages for three-dimensional imaging”. This process is used for “imaging of living cells, especially within intact tissues such as brain slices, embryos, whole organs, and even entire animals”, making Dr. Paul Appleton’s pictures both studies of biological components of organisms, but also aesthetically, vibrant, geometric abstractions. 
Claudia Buttera creates similar pieces, most of them cells under stress, and frames them to be placed in a gallery setting, where both the science of the subject and aesthetic of the overall piece is appreciated for as a work of art. The muse is nature, the artist Buttera.
Nikola Rahme moves slightly further away from the subjects, revealing the actual features and body parts of wasps and beetles, instead of merely the puzzle pieces of their anatomy known as cells. Works such as Rahme’s help viewers put a ‘face’ to the cluster of shapes that the aforementioned photomicrographers capture.

-Anna Paluch

Taking A Closer Look: Photomicrography

Photography has been used for decades to capture the images that we see with our eyes, but, it can also help us to see things that we could never see with just the naked eye.

Photomicrographers are those who photograph the microscopic world around us. With the help of special cameras, we can now see cell nuclei or the intestines of fruit flies if we so wanted to. There are hundreds of photomicrographers in the world, each with their own unique specialization or style; like artists, they present to us their own interpretations of microscopic objects, using various techniques, such as two-photon excitation microscopy, which “provides distinct advantages for three-dimensional imaging”. This process is used for “imaging of living cells, especially within intact tissues such as brain slices, embryos, whole organs, and even entire animals”, making Dr. Paul Appleton’s pictures both studies of biological components of organisms, but also aesthetically, vibrant, geometric abstractions.

Claudia Buttera creates similar pieces, most of them cells under stress, and frames them to be placed in a gallery setting, where both the science of the subject and aesthetic of the overall piece is appreciated for as a work of art. The muse is nature, the artist Buttera.

Nikola Rahme moves slightly further away from the subjects, revealing the actual features and body parts of wasps and beetles, instead of merely the puzzle pieces of their anatomy known as cells. Works such as Rahme’s help viewers put a ‘face’ to the cluster of shapes that the aforementioned photomicrographers capture.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ photomicrography cells science biology Microscopy microbiology nuclei photography Dr. Paul Appleton Claudia Buttera Nikola Rahme anna paluch art art and science journal
Fragile Viruses
Viruses are scary enough as small micro-organisms that we cannot see with the naked eye, but artist Luke Jerram takes these deadly microscopic agents, and blows them up, literally, as glass sculptures.
Instead of the usual cartoons found in textbooks, these viruses can be examined from various angles, to understand their structures better. Great detail is put into each piece, making the glass sculptures practically exact replicas. Aesthetically, the work is beautiful, and few would even know that what they are admiring are the structures of an HIV virus, E. coli or even Smallpox. 
The sculptures allow viewers to better understand, or at least to finally see for themselves, what attacks their immune (or other) systems, and especially what causes them to be sick. Of course, this does not mean that it will be easier to fight a virus if you know what it looks like, but for science, the sculptures are a great learning tool to understand the virus’ structures, and possibly even to recognize them better when looking under a microscope.
-Anna Paluch
Fragile Viruses
Viruses are scary enough as small micro-organisms that we cannot see with the naked eye, but artist Luke Jerram takes these deadly microscopic agents, and blows them up, literally, as glass sculptures.
Instead of the usual cartoons found in textbooks, these viruses can be examined from various angles, to understand their structures better. Great detail is put into each piece, making the glass sculptures practically exact replicas. Aesthetically, the work is beautiful, and few would even know that what they are admiring are the structures of an HIV virus, E. coli or even Smallpox. 
The sculptures allow viewers to better understand, or at least to finally see for themselves, what attacks their immune (or other) systems, and especially what causes them to be sick. Of course, this does not mean that it will be easier to fight a virus if you know what it looks like, but for science, the sculptures are a great learning tool to understand the virus’ structures, and possibly even to recognize them better when looking under a microscope.
-Anna Paluch

Fragile Viruses

Viruses are scary enough as small micro-organisms that we cannot see with the naked eye, but artist Luke Jerram takes these deadly microscopic agents, and blows them up, literally, as glass sculptures.

Instead of the usual cartoons found in textbooks, these viruses can be examined from various angles, to understand their structures better. Great detail is put into each piece, making the glass sculptures practically exact replicas. Aesthetically, the work is beautiful, and few would even know that what they are admiring are the structures of an HIV virus, E. coli or even Smallpox

The sculptures allow viewers to better understand, or at least to finally see for themselves, what attacks their immune (or other) systems, and especially what causes them to be sick. Of course, this does not mean that it will be easier to fight a virus if you know what it looks like, but for science, the sculptures are a great learning tool to understand the virus’ structures, and possibly even to recognize them better when looking under a microscope.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ Luke Jerram anna paluch science art viruses virus biology glass sculpture art and science journal
Inner Beauty
Our biological identity as art?
DNA 11 is a company that takes an individual’s DNA and transforms it into a print, which may be the most personal form of art. The minimalist composition of the image is a reflection of our complex cellular composition - our self-portrait.
Founders Adrian Salamunovic and Nazim Ahmed, best friends and innovators, wanted to create the most personalized art possible. Sending in your DNA, which is merely a cheek swab sample, gives you the options of having your DNA transformed into either black and white or coloured ‘portraits’. Lip and finger print ‘portraits’ are also options. Have a significant other? You can send up to four DNA samples to create a series of identity works. 
It may be a business and not an actual artist, but the concept of taking our literal, biological identity, and transforming it into an aesthetic piece, out of context, is pretty cool. Whether as a conversion piece or just out of love for your own being, the DNA 11 images are a creative alternative to the typical self-portrait or family photo.
-Anna Paluch

Inner Beauty

Our biological identity as art?

DNA 11 is a company that takes an individual’s DNA and transforms it into a print, which may be the most personal form of art. The minimalist composition of the image is a reflection of our complex cellular composition - our self-portrait.

Founders Adrian Salamunovic and Nazim Ahmed, best friends and innovators, wanted to create the most personalized art possible. Sending in your DNA, which is merely a cheek swab sample, gives you the options of having your DNA transformed into either black and white or coloured ‘portraits’. Lip and finger print ‘portraits’ are also options. Have a significant other? You can send up to four DNA samples to create a series of identity works. 

It may be a business and not an actual artist, but the concept of taking our literal, biological identity, and transforming it into an aesthetic piece, out of context, is pretty cool. Whether as a conversion piece or just out of love for your own being, the DNA 11 images are a creative alternative to the typical self-portrait or family photo.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

dna dna 11 biology identity anna paluch art science art and science journal
Wildlife: Queer Zoology
Humboldt Magnussen invites us into “Wildlife: Queer Zoology” by asking that we don animal masks he has painstakingly silkscreened. Caribou, Penguin, Walrus, and Giraffe – the masks suggest we adopt new animal identities for the opening evening, adorn ourselves with new costumes that challenge the boundaries of nature and culture.
The show questions the rhetoric of queer sexuality’s natural- (or unnatural-)ness. Responding to right-wing-evangelical claims that queer sexualities and non-gender-conforming identities are unnatural, Magnussen’s exhibition features the work of seven artists who challenge this notion.
Alexis Boyle’s coil of rope snakes refers to recent research finding that male snakes which emit both male and female hormones are seen the most desirable mates, attracting frenzied attention resulting in a tangled “mating ball.” This finding suggests that long-held ideas about sexuality among animals are perhaps more politically convenient than accurate. Boyle’s work reexamines queerness in both animal and human worlds by emphasizing the degree to which the gender binary is constructed by social norms, rather than hard science.Gustavo Cerquera Benjumea’s tongue-in-cheek sculpture plays the part of a good-luck charm (a dried llama fetus), designed to protect Videofag from homophobia and transphobia. A certificate of authenticity purportedly from the Bolivian and Columbian embassies accompanies it on the wall. Benjumea’s sculpture provides a complex mixing ground for preconceptions about both culture and sexuality, and hints at the magical, rather than strictly scientific, role of the animal.Danielle Nicole Smith’s high-femme bejeweled works look at the parallel spaces of domesticity and domestication, pairing an image of a kitten captioned “Lady Love,” aside a sparkly text collage spelling out her girlfriend’s affectionate nickname. Meanwhile, Corinne Teed’s labourious drawing and collage works represent ambiguous human and animal sexual behaviours. In Negotiations, Teed fills the necks of two deer, antlers entangled, with images of women wrestling in the nude. The work manifests a tension between violence and tenderness, competition and play, sex and dominance. Michael Rennick’s work refers to queer use of animal metaphor, with careful and precious paintings of individual animals (wolf, pig, otter, and bear) on underwear which has been subsequently ripped up by his dog. Mary Tremonte’s silkscreened hankies serve a similar function, charting queer self-identifying gestures through the language of the animal kingdom. Her serigraph prints document instances of queerness in the animal world, and include the story of Roy and Silo, two male chinstrap penguins at the Central Park Zoo who nested together in 1998, first caring for an egg-shaped rock, and finally hatching an adoptive egg. Together, the works in the show highlight the ecologies of queerness, and present scientific and inventive potential for worlds of human and animal identity not bound by dichotomy.-Alison Cooley
Wildlife: Queer Zoology
Humboldt Magnussen invites us into “Wildlife: Queer Zoology” by asking that we don animal masks he has painstakingly silkscreened. Caribou, Penguin, Walrus, and Giraffe – the masks suggest we adopt new animal identities for the opening evening, adorn ourselves with new costumes that challenge the boundaries of nature and culture.
The show questions the rhetoric of queer sexuality’s natural- (or unnatural-)ness. Responding to right-wing-evangelical claims that queer sexualities and non-gender-conforming identities are unnatural, Magnussen’s exhibition features the work of seven artists who challenge this notion.
Alexis Boyle’s coil of rope snakes refers to recent research finding that male snakes which emit both male and female hormones are seen the most desirable mates, attracting frenzied attention resulting in a tangled “mating ball.” This finding suggests that long-held ideas about sexuality among animals are perhaps more politically convenient than accurate. Boyle’s work reexamines queerness in both animal and human worlds by emphasizing the degree to which the gender binary is constructed by social norms, rather than hard science.Gustavo Cerquera Benjumea’s tongue-in-cheek sculpture plays the part of a good-luck charm (a dried llama fetus), designed to protect Videofag from homophobia and transphobia. A certificate of authenticity purportedly from the Bolivian and Columbian embassies accompanies it on the wall. Benjumea’s sculpture provides a complex mixing ground for preconceptions about both culture and sexuality, and hints at the magical, rather than strictly scientific, role of the animal.Danielle Nicole Smith’s high-femme bejeweled works look at the parallel spaces of domesticity and domestication, pairing an image of a kitten captioned “Lady Love,” aside a sparkly text collage spelling out her girlfriend’s affectionate nickname. Meanwhile, Corinne Teed’s labourious drawing and collage works represent ambiguous human and animal sexual behaviours. In Negotiations, Teed fills the necks of two deer, antlers entangled, with images of women wrestling in the nude. The work manifests a tension between violence and tenderness, competition and play, sex and dominance. Michael Rennick’s work refers to queer use of animal metaphor, with careful and precious paintings of individual animals (wolf, pig, otter, and bear) on underwear which has been subsequently ripped up by his dog. Mary Tremonte’s silkscreened hankies serve a similar function, charting queer self-identifying gestures through the language of the animal kingdom. Her serigraph prints document instances of queerness in the animal world, and include the story of Roy and Silo, two male chinstrap penguins at the Central Park Zoo who nested together in 1998, first caring for an egg-shaped rock, and finally hatching an adoptive egg. Together, the works in the show highlight the ecologies of queerness, and present scientific and inventive potential for worlds of human and animal identity not bound by dichotomy.-Alison Cooley
Wildlife: Queer Zoology
Humboldt Magnussen invites us into “Wildlife: Queer Zoology” by asking that we don animal masks he has painstakingly silkscreened. Caribou, Penguin, Walrus, and Giraffe – the masks suggest we adopt new animal identities for the opening evening, adorn ourselves with new costumes that challenge the boundaries of nature and culture.
The show questions the rhetoric of queer sexuality’s natural- (or unnatural-)ness. Responding to right-wing-evangelical claims that queer sexualities and non-gender-conforming identities are unnatural, Magnussen’s exhibition features the work of seven artists who challenge this notion.
Alexis Boyle’s coil of rope snakes refers to recent research finding that male snakes which emit both male and female hormones are seen the most desirable mates, attracting frenzied attention resulting in a tangled “mating ball.” This finding suggests that long-held ideas about sexuality among animals are perhaps more politically convenient than accurate. Boyle’s work reexamines queerness in both animal and human worlds by emphasizing the degree to which the gender binary is constructed by social norms, rather than hard science.Gustavo Cerquera Benjumea’s tongue-in-cheek sculpture plays the part of a good-luck charm (a dried llama fetus), designed to protect Videofag from homophobia and transphobia. A certificate of authenticity purportedly from the Bolivian and Columbian embassies accompanies it on the wall. Benjumea’s sculpture provides a complex mixing ground for preconceptions about both culture and sexuality, and hints at the magical, rather than strictly scientific, role of the animal.Danielle Nicole Smith’s high-femme bejeweled works look at the parallel spaces of domesticity and domestication, pairing an image of a kitten captioned “Lady Love,” aside a sparkly text collage spelling out her girlfriend’s affectionate nickname. Meanwhile, Corinne Teed’s labourious drawing and collage works represent ambiguous human and animal sexual behaviours. In Negotiations, Teed fills the necks of two deer, antlers entangled, with images of women wrestling in the nude. The work manifests a tension between violence and tenderness, competition and play, sex and dominance. Michael Rennick’s work refers to queer use of animal metaphor, with careful and precious paintings of individual animals (wolf, pig, otter, and bear) on underwear which has been subsequently ripped up by his dog. Mary Tremonte’s silkscreened hankies serve a similar function, charting queer self-identifying gestures through the language of the animal kingdom. Her serigraph prints document instances of queerness in the animal world, and include the story of Roy and Silo, two male chinstrap penguins at the Central Park Zoo who nested together in 1998, first caring for an egg-shaped rock, and finally hatching an adoptive egg. Together, the works in the show highlight the ecologies of queerness, and present scientific and inventive potential for worlds of human and animal identity not bound by dichotomy.-Alison Cooley
Wildlife: Queer Zoology
Humboldt Magnussen invites us into “Wildlife: Queer Zoology” by asking that we don animal masks he has painstakingly silkscreened. Caribou, Penguin, Walrus, and Giraffe – the masks suggest we adopt new animal identities for the opening evening, adorn ourselves with new costumes that challenge the boundaries of nature and culture.
The show questions the rhetoric of queer sexuality’s natural- (or unnatural-)ness. Responding to right-wing-evangelical claims that queer sexualities and non-gender-conforming identities are unnatural, Magnussen’s exhibition features the work of seven artists who challenge this notion.
Alexis Boyle’s coil of rope snakes refers to recent research finding that male snakes which emit both male and female hormones are seen the most desirable mates, attracting frenzied attention resulting in a tangled “mating ball.” This finding suggests that long-held ideas about sexuality among animals are perhaps more politically convenient than accurate. Boyle’s work reexamines queerness in both animal and human worlds by emphasizing the degree to which the gender binary is constructed by social norms, rather than hard science.Gustavo Cerquera Benjumea’s tongue-in-cheek sculpture plays the part of a good-luck charm (a dried llama fetus), designed to protect Videofag from homophobia and transphobia. A certificate of authenticity purportedly from the Bolivian and Columbian embassies accompanies it on the wall. Benjumea’s sculpture provides a complex mixing ground for preconceptions about both culture and sexuality, and hints at the magical, rather than strictly scientific, role of the animal.Danielle Nicole Smith’s high-femme bejeweled works look at the parallel spaces of domesticity and domestication, pairing an image of a kitten captioned “Lady Love,” aside a sparkly text collage spelling out her girlfriend’s affectionate nickname. Meanwhile, Corinne Teed’s labourious drawing and collage works represent ambiguous human and animal sexual behaviours. In Negotiations, Teed fills the necks of two deer, antlers entangled, with images of women wrestling in the nude. The work manifests a tension between violence and tenderness, competition and play, sex and dominance. Michael Rennick’s work refers to queer use of animal metaphor, with careful and precious paintings of individual animals (wolf, pig, otter, and bear) on underwear which has been subsequently ripped up by his dog. Mary Tremonte’s silkscreened hankies serve a similar function, charting queer self-identifying gestures through the language of the animal kingdom. Her serigraph prints document instances of queerness in the animal world, and include the story of Roy and Silo, two male chinstrap penguins at the Central Park Zoo who nested together in 1998, first caring for an egg-shaped rock, and finally hatching an adoptive egg. Together, the works in the show highlight the ecologies of queerness, and present scientific and inventive potential for worlds of human and animal identity not bound by dichotomy.-Alison Cooley
Wildlife: Queer Zoology
Humboldt Magnussen invites us into “Wildlife: Queer Zoology” by asking that we don animal masks he has painstakingly silkscreened. Caribou, Penguin, Walrus, and Giraffe – the masks suggest we adopt new animal identities for the opening evening, adorn ourselves with new costumes that challenge the boundaries of nature and culture.
The show questions the rhetoric of queer sexuality’s natural- (or unnatural-)ness. Responding to right-wing-evangelical claims that queer sexualities and non-gender-conforming identities are unnatural, Magnussen’s exhibition features the work of seven artists who challenge this notion.
Alexis Boyle’s coil of rope snakes refers to recent research finding that male snakes which emit both male and female hormones are seen the most desirable mates, attracting frenzied attention resulting in a tangled “mating ball.” This finding suggests that long-held ideas about sexuality among animals are perhaps more politically convenient than accurate. Boyle’s work reexamines queerness in both animal and human worlds by emphasizing the degree to which the gender binary is constructed by social norms, rather than hard science.Gustavo Cerquera Benjumea’s tongue-in-cheek sculpture plays the part of a good-luck charm (a dried llama fetus), designed to protect Videofag from homophobia and transphobia. A certificate of authenticity purportedly from the Bolivian and Columbian embassies accompanies it on the wall. Benjumea’s sculpture provides a complex mixing ground for preconceptions about both culture and sexuality, and hints at the magical, rather than strictly scientific, role of the animal.Danielle Nicole Smith’s high-femme bejeweled works look at the parallel spaces of domesticity and domestication, pairing an image of a kitten captioned “Lady Love,” aside a sparkly text collage spelling out her girlfriend’s affectionate nickname. Meanwhile, Corinne Teed’s labourious drawing and collage works represent ambiguous human and animal sexual behaviours. In Negotiations, Teed fills the necks of two deer, antlers entangled, with images of women wrestling in the nude. The work manifests a tension between violence and tenderness, competition and play, sex and dominance. Michael Rennick’s work refers to queer use of animal metaphor, with careful and precious paintings of individual animals (wolf, pig, otter, and bear) on underwear which has been subsequently ripped up by his dog. Mary Tremonte’s silkscreened hankies serve a similar function, charting queer self-identifying gestures through the language of the animal kingdom. Her serigraph prints document instances of queerness in the animal world, and include the story of Roy and Silo, two male chinstrap penguins at the Central Park Zoo who nested together in 1998, first caring for an egg-shaped rock, and finally hatching an adoptive egg. Together, the works in the show highlight the ecologies of queerness, and present scientific and inventive potential for worlds of human and animal identity not bound by dichotomy.-Alison Cooley
Wildlife: Queer Zoology
Humboldt Magnussen invites us into “Wildlife: Queer Zoology” by asking that we don animal masks he has painstakingly silkscreened. Caribou, Penguin, Walrus, and Giraffe – the masks suggest we adopt new animal identities for the opening evening, adorn ourselves with new costumes that challenge the boundaries of nature and culture.
The show questions the rhetoric of queer sexuality’s natural- (or unnatural-)ness. Responding to right-wing-evangelical claims that queer sexualities and non-gender-conforming identities are unnatural, Magnussen’s exhibition features the work of seven artists who challenge this notion.
Alexis Boyle’s coil of rope snakes refers to recent research finding that male snakes which emit both male and female hormones are seen the most desirable mates, attracting frenzied attention resulting in a tangled “mating ball.” This finding suggests that long-held ideas about sexuality among animals are perhaps more politically convenient than accurate. Boyle’s work reexamines queerness in both animal and human worlds by emphasizing the degree to which the gender binary is constructed by social norms, rather than hard science.Gustavo Cerquera Benjumea’s tongue-in-cheek sculpture plays the part of a good-luck charm (a dried llama fetus), designed to protect Videofag from homophobia and transphobia. A certificate of authenticity purportedly from the Bolivian and Columbian embassies accompanies it on the wall. Benjumea’s sculpture provides a complex mixing ground for preconceptions about both culture and sexuality, and hints at the magical, rather than strictly scientific, role of the animal.Danielle Nicole Smith’s high-femme bejeweled works look at the parallel spaces of domesticity and domestication, pairing an image of a kitten captioned “Lady Love,” aside a sparkly text collage spelling out her girlfriend’s affectionate nickname. Meanwhile, Corinne Teed’s labourious drawing and collage works represent ambiguous human and animal sexual behaviours. In Negotiations, Teed fills the necks of two deer, antlers entangled, with images of women wrestling in the nude. The work manifests a tension between violence and tenderness, competition and play, sex and dominance. Michael Rennick’s work refers to queer use of animal metaphor, with careful and precious paintings of individual animals (wolf, pig, otter, and bear) on underwear which has been subsequently ripped up by his dog. Mary Tremonte’s silkscreened hankies serve a similar function, charting queer self-identifying gestures through the language of the animal kingdom. Her serigraph prints document instances of queerness in the animal world, and include the story of Roy and Silo, two male chinstrap penguins at the Central Park Zoo who nested together in 1998, first caring for an egg-shaped rock, and finally hatching an adoptive egg. Together, the works in the show highlight the ecologies of queerness, and present scientific and inventive potential for worlds of human and animal identity not bound by dichotomy.-Alison Cooley

Wildlife: Queer Zoology

Humboldt Magnussen invites us into “Wildlife: Queer Zoology” by asking that we don animal masks he has painstakingly silkscreened. Caribou, Penguin, Walrus, and Giraffe – the masks suggest we adopt new animal identities for the opening evening, adorn ourselves with new costumes that challenge the boundaries of nature and culture.

The show questions the rhetoric of queer sexuality’s natural- (or unnatural-)ness. Responding to right-wing-evangelical claims that queer sexualities and non-gender-conforming identities are unnatural, Magnussen’s exhibition features the work of seven artists who challenge this notion.

Alexis Boyle’s coil of rope snakes refers to recent research finding that male snakes which emit both male and female hormones are seen the most desirable mates, attracting frenzied attention resulting in a tangled “mating ball.” This finding suggests that long-held ideas about sexuality among animals are perhaps more politically convenient than accurate. Boyle’s work reexamines queerness in both animal and human worlds by emphasizing the degree to which the gender binary is constructed by social norms, rather than hard science.

Gustavo Cerquera Benjumea’s tongue-in-cheek sculpture plays the part of a good-luck charm (a dried llama fetus), designed to protect Videofag from homophobia and transphobia. A certificate of authenticity purportedly from the Bolivian and Columbian embassies accompanies it on the wall. Benjumea’s sculpture provides a complex mixing ground for preconceptions about both culture and sexuality, and hints at the magical, rather than strictly scientific, role of the animal.

Danielle Nicole Smith’s high-femme bejeweled works look at the parallel spaces of domesticity and domestication, pairing an image of a kitten captioned “Lady Love,” aside a sparkly text collage spelling out her girlfriend’s affectionate nickname. Meanwhile, Corinne Teed’s labourious drawing and collage works represent ambiguous human and animal sexual behaviours. In Negotiations, Teed fills the necks of two deer, antlers entangled, with images of women wrestling in the nude. The work manifests a tension between violence and tenderness, competition and play, sex and dominance.

Michael Rennick’s work refers to queer use of animal metaphor, with careful and precious paintings of individual animals (wolf, pig, otter, and bear) on underwear which has been subsequently ripped up by his dog. Mary Tremonte’s silkscreened hankies serve a similar function, charting queer self-identifying gestures through the language of the animal kingdom. Her serigraph prints document instances of queerness in the animal world, and include the story of Roy and Silo, two male chinstrap penguins at the Central Park Zoo who nested together in 1998, first caring for an egg-shaped rock, and finally hatching an adoptive egg. Together, the works in the show highlight the ecologies of queerness, and present scientific and inventive potential for worlds of human and animal identity not bound by dichotomy.

-Alison Cooley

6 Photos
/ humboldt magnussen alexis boyle mary tremonte michael rennick corinne teed danielle nicole smith gustavo cerquera benjumea queer zoology videofag art toronto ecology sexuality nature biology science canada
Body of Constructs

The sculptural works of James Roper are assembled in a way that they almost look like exploding micro-organisms, frozen in time. His work Construct which is part of his greater installation work Chaosmos II (2011) and Into the Fold (2005-2008) seems to play on the ideas of chaos within the vast microbiological world. Many of Roper’s works focus on the complex structures of the human body, by assembling small triangular pieces, to create a spherical shape, which is then combined to create a larger shape. This process is reminiscent of fractals, starting from small basic shapes, evolving into a more defined concept.
The artwork is a burst of energy, a quality often found in the artists’ works. The spontaneity of composition and colour, play with possibilities; is this random representation of form, or could it be a leaf cell, a human cell, maybe even a rock molecule?
-Anna Paluch
Body of Constructs

The sculptural works of James Roper are assembled in a way that they almost look like exploding micro-organisms, frozen in time. His work Construct which is part of his greater installation work Chaosmos II (2011) and Into the Fold (2005-2008) seems to play on the ideas of chaos within the vast microbiological world. Many of Roper’s works focus on the complex structures of the human body, by assembling small triangular pieces, to create a spherical shape, which is then combined to create a larger shape. This process is reminiscent of fractals, starting from small basic shapes, evolving into a more defined concept.
The artwork is a burst of energy, a quality often found in the artists’ works. The spontaneity of composition and colour, play with possibilities; is this random representation of form, or could it be a leaf cell, a human cell, maybe even a rock molecule?
-Anna Paluch

Body of Constructs

The sculptural works of James Roper are assembled in a way that they almost look like exploding micro-organisms, frozen in time. His work Construct which is part of his greater installation work Chaosmos II (2011) and Into the Fold (2005-2008) seems to play on the ideas of chaos within the vast microbiological world. Many of Roper’s works focus on the complex structures of the human body, by assembling small triangular pieces, to create a spherical shape, which is then combined to create a larger shape. This process is reminiscent of fractals, starting from small basic shapes, evolving into a more defined concept.

The artwork is a burst of energy, a quality often found in the artists’ works. The spontaneity of composition and colour, play with possibilities; is this random representation of form, or could it be a leaf cell, a human cell, maybe even a rock molecule?

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ anna paluch james roper fractal cells sculpture biology micro-organism human body art science art and science journal
God’s Prototype by Ian Crawley
As if ‘playing God’ artist Ian Crawley is taking found objects in nature, such as stones, sticks and moss, to recreate the human body. Humorously, the artist describes these pieces as what he imagined God’s first ‘sketches’ or prototypes of the human body would look like, with the materials that were available.
But this work isn’t focusing on Creationism or who (or what) created whom, but the connection we as humans have to nature. Reflecting on the natural-made versus man-made. These natural objects have always been used by humans to sustain them us nutrition, or protect them us weapons. Even though we now have processed foods and more advanced weaponry, there is still a need for natural objects. We need trees for oxygen, don’t we? Coexistence is the main theme in this work.
In the end, God’s Prototype is there to remind us that we aren’t above or below stones, sticks, and plants. We are part of the same level of natural objects, and though we’re made out of flesh and not leaves, we’re still as natural as a leaf or a rock. 
-Anna Paluch

God’s Prototype by Ian Crawley


As if ‘playing God’ artist
Ian Crawley is taking found objects in nature, such as stones, sticks and moss, to recreate the human body. Humorously, the artist describes these pieces as what he imagined God’s first ‘sketches’ or prototypes of the human body would look like, with the materials that were available.

But this work isn’t focusing on Creationism or who (or what) created whom, but the connection we as humans have to nature. Reflecting on the natural-made versus man-made. These natural objects have always been used by humans to sustain them us nutrition, or protect them us weapons. Even though we now have processed foods and more advanced weaponry, there is still a need for natural objects. We need trees for oxygen, don’t we? Coexistence is the main theme in this work.

In the end, God’s Prototype is there to remind us that we aren’t above or below stones, sticks, and plants. We are part of the same level of natural objects, and though we’re made out of flesh and not leaves, we’re still as natural as a leaf or a rock. 

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

anna paluch ian crawley biology nature plants rocks art science art and science journal
Julia Buntaine
Bio-artist Julia Buntaine’s work juxtaposes the familiar with the unfamiliar - playful colors, subway maps, model high-rises, and simple wooden blocks. But look again and you see a world designed around aspects of biology and neuroscience. For Buntaine, this began as a fascination with psychology and mental illness that was broadened by studying biology in college. Her work aims to draw in those interested in the aesthetics of colors, maps, and shapes, but leave them with the same colorful and bright interest in neuroscience that Buntaine, herself, began with.
Her works have been inspired by fMRI images, circuit diagrams, and anatomical structures. One particular inspiration is the Brodmann map – a way of mapping the sections of the brain using color and numbers, making the brain look like a topographical surface that could potentially translate into a large space of land. Buntaine’s work brings this potential to life in her brain-city sculptures. Her pieces, such as those shown here, often use a biological shape made from diagrams depicting cities, thus symbolizing vast space inside the body and mind, and human-made achievements.
- Alinta Krauth
Julia Buntaine
Bio-artist Julia Buntaine’s work juxtaposes the familiar with the unfamiliar - playful colors, subway maps, model high-rises, and simple wooden blocks. But look again and you see a world designed around aspects of biology and neuroscience. For Buntaine, this began as a fascination with psychology and mental illness that was broadened by studying biology in college. Her work aims to draw in those interested in the aesthetics of colors, maps, and shapes, but leave them with the same colorful and bright interest in neuroscience that Buntaine, herself, began with.
Her works have been inspired by fMRI images, circuit diagrams, and anatomical structures. One particular inspiration is the Brodmann map – a way of mapping the sections of the brain using color and numbers, making the brain look like a topographical surface that could potentially translate into a large space of land. Buntaine’s work brings this potential to life in her brain-city sculptures. Her pieces, such as those shown here, often use a biological shape made from diagrams depicting cities, thus symbolizing vast space inside the body and mind, and human-made achievements.
- Alinta Krauth
Julia Buntaine
Bio-artist Julia Buntaine’s work juxtaposes the familiar with the unfamiliar - playful colors, subway maps, model high-rises, and simple wooden blocks. But look again and you see a world designed around aspects of biology and neuroscience. For Buntaine, this began as a fascination with psychology and mental illness that was broadened by studying biology in college. Her work aims to draw in those interested in the aesthetics of colors, maps, and shapes, but leave them with the same colorful and bright interest in neuroscience that Buntaine, herself, began with.
Her works have been inspired by fMRI images, circuit diagrams, and anatomical structures. One particular inspiration is the Brodmann map – a way of mapping the sections of the brain using color and numbers, making the brain look like a topographical surface that could potentially translate into a large space of land. Buntaine’s work brings this potential to life in her brain-city sculptures. Her pieces, such as those shown here, often use a biological shape made from diagrams depicting cities, thus symbolizing vast space inside the body and mind, and human-made achievements.
- Alinta Krauth

Julia Buntaine

Bio-artist Julia Buntaine’s work juxtaposes the familiar with the unfamiliar - playful colors, subway maps, model high-rises, and simple wooden blocks. But look again and you see a world designed around aspects of biology and neuroscience. For Buntaine, this began as a fascination with psychology and mental illness that was broadened by studying biology in college. Her work aims to draw in those interested in the aesthetics of colors, maps, and shapes, but leave them with the same colorful and bright interest in neuroscience that Buntaine, herself, began with.

Her works have been inspired by fMRI images, circuit diagrams, and anatomical structures. One particular inspiration is the Brodmann map – a way of mapping the sections of the brain using color and numbers, making the brain look like a topographical surface that could potentially translate into a large space of land. Buntaine’s work brings this potential to life in her brain-city sculptures. Her pieces, such as those shown here, often use a biological shape made from diagrams depicting cities, thus symbolizing vast space inside the body and mind, and human-made achievements.

- Alinta Krauth

3 Photos
/ art science biology neuroscience mental health julia buntaine alinta krauth

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