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Aram Bartholl’s Google Portrait Series
Aram Bartholl’s hand-copied QR codes are portraits for the digital age. Made from different drawing media like charcoal, ink, and edding, Bartholl has artistically rendered what is now a very familiar form of information storage. Each of these portraits is encrypted with search results for the sitter’s name; the code is in this way a portal to the subject’s digital presence. Of course, these search results are ever-changing as Bartholl’s subjects continue to add to their digital biographies while also competing with others who share their name. These portraits begin to tap into a kind of acute cultural anxiety: that we must maintain a web-based existence to verify our physical one. Bartholl writes:
“Almost everyone can be found by name on Google nowadays. Even people who never used computers can be found because their names appear in scanned books on the internet. Almost everybody has at least once googled himself. ‘Ego-surfing’ is a very popular way to see what people find out about you googling your name. In that way the first 10 entries of a Google search result page represent the modern portrait. Who is this person? In what context does the name appear? What are the top links? Are there other people with same or similar name in the results? The portrait dynamically changes over time depending on the Google algorithms, the language of the search and of course by the activities of the person. Due to the omnipresence of Google people often care very much about their Google portrait and sometimes even hire specialized services to have the result page altered ‘actively’.”
Naturally, Bartholl makes sure to underscore the narcissism inherent in the act of Googling oneself by including a self-portrait in the series.
For more of Bartholl’s work — including his incredible Map work and a recent curatorial project called Offline Art — see his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Aram Bartholl’s Google Portrait Series
Aram Bartholl’s hand-copied QR codes are portraits for the digital age. Made from different drawing media like charcoal, ink, and edding, Bartholl has artistically rendered what is now a very familiar form of information storage. Each of these portraits is encrypted with search results for the sitter’s name; the code is in this way a portal to the subject’s digital presence. Of course, these search results are ever-changing as Bartholl’s subjects continue to add to their digital biographies while also competing with others who share their name. These portraits begin to tap into a kind of acute cultural anxiety: that we must maintain a web-based existence to verify our physical one. Bartholl writes:
“Almost everyone can be found by name on Google nowadays. Even people who never used computers can be found because their names appear in scanned books on the internet. Almost everybody has at least once googled himself. ‘Ego-surfing’ is a very popular way to see what people find out about you googling your name. In that way the first 10 entries of a Google search result page represent the modern portrait. Who is this person? In what context does the name appear? What are the top links? Are there other people with same or similar name in the results? The portrait dynamically changes over time depending on the Google algorithms, the language of the search and of course by the activities of the person. Due to the omnipresence of Google people often care very much about their Google portrait and sometimes even hire specialized services to have the result page altered ‘actively’.”
Naturally, Bartholl makes sure to underscore the narcissism inherent in the act of Googling oneself by including a self-portrait in the series.
For more of Bartholl’s work — including his incredible Map work and a recent curatorial project called Offline Art — see his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Aram Bartholl’s Google Portrait Series
Aram Bartholl’s hand-copied QR codes are portraits for the digital age. Made from different drawing media like charcoal, ink, and edding, Bartholl has artistically rendered what is now a very familiar form of information storage. Each of these portraits is encrypted with search results for the sitter’s name; the code is in this way a portal to the subject’s digital presence. Of course, these search results are ever-changing as Bartholl’s subjects continue to add to their digital biographies while also competing with others who share their name. These portraits begin to tap into a kind of acute cultural anxiety: that we must maintain a web-based existence to verify our physical one. Bartholl writes:
“Almost everyone can be found by name on Google nowadays. Even people who never used computers can be found because their names appear in scanned books on the internet. Almost everybody has at least once googled himself. ‘Ego-surfing’ is a very popular way to see what people find out about you googling your name. In that way the first 10 entries of a Google search result page represent the modern portrait. Who is this person? In what context does the name appear? What are the top links? Are there other people with same or similar name in the results? The portrait dynamically changes over time depending on the Google algorithms, the language of the search and of course by the activities of the person. Due to the omnipresence of Google people often care very much about their Google portrait and sometimes even hire specialized services to have the result page altered ‘actively’.”
Naturally, Bartholl makes sure to underscore the narcissism inherent in the act of Googling oneself by including a self-portrait in the series.
For more of Bartholl’s work — including his incredible Map work and a recent curatorial project called Offline Art — see his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Aram Bartholl’s Google Portrait Series
Aram Bartholl’s hand-copied QR codes are portraits for the digital age. Made from different drawing media like charcoal, ink, and edding, Bartholl has artistically rendered what is now a very familiar form of information storage. Each of these portraits is encrypted with search results for the sitter’s name; the code is in this way a portal to the subject’s digital presence. Of course, these search results are ever-changing as Bartholl’s subjects continue to add to their digital biographies while also competing with others who share their name. These portraits begin to tap into a kind of acute cultural anxiety: that we must maintain a web-based existence to verify our physical one. Bartholl writes:
“Almost everyone can be found by name on Google nowadays. Even people who never used computers can be found because their names appear in scanned books on the internet. Almost everybody has at least once googled himself. ‘Ego-surfing’ is a very popular way to see what people find out about you googling your name. In that way the first 10 entries of a Google search result page represent the modern portrait. Who is this person? In what context does the name appear? What are the top links? Are there other people with same or similar name in the results? The portrait dynamically changes over time depending on the Google algorithms, the language of the search and of course by the activities of the person. Due to the omnipresence of Google people often care very much about their Google portrait and sometimes even hire specialized services to have the result page altered ‘actively’.”
Naturally, Bartholl makes sure to underscore the narcissism inherent in the act of Googling oneself by including a self-portrait in the series.
For more of Bartholl’s work — including his incredible Map work and a recent curatorial project called Offline Art — see his website here.
- Erin Saunders

Aram Bartholl’s Google Portrait Series


Aram Bartholl’s hand-copied QR codes are portraits for the digital age. Made from different drawing media like charcoal, ink, and edding, Bartholl has artistically rendered what is now a very familiar form of information storage. Each of these portraits is encrypted with search results for the sitter’s name; the code is in this way a portal to the subject’s digital presence. Of course, these search results are ever-changing as Bartholl’s subjects continue to add to their digital biographies while also competing with others who share their name. These portraits begin to tap into a kind of acute cultural anxiety: that we must maintain a web-based existence to verify our physical one. Bartholl writes:

Almost everyone can be found by name on Google nowadays. Even people who never used computers can be found because their names appear in scanned books on the internet. Almost everybody has at least once googled himself. ‘Ego-surfing’ is a very popular way to see what people find out about you googling your name. In that way the first 10 entries of a Google search result page represent the modern portrait. Who is this person? In what context does the name appear? What are the top links? Are there other people with same or similar name in the results? The portrait dynamically changes over time depending on the Google algorithms, the language of the search and of course by the activities of the person. Due to the omnipresence of Google people often care very much about their Google portrait and sometimes even hire specialized services to have the result page altered ‘actively’.”

Naturally, Bartholl makes sure to underscore the narcissism inherent in the act of Googling oneself by including a self-portrait in the series.

For more of Bartholl’s work — including his incredible Map work and a recent curatorial project called Offline Art — see his website here.

- Erin Saunders

4 Photos
/ art black and white aram bartholl technology Google QR code portrait
Mårten Lange
In this series Another Language, photographer Mårten Lange focuses on the aesthetics of science and the world around us. As Lange states, “Another Language is a project about science, nature, the joy of exploration and the photographic impulse to catalogue the world.” What is interesting about this series is how, though Lange photographs a wide variety of subject matter, his works all seem to have the same texture and feeling to them. To see more of Lange’s work click here. To see his recently published book Another Language, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mårten Lange
In this series Another Language, photographer Mårten Lange focuses on the aesthetics of science and the world around us. As Lange states, “Another Language is a project about science, nature, the joy of exploration and the photographic impulse to catalogue the world.” What is interesting about this series is how, though Lange photographs a wide variety of subject matter, his works all seem to have the same texture and feeling to them. To see more of Lange’s work click here. To see his recently published book Another Language, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mårten Lange
In this series Another Language, photographer Mårten Lange focuses on the aesthetics of science and the world around us. As Lange states, “Another Language is a project about science, nature, the joy of exploration and the photographic impulse to catalogue the world.” What is interesting about this series is how, though Lange photographs a wide variety of subject matter, his works all seem to have the same texture and feeling to them. To see more of Lange’s work click here. To see his recently published book Another Language, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mårten Lange
In this series Another Language, photographer Mårten Lange focuses on the aesthetics of science and the world around us. As Lange states, “Another Language is a project about science, nature, the joy of exploration and the photographic impulse to catalogue the world.” What is interesting about this series is how, though Lange photographs a wide variety of subject matter, his works all seem to have the same texture and feeling to them. To see more of Lange’s work click here. To see his recently published book Another Language, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mårten Lange
In this series Another Language, photographer Mårten Lange focuses on the aesthetics of science and the world around us. As Lange states, “Another Language is a project about science, nature, the joy of exploration and the photographic impulse to catalogue the world.” What is interesting about this series is how, though Lange photographs a wide variety of subject matter, his works all seem to have the same texture and feeling to them. To see more of Lange’s work click here. To see his recently published book Another Language, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mårten Lange
In this series Another Language, photographer Mårten Lange focuses on the aesthetics of science and the world around us. As Lange states, “Another Language is a project about science, nature, the joy of exploration and the photographic impulse to catalogue the world.” What is interesting about this series is how, though Lange photographs a wide variety of subject matter, his works all seem to have the same texture and feeling to them. To see more of Lange’s work click here. To see his recently published book Another Language, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mårten Lange
In this series Another Language, photographer Mårten Lange focuses on the aesthetics of science and the world around us. As Lange states, “Another Language is a project about science, nature, the joy of exploration and the photographic impulse to catalogue the world.” What is interesting about this series is how, though Lange photographs a wide variety of subject matter, his works all seem to have the same texture and feeling to them. To see more of Lange’s work click here. To see his recently published book Another Language, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mårten Lange
In this series Another Language, photographer Mårten Lange focuses on the aesthetics of science and the world around us. As Lange states, “Another Language is a project about science, nature, the joy of exploration and the photographic impulse to catalogue the world.” What is interesting about this series is how, though Lange photographs a wide variety of subject matter, his works all seem to have the same texture and feeling to them. To see more of Lange’s work click here. To see his recently published book Another Language, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mårten Lange
In this series Another Language, photographer Mårten Lange focuses on the aesthetics of science and the world around us. As Lange states, “Another Language is a project about science, nature, the joy of exploration and the photographic impulse to catalogue the world.” What is interesting about this series is how, though Lange photographs a wide variety of subject matter, his works all seem to have the same texture and feeling to them. To see more of Lange’s work click here. To see his recently published book Another Language, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mårten Lange
In this series Another Language, photographer Mårten Lange focuses on the aesthetics of science and the world around us. As Lange states, “Another Language is a project about science, nature, the joy of exploration and the photographic impulse to catalogue the world.” What is interesting about this series is how, though Lange photographs a wide variety of subject matter, his works all seem to have the same texture and feeling to them. To see more of Lange’s work click here. To see his recently published book Another Language, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Tristan Perich’s Machine Drawings
These drawings by artist and musician Tristan Perich are made by a machine-powered pen. Perich, who considers the sometimes opposing principles of randomness and order his “raw materials,”  looks to create images born both of control and uncertainty. He describes his work:
"The machine creates pen drawings that have a mechanical precision. It can run indefinitely, usually creating works that would take multiple days of non-stop drawing…At the same time, the system itself is delicate. The final drawings have a nervousness of a pen that a computer simulation alone cannot emulate. It is this balance between the code and the pen that excites me most, for the drawings couldn’t be made without the code, and the code couldn’t create the drawings on its own."
Perich’s drawings in this way offer an artistic consideration of the limits of both technological, mechanical outputs and purely manual, human processes; what sort of potential exists between these two types of creation?
See more of Perich’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Tristan Perich’s Machine Drawings
These drawings by artist and musician Tristan Perich are made by a machine-powered pen. Perich, who considers the sometimes opposing principles of randomness and order his “raw materials,”  looks to create images born both of control and uncertainty. He describes his work:
"The machine creates pen drawings that have a mechanical precision. It can run indefinitely, usually creating works that would take multiple days of non-stop drawing…At the same time, the system itself is delicate. The final drawings have a nervousness of a pen that a computer simulation alone cannot emulate. It is this balance between the code and the pen that excites me most, for the drawings couldn’t be made without the code, and the code couldn’t create the drawings on its own."
Perich’s drawings in this way offer an artistic consideration of the limits of both technological, mechanical outputs and purely manual, human processes; what sort of potential exists between these two types of creation?
See more of Perich’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Tristan Perich’s Machine Drawings
These drawings by artist and musician Tristan Perich are made by a machine-powered pen. Perich, who considers the sometimes opposing principles of randomness and order his “raw materials,”  looks to create images born both of control and uncertainty. He describes his work:
"The machine creates pen drawings that have a mechanical precision. It can run indefinitely, usually creating works that would take multiple days of non-stop drawing…At the same time, the system itself is delicate. The final drawings have a nervousness of a pen that a computer simulation alone cannot emulate. It is this balance between the code and the pen that excites me most, for the drawings couldn’t be made without the code, and the code couldn’t create the drawings on its own."
Perich’s drawings in this way offer an artistic consideration of the limits of both technological, mechanical outputs and purely manual, human processes; what sort of potential exists between these two types of creation?
See more of Perich’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Tristan Perich’s Machine Drawings
These drawings by artist and musician Tristan Perich are made by a machine-powered pen. Perich, who considers the sometimes opposing principles of randomness and order his “raw materials,”  looks to create images born both of control and uncertainty. He describes his work:
"The machine creates pen drawings that have a mechanical precision. It can run indefinitely, usually creating works that would take multiple days of non-stop drawing…At the same time, the system itself is delicate. The final drawings have a nervousness of a pen that a computer simulation alone cannot emulate. It is this balance between the code and the pen that excites me most, for the drawings couldn’t be made without the code, and the code couldn’t create the drawings on its own."
Perich’s drawings in this way offer an artistic consideration of the limits of both technological, mechanical outputs and purely manual, human processes; what sort of potential exists between these two types of creation?
See more of Perich’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Tristan Perich’s Machine Drawings
These drawings by artist and musician Tristan Perich are made by a machine-powered pen. Perich, who considers the sometimes opposing principles of randomness and order his “raw materials,”  looks to create images born both of control and uncertainty. He describes his work:
"The machine creates pen drawings that have a mechanical precision. It can run indefinitely, usually creating works that would take multiple days of non-stop drawing…At the same time, the system itself is delicate. The final drawings have a nervousness of a pen that a computer simulation alone cannot emulate. It is this balance between the code and the pen that excites me most, for the drawings couldn’t be made without the code, and the code couldn’t create the drawings on its own."
Perich’s drawings in this way offer an artistic consideration of the limits of both technological, mechanical outputs and purely manual, human processes; what sort of potential exists between these two types of creation?
See more of Perich’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Tristan Perich’s Machine Drawings
These drawings by artist and musician Tristan Perich are made by a machine-powered pen. Perich, who considers the sometimes opposing principles of randomness and order his “raw materials,”  looks to create images born both of control and uncertainty. He describes his work:
"The machine creates pen drawings that have a mechanical precision. It can run indefinitely, usually creating works that would take multiple days of non-stop drawing…At the same time, the system itself is delicate. The final drawings have a nervousness of a pen that a computer simulation alone cannot emulate. It is this balance between the code and the pen that excites me most, for the drawings couldn’t be made without the code, and the code couldn’t create the drawings on its own."
Perich’s drawings in this way offer an artistic consideration of the limits of both technological, mechanical outputs and purely manual, human processes; what sort of potential exists between these two types of creation?
See more of Perich’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Tristan Perich’s Machine Drawings
These drawings by artist and musician Tristan Perich are made by a machine-powered pen. Perich, who considers the sometimes opposing principles of randomness and order his “raw materials,”  looks to create images born both of control and uncertainty. He describes his work:
"The machine creates pen drawings that have a mechanical precision. It can run indefinitely, usually creating works that would take multiple days of non-stop drawing…At the same time, the system itself is delicate. The final drawings have a nervousness of a pen that a computer simulation alone cannot emulate. It is this balance between the code and the pen that excites me most, for the drawings couldn’t be made without the code, and the code couldn’t create the drawings on its own."
Perich’s drawings in this way offer an artistic consideration of the limits of both technological, mechanical outputs and purely manual, human processes; what sort of potential exists between these two types of creation?
See more of Perich’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Tristan Perich’s Machine Drawings
These drawings by artist and musician Tristan Perich are made by a machine-powered pen. Perich, who considers the sometimes opposing principles of randomness and order his “raw materials,”  looks to create images born both of control and uncertainty. He describes his work:
"The machine creates pen drawings that have a mechanical precision. It can run indefinitely, usually creating works that would take multiple days of non-stop drawing…At the same time, the system itself is delicate. The final drawings have a nervousness of a pen that a computer simulation alone cannot emulate. It is this balance between the code and the pen that excites me most, for the drawings couldn’t be made without the code, and the code couldn’t create the drawings on its own."
Perich’s drawings in this way offer an artistic consideration of the limits of both technological, mechanical outputs and purely manual, human processes; what sort of potential exists between these two types of creation?
See more of Perich’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
David Arantes
These photographic prints by David Arantes remind us to look for hidden beauty in overlooked places. With his emphasis on the range of textures and contrasts present in nature – and their artistic potential — Arantes’s images are mysteriously arresting despite their more conventional subject-matter. 
See more of Arantes’s photographs at his tumblr here, and buy prints here.
- Erin Saunders
David Arantes
These photographic prints by David Arantes remind us to look for hidden beauty in overlooked places. With his emphasis on the range of textures and contrasts present in nature – and their artistic potential — Arantes’s images are mysteriously arresting despite their more conventional subject-matter. 
See more of Arantes’s photographs at his tumblr here, and buy prints here.
- Erin Saunders
David Arantes
These photographic prints by David Arantes remind us to look for hidden beauty in overlooked places. With his emphasis on the range of textures and contrasts present in nature – and their artistic potential — Arantes’s images are mysteriously arresting despite their more conventional subject-matter. 
See more of Arantes’s photographs at his tumblr here, and buy prints here.
- Erin Saunders
David Arantes
These photographic prints by David Arantes remind us to look for hidden beauty in overlooked places. With his emphasis on the range of textures and contrasts present in nature – and their artistic potential — Arantes’s images are mysteriously arresting despite their more conventional subject-matter. 
See more of Arantes’s photographs at his tumblr here, and buy prints here.
- Erin Saunders
David Arantes
These photographic prints by David Arantes remind us to look for hidden beauty in overlooked places. With his emphasis on the range of textures and contrasts present in nature – and their artistic potential — Arantes’s images are mysteriously arresting despite their more conventional subject-matter. 
See more of Arantes’s photographs at his tumblr here, and buy prints here.
- Erin Saunders
David Arantes
These photographic prints by David Arantes remind us to look for hidden beauty in overlooked places. With his emphasis on the range of textures and contrasts present in nature – and their artistic potential — Arantes’s images are mysteriously arresting despite their more conventional subject-matter. 
See more of Arantes’s photographs at his tumblr here, and buy prints here.
- Erin Saunders
David Arantes
These photographic prints by David Arantes remind us to look for hidden beauty in overlooked places. With his emphasis on the range of textures and contrasts present in nature – and their artistic potential — Arantes’s images are mysteriously arresting despite their more conventional subject-matter. 
See more of Arantes’s photographs at his tumblr here, and buy prints here.
- Erin Saunders
Kasia Jackowska
Kasia Jackowska’s Drawing Mathematics series whimsically illustrates various mathematical concepts as part of a project done for a brochure published by the University of Warsaw. Simple and sweet, these drawings add creativity to convention, using principles and formulas as her inspiration, and stylized animals as her muses. Can you recognize all the concepts?
See many more drawings and paintings by Jackowska at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Kasia Jackowska
Kasia Jackowska’s Drawing Mathematics series whimsically illustrates various mathematical concepts as part of a project done for a brochure published by the University of Warsaw. Simple and sweet, these drawings add creativity to convention, using principles and formulas as her inspiration, and stylized animals as her muses. Can you recognize all the concepts?
See many more drawings and paintings by Jackowska at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Kasia Jackowska
Kasia Jackowska’s Drawing Mathematics series whimsically illustrates various mathematical concepts as part of a project done for a brochure published by the University of Warsaw. Simple and sweet, these drawings add creativity to convention, using principles and formulas as her inspiration, and stylized animals as her muses. Can you recognize all the concepts?
See many more drawings and paintings by Jackowska at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Kasia Jackowska
Kasia Jackowska’s Drawing Mathematics series whimsically illustrates various mathematical concepts as part of a project done for a brochure published by the University of Warsaw. Simple and sweet, these drawings add creativity to convention, using principles and formulas as her inspiration, and stylized animals as her muses. Can you recognize all the concepts?
See many more drawings and paintings by Jackowska at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Kasia Jackowska
Kasia Jackowska’s Drawing Mathematics series whimsically illustrates various mathematical concepts as part of a project done for a brochure published by the University of Warsaw. Simple and sweet, these drawings add creativity to convention, using principles and formulas as her inspiration, and stylized animals as her muses. Can you recognize all the concepts?
See many more drawings and paintings by Jackowska at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Kasia Jackowska
Kasia Jackowska’s Drawing Mathematics series whimsically illustrates various mathematical concepts as part of a project done for a brochure published by the University of Warsaw. Simple and sweet, these drawings add creativity to convention, using principles and formulas as her inspiration, and stylized animals as her muses. Can you recognize all the concepts?
See many more drawings and paintings by Jackowska at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Complexity Graphics
Tatiana Plakhova, also known as Complexity Graphics, is a digital illustrator based in Moscow. Her projects are complicated, highly-detailed diagrams of data sets or other non-graphic information. With project titles like “Music is Math,” “The End of Geography,” and “Visual Science,” Plakhova’s images clearly seek to bridge the divide between the visual arts and the often invisible worlds of math, science, and music.
See more of Plakhova’s works at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Complexity Graphics
Tatiana Plakhova, also known as Complexity Graphics, is a digital illustrator based in Moscow. Her projects are complicated, highly-detailed diagrams of data sets or other non-graphic information. With project titles like “Music is Math,” “The End of Geography,” and “Visual Science,” Plakhova’s images clearly seek to bridge the divide between the visual arts and the often invisible worlds of math, science, and music.
See more of Plakhova’s works at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Complexity Graphics
Tatiana Plakhova, also known as Complexity Graphics, is a digital illustrator based in Moscow. Her projects are complicated, highly-detailed diagrams of data sets or other non-graphic information. With project titles like “Music is Math,” “The End of Geography,” and “Visual Science,” Plakhova’s images clearly seek to bridge the divide between the visual arts and the often invisible worlds of math, science, and music.
See more of Plakhova’s works at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Complexity Graphics
Tatiana Plakhova, also known as Complexity Graphics, is a digital illustrator based in Moscow. Her projects are complicated, highly-detailed diagrams of data sets or other non-graphic information. With project titles like “Music is Math,” “The End of Geography,” and “Visual Science,” Plakhova’s images clearly seek to bridge the divide between the visual arts and the often invisible worlds of math, science, and music.
See more of Plakhova’s works at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Sebastian Schmieg and Silvio Lorusso’s 56 Broken Kindle Screens
56 Broken Kindle Screens is a print-on-demand publication by digi-artists Sebastian Schmieg and Silvio Lorusso that features strange and intriguing found photos of broken or malfunctioning e-reader screens. The artists explain:
"The book takes as its starting point the peculiar aesthetic of broken E Ink displays and serves as an examination into the reading device’s materiality. As the screens break, they become collages composed of different pages, cover illustrations and interface elements."
A meditation on medium, the fallible digital kindle screen is now reproduced in print – the very material this technology works to replace. 
See more interesting works by Schmieg here. Also: "How Electronic Ink Works."
 - Erin Saunders
Sebastian Schmieg and Silvio Lorusso’s 56 Broken Kindle Screens
56 Broken Kindle Screens is a print-on-demand publication by digi-artists Sebastian Schmieg and Silvio Lorusso that features strange and intriguing found photos of broken or malfunctioning e-reader screens. The artists explain:
"The book takes as its starting point the peculiar aesthetic of broken E Ink displays and serves as an examination into the reading device’s materiality. As the screens break, they become collages composed of different pages, cover illustrations and interface elements."
A meditation on medium, the fallible digital kindle screen is now reproduced in print – the very material this technology works to replace. 
See more interesting works by Schmieg here. Also: "How Electronic Ink Works."
 - Erin Saunders
Sebastian Schmieg and Silvio Lorusso’s 56 Broken Kindle Screens
56 Broken Kindle Screens is a print-on-demand publication by digi-artists Sebastian Schmieg and Silvio Lorusso that features strange and intriguing found photos of broken or malfunctioning e-reader screens. The artists explain:
"The book takes as its starting point the peculiar aesthetic of broken E Ink displays and serves as an examination into the reading device’s materiality. As the screens break, they become collages composed of different pages, cover illustrations and interface elements."
A meditation on medium, the fallible digital kindle screen is now reproduced in print – the very material this technology works to replace. 
See more interesting works by Schmieg here. Also: "How Electronic Ink Works."
 - Erin Saunders
Sebastian Schmieg and Silvio Lorusso’s 56 Broken Kindle Screens
56 Broken Kindle Screens is a print-on-demand publication by digi-artists Sebastian Schmieg and Silvio Lorusso that features strange and intriguing found photos of broken or malfunctioning e-reader screens. The artists explain:
"The book takes as its starting point the peculiar aesthetic of broken E Ink displays and serves as an examination into the reading device’s materiality. As the screens break, they become collages composed of different pages, cover illustrations and interface elements."
A meditation on medium, the fallible digital kindle screen is now reproduced in print – the very material this technology works to replace. 
See more interesting works by Schmieg here. Also: "How Electronic Ink Works."
 - Erin Saunders
Sebastian Schmieg and Silvio Lorusso’s 56 Broken Kindle Screens
56 Broken Kindle Screens is a print-on-demand publication by digi-artists Sebastian Schmieg and Silvio Lorusso that features strange and intriguing found photos of broken or malfunctioning e-reader screens. The artists explain:
"The book takes as its starting point the peculiar aesthetic of broken E Ink displays and serves as an examination into the reading device’s materiality. As the screens break, they become collages composed of different pages, cover illustrations and interface elements."
A meditation on medium, the fallible digital kindle screen is now reproduced in print – the very material this technology works to replace. 
See more interesting works by Schmieg here. Also: "How Electronic Ink Works."
 - Erin Saunders
Sebastian Schmieg and Silvio Lorusso’s 56 Broken Kindle Screens
56 Broken Kindle Screens is a print-on-demand publication by digi-artists Sebastian Schmieg and Silvio Lorusso that features strange and intriguing found photos of broken or malfunctioning e-reader screens. The artists explain:
"The book takes as its starting point the peculiar aesthetic of broken E Ink displays and serves as an examination into the reading device’s materiality. As the screens break, they become collages composed of different pages, cover illustrations and interface elements."
A meditation on medium, the fallible digital kindle screen is now reproduced in print – the very material this technology works to replace. 
See more interesting works by Schmieg here. Also: "How Electronic Ink Works."
 - Erin Saunders
Sebastian Schmieg and Silvio Lorusso’s 56 Broken Kindle Screens
56 Broken Kindle Screens is a print-on-demand publication by digi-artists Sebastian Schmieg and Silvio Lorusso that features strange and intriguing found photos of broken or malfunctioning e-reader screens. The artists explain:
"The book takes as its starting point the peculiar aesthetic of broken E Ink displays and serves as an examination into the reading device’s materiality. As the screens break, they become collages composed of different pages, cover illustrations and interface elements."
A meditation on medium, the fallible digital kindle screen is now reproduced in print – the very material this technology works to replace. 
See more interesting works by Schmieg here. Also: "How Electronic Ink Works."
 - Erin Saunders
Sebastian Schmieg and Silvio Lorusso’s 56 Broken Kindle Screens
56 Broken Kindle Screens is a print-on-demand publication by digi-artists Sebastian Schmieg and Silvio Lorusso that features strange and intriguing found photos of broken or malfunctioning e-reader screens. The artists explain:
"The book takes as its starting point the peculiar aesthetic of broken E Ink displays and serves as an examination into the reading device’s materiality. As the screens break, they become collages composed of different pages, cover illustrations and interface elements."
A meditation on medium, the fallible digital kindle screen is now reproduced in print – the very material this technology works to replace. 
See more interesting works by Schmieg here. Also: "How Electronic Ink Works."
 - Erin Saunders

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