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The Future of Nature in Art
The forms of nature are, in their own ways, works of art. For centuries, artists have mimicked natural phenomenon, such as the roughness of tree bark, and the vibrant colours of fruit, in oil paintings and even sculpture. Now, most artists are using new tools to attempt to control these forms, and in doing so, re-create the natural form. Artist Ken To, for example, uses metal wiring to create detailed and realistically sized bonsai trees. The easing twists of the metal perfectly mimic the tree bark, that ever so slightly curves up and outwards, creating branches. 
Even more extreme, artist Natalie Jeremijenko uses L-systems, which are algorithms created in order to mimic the cell growth of a tree. With the L-system technology, you could have your very own forest growing on your computers’ desktop! She has even created a whole art project called ONETREES, and she calls her virtual trees ‘e-trees’, or ‘electronic trees’. Not only that, the e-trees themselves can be manipulated to grow at certain rates when a CO2 reader is plugged into the USB ports of the computer. The virtual trees mimic the cell growth of natural trees, and they also react in a similar way that trees do when they come into contact with atmospheric changes. It is a revolutionary twist of artistic mimesis.
So whether you prefer a forest of trees on your desktop, or a little bonsai tree on top of your desk, there are many different mediums that you can explore in order to experience this new movement of nature mimesis in the 21st Century.-Anna Paluch

The Future of Nature in Art

The forms of nature are, in their own ways, works of art. For centuries, artists have mimicked natural phenomenon, such as the roughness of tree bark, and the vibrant colours of fruit, in oil paintings and even sculpture. Now, most artists are using new tools to attempt to control these forms, and in doing so, re-create the natural form. Artist Ken To, for example, uses metal wiring to create detailed and realistically sized bonsai trees. The easing twists of the metal perfectly mimic the tree bark, that ever so slightly curves up and outwards, creating branches.

Even more extreme, artist Natalie Jeremijenko uses L-systems, which are algorithms created in order to mimic the cell growth of a tree. With the L-system technology, you could have your very own forest growing on your computers’ desktop! She has even created a whole art project called ONETREES, and she calls her virtual trees ‘e-trees’, or ‘electronic trees’. Not only that, the e-trees themselves can be manipulated to grow at certain rates when a CO2 reader is plugged into the USB ports of the computer. The virtual trees mimic the cell growth of natural trees, and they also react in a similar way that trees do when they come into contact with atmospheric changes. It is a revolutionary twist of artistic mimesis.

So whether you prefer a forest of trees on your desktop, or a little bonsai tree on top of your desk, there are many different mediums that you can explore in order to experience this new movement of nature mimesis in the 21st Century.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

art science artandsciencejournal ken to natalie jeremijenko L-systems tree mimesis future nature bonsai sculpture screen Anna Paluch

Azuma Makoto: Water and Bonsai

As an artform that can be traced back over two thousand years in Japanese history, the cultivation of the bonsai follows many horticultural and aesthetic properties that are said to evoke unique responses from different viewers. Traditionally grown small enough to fit inside a small pot, the bonsai generally symbolizes “the aesthetic qualities found in nature through balance, simplicity, and harmony,” with balance being a key element of the bonsai’s aesthetic qualities. 

In this installation, Water and Bonsai, self-proclaimed “botanical artist” Azuma Makoto submerges what appears to be a small bonsai tree in an aquarium filled with water. Upon further inspection, however, we learn that this bonsai is actually a piece of deadwood adorned with moss. The moss is kept alive with the aid of a filtration system and LED lights. 

As Makoto describes the work, 

Bonsai transforms its shape through [the] ages [and] now finds a life in water and continues to be alive. We can, continuously, admire its new appearance with plants from land and water within clear water.”

In this sense, Water and Bonsai seeks to redefine the tradition of the bonsai by exposing it to a new natural element: the water. The bonsai’s shifting appearance in the water further demonstrates its ability to achieve aesthetic balance and harmony by being “one with the water.” As a result, Makoto exposes us to a sort of miniaturized botanical ecosystem that showcases the beauty and complexity of the plant world. 

Azuma Makoto’s practice as a botanical artist involves the staging and creation of “botanical sculptures” and large scale art installations. For more information about Makoto’s other projects, visit his website here

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

artscienceartsciencebonsaibotanical installationwaterbotanyazuma makotovictoria nolte
Takanori Aiba
Aiba, a former maze illustrator, founded his own company in 1981 and expanded his practice as an “art director for architectural spaces.” In this new role, Aiba showcases his knowledge of maze illustration and architecture by creating intricately detailed, miniature, worlds wrapped around bonsai trees, lighthouses, cliffs, and constructed on vertical islands. His works explore our involvement with the environment and his use of the bonsai recalls the Japanese tradition of the bonsai as a work of art. Expressing “the magnificence of nature,” Aiba’s inclusion of the bonsai in this series is seen as almost an act of updating history as various narratives can be drawn from each individual detail in his works. 
In addition, Aiba uses a variety of materials to craft these installations, including craft paper, plastic, plaster, and paint. 
For more information about Aiba’s work, please visit his website. 
- Victoria Nolte
Takanori Aiba
Aiba, a former maze illustrator, founded his own company in 1981 and expanded his practice as an “art director for architectural spaces.” In this new role, Aiba showcases his knowledge of maze illustration and architecture by creating intricately detailed, miniature, worlds wrapped around bonsai trees, lighthouses, cliffs, and constructed on vertical islands. His works explore our involvement with the environment and his use of the bonsai recalls the Japanese tradition of the bonsai as a work of art. Expressing “the magnificence of nature,” Aiba’s inclusion of the bonsai in this series is seen as almost an act of updating history as various narratives can be drawn from each individual detail in his works. 
In addition, Aiba uses a variety of materials to craft these installations, including craft paper, plastic, plaster, and paint. 
For more information about Aiba’s work, please visit his website. 
- Victoria Nolte
Takanori Aiba
Aiba, a former maze illustrator, founded his own company in 1981 and expanded his practice as an “art director for architectural spaces.” In this new role, Aiba showcases his knowledge of maze illustration and architecture by creating intricately detailed, miniature, worlds wrapped around bonsai trees, lighthouses, cliffs, and constructed on vertical islands. His works explore our involvement with the environment and his use of the bonsai recalls the Japanese tradition of the bonsai as a work of art. Expressing “the magnificence of nature,” Aiba’s inclusion of the bonsai in this series is seen as almost an act of updating history as various narratives can be drawn from each individual detail in his works. 
In addition, Aiba uses a variety of materials to craft these installations, including craft paper, plastic, plaster, and paint. 
For more information about Aiba’s work, please visit his website. 
- Victoria Nolte
Takanori Aiba
Aiba, a former maze illustrator, founded his own company in 1981 and expanded his practice as an “art director for architectural spaces.” In this new role, Aiba showcases his knowledge of maze illustration and architecture by creating intricately detailed, miniature, worlds wrapped around bonsai trees, lighthouses, cliffs, and constructed on vertical islands. His works explore our involvement with the environment and his use of the bonsai recalls the Japanese tradition of the bonsai as a work of art. Expressing “the magnificence of nature,” Aiba’s inclusion of the bonsai in this series is seen as almost an act of updating history as various narratives can be drawn from each individual detail in his works. 
In addition, Aiba uses a variety of materials to craft these installations, including craft paper, plastic, plaster, and paint. 
For more information about Aiba’s work, please visit his website. 
- Victoria Nolte

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