Our Blog

Posts tagged botany

Categories:

Outer-site Art
 
Tokyo-based artist Makoto Azuma doesn’t appear to believe in doing things by halves. His latest installation looks at the universe, beyond Earth, as a site for appreciating beauty and art. Two pieces, a Japanese white pine bonsai known as the “Shiki 1”, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, were launched into the stratosphere last week in the Black Rock Desert, Nevada. This is part of project Exobotanica – Botanical Space Flight (see more pictures here), where Azuma heads a 10 person team, coupled with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace — “America’s Other Space Program”, a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit.
 
Azuma is interested in the beauty of organic movement in plants, and how this beauty would be suspended in space as a weightless environment. The objects themselves – the bonsai plant and the flower arrangement, have an almost uneasy juxtaposition in their nature. On the one hand, they are organic, Earth-bound items that send instant connotations to the viewer about the beauty of our natural world, yet both represent a natural world moulded by human hands – the miniaturised tree and the specifically arranged flowers. In the end, they can almost be seen less as art and more as specific examples of Earthly design; an amalgamation of human and mother nature’s architecture, broadcast to the universe beyond.
 
But equally as stunning is the documentary imagery itself, taken from orbit and brought back to Earth. Oh to see what those blossoms have seen!

- Alinta Krauth 
Outer-site Art
 
Tokyo-based artist Makoto Azuma doesn’t appear to believe in doing things by halves. His latest installation looks at the universe, beyond Earth, as a site for appreciating beauty and art. Two pieces, a Japanese white pine bonsai known as the “Shiki 1”, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, were launched into the stratosphere last week in the Black Rock Desert, Nevada. This is part of project Exobotanica – Botanical Space Flight (see more pictures here), where Azuma heads a 10 person team, coupled with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace — “America’s Other Space Program”, a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit.
 
Azuma is interested in the beauty of organic movement in plants, and how this beauty would be suspended in space as a weightless environment. The objects themselves – the bonsai plant and the flower arrangement, have an almost uneasy juxtaposition in their nature. On the one hand, they are organic, Earth-bound items that send instant connotations to the viewer about the beauty of our natural world, yet both represent a natural world moulded by human hands – the miniaturised tree and the specifically arranged flowers. In the end, they can almost be seen less as art and more as specific examples of Earthly design; an amalgamation of human and mother nature’s architecture, broadcast to the universe beyond.
 
But equally as stunning is the documentary imagery itself, taken from orbit and brought back to Earth. Oh to see what those blossoms have seen!

- Alinta Krauth 
Outer-site Art
 
Tokyo-based artist Makoto Azuma doesn’t appear to believe in doing things by halves. His latest installation looks at the universe, beyond Earth, as a site for appreciating beauty and art. Two pieces, a Japanese white pine bonsai known as the “Shiki 1”, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, were launched into the stratosphere last week in the Black Rock Desert, Nevada. This is part of project Exobotanica – Botanical Space Flight (see more pictures here), where Azuma heads a 10 person team, coupled with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace — “America’s Other Space Program”, a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit.
 
Azuma is interested in the beauty of organic movement in plants, and how this beauty would be suspended in space as a weightless environment. The objects themselves – the bonsai plant and the flower arrangement, have an almost uneasy juxtaposition in their nature. On the one hand, they are organic, Earth-bound items that send instant connotations to the viewer about the beauty of our natural world, yet both represent a natural world moulded by human hands – the miniaturised tree and the specifically arranged flowers. In the end, they can almost be seen less as art and more as specific examples of Earthly design; an amalgamation of human and mother nature’s architecture, broadcast to the universe beyond.
 
But equally as stunning is the documentary imagery itself, taken from orbit and brought back to Earth. Oh to see what those blossoms have seen!

- Alinta Krauth 
Outer-site Art
 
Tokyo-based artist Makoto Azuma doesn’t appear to believe in doing things by halves. His latest installation looks at the universe, beyond Earth, as a site for appreciating beauty and art. Two pieces, a Japanese white pine bonsai known as the “Shiki 1”, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, were launched into the stratosphere last week in the Black Rock Desert, Nevada. This is part of project Exobotanica – Botanical Space Flight (see more pictures here), where Azuma heads a 10 person team, coupled with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace — “America’s Other Space Program”, a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit.
 
Azuma is interested in the beauty of organic movement in plants, and how this beauty would be suspended in space as a weightless environment. The objects themselves – the bonsai plant and the flower arrangement, have an almost uneasy juxtaposition in their nature. On the one hand, they are organic, Earth-bound items that send instant connotations to the viewer about the beauty of our natural world, yet both represent a natural world moulded by human hands – the miniaturised tree and the specifically arranged flowers. In the end, they can almost be seen less as art and more as specific examples of Earthly design; an amalgamation of human and mother nature’s architecture, broadcast to the universe beyond.
 
But equally as stunning is the documentary imagery itself, taken from orbit and brought back to Earth. Oh to see what those blossoms have seen!

- Alinta Krauth 
Outer-site Art
 
Tokyo-based artist Makoto Azuma doesn’t appear to believe in doing things by halves. His latest installation looks at the universe, beyond Earth, as a site for appreciating beauty and art. Two pieces, a Japanese white pine bonsai known as the “Shiki 1”, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, were launched into the stratosphere last week in the Black Rock Desert, Nevada. This is part of project Exobotanica – Botanical Space Flight (see more pictures here), where Azuma heads a 10 person team, coupled with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace — “America’s Other Space Program”, a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit.
 
Azuma is interested in the beauty of organic movement in plants, and how this beauty would be suspended in space as a weightless environment. The objects themselves – the bonsai plant and the flower arrangement, have an almost uneasy juxtaposition in their nature. On the one hand, they are organic, Earth-bound items that send instant connotations to the viewer about the beauty of our natural world, yet both represent a natural world moulded by human hands – the miniaturised tree and the specifically arranged flowers. In the end, they can almost be seen less as art and more as specific examples of Earthly design; an amalgamation of human and mother nature’s architecture, broadcast to the universe beyond.
 
But equally as stunning is the documentary imagery itself, taken from orbit and brought back to Earth. Oh to see what those blossoms have seen!

- Alinta Krauth 
Outer-site Art
 
Tokyo-based artist Makoto Azuma doesn’t appear to believe in doing things by halves. His latest installation looks at the universe, beyond Earth, as a site for appreciating beauty and art. Two pieces, a Japanese white pine bonsai known as the “Shiki 1”, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, were launched into the stratosphere last week in the Black Rock Desert, Nevada. This is part of project Exobotanica – Botanical Space Flight (see more pictures here), where Azuma heads a 10 person team, coupled with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace — “America’s Other Space Program”, a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit.
 
Azuma is interested in the beauty of organic movement in plants, and how this beauty would be suspended in space as a weightless environment. The objects themselves – the bonsai plant and the flower arrangement, have an almost uneasy juxtaposition in their nature. On the one hand, they are organic, Earth-bound items that send instant connotations to the viewer about the beauty of our natural world, yet both represent a natural world moulded by human hands – the miniaturised tree and the specifically arranged flowers. In the end, they can almost be seen less as art and more as specific examples of Earthly design; an amalgamation of human and mother nature’s architecture, broadcast to the universe beyond.
 
But equally as stunning is the documentary imagery itself, taken from orbit and brought back to Earth. Oh to see what those blossoms have seen!

- Alinta Krauth 

Outer-site Art

 

Tokyo-based artist Makoto Azuma doesn’t appear to believe in doing things by halves. His latest installation looks at the universe, beyond Earth, as a site for appreciating beauty and art. Two pieces, a Japanese white pine bonsai known as the “Shiki 1”, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, were launched into the stratosphere last week in the Black Rock Desert, Nevada. This is part of project Exobotanica – Botanical Space Flight (see more pictures here), where Azuma heads a 10 person team, coupled with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace — “America’s Other Space Program”, a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit.

 

Azuma is interested in the beauty of organic movement in plants, and how this beauty would be suspended in space as a weightless environment. The objects themselves – the bonsai plant and the flower arrangement, have an almost uneasy juxtaposition in their nature. On the one hand, they are organic, Earth-bound items that send instant connotations to the viewer about the beauty of our natural world, yet both represent a natural world moulded by human hands – the miniaturised tree and the specifically arranged flowers. In the end, they can almost be seen less as art and more as specific examples of Earthly design; an amalgamation of human and mother nature’s architecture, broadcast to the universe beyond.

 

But equally as stunning is the documentary imagery itself, taken from orbit and brought back to Earth. Oh to see what those blossoms have seen!

- Alinta Krauth 

6 Photos
/ exobotanica azuma makoto jp aerospace shiki 1 art and science art and science journal space botanical botany alinta krauth
Camila Carlow’s Eye Heart Spleen
When we look at human organs, sometimes their imagery can be off-putting (though fascinating!) but artist Camila Carlow uses our organs, at least pictures of them, to create her intricate Eye Heart Spleen series; human organs made from foraged plants.
The artist combines different plants, such as flowers and leaves, already themselves unique living organisms, to create one piece, one organ, of another living organism; the human. It is interesting to look at her series in regards to the place of humans in the world; how we pick flowers, tear down trees and stomp around in the grass, only to then have our bodies be consumed by the earth, covered by flowers, trees and grass. The plants sustain us, as either food or helping to create oxygen, just like our organs, and just like plants, we sometimes too forget to take care of our organs. As the artist states, “regardless of whether we fill ourselves with toxins or nourishing food, whether we exercise or not - our organs sustain us, working away effortlessly and unnoticed”. Both plants and organs are delicate structures, and both need to be taken care of, in order for them to take care of us.
To learn more about Camila Carlow’s work, you can visit her website, or if you would like to purchase one of her prints, they are available on Etsy.
-Anna Paluch
Camila Carlow’s Eye Heart Spleen
When we look at human organs, sometimes their imagery can be off-putting (though fascinating!) but artist Camila Carlow uses our organs, at least pictures of them, to create her intricate Eye Heart Spleen series; human organs made from foraged plants.
The artist combines different plants, such as flowers and leaves, already themselves unique living organisms, to create one piece, one organ, of another living organism; the human. It is interesting to look at her series in regards to the place of humans in the world; how we pick flowers, tear down trees and stomp around in the grass, only to then have our bodies be consumed by the earth, covered by flowers, trees and grass. The plants sustain us, as either food or helping to create oxygen, just like our organs, and just like plants, we sometimes too forget to take care of our organs. As the artist states, “regardless of whether we fill ourselves with toxins or nourishing food, whether we exercise or not - our organs sustain us, working away effortlessly and unnoticed”. Both plants and organs are delicate structures, and both need to be taken care of, in order for them to take care of us.
To learn more about Camila Carlow’s work, you can visit her website, or if you would like to purchase one of her prints, they are available on Etsy.
-Anna Paluch
Camila Carlow’s Eye Heart Spleen
When we look at human organs, sometimes their imagery can be off-putting (though fascinating!) but artist Camila Carlow uses our organs, at least pictures of them, to create her intricate Eye Heart Spleen series; human organs made from foraged plants.
The artist combines different plants, such as flowers and leaves, already themselves unique living organisms, to create one piece, one organ, of another living organism; the human. It is interesting to look at her series in regards to the place of humans in the world; how we pick flowers, tear down trees and stomp around in the grass, only to then have our bodies be consumed by the earth, covered by flowers, trees and grass. The plants sustain us, as either food or helping to create oxygen, just like our organs, and just like plants, we sometimes too forget to take care of our organs. As the artist states, “regardless of whether we fill ourselves with toxins or nourishing food, whether we exercise or not - our organs sustain us, working away effortlessly and unnoticed”. Both plants and organs are delicate structures, and both need to be taken care of, in order for them to take care of us.
To learn more about Camila Carlow’s work, you can visit her website, or if you would like to purchase one of her prints, they are available on Etsy.
-Anna Paluch

Camila Carlow’s Eye Heart Spleen

When we look at human organs, sometimes their imagery can be off-putting (though fascinating!) but artist Camila Carlow uses our organs, at least pictures of them, to create her intricate Eye Heart Spleen series; human organs made from foraged plants.

The artist combines different plants, such as flowers and leaves, already themselves unique living organisms, to create one piece, one organ, of another living organism; the human. It is interesting to look at her series in regards to the place of humans in the world; how we pick flowers, tear down trees and stomp around in the grass, only to then have our bodies be consumed by the earth, covered by flowers, trees and grass. The plants sustain us, as either food or helping to create oxygen, just like our organs, and just like plants, we sometimes too forget to take care of our organs. As the artist states, “regardless of whether we fill ourselves with toxins or nourishing food, whether we exercise or not - our organs sustain us, working away effortlessly and unnoticed”. Both plants and organs are delicate structures, and both need to be taken care of, in order for them to take care of us.

To learn more about Camila Carlow’s work, you can visit her website, or if you would like to purchase one of her prints, they are available on Etsy.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ camila carlow eye heart spleen anatomy botany flowers plants organs human organs human body art science art and science journal anna paluch
Nature’s Vibrations: Lin Xue
Time sensitivity is not what comes to mind when one views the ink drawings of Lin Xue. The viewer is too busy noting the intricacies of the lines and forms; immersing themselves in the segments of buildings and landscapes that meld into a chimerical natural world. But these drawings had to be done quickly and without being able to control the final composition of the piece. Xue’s drawing tool of choice is a sharpened shard of bamboo, and bamboo doesn’t retain ink so each mark must be made quickly and with precision. The choice of tool reflects both the artist’s closeness to nature (the drawings themselves are inspired by his regular mountain hikes), as well as explaining the intent to express nature itself. Xue has always been drawn to the “orchestral energy” he sensed within the world around him, the vibrations of what was living, and these drawings represent his attempts to place it on paper.
These drawings, despite being obviously inspired by Xue’s immersion within nature, have an element of the fantastic; they are isolated world clusters, floating islands that are a configuration between nature’s energies and the workings of the mind. The patterns of landscape and edifice are the artist’s way of rendering the network within nature that links everything together. The stitched together quality also fools the viewer as to whether or not what they are looking at is macro or micro. The size of the work itself forces the viewer to be intimate, looking closely to see all of the details, but the landscape cannot help but invoke the feeling that one is approaching a new world in its own right.
The drawings shown above were selected to be exhibited in the Arsenale, part of the Venice Biennale 2013. To learn more about the Biennale,and the theme of the Biennale itself, click here.
- Lea Hamilton
Nature’s Vibrations: Lin Xue
Time sensitivity is not what comes to mind when one views the ink drawings of Lin Xue. The viewer is too busy noting the intricacies of the lines and forms; immersing themselves in the segments of buildings and landscapes that meld into a chimerical natural world. But these drawings had to be done quickly and without being able to control the final composition of the piece. Xue’s drawing tool of choice is a sharpened shard of bamboo, and bamboo doesn’t retain ink so each mark must be made quickly and with precision. The choice of tool reflects both the artist’s closeness to nature (the drawings themselves are inspired by his regular mountain hikes), as well as explaining the intent to express nature itself. Xue has always been drawn to the “orchestral energy” he sensed within the world around him, the vibrations of what was living, and these drawings represent his attempts to place it on paper.
These drawings, despite being obviously inspired by Xue’s immersion within nature, have an element of the fantastic; they are isolated world clusters, floating islands that are a configuration between nature’s energies and the workings of the mind. The patterns of landscape and edifice are the artist’s way of rendering the network within nature that links everything together. The stitched together quality also fools the viewer as to whether or not what they are looking at is macro or micro. The size of the work itself forces the viewer to be intimate, looking closely to see all of the details, but the landscape cannot help but invoke the feeling that one is approaching a new world in its own right.
The drawings shown above were selected to be exhibited in the Arsenale, part of the Venice Biennale 2013. To learn more about the Biennale,and the theme of the Biennale itself, click here.
- Lea Hamilton
Nature’s Vibrations: Lin Xue
Time sensitivity is not what comes to mind when one views the ink drawings of Lin Xue. The viewer is too busy noting the intricacies of the lines and forms; immersing themselves in the segments of buildings and landscapes that meld into a chimerical natural world. But these drawings had to be done quickly and without being able to control the final composition of the piece. Xue’s drawing tool of choice is a sharpened shard of bamboo, and bamboo doesn’t retain ink so each mark must be made quickly and with precision. The choice of tool reflects both the artist’s closeness to nature (the drawings themselves are inspired by his regular mountain hikes), as well as explaining the intent to express nature itself. Xue has always been drawn to the “orchestral energy” he sensed within the world around him, the vibrations of what was living, and these drawings represent his attempts to place it on paper.
These drawings, despite being obviously inspired by Xue’s immersion within nature, have an element of the fantastic; they are isolated world clusters, floating islands that are a configuration between nature’s energies and the workings of the mind. The patterns of landscape and edifice are the artist’s way of rendering the network within nature that links everything together. The stitched together quality also fools the viewer as to whether or not what they are looking at is macro or micro. The size of the work itself forces the viewer to be intimate, looking closely to see all of the details, but the landscape cannot help but invoke the feeling that one is approaching a new world in its own right.
The drawings shown above were selected to be exhibited in the Arsenale, part of the Venice Biennale 2013. To learn more about the Biennale,and the theme of the Biennale itself, click here.
- Lea Hamilton
Nature’s Vibrations: Lin Xue
Time sensitivity is not what comes to mind when one views the ink drawings of Lin Xue. The viewer is too busy noting the intricacies of the lines and forms; immersing themselves in the segments of buildings and landscapes that meld into a chimerical natural world. But these drawings had to be done quickly and without being able to control the final composition of the piece. Xue’s drawing tool of choice is a sharpened shard of bamboo, and bamboo doesn’t retain ink so each mark must be made quickly and with precision. The choice of tool reflects both the artist’s closeness to nature (the drawings themselves are inspired by his regular mountain hikes), as well as explaining the intent to express nature itself. Xue has always been drawn to the “orchestral energy” he sensed within the world around him, the vibrations of what was living, and these drawings represent his attempts to place it on paper.
These drawings, despite being obviously inspired by Xue’s immersion within nature, have an element of the fantastic; they are isolated world clusters, floating islands that are a configuration between nature’s energies and the workings of the mind. The patterns of landscape and edifice are the artist’s way of rendering the network within nature that links everything together. The stitched together quality also fools the viewer as to whether or not what they are looking at is macro or micro. The size of the work itself forces the viewer to be intimate, looking closely to see all of the details, but the landscape cannot help but invoke the feeling that one is approaching a new world in its own right.
The drawings shown above were selected to be exhibited in the Arsenale, part of the Venice Biennale 2013. To learn more about the Biennale,and the theme of the Biennale itself, click here.
- Lea Hamilton

Nature’s Vibrations: Lin Xue

Time sensitivity is not what comes to mind when one views the ink drawings of Lin Xue. The viewer is too busy noting the intricacies of the lines and forms; immersing themselves in the segments of buildings and landscapes that meld into a chimerical natural world. But these drawings had to be done quickly and without being able to control the final composition of the piece. Xue’s drawing tool of choice is a sharpened shard of bamboo, and bamboo doesn’t retain ink so each mark must be made quickly and with precision. The choice of tool reflects both the artist’s closeness to nature (the drawings themselves are inspired by his regular mountain hikes), as well as explaining the intent to express nature itself. Xue has always been drawn to the “orchestral energy” he sensed within the world around him, the vibrations of what was living, and these drawings represent his attempts to place it on paper.

These drawings, despite being obviously inspired by Xue’s immersion within nature, have an element of the fantastic; they are isolated world clusters, floating islands that are a configuration between nature’s energies and the workings of the mind. The patterns of landscape and edifice are the artist’s way of rendering the network within nature that links everything together. The stitched together quality also fools the viewer as to whether or not what they are looking at is macro or micro. The size of the work itself forces the viewer to be intimate, looking closely to see all of the details, but the landscape cannot help but invoke the feeling that one is approaching a new world in its own right.

The drawings shown above were selected to be exhibited in the Arsenale, part of the Venice Biennale 2013. To learn more about the Biennale,and the theme of the Biennale itself, click here.

- Lea Hamilton

(Source: )

4 Photos
/ Lin Xue nature bamboo ink surrealism worlds art Venice Biennale 2013 Arsenale Lea Hamilton botany landscape
In a photo lab far, far away…
Ottawa-based artist Dante Penman takes the traditional process of the photogram, and completely turns it around. With a bit of chemical manipulation, his photograms become chemigrams, a process invented in 1956 by Pierre Cordier. What this entails, is that the developing chemicals are not placed evenly on the photopaper. It is the Abstract Expressionism of photography (a connection which Penman made in his artists’ statement). Instead of just painting with developer, Penman adds three-dimensional botanical aspects, such as fern leaves, to mimic the effects of light from pictures in space.  Chemistry, botany and astronomy all play pivotal roles in his work.
Some of his works are even inspired by Science Fiction, the images alluding to lost worlds and alien wildlife. Not only does the viewer become lost in the multi-layers of leaves, debris and chemicals, but they can also become lost in the image, wondering how the artist put it together. The chemistry in it is like magic, and the images will surely put you under their spell. If you would like to see these chemigrams for yourself, Dante Penman’s work is currently on display at Bubblicity, 730 Somerset St. W., as part of Chinatown Remixed, until the 18th of June.-Anna Paluch

In a photo lab far, far away…

Ottawa-based artist Dante Penman takes the traditional process of the photogram, and completely turns it around. With a bit of chemical manipulation, his photograms become chemigrams, a process invented in 1956 by Pierre Cordier. What this entails, is that the developing chemicals are not placed evenly on the photopaper. It is the Abstract Expressionism of photography (a connection which Penman made in his artists’ statement). Instead of just painting with developer, Penman adds three-dimensional botanical aspects, such as fern leaves, to mimic the effects of light from pictures in space.

Chemistry, botany and astronomy all play pivotal roles in his work.

Some of his works are even inspired by Science Fiction, the images alluding to lost worlds and alien wildlife. Not only does the viewer become lost in the multi-layers of leaves, debris and chemicals, but they can also become lost in the image, wondering how the artist put it together. The chemistry in it is like magic, and the images will surely put you under their spell.

If you would like to see these chemigrams for yourself, Dante Penman’s work is currently on display at Bubblicity, 730 Somerset St. W., as part of Chinatown Remixed, until the 18th of June.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

dante penman chemigram pierre cordier photogram botany chemistry art science art and science journal abstract expressionism Astronomy science fiction

Azuma Makoto: Water and Bonsai

As an artform that can be traced back over two thousand years in Japanese history, the cultivation of the bonsai follows many horticultural and aesthetic properties that are said to evoke unique responses from different viewers. Traditionally grown small enough to fit inside a small pot, the bonsai generally symbolizes “the aesthetic qualities found in nature through balance, simplicity, and harmony,” with balance being a key element of the bonsai’s aesthetic qualities. 

In this installation, Water and Bonsai, self-proclaimed “botanical artist” Azuma Makoto submerges what appears to be a small bonsai tree in an aquarium filled with water. Upon further inspection, however, we learn that this bonsai is actually a piece of deadwood adorned with moss. The moss is kept alive with the aid of a filtration system and LED lights. 

As Makoto describes the work, 

Bonsai transforms its shape through [the] ages [and] now finds a life in water and continues to be alive. We can, continuously, admire its new appearance with plants from land and water within clear water.”

In this sense, Water and Bonsai seeks to redefine the tradition of the bonsai by exposing it to a new natural element: the water. The bonsai’s shifting appearance in the water further demonstrates its ability to achieve aesthetic balance and harmony by being “one with the water.” As a result, Makoto exposes us to a sort of miniaturized botanical ecosystem that showcases the beauty and complexity of the plant world. 

Azuma Makoto’s practice as a botanical artist involves the staging and creation of “botanical sculptures” and large scale art installations. For more information about Makoto’s other projects, visit his website here

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

artscienceartsciencebonsaibotanical installationwaterbotanyazuma makotovictoria nolte
Daniel Freytag
Daniel Freytag is a UK-based photographer whose work explores the hidden beauty of everyday objects by isolating them from their contexts.
 In this series titled Fade, Freytag recalls the long-standing tradition of botanical documentation; these photographs, however, offer a new contemporary aesthetic layer that “[transforms] the ordinary into extraordinary.” Freytag’s projects look to draw together different art practices – photography and design – but to also avoid those conventions of ornamentation so characteristic of today’s photography. This, he writes, gives “depth to the unexpected beauty of the everyday. And with this comes an intimacy in its realness: No artifice, no set-up, purely the ability to re-engage the viewer with the ‘newness’ of the normal, and perhaps, at times, render it almost surreal.”

See more of Freytag’s work at his website here, and find some prints for sale here.
- Erin Saunders
Daniel Freytag
Daniel Freytag is a UK-based photographer whose work explores the hidden beauty of everyday objects by isolating them from their contexts.
 In this series titled Fade, Freytag recalls the long-standing tradition of botanical documentation; these photographs, however, offer a new contemporary aesthetic layer that “[transforms] the ordinary into extraordinary.” Freytag’s projects look to draw together different art practices – photography and design – but to also avoid those conventions of ornamentation so characteristic of today’s photography. This, he writes, gives “depth to the unexpected beauty of the everyday. And with this comes an intimacy in its realness: No artifice, no set-up, purely the ability to re-engage the viewer with the ‘newness’ of the normal, and perhaps, at times, render it almost surreal.”

See more of Freytag’s work at his website here, and find some prints for sale here.
- Erin Saunders
Daniel Freytag
Daniel Freytag is a UK-based photographer whose work explores the hidden beauty of everyday objects by isolating them from their contexts.
 In this series titled Fade, Freytag recalls the long-standing tradition of botanical documentation; these photographs, however, offer a new contemporary aesthetic layer that “[transforms] the ordinary into extraordinary.” Freytag’s projects look to draw together different art practices – photography and design – but to also avoid those conventions of ornamentation so characteristic of today’s photography. This, he writes, gives “depth to the unexpected beauty of the everyday. And with this comes an intimacy in its realness: No artifice, no set-up, purely the ability to re-engage the viewer with the ‘newness’ of the normal, and perhaps, at times, render it almost surreal.”

See more of Freytag’s work at his website here, and find some prints for sale here.
- Erin Saunders

Contact Us

For submissions: please send images and a detailed description to our editor, Lee Jones, at leejones@artandsciencejournal.com.
Thank you and have a lovely day!