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Wear Your Chromosomes: Jewelry Collection Made from 3D Prints of Microscopy Data 
The X and Y-chromosomes found in humans are now wearable. Electron microscopist, Louise Hughes, has created a jewelry collection designed to mirror the look and shape of human chromosomes. Hughes designs every piece from microscopy data and produces it using 3D printing technology. Having already used the structures of organisms to create other jewelry pieces, Hughes felt she could not leave out the essential DNA and chromosomes. The 46 chromosomes found in our cells have never before been so beautifully displayed and worn.
As humans the genes in our DNA, as well as our environment, come to define us. When cells divide, chromosomes compress and form distinct shapes. Those shapes are what inspire the jewelry pieces made by Hughes. Male chromosomes, X and Y, female chromosomes, X and X and the triplet 21st chromosome that causes Down’s syndrome are all replicated in the human chromosome jewelry line. From rings and pendants, to earrings and cufflinks, the stainless steel, bronze, and silver pieces are available in both, karyotpye 1 or 2 structural designs. It has been said that art imitates life and with the human chromosome jewelry designs by Louise Hughes, art is literally replicates life.
Explore the Human Chromosome Jewelry Collection by Louise Hudges on Kickstarter. 
- Lee Jones
Wear Your Chromosomes: Jewelry Collection Made from 3D Prints of Microscopy Data 
The X and Y-chromosomes found in humans are now wearable. Electron microscopist, Louise Hughes, has created a jewelry collection designed to mirror the look and shape of human chromosomes. Hughes designs every piece from microscopy data and produces it using 3D printing technology. Having already used the structures of organisms to create other jewelry pieces, Hughes felt she could not leave out the essential DNA and chromosomes. The 46 chromosomes found in our cells have never before been so beautifully displayed and worn.
As humans the genes in our DNA, as well as our environment, come to define us. When cells divide, chromosomes compress and form distinct shapes. Those shapes are what inspire the jewelry pieces made by Hughes. Male chromosomes, X and Y, female chromosomes, X and X and the triplet 21st chromosome that causes Down’s syndrome are all replicated in the human chromosome jewelry line. From rings and pendants, to earrings and cufflinks, the stainless steel, bronze, and silver pieces are available in both, karyotpye 1 or 2 structural designs. It has been said that art imitates life and with the human chromosome jewelry designs by Louise Hughes, art is literally replicates life.
Explore the Human Chromosome Jewelry Collection by Louise Hudges on Kickstarter. 
- Lee Jones
Twenty Three Pairs by Andrea Duncan 
Andrea Duncan spots the aesthetic and the more significantly idiosyncratic parallels between the 23 pairs of chromosomes in humans and pairs of old socks. Whilst a resident at King’s College Hospital in London she was struck by the differences in terminology used to explain the same medical conditions by doctors and patients alike. With this digital print, Andrea shows that the insularity of the scientific community with its complex terms explaining complex phenomenon can, in the right hands, be reduced to the simplest most palatable of mediums.

23 pairs of chromosomes each composed of entwined strands of DNA, portions of proteins and other bits of biological matter; each unique, each ‘tailored’ to meet the needs of the individual who possesses them. 23 pairs of worn socks replete with stray strands of hair, moisture from sweat and dustings of dead skin, each crumple and dent the result of the specifications of the life of the individual who has worn them.

- Adrian Deen
Suzanne Anker 
The work of Suzanne Anker finds itself at a crossroads between the realms of biology and art, psychology and semiotics. Her projects offer us a glimpse of the deep and intensive research required in the field of science, encouraging the viewer to consider how the non-scientific world takes for granted not only the previously unimagined progresses in science but, more simply, the wonderful complexity of our own bodies. Anker’s fastidious experimentation in a wide array of mediums and subjects is an effort to push at the boundaries of what Anker terms ‘BioArt’ and is an incitement of fearlessness and tenacity in the creation of scientific artworks.
Anker’s investigation of this crossroads began with a study of animal and human chromosomes and how they resembled written language. In her 1993-1995 series Zoosemiotics, Anker constructs a ‘text’ from the chromosomes of such animals and bats, alligators and fish, presented as small silver objects affixed to the wall, and though they do resemble rune-like forms it is interesting how they can also take on different meanings presented in a highly de-contextualized setting. For example, the objects in Fish(bottom left image) look like shiny pants in a wide variety of positions. In the Rorschach series, Anker transforms inkblot images into 3-dimensional reliefs reminiscent of fossil molds. The almost always highly symbolic pelvic appearance of the Rorschach inkblots is intensified by the sculptures’ concave forms. Genetic Seed Bank demonstrates the recuperative and adaptive power of nature and the potential for organic materials as a medium for artistic expression.
All of Anker’s works possess an overarching theme of the issues of scientific ethicality. Anker challenges the hygienically sealed nature of the lab, which often alienates individuals or subjects from their species-being, as Karl Marx might say. Bringing these subjects into the light of the public space, not only as scientific experiments but also as deeply-invested and aesthetically stirring art works, allows Anker to bridge the often too-broad gaps between the public, the gallery and the lab.
To see more of Suzanne Anker’s work, visit her website
-Stephanie Read
Suzanne Anker 
The work of Suzanne Anker finds itself at a crossroads between the realms of biology and art, psychology and semiotics. Her projects offer us a glimpse of the deep and intensive research required in the field of science, encouraging the viewer to consider how the non-scientific world takes for granted not only the previously unimagined progresses in science but, more simply, the wonderful complexity of our own bodies. Anker’s fastidious experimentation in a wide array of mediums and subjects is an effort to push at the boundaries of what Anker terms ‘BioArt’ and is an incitement of fearlessness and tenacity in the creation of scientific artworks.
Anker’s investigation of this crossroads began with a study of animal and human chromosomes and how they resembled written language. In her 1993-1995 series Zoosemiotics, Anker constructs a ‘text’ from the chromosomes of such animals and bats, alligators and fish, presented as small silver objects affixed to the wall, and though they do resemble rune-like forms it is interesting how they can also take on different meanings presented in a highly de-contextualized setting. For example, the objects in Fish(bottom left image) look like shiny pants in a wide variety of positions. In the Rorschach series, Anker transforms inkblot images into 3-dimensional reliefs reminiscent of fossil molds. The almost always highly symbolic pelvic appearance of the Rorschach inkblots is intensified by the sculptures’ concave forms. Genetic Seed Bank demonstrates the recuperative and adaptive power of nature and the potential for organic materials as a medium for artistic expression.
All of Anker’s works possess an overarching theme of the issues of scientific ethicality. Anker challenges the hygienically sealed nature of the lab, which often alienates individuals or subjects from their species-being, as Karl Marx might say. Bringing these subjects into the light of the public space, not only as scientific experiments but also as deeply-invested and aesthetically stirring art works, allows Anker to bridge the often too-broad gaps between the public, the gallery and the lab.
To see more of Suzanne Anker’s work, visit her website
-Stephanie Read
Suzanne Anker 
The work of Suzanne Anker finds itself at a crossroads between the realms of biology and art, psychology and semiotics. Her projects offer us a glimpse of the deep and intensive research required in the field of science, encouraging the viewer to consider how the non-scientific world takes for granted not only the previously unimagined progresses in science but, more simply, the wonderful complexity of our own bodies. Anker’s fastidious experimentation in a wide array of mediums and subjects is an effort to push at the boundaries of what Anker terms ‘BioArt’ and is an incitement of fearlessness and tenacity in the creation of scientific artworks.
Anker’s investigation of this crossroads began with a study of animal and human chromosomes and how they resembled written language. In her 1993-1995 series Zoosemiotics, Anker constructs a ‘text’ from the chromosomes of such animals and bats, alligators and fish, presented as small silver objects affixed to the wall, and though they do resemble rune-like forms it is interesting how they can also take on different meanings presented in a highly de-contextualized setting. For example, the objects in Fish(bottom left image) look like shiny pants in a wide variety of positions. In the Rorschach series, Anker transforms inkblot images into 3-dimensional reliefs reminiscent of fossil molds. The almost always highly symbolic pelvic appearance of the Rorschach inkblots is intensified by the sculptures’ concave forms. Genetic Seed Bank demonstrates the recuperative and adaptive power of nature and the potential for organic materials as a medium for artistic expression.
All of Anker’s works possess an overarching theme of the issues of scientific ethicality. Anker challenges the hygienically sealed nature of the lab, which often alienates individuals or subjects from their species-being, as Karl Marx might say. Bringing these subjects into the light of the public space, not only as scientific experiments but also as deeply-invested and aesthetically stirring art works, allows Anker to bridge the often too-broad gaps between the public, the gallery and the lab.
To see more of Suzanne Anker’s work, visit her website
-Stephanie Read
Suzanne Anker 
The work of Suzanne Anker finds itself at a crossroads between the realms of biology and art, psychology and semiotics. Her projects offer us a glimpse of the deep and intensive research required in the field of science, encouraging the viewer to consider how the non-scientific world takes for granted not only the previously unimagined progresses in science but, more simply, the wonderful complexity of our own bodies. Anker’s fastidious experimentation in a wide array of mediums and subjects is an effort to push at the boundaries of what Anker terms ‘BioArt’ and is an incitement of fearlessness and tenacity in the creation of scientific artworks.
Anker’s investigation of this crossroads began with a study of animal and human chromosomes and how they resembled written language. In her 1993-1995 series Zoosemiotics, Anker constructs a ‘text’ from the chromosomes of such animals and bats, alligators and fish, presented as small silver objects affixed to the wall, and though they do resemble rune-like forms it is interesting how they can also take on different meanings presented in a highly de-contextualized setting. For example, the objects in Fish(bottom left image) look like shiny pants in a wide variety of positions. In the Rorschach series, Anker transforms inkblot images into 3-dimensional reliefs reminiscent of fossil molds. The almost always highly symbolic pelvic appearance of the Rorschach inkblots is intensified by the sculptures’ concave forms. Genetic Seed Bank demonstrates the recuperative and adaptive power of nature and the potential for organic materials as a medium for artistic expression.
All of Anker’s works possess an overarching theme of the issues of scientific ethicality. Anker challenges the hygienically sealed nature of the lab, which often alienates individuals or subjects from their species-being, as Karl Marx might say. Bringing these subjects into the light of the public space, not only as scientific experiments but also as deeply-invested and aesthetically stirring art works, allows Anker to bridge the often too-broad gaps between the public, the gallery and the lab.
To see more of Suzanne Anker’s work, visit her website
-Stephanie Read
Suzanne Anker 
The work of Suzanne Anker finds itself at a crossroads between the realms of biology and art, psychology and semiotics. Her projects offer us a glimpse of the deep and intensive research required in the field of science, encouraging the viewer to consider how the non-scientific world takes for granted not only the previously unimagined progresses in science but, more simply, the wonderful complexity of our own bodies. Anker’s fastidious experimentation in a wide array of mediums and subjects is an effort to push at the boundaries of what Anker terms ‘BioArt’ and is an incitement of fearlessness and tenacity in the creation of scientific artworks.
Anker’s investigation of this crossroads began with a study of animal and human chromosomes and how they resembled written language. In her 1993-1995 series Zoosemiotics, Anker constructs a ‘text’ from the chromosomes of such animals and bats, alligators and fish, presented as small silver objects affixed to the wall, and though they do resemble rune-like forms it is interesting how they can also take on different meanings presented in a highly de-contextualized setting. For example, the objects in Fish(bottom left image) look like shiny pants in a wide variety of positions. In the Rorschach series, Anker transforms inkblot images into 3-dimensional reliefs reminiscent of fossil molds. The almost always highly symbolic pelvic appearance of the Rorschach inkblots is intensified by the sculptures’ concave forms. Genetic Seed Bank demonstrates the recuperative and adaptive power of nature and the potential for organic materials as a medium for artistic expression.
All of Anker’s works possess an overarching theme of the issues of scientific ethicality. Anker challenges the hygienically sealed nature of the lab, which often alienates individuals or subjects from their species-being, as Karl Marx might say. Bringing these subjects into the light of the public space, not only as scientific experiments but also as deeply-invested and aesthetically stirring art works, allows Anker to bridge the often too-broad gaps between the public, the gallery and the lab.
To see more of Suzanne Anker’s work, visit her website
-Stephanie Read

Suzanne Anker 

The work of Suzanne Anker finds itself at a crossroads between the realms of biology and art, psychology and semiotics. Her projects offer us a glimpse of the deep and intensive research required in the field of science, encouraging the viewer to consider how the non-scientific world takes for granted not only the previously unimagined progresses in science but, more simply, the wonderful complexity of our own bodies. Anker’s fastidious experimentation in a wide array of mediums and subjects is an effort to push at the boundaries of what Anker terms ‘BioArt’ and is an incitement of fearlessness and tenacity in the creation of scientific artworks.

Anker’s investigation of this crossroads began with a study of animal and human chromosomes and how they resembled written language. In her 1993-1995 series Zoosemiotics, Anker constructs a ‘text’ from the chromosomes of such animals and bats, alligators and fish, presented as small silver objects affixed to the wall, and though they do resemble rune-like forms it is interesting how they can also take on different meanings presented in a highly de-contextualized setting. For example, the objects in Fish(bottom left image) look like shiny pants in a wide variety of positions. In the Rorschach series, Anker transforms inkblot images into 3-dimensional reliefs reminiscent of fossil molds. The almost always highly symbolic pelvic appearance of the Rorschach inkblots is intensified by the sculptures’ concave forms. Genetic Seed Bank demonstrates the recuperative and adaptive power of nature and the potential for organic materials as a medium for artistic expression.

All of Anker’s works possess an overarching theme of the issues of scientific ethicality. Anker challenges the hygienically sealed nature of the lab, which often alienates individuals or subjects from their species-being, as Karl Marx might say. Bringing these subjects into the light of the public space, not only as scientific experiments but also as deeply-invested and aesthetically stirring art works, allows Anker to bridge the often too-broad gaps between the public, the gallery and the lab.

To see more of Suzanne Anker’s work, visit her website

-Stephanie Read

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