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Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones

Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?

The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.

With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.

Visit the MeMo website.

- Lee Jones

8 Photos
/ art design death jessica charlesworth MeMo technology
Mike Thompson’s Growing Pains 
In his project Growing Pains: Nurturing the Relationship Between Man & Object designer and researcher Mike Thompson toys with the notion of death, imagining a future wherein our bodies could cultivate an object that would represent us beyond the grave. If this design were possible, Thompson writes that “we would grow death inside of us, forcing us to interact with it on a daily basis whilst nurturing new material in preparation for our decay.”
Over the course of its growth process, we would shape the object under our skin through our physical interaction with it. Effectively, we would be designing our own death. 
 After our death, the object would be extracted from our body and passed onto a loved one as a physical and symbolic representation of ourselves. In the images above, we see Thompson’s imagined object: a simulated bone shaped into a pipe by its agent.
 Although imagined, Thompson’s project presents us with some challenging questions. If we were preparing for our death rather than attempting to run away from it, how might we live differently? If we could design our own death, what form would it take? How would we want to be remembered?  
For more information about this project and others by Thompson, visit his website.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Mike Thompson’s Growing Pains 
In his project Growing Pains: Nurturing the Relationship Between Man & Object designer and researcher Mike Thompson toys with the notion of death, imagining a future wherein our bodies could cultivate an object that would represent us beyond the grave. If this design were possible, Thompson writes that “we would grow death inside of us, forcing us to interact with it on a daily basis whilst nurturing new material in preparation for our decay.”
Over the course of its growth process, we would shape the object under our skin through our physical interaction with it. Effectively, we would be designing our own death. 
 After our death, the object would be extracted from our body and passed onto a loved one as a physical and symbolic representation of ourselves. In the images above, we see Thompson’s imagined object: a simulated bone shaped into a pipe by its agent.
 Although imagined, Thompson’s project presents us with some challenging questions. If we were preparing for our death rather than attempting to run away from it, how might we live differently? If we could design our own death, what form would it take? How would we want to be remembered?  
For more information about this project and others by Thompson, visit his website.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Mike Thompson’s Growing Pains 
In his project Growing Pains: Nurturing the Relationship Between Man & Object designer and researcher Mike Thompson toys with the notion of death, imagining a future wherein our bodies could cultivate an object that would represent us beyond the grave. If this design were possible, Thompson writes that “we would grow death inside of us, forcing us to interact with it on a daily basis whilst nurturing new material in preparation for our decay.”
Over the course of its growth process, we would shape the object under our skin through our physical interaction with it. Effectively, we would be designing our own death. 
 After our death, the object would be extracted from our body and passed onto a loved one as a physical and symbolic representation of ourselves. In the images above, we see Thompson’s imagined object: a simulated bone shaped into a pipe by its agent.
 Although imagined, Thompson’s project presents us with some challenging questions. If we were preparing for our death rather than attempting to run away from it, how might we live differently? If we could design our own death, what form would it take? How would we want to be remembered?  
For more information about this project and others by Thompson, visit his website.
- Gabrielle Doiron

Mike Thompson’s Growing Pains

In his project Growing Pains: Nurturing the Relationship Between Man & Object designer and researcher Mike Thompson toys with the notion of death, imagining a future wherein our bodies could cultivate an object that would represent us beyond the grave. If this design were possible, Thompson writes that “we would grow death inside of us, forcing us to interact with it on a daily basis whilst nurturing new material in preparation for our decay.”

Over the course of its growth process, we would shape the object under our skin through our physical interaction with it. Effectively, we would be designing our own death. 

After our death, the object would be extracted from our body and passed onto a loved one as a physical and symbolic representation of ourselves. In the images above, we see Thompson’s imagined object: a simulated bone shaped into a pipe by its agent.

Although imagined, Thompson’s project presents us with some challenging questions. If we were preparing for our death rather than attempting to run away from it, how might we live differently? If we could design our own death, what form would it take? How would we want to be remembered?  

For more information about this project and others by Thompson, visit his website.

- Gabrielle Doiron

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ art science design death Gabrielle Doiron Mike Thompson technology

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