Our Blog

Posts tagged decay

Categories:

Vanessa Krystin Wong
Vancouver artist Vanessa Krystin Wong makes works about nature and decay. As the artist describes her art practice,
"My works derive from the unexplainable awe and wanderlust of decay and ruin, using natural aesthetics and forms. The emotional affects placed upon my works is juxtaposed with the explorations of why such aesthetics of decay create a sense of beauty that cannot be definitively explained, other than a sense of curiosity and magnetism. Through beautifully haunting and ethereal materialities, an otherworldly environment is created where audience’s may escape to battling the known to the unknown."
In the two projects shown above—Only I Would Count Stars At Night and By Tomorrow We’ll Be Lost— Wong creates new worlds that viewers will want to step into. Currently, Wong is working on her last year of her degree and planning for her graduate show in April. To see more of her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vanessa Krystin Wong
Vancouver artist Vanessa Krystin Wong makes works about nature and decay. As the artist describes her art practice,
"My works derive from the unexplainable awe and wanderlust of decay and ruin, using natural aesthetics and forms. The emotional affects placed upon my works is juxtaposed with the explorations of why such aesthetics of decay create a sense of beauty that cannot be definitively explained, other than a sense of curiosity and magnetism. Through beautifully haunting and ethereal materialities, an otherworldly environment is created where audience’s may escape to battling the known to the unknown."
In the two projects shown above—Only I Would Count Stars At Night and By Tomorrow We’ll Be Lost— Wong creates new worlds that viewers will want to step into. Currently, Wong is working on her last year of her degree and planning for her graduate show in April. To see more of her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vanessa Krystin Wong
Vancouver artist Vanessa Krystin Wong makes works about nature and decay. As the artist describes her art practice,
"My works derive from the unexplainable awe and wanderlust of decay and ruin, using natural aesthetics and forms. The emotional affects placed upon my works is juxtaposed with the explorations of why such aesthetics of decay create a sense of beauty that cannot be definitively explained, other than a sense of curiosity and magnetism. Through beautifully haunting and ethereal materialities, an otherworldly environment is created where audience’s may escape to battling the known to the unknown."
In the two projects shown above—Only I Would Count Stars At Night and By Tomorrow We’ll Be Lost— Wong creates new worlds that viewers will want to step into. Currently, Wong is working on her last year of her degree and planning for her graduate show in April. To see more of her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vanessa Krystin Wong
Vancouver artist Vanessa Krystin Wong makes works about nature and decay. As the artist describes her art practice,
"My works derive from the unexplainable awe and wanderlust of decay and ruin, using natural aesthetics and forms. The emotional affects placed upon my works is juxtaposed with the explorations of why such aesthetics of decay create a sense of beauty that cannot be definitively explained, other than a sense of curiosity and magnetism. Through beautifully haunting and ethereal materialities, an otherworldly environment is created where audience’s may escape to battling the known to the unknown."
In the two projects shown above—Only I Would Count Stars At Night and By Tomorrow We’ll Be Lost— Wong creates new worlds that viewers will want to step into. Currently, Wong is working on her last year of her degree and planning for her graduate show in April. To see more of her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Billy Kidd
In this series, Billy Kidd, a photographer from Brooklyn, took stunning photos of decaying flowers. These shots are dramatic with deep shadows and explosions of colour, yet they are full of elegance. Kidd works mostly in fashion photography, and this series is an anomaly is his portfolio. I find it interesting how fashion photographers treat other subject in much the same manner and one would clothing. They know how to make the colours and textures pop with just the right hint of romanticism. For more of Kidd’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Billy Kidd
In this series, Billy Kidd, a photographer from Brooklyn, took stunning photos of decaying flowers. These shots are dramatic with deep shadows and explosions of colour, yet they are full of elegance. Kidd works mostly in fashion photography, and this series is an anomaly is his portfolio. I find it interesting how fashion photographers treat other subject in much the same manner and one would clothing. They know how to make the colours and textures pop with just the right hint of romanticism. For more of Kidd’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Billy Kidd
In this series, Billy Kidd, a photographer from Brooklyn, took stunning photos of decaying flowers. These shots are dramatic with deep shadows and explosions of colour, yet they are full of elegance. Kidd works mostly in fashion photography, and this series is an anomaly is his portfolio. I find it interesting how fashion photographers treat other subject in much the same manner and one would clothing. They know how to make the colours and textures pop with just the right hint of romanticism. For more of Kidd’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Billy Kidd
In this series, Billy Kidd, a photographer from Brooklyn, took stunning photos of decaying flowers. These shots are dramatic with deep shadows and explosions of colour, yet they are full of elegance. Kidd works mostly in fashion photography, and this series is an anomaly is his portfolio. I find it interesting how fashion photographers treat other subject in much the same manner and one would clothing. They know how to make the colours and textures pop with just the right hint of romanticism. For more of Kidd’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Billy Kidd
In this series, Billy Kidd, a photographer from Brooklyn, took stunning photos of decaying flowers. These shots are dramatic with deep shadows and explosions of colour, yet they are full of elegance. Kidd works mostly in fashion photography, and this series is an anomaly is his portfolio. I find it interesting how fashion photographers treat other subject in much the same manner and one would clothing. They know how to make the colours and textures pop with just the right hint of romanticism. For more of Kidd’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Billy Kidd
In this series, Billy Kidd, a photographer from Brooklyn, took stunning photos of decaying flowers. These shots are dramatic with deep shadows and explosions of colour, yet they are full of elegance. Kidd works mostly in fashion photography, and this series is an anomaly is his portfolio. I find it interesting how fashion photographers treat other subject in much the same manner and one would clothing. They know how to make the colours and textures pop with just the right hint of romanticism. For more of Kidd’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Billy Kidd
In this series, Billy Kidd, a photographer from Brooklyn, took stunning photos of decaying flowers. These shots are dramatic with deep shadows and explosions of colour, yet they are full of elegance. Kidd works mostly in fashion photography, and this series is an anomaly is his portfolio. I find it interesting how fashion photographers treat other subject in much the same manner and one would clothing. They know how to make the colours and textures pop with just the right hint of romanticism. For more of Kidd’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Billy Kidd
In this series, Billy Kidd, a photographer from Brooklyn, took stunning photos of decaying flowers. These shots are dramatic with deep shadows and explosions of colour, yet they are full of elegance. Kidd works mostly in fashion photography, and this series is an anomaly is his portfolio. I find it interesting how fashion photographers treat other subject in much the same manner and one would clothing. They know how to make the colours and textures pop with just the right hint of romanticism. For more of Kidd’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Billy Kidd
In this series, Billy Kidd, a photographer from Brooklyn, took stunning photos of decaying flowers. These shots are dramatic with deep shadows and explosions of colour, yet they are full of elegance. Kidd works mostly in fashion photography, and this series is an anomaly is his portfolio. I find it interesting how fashion photographers treat other subject in much the same manner and one would clothing. They know how to make the colours and textures pop with just the right hint of romanticism. For more of Kidd’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mathilde Roussel: Living Art
The works of Paris-based artist Mathilde Roussel revolve around the themes of life and decay in nature. Using vegetation and other living organisms as media in her work, Roussel explores the cycle of life and death.
Homo Arboretum is one of these living works, wrinkling and filling out with the changing weather conditions. Designed in the shape of human organs, it is a symbol of the lungs that breathe life into the heart of the city of Nashville. What is most heart-warming (no pun intended) about this piece is that it was a collaborative effort — it is composed of red clothing donated and stitched together by Nashville residents. It has received positive response in Nashville, and appeared so huggable to young children that the artist eventually had to have a guardrail built around it. (Can you blame the little ones? It is a veritable pillow play structure.)
In another work, entitled Echology, Roussel filled etched glass jars with natural substances that represented human body fluids and substances. With time, the living substances slowly changed, echoing the process of metamorphosis and decay that our own body parts, substances and fluids undergo when their life source is cut off. [To see the before and after shots of the substances, click here]
Similarly, her series Lives of Grass is another metaphor for the transformation of the human body over time. As described on her website, “Time sculpts the forms, makes them change and then decay”. These sculptures also draw attention to the fact that food (here represented by the wheat grass) has a profound impact on living beings, becoming a component of our body and affecting every single organ system once ingested. With this work, Roussel hopes to make viewers more sensitive to food and nature cycles and, on a greater scale, to the issues of abundance and famine, so that we may be more aware of our global reality.
For more fantastic living art, I encourage you to visit Roussel’s website here. 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Mathilde Roussel: Living Art
The works of Paris-based artist Mathilde Roussel revolve around the themes of life and decay in nature. Using vegetation and other living organisms as media in her work, Roussel explores the cycle of life and death.
Homo Arboretum is one of these living works, wrinkling and filling out with the changing weather conditions. Designed in the shape of human organs, it is a symbol of the lungs that breathe life into the heart of the city of Nashville. What is most heart-warming (no pun intended) about this piece is that it was a collaborative effort — it is composed of red clothing donated and stitched together by Nashville residents. It has received positive response in Nashville, and appeared so huggable to young children that the artist eventually had to have a guardrail built around it. (Can you blame the little ones? It is a veritable pillow play structure.)
In another work, entitled Echology, Roussel filled etched glass jars with natural substances that represented human body fluids and substances. With time, the living substances slowly changed, echoing the process of metamorphosis and decay that our own body parts, substances and fluids undergo when their life source is cut off. [To see the before and after shots of the substances, click here]
Similarly, her series Lives of Grass is another metaphor for the transformation of the human body over time. As described on her website, “Time sculpts the forms, makes them change and then decay”. These sculptures also draw attention to the fact that food (here represented by the wheat grass) has a profound impact on living beings, becoming a component of our body and affecting every single organ system once ingested. With this work, Roussel hopes to make viewers more sensitive to food and nature cycles and, on a greater scale, to the issues of abundance and famine, so that we may be more aware of our global reality.
For more fantastic living art, I encourage you to visit Roussel’s website here. 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Mathilde Roussel: Living Art
The works of Paris-based artist Mathilde Roussel revolve around the themes of life and decay in nature. Using vegetation and other living organisms as media in her work, Roussel explores the cycle of life and death.
Homo Arboretum is one of these living works, wrinkling and filling out with the changing weather conditions. Designed in the shape of human organs, it is a symbol of the lungs that breathe life into the heart of the city of Nashville. What is most heart-warming (no pun intended) about this piece is that it was a collaborative effort — it is composed of red clothing donated and stitched together by Nashville residents. It has received positive response in Nashville, and appeared so huggable to young children that the artist eventually had to have a guardrail built around it. (Can you blame the little ones? It is a veritable pillow play structure.)
In another work, entitled Echology, Roussel filled etched glass jars with natural substances that represented human body fluids and substances. With time, the living substances slowly changed, echoing the process of metamorphosis and decay that our own body parts, substances and fluids undergo when their life source is cut off. [To see the before and after shots of the substances, click here]
Similarly, her series Lives of Grass is another metaphor for the transformation of the human body over time. As described on her website, “Time sculpts the forms, makes them change and then decay”. These sculptures also draw attention to the fact that food (here represented by the wheat grass) has a profound impact on living beings, becoming a component of our body and affecting every single organ system once ingested. With this work, Roussel hopes to make viewers more sensitive to food and nature cycles and, on a greater scale, to the issues of abundance and famine, so that we may be more aware of our global reality.
For more fantastic living art, I encourage you to visit Roussel’s website here. 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Mathilde Roussel: Living Art
The works of Paris-based artist Mathilde Roussel revolve around the themes of life and decay in nature. Using vegetation and other living organisms as media in her work, Roussel explores the cycle of life and death.
Homo Arboretum is one of these living works, wrinkling and filling out with the changing weather conditions. Designed in the shape of human organs, it is a symbol of the lungs that breathe life into the heart of the city of Nashville. What is most heart-warming (no pun intended) about this piece is that it was a collaborative effort — it is composed of red clothing donated and stitched together by Nashville residents. It has received positive response in Nashville, and appeared so huggable to young children that the artist eventually had to have a guardrail built around it. (Can you blame the little ones? It is a veritable pillow play structure.)
In another work, entitled Echology, Roussel filled etched glass jars with natural substances that represented human body fluids and substances. With time, the living substances slowly changed, echoing the process of metamorphosis and decay that our own body parts, substances and fluids undergo when their life source is cut off. [To see the before and after shots of the substances, click here]
Similarly, her series Lives of Grass is another metaphor for the transformation of the human body over time. As described on her website, “Time sculpts the forms, makes them change and then decay”. These sculptures also draw attention to the fact that food (here represented by the wheat grass) has a profound impact on living beings, becoming a component of our body and affecting every single organ system once ingested. With this work, Roussel hopes to make viewers more sensitive to food and nature cycles and, on a greater scale, to the issues of abundance and famine, so that we may be more aware of our global reality.
For more fantastic living art, I encourage you to visit Roussel’s website here. 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Mathilde Roussel: Living Art
The works of Paris-based artist Mathilde Roussel revolve around the themes of life and decay in nature. Using vegetation and other living organisms as media in her work, Roussel explores the cycle of life and death.
Homo Arboretum is one of these living works, wrinkling and filling out with the changing weather conditions. Designed in the shape of human organs, it is a symbol of the lungs that breathe life into the heart of the city of Nashville. What is most heart-warming (no pun intended) about this piece is that it was a collaborative effort — it is composed of red clothing donated and stitched together by Nashville residents. It has received positive response in Nashville, and appeared so huggable to young children that the artist eventually had to have a guardrail built around it. (Can you blame the little ones? It is a veritable pillow play structure.)
In another work, entitled Echology, Roussel filled etched glass jars with natural substances that represented human body fluids and substances. With time, the living substances slowly changed, echoing the process of metamorphosis and decay that our own body parts, substances and fluids undergo when their life source is cut off. [To see the before and after shots of the substances, click here]
Similarly, her series Lives of Grass is another metaphor for the transformation of the human body over time. As described on her website, “Time sculpts the forms, makes them change and then decay”. These sculptures also draw attention to the fact that food (here represented by the wheat grass) has a profound impact on living beings, becoming a component of our body and affecting every single organ system once ingested. With this work, Roussel hopes to make viewers more sensitive to food and nature cycles and, on a greater scale, to the issues of abundance and famine, so that we may be more aware of our global reality.
For more fantastic living art, I encourage you to visit Roussel’s website here. 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Mathilde Roussel: Living Art
The works of Paris-based artist Mathilde Roussel revolve around the themes of life and decay in nature. Using vegetation and other living organisms as media in her work, Roussel explores the cycle of life and death.
Homo Arboretum is one of these living works, wrinkling and filling out with the changing weather conditions. Designed in the shape of human organs, it is a symbol of the lungs that breathe life into the heart of the city of Nashville. What is most heart-warming (no pun intended) about this piece is that it was a collaborative effort — it is composed of red clothing donated and stitched together by Nashville residents. It has received positive response in Nashville, and appeared so huggable to young children that the artist eventually had to have a guardrail built around it. (Can you blame the little ones? It is a veritable pillow play structure.)
In another work, entitled Echology, Roussel filled etched glass jars with natural substances that represented human body fluids and substances. With time, the living substances slowly changed, echoing the process of metamorphosis and decay that our own body parts, substances and fluids undergo when their life source is cut off. [To see the before and after shots of the substances, click here]
Similarly, her series Lives of Grass is another metaphor for the transformation of the human body over time. As described on her website, “Time sculpts the forms, makes them change and then decay”. These sculptures also draw attention to the fact that food (here represented by the wheat grass) has a profound impact on living beings, becoming a component of our body and affecting every single organ system once ingested. With this work, Roussel hopes to make viewers more sensitive to food and nature cycles and, on a greater scale, to the issues of abundance and famine, so that we may be more aware of our global reality.
For more fantastic living art, I encourage you to visit Roussel’s website here. 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Mathilde Roussel: Living Art
The works of Paris-based artist Mathilde Roussel revolve around the themes of life and decay in nature. Using vegetation and other living organisms as media in her work, Roussel explores the cycle of life and death.
Homo Arboretum is one of these living works, wrinkling and filling out with the changing weather conditions. Designed in the shape of human organs, it is a symbol of the lungs that breathe life into the heart of the city of Nashville. What is most heart-warming (no pun intended) about this piece is that it was a collaborative effort — it is composed of red clothing donated and stitched together by Nashville residents. It has received positive response in Nashville, and appeared so huggable to young children that the artist eventually had to have a guardrail built around it. (Can you blame the little ones? It is a veritable pillow play structure.)
In another work, entitled Echology, Roussel filled etched glass jars with natural substances that represented human body fluids and substances. With time, the living substances slowly changed, echoing the process of metamorphosis and decay that our own body parts, substances and fluids undergo when their life source is cut off. [To see the before and after shots of the substances, click here]
Similarly, her series Lives of Grass is another metaphor for the transformation of the human body over time. As described on her website, “Time sculpts the forms, makes them change and then decay”. These sculptures also draw attention to the fact that food (here represented by the wheat grass) has a profound impact on living beings, becoming a component of our body and affecting every single organ system once ingested. With this work, Roussel hopes to make viewers more sensitive to food and nature cycles and, on a greater scale, to the issues of abundance and famine, so that we may be more aware of our global reality.
For more fantastic living art, I encourage you to visit Roussel’s website here. 
- Gabrielle Doiron

Mathilde Roussel: Living Art


The works of Paris-based artist Mathilde Roussel revolve around the themes of life and decay in nature. Using vegetation and other living organisms as media in her work, Roussel explores the cycle of life and death.

Homo Arboretum is one of these living works, wrinkling and filling out with the changing weather conditions. Designed in the shape of human organs, it is a symbol of the lungs that breathe life into the heart of the city of Nashville. What is most heart-warming (no pun intended) about this piece is that it was a collaborative effort — it is composed of red clothing donated and stitched together by Nashville residents. It has received positive response in Nashville, and appeared so huggable to young children that the artist eventually had to have a guardrail built around it. (Can you blame the little ones? It is a veritable pillow play structure.)

In another work, entitled Echology, Roussel filled etched glass jars with natural substances that represented human body fluids and substances. With time, the living substances slowly changed, echoing the process of metamorphosis and decay that our own body parts, substances and fluids undergo when their life source is cut off. [To see the before and after shots of the substances, click here]

Similarly, her series Lives of Grass is another metaphor for the transformation of the human body over time. As described on her website, “Time sculpts the forms, makes them change and then decay”. These sculptures also draw attention to the fact that food (here represented by the wheat grass) has a profound impact on living beings, becoming a component of our body and affecting every single organ system once ingested. With this work, Roussel hopes to make viewers more sensitive to food and nature cycles and, on a greater scale, to the issues of abundance and famine, so that we may be more aware of our global reality.

For more fantastic living art, I encourage you to visit Roussel’s website here.

- Gabrielle Doiron

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

7 Photos
/ art science artscience art and science nature decay life environment sculpture conceptual art Nashville Mathilde Roussel Gabrielle Doiron

Contact Us

Please include your email address