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Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones

Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?

The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.

With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.

Visit the MeMo website.

- Lee Jones

8 Photos
/ art design death jessica charlesworth MeMo technology
A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones
A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones
A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones
A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones
A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones
A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones
A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones

A Form of Happiness: Dopamine

We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.

A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 

Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio

- Lee Jones

7 Photos
/ art design jessica charlesworth a form of happiness dopamine tim parsons speculative design product design chemistry science

Hoverboards Just Became Real (or Not?) - HUVrTech

Came across this video online and just had to share. A company called HUVrTech has launched a hoverboard set to be released in December 2014. Whether it’s real or not, it’s definitely a brilliant marketing stunt. 

Here’s their story:

"What began as a summer project in 2010 at the MIT Physics Graduate Program has evolved into one of the most exciting independent products to be developed out of MIT since the high-powered lithium-ion batteries developed by Yet-Ming Chiang in 2001. Our team consists of materials science, electricity & magnetism experts who’ve solved an important part of one of science’s mysteries: the key to antigravity.

The HUVr Board team ultimately aims to improve the efficiency, speed and sustainability of mass transportation. Yet rather than spend several more years closed off from the world while investing in research and development, the team and our world-class investors have worked to change the economics R&D by marketing this exciting consumer product in order to fund ongoing R&D.”

Visit their website here

- Lee Jones

arthoverboardhuvrtechdesigntechnology

Kickstarter for Little Robot Friends by Aesthetec

Aesthetec, an interaction design and technology company from Toronto, has developed cute little robots with their own unique and customizable personalities. Their Kickstarter project, called Little Robot Friends, includes beginner sets all the way up to developer kits. These little robots include smart technologies. As the team describes the little friends:

They can sense the amount of light in a room, they can hear with a small integrated microphone, they can detect your touch and they can also communicate with other Little Robot Friends using infrared light (like your TV remote). They have two RGB LED eyes and a 250mW speaker for expressing their current mood. The brain is an 8-bit 32K microcontroller that provides a lot of space for coding behaviours and storing memories.”

They can become your friend, and even friends with each other. With the customizable kit, you can set your robot’s personality on 6 different settings - from brave to timid, happy to angry and several others.

The project was inspired by Aesthetec’s first venture into personalized robots. Their exhibit Nicebots (2004), which was at the Modern Art Museum in Nice, France, included 30 robots who roamed the museum. As the team describes the project, “By the end of the project we had 30 robots, each with their own quirks and charms.”

You can see more of Aesthetec’s interactive projects on their website. 

- Lee Jones

artdesigntechnologyaestheteclittle robot friendskickstartertorontolee jones
Algaculture
Imagine having the ability to convert light into food. This, as we know, is photosynthesis and plants have been doing it for millennia. But what about humans? According to British artists Michael Burton and Michiko Nitta (aka Burton Nitta), this may be more of a reality than inconceivability. With their collaborative project, Algaculture, the two artists have created a wearable suit that not only is able to perform photosynthesis, but feeds its wearer with algae. Thus, the relationship between the human and food becomes a symbiotic one, in which the human and the algae depend on one another to exist. While algae may not seem like the most appetising meal, the Algaculture suit certainly presents an alternative method for fuelling the human body and perhaps even a solution to an escalating global food crisis.
The Algaculture suit operates by means of a series of small tubes connected to the mouth of the wearer that envelope the head, bust, arms, and upper back resulting in a sort of sci-fi helmet-backpack amalgamation. The algae are produced by light through a photosynthetic process and are fed by the carbon dioxide emitted by the human, thereby facilitating the symbiosis.
As an artistic vision, the suit rebels against the ever-persisting traditions of Western art production – it is not intended to be hung on a wall in a climate-controlled space to merely be gazed at. Rather, Burton Nitta’s creative project recalls the utilitarian traditions and principles of Aboriginal art practices where art and practicality are unquestioningly merged. Burton Nitta not only push the boundaries of biological processes with this project, but also set a precedent for redefining the landscape of contemporary art. Algaculture is at once a practical life-sustaining object, a scientific innovation, and an aesthetically intriguing work of art.
- Leona Nikolic
(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)
Algaculture
Imagine having the ability to convert light into food. This, as we know, is photosynthesis and plants have been doing it for millennia. But what about humans? According to British artists Michael Burton and Michiko Nitta (aka Burton Nitta), this may be more of a reality than inconceivability. With their collaborative project, Algaculture, the two artists have created a wearable suit that not only is able to perform photosynthesis, but feeds its wearer with algae. Thus, the relationship between the human and food becomes a symbiotic one, in which the human and the algae depend on one another to exist. While algae may not seem like the most appetising meal, the Algaculture suit certainly presents an alternative method for fuelling the human body and perhaps even a solution to an escalating global food crisis.
The Algaculture suit operates by means of a series of small tubes connected to the mouth of the wearer that envelope the head, bust, arms, and upper back resulting in a sort of sci-fi helmet-backpack amalgamation. The algae are produced by light through a photosynthetic process and are fed by the carbon dioxide emitted by the human, thereby facilitating the symbiosis.
As an artistic vision, the suit rebels against the ever-persisting traditions of Western art production – it is not intended to be hung on a wall in a climate-controlled space to merely be gazed at. Rather, Burton Nitta’s creative project recalls the utilitarian traditions and principles of Aboriginal art practices where art and practicality are unquestioningly merged. Burton Nitta not only push the boundaries of biological processes with this project, but also set a precedent for redefining the landscape of contemporary art. Algaculture is at once a practical life-sustaining object, a scientific innovation, and an aesthetically intriguing work of art.
- Leona Nikolic
(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Algaculture

Imagine having the ability to convert light into food. This, as we know, is photosynthesis and plants have been doing it for millennia. But what about humans? According to British artists Michael Burton and Michiko Nitta (aka Burton Nitta), this may be more of a reality than inconceivability. With their collaborative project, Algaculture, the two artists have created a wearable suit that not only is able to perform photosynthesis, but feeds its wearer with algae. Thus, the relationship between the human and food becomes a symbiotic one, in which the human and the algae depend on one another to exist. While algae may not seem like the most appetising meal, the Algaculture suit certainly presents an alternative method for fuelling the human body and perhaps even a solution to an escalating global food crisis.

The Algaculture suit operates by means of a series of small tubes connected to the mouth of the wearer that envelope the head, bust, arms, and upper back resulting in a sort of sci-fi helmet-backpack amalgamation. The algae are produced by light through a photosynthetic process and are fed by the carbon dioxide emitted by the human, thereby facilitating the symbiosis.

As an artistic vision, the suit rebels against the ever-persisting traditions of Western art production – it is not intended to be hung on a wall in a climate-controlled space to merely be gazed at. Rather, Burton Nitta’s creative project recalls the utilitarian traditions and principles of Aboriginal art practices where art and practicality are unquestioningly merged. Burton Nitta not only push the boundaries of biological processes with this project, but also set a precedent for redefining the landscape of contemporary art. Algaculture is at once a practical life-sustaining object, a scientific innovation, and an aesthetically intriguing work of art.

- Leona Nikolic

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ ArtScience art science design Michael Burton Michiko Nitta Burton Nitta algae photosynthesis symbiosis
3D-REX: A 3D Printed Tyrannosaurus Rex Sculpture
Move your wall hangings into storage, namisu from Madrid and Edinburgh has created something a bit different for your wall. Their Kickstarter project for 3D printed Tyrannosaurus Rex Sculptures aims to bring together the tradition of fossil collecting and displaying with new technologies. In doing so this design team has played with nature’s creations to influence some of their own. The sculptures they have designed are wire frame fossils created with Selective Laser Sintering, which the team states “feels and looks more like something between wood and stone, rather than plastic. It actually feels like a fossil!” The project comes in two designs, one for walls, and one for tables. You can check out the rest of their Kickstarter project, and their video discussion, here. 
- Lee Jones 
3D-REX: A 3D Printed Tyrannosaurus Rex Sculpture
Move your wall hangings into storage, namisu from Madrid and Edinburgh has created something a bit different for your wall. Their Kickstarter project for 3D printed Tyrannosaurus Rex Sculptures aims to bring together the tradition of fossil collecting and displaying with new technologies. In doing so this design team has played with nature’s creations to influence some of their own. The sculptures they have designed are wire frame fossils created with Selective Laser Sintering, which the team states “feels and looks more like something between wood and stone, rather than plastic. It actually feels like a fossil!” The project comes in two designs, one for walls, and one for tables. You can check out the rest of their Kickstarter project, and their video discussion, here. 
- Lee Jones 
3D-REX: A 3D Printed Tyrannosaurus Rex Sculpture
Move your wall hangings into storage, namisu from Madrid and Edinburgh has created something a bit different for your wall. Their Kickstarter project for 3D printed Tyrannosaurus Rex Sculptures aims to bring together the tradition of fossil collecting and displaying with new technologies. In doing so this design team has played with nature’s creations to influence some of their own. The sculptures they have designed are wire frame fossils created with Selective Laser Sintering, which the team states “feels and looks more like something between wood and stone, rather than plastic. It actually feels like a fossil!” The project comes in two designs, one for walls, and one for tables. You can check out the rest of their Kickstarter project, and their video discussion, here. 
- Lee Jones 
3D-REX: A 3D Printed Tyrannosaurus Rex Sculpture
Move your wall hangings into storage, namisu from Madrid and Edinburgh has created something a bit different for your wall. Their Kickstarter project for 3D printed Tyrannosaurus Rex Sculptures aims to bring together the tradition of fossil collecting and displaying with new technologies. In doing so this design team has played with nature’s creations to influence some of their own. The sculptures they have designed are wire frame fossils created with Selective Laser Sintering, which the team states “feels and looks more like something between wood and stone, rather than plastic. It actually feels like a fossil!” The project comes in two designs, one for walls, and one for tables. You can check out the rest of their Kickstarter project, and their video discussion, here. 
- Lee Jones 

3D-REX: A 3D Printed Tyrannosaurus Rex Sculpture

Move your wall hangings into storage, namisu from Madrid and Edinburgh has created something a bit different for your wall. Their Kickstarter project for 3D printed Tyrannosaurus Rex Sculptures aims to bring together the tradition of fossil collecting and displaying with new technologies. In doing so this design team has played with nature’s creations to influence some of their own. The sculptures they have designed are wire frame fossils created with Selective Laser Sintering, which the team states “feels and looks more like something between wood and stone, rather than plastic. It actually feels like a fossil!” The project comes in two designs, one for walls, and one for tables. You can check out the rest of their Kickstarter project, and their video discussion, here

- Lee Jones 

4 Photos
/ design kickstarter namisu t-rex sculpture 3d printer 3d printing
Jake Evill’s Cortex: Exoskeleton Protecting the Internal Skeleton
Cortex is a project that aims to replace casts, and get rid of all the sweaty, uncomfortable experiences that go along with them. As Jake Evill describes the issues behind this work,
"After many centuries of splints and cumbersome plaster casts that have been the itchy and smelly bane of millions of children, adults and the aged alike, the world over, we at last bring fracture support into the 21st century. The Cortex Exoskeletal Cast provides a highly technical and trauma zone localized support system that is fully ventilated, super light, shower friendly, hygienic, recyclable and extremely cool!"
It’s so great when design solves the problems of everyday life. In his analysis of the cast and its impact, Evill goes through all the pros and cons of casts (both plaster and fiberglass). Basically, casts suck. They’re heavy, uncomfortable, get in the way of having showers, bad for the environment, and they sometimes even smell. Ew! On the plus side, plaster is low cost, low tech, and easily moldable. Fiberglass is light and strong. But it’s not one or the other, cheap or great, Evill has come up with a way to capture everything needed in a cast. This type of innovative thinking, of capturing it all, is getting me more and more excited about the possibilities of 3D printers. To check out Evill’s portfolio, click here. 
- Lee Jones
P.S. Drop us a line - what do you think 3D printers should do next?
Jake Evill’s Cortex: Exoskeleton Protecting the Internal Skeleton
Cortex is a project that aims to replace casts, and get rid of all the sweaty, uncomfortable experiences that go along with them. As Jake Evill describes the issues behind this work,
"After many centuries of splints and cumbersome plaster casts that have been the itchy and smelly bane of millions of children, adults and the aged alike, the world over, we at last bring fracture support into the 21st century. The Cortex Exoskeletal Cast provides a highly technical and trauma zone localized support system that is fully ventilated, super light, shower friendly, hygienic, recyclable and extremely cool!"
It’s so great when design solves the problems of everyday life. In his analysis of the cast and its impact, Evill goes through all the pros and cons of casts (both plaster and fiberglass). Basically, casts suck. They’re heavy, uncomfortable, get in the way of having showers, bad for the environment, and they sometimes even smell. Ew! On the plus side, plaster is low cost, low tech, and easily moldable. Fiberglass is light and strong. But it’s not one or the other, cheap or great, Evill has come up with a way to capture everything needed in a cast. This type of innovative thinking, of capturing it all, is getting me more and more excited about the possibilities of 3D printers. To check out Evill’s portfolio, click here. 
- Lee Jones
P.S. Drop us a line - what do you think 3D printers should do next?
Jake Evill’s Cortex: Exoskeleton Protecting the Internal Skeleton
Cortex is a project that aims to replace casts, and get rid of all the sweaty, uncomfortable experiences that go along with them. As Jake Evill describes the issues behind this work,
"After many centuries of splints and cumbersome plaster casts that have been the itchy and smelly bane of millions of children, adults and the aged alike, the world over, we at last bring fracture support into the 21st century. The Cortex Exoskeletal Cast provides a highly technical and trauma zone localized support system that is fully ventilated, super light, shower friendly, hygienic, recyclable and extremely cool!"
It’s so great when design solves the problems of everyday life. In his analysis of the cast and its impact, Evill goes through all the pros and cons of casts (both plaster and fiberglass). Basically, casts suck. They’re heavy, uncomfortable, get in the way of having showers, bad for the environment, and they sometimes even smell. Ew! On the plus side, plaster is low cost, low tech, and easily moldable. Fiberglass is light and strong. But it’s not one or the other, cheap or great, Evill has come up with a way to capture everything needed in a cast. This type of innovative thinking, of capturing it all, is getting me more and more excited about the possibilities of 3D printers. To check out Evill’s portfolio, click here. 
- Lee Jones
P.S. Drop us a line - what do you think 3D printers should do next?
Jake Evill’s Cortex: Exoskeleton Protecting the Internal Skeleton
Cortex is a project that aims to replace casts, and get rid of all the sweaty, uncomfortable experiences that go along with them. As Jake Evill describes the issues behind this work,
"After many centuries of splints and cumbersome plaster casts that have been the itchy and smelly bane of millions of children, adults and the aged alike, the world over, we at last bring fracture support into the 21st century. The Cortex Exoskeletal Cast provides a highly technical and trauma zone localized support system that is fully ventilated, super light, shower friendly, hygienic, recyclable and extremely cool!"
It’s so great when design solves the problems of everyday life. In his analysis of the cast and its impact, Evill goes through all the pros and cons of casts (both plaster and fiberglass). Basically, casts suck. They’re heavy, uncomfortable, get in the way of having showers, bad for the environment, and they sometimes even smell. Ew! On the plus side, plaster is low cost, low tech, and easily moldable. Fiberglass is light and strong. But it’s not one or the other, cheap or great, Evill has come up with a way to capture everything needed in a cast. This type of innovative thinking, of capturing it all, is getting me more and more excited about the possibilities of 3D printers. To check out Evill’s portfolio, click here. 
- Lee Jones
P.S. Drop us a line - what do you think 3D printers should do next?
Jake Evill’s Cortex: Exoskeleton Protecting the Internal Skeleton
Cortex is a project that aims to replace casts, and get rid of all the sweaty, uncomfortable experiences that go along with them. As Jake Evill describes the issues behind this work,
"After many centuries of splints and cumbersome plaster casts that have been the itchy and smelly bane of millions of children, adults and the aged alike, the world over, we at last bring fracture support into the 21st century. The Cortex Exoskeletal Cast provides a highly technical and trauma zone localized support system that is fully ventilated, super light, shower friendly, hygienic, recyclable and extremely cool!"
It’s so great when design solves the problems of everyday life. In his analysis of the cast and its impact, Evill goes through all the pros and cons of casts (both plaster and fiberglass). Basically, casts suck. They’re heavy, uncomfortable, get in the way of having showers, bad for the environment, and they sometimes even smell. Ew! On the plus side, plaster is low cost, low tech, and easily moldable. Fiberglass is light and strong. But it’s not one or the other, cheap or great, Evill has come up with a way to capture everything needed in a cast. This type of innovative thinking, of capturing it all, is getting me more and more excited about the possibilities of 3D printers. To check out Evill’s portfolio, click here. 
- Lee Jones
P.S. Drop us a line - what do you think 3D printers should do next?

Jake Evill’s Cortex: Exoskeleton Protecting the Internal Skeleton

Cortex is a project that aims to replace casts, and get rid of all the sweaty, uncomfortable experiences that go along with them. As Jake Evill describes the issues behind this work,

"After many centuries of splints and cumbersome plaster casts that have been the itchy and smelly bane of millions of children, adults and the aged alike, the world over, we at last bring fracture support into the 21st century. The Cortex Exoskeletal Cast provides a highly technical and trauma zone localized support system that is fully ventilated, super light, shower friendly, hygienic, recyclable and extremely cool!"

It’s so great when design solves the problems of everyday life. In his analysis of the cast and its impact, Evill goes through all the pros and cons of casts (both plaster and fiberglass). Basically, casts suck. They’re heavy, uncomfortable, get in the way of having showers, bad for the environment, and they sometimes even smell. Ew! On the plus side, plaster is low cost, low tech, and easily moldable. Fiberglass is light and strong. But it’s not one or the other, cheap or great, Evill has come up with a way to capture everything needed in a cast. This type of innovative thinking, of capturing it all, is getting me more and more excited about the possibilities of 3D printers. To check out Evill’s portfolio, click here. 

- Lee Jones

P.S. Drop us a line - what do you think 3D printers should do next?

5 Photos
/ design Jake Evill Cortex Cortex Exoskeleton cast 3D Printing Lee Jones
About Two Squares: The Unusual Children’s Literature of El Lissitzky 
How would you simultaneously explain the social and astrophysical revolutions of the early twentieth century to a child? If you were El Lissitzky (1890-1941), a Russian artist and co-founder of Suprematism who no doubt required a capacious closet for his many hats (architect, designer, typographer, teacher), the answer would involve two squares and an approach to children’s literature that was itself revolutionary. In the protean post-war period, Lissitzky re-imagined how text and pictures could be used together to tell a story through the bold abstraction of geometry.     
From the description: 
“El Lissitzky’s first suprematist book is a story about how two squares, one red, one black, transform a world. It is Lissitzky’s “scientific romance,” an allegory of the fourth dimension and its effect on the three-dimensional world […] It marked the beginning of a new graphic art and is among the most important publications in the history of the avant-garde in typography and graphic design.”
Lissitzky’s book was recently featured in the Museum of Modern Art’s Century of the Child exhibition; in it, the curators noted that “the obtuse poetic terseness and unflinching abstraction, unfamiliar to children’s eyes, didn’t connect with its target audience.” 
To better see why children didn’t enjoy the book, an online version is available here — but perhaps they would have preferred the animated version.  
- Alex Tesar
About Two Squares: The Unusual Children’s Literature of El Lissitzky 
How would you simultaneously explain the social and astrophysical revolutions of the early twentieth century to a child? If you were El Lissitzky (1890-1941), a Russian artist and co-founder of Suprematism who no doubt required a capacious closet for his many hats (architect, designer, typographer, teacher), the answer would involve two squares and an approach to children’s literature that was itself revolutionary. In the protean post-war period, Lissitzky re-imagined how text and pictures could be used together to tell a story through the bold abstraction of geometry.     
From the description: 
“El Lissitzky’s first suprematist book is a story about how two squares, one red, one black, transform a world. It is Lissitzky’s “scientific romance,” an allegory of the fourth dimension and its effect on the three-dimensional world […] It marked the beginning of a new graphic art and is among the most important publications in the history of the avant-garde in typography and graphic design.”
Lissitzky’s book was recently featured in the Museum of Modern Art’s Century of the Child exhibition; in it, the curators noted that “the obtuse poetic terseness and unflinching abstraction, unfamiliar to children’s eyes, didn’t connect with its target audience.” 
To better see why children didn’t enjoy the book, an online version is available here — but perhaps they would have preferred the animated version.  
- Alex Tesar
About Two Squares: The Unusual Children’s Literature of El Lissitzky 
How would you simultaneously explain the social and astrophysical revolutions of the early twentieth century to a child? If you were El Lissitzky (1890-1941), a Russian artist and co-founder of Suprematism who no doubt required a capacious closet for his many hats (architect, designer, typographer, teacher), the answer would involve two squares and an approach to children’s literature that was itself revolutionary. In the protean post-war period, Lissitzky re-imagined how text and pictures could be used together to tell a story through the bold abstraction of geometry.     
From the description: 
“El Lissitzky’s first suprematist book is a story about how two squares, one red, one black, transform a world. It is Lissitzky’s “scientific romance,” an allegory of the fourth dimension and its effect on the three-dimensional world […] It marked the beginning of a new graphic art and is among the most important publications in the history of the avant-garde in typography and graphic design.”
Lissitzky’s book was recently featured in the Museum of Modern Art’s Century of the Child exhibition; in it, the curators noted that “the obtuse poetic terseness and unflinching abstraction, unfamiliar to children’s eyes, didn’t connect with its target audience.” 
To better see why children didn’t enjoy the book, an online version is available here — but perhaps they would have preferred the animated version.  
- Alex Tesar

About Two Squares: The Unusual Children’s Literature of El Lissitzky

How would you simultaneously explain the social and astrophysical revolutions of the early twentieth century to a child? If you were El Lissitzky (1890-1941), a Russian artist and co-founder of Suprematism who no doubt required a capacious closet for his many hats (architect, designer, typographer, teacher), the answer would involve two squares and an approach to children’s literature that was itself revolutionary. In the protean post-war period, Lissitzky re-imagined how text and pictures could be used together to tell a story through the bold abstraction of geometry.     

From the description:

“El Lissitzky’s first suprematist book is a story about how two squares, one red, one black, transform a world. It is Lissitzky’s “scientific romance,” an allegory of the fourth dimension and its effect on the three-dimensional world […] It marked the beginning of a new graphic art and is among the most important publications in the history of the avant-garde in typography and graphic design.”

Lissitzky’s book was recently featured in the Museum of Modern Art’s Century of the Child exhibition; in it, the curators noted that “the obtuse poetic terseness and unflinching abstraction, unfamiliar to children’s eyes, didn’t connect with its target audience.”

To better see why children didn’t enjoy the book, an online version is available here — but perhaps they would have preferred the animated version.  

- Alex Tesar

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ art design children's lit
Mike Thompson’s Growing Pains 
In his project Growing Pains: Nurturing the Relationship Between Man & Object designer and researcher Mike Thompson toys with the notion of death, imagining a future wherein our bodies could cultivate an object that would represent us beyond the grave. If this design were possible, Thompson writes that “we would grow death inside of us, forcing us to interact with it on a daily basis whilst nurturing new material in preparation for our decay.”
Over the course of its growth process, we would shape the object under our skin through our physical interaction with it. Effectively, we would be designing our own death. 
 After our death, the object would be extracted from our body and passed onto a loved one as a physical and symbolic representation of ourselves. In the images above, we see Thompson’s imagined object: a simulated bone shaped into a pipe by its agent.
 Although imagined, Thompson’s project presents us with some challenging questions. If we were preparing for our death rather than attempting to run away from it, how might we live differently? If we could design our own death, what form would it take? How would we want to be remembered?  
For more information about this project and others by Thompson, visit his website.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Mike Thompson’s Growing Pains 
In his project Growing Pains: Nurturing the Relationship Between Man & Object designer and researcher Mike Thompson toys with the notion of death, imagining a future wherein our bodies could cultivate an object that would represent us beyond the grave. If this design were possible, Thompson writes that “we would grow death inside of us, forcing us to interact with it on a daily basis whilst nurturing new material in preparation for our decay.”
Over the course of its growth process, we would shape the object under our skin through our physical interaction with it. Effectively, we would be designing our own death. 
 After our death, the object would be extracted from our body and passed onto a loved one as a physical and symbolic representation of ourselves. In the images above, we see Thompson’s imagined object: a simulated bone shaped into a pipe by its agent.
 Although imagined, Thompson’s project presents us with some challenging questions. If we were preparing for our death rather than attempting to run away from it, how might we live differently? If we could design our own death, what form would it take? How would we want to be remembered?  
For more information about this project and others by Thompson, visit his website.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Mike Thompson’s Growing Pains 
In his project Growing Pains: Nurturing the Relationship Between Man & Object designer and researcher Mike Thompson toys with the notion of death, imagining a future wherein our bodies could cultivate an object that would represent us beyond the grave. If this design were possible, Thompson writes that “we would grow death inside of us, forcing us to interact with it on a daily basis whilst nurturing new material in preparation for our decay.”
Over the course of its growth process, we would shape the object under our skin through our physical interaction with it. Effectively, we would be designing our own death. 
 After our death, the object would be extracted from our body and passed onto a loved one as a physical and symbolic representation of ourselves. In the images above, we see Thompson’s imagined object: a simulated bone shaped into a pipe by its agent.
 Although imagined, Thompson’s project presents us with some challenging questions. If we were preparing for our death rather than attempting to run away from it, how might we live differently? If we could design our own death, what form would it take? How would we want to be remembered?  
For more information about this project and others by Thompson, visit his website.
- Gabrielle Doiron

Mike Thompson’s Growing Pains

In his project Growing Pains: Nurturing the Relationship Between Man & Object designer and researcher Mike Thompson toys with the notion of death, imagining a future wherein our bodies could cultivate an object that would represent us beyond the grave. If this design were possible, Thompson writes that “we would grow death inside of us, forcing us to interact with it on a daily basis whilst nurturing new material in preparation for our decay.”

Over the course of its growth process, we would shape the object under our skin through our physical interaction with it. Effectively, we would be designing our own death. 

After our death, the object would be extracted from our body and passed onto a loved one as a physical and symbolic representation of ourselves. In the images above, we see Thompson’s imagined object: a simulated bone shaped into a pipe by its agent.

Although imagined, Thompson’s project presents us with some challenging questions. If we were preparing for our death rather than attempting to run away from it, how might we live differently? If we could design our own death, what form would it take? How would we want to be remembered?  

For more information about this project and others by Thompson, visit his website.

- Gabrielle Doiron

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ art science design death Gabrielle Doiron Mike Thompson technology
TEDxOCADU 
This Saturday, January 19, The Ontario College of Art and Design University hosted its inaugural TEDxOCADU, dedicating a full day to “ideas worth spreading” specifically themed around the powerfully multifaceted concept of Simplexity.
For those who don’t already know, TEDx events are local, independently-organized conference-style gatherings modelled after the TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) format, mission, and brand. TEDxOCADU is the first TEDx event I’ve personally attended, and was a truly inspiring experience.
TEDxOCADU framed Simplexity as “the constant tension between the simple and the complex” – a flexible definition that came to house a plethora of diverse interpretations from its speakers, audience members, talent, and hosts.
Here’s a brief glimpse at what the 12 presenters had to share:
Arianne Schafer, a local urban story teller, discussed the community-building potential of truthful story-telling. In her eyes, exchanges of reciprocal vulnerability and empathy emerge from situations in which strangers are simply invited to share themselves with one another. She encourages everyone to send a love letter to their friend.
Mike Lovas, an Industrial Design student at OCADU currently focused on themes of healthcare and sustainability, recounted his tumultuous path of searching for an education and career trajectory that could guarantee security. As you might expect, he’s concluded that security will no longer suffice as an aspiration, and attests that we learn to embrace the ambiguity and hold faith amidst our uncertainty.
Sara Diamond, President of OCADU, explored the snowballing phenomenon of Big Data, insisting upon our need to actively understand the ways in which our personal production of data is building our identity – in her words, “our personal data portrait”. Such an understanding can function as a mode of self-discovery as well as a way in which to take ownership of this parallel universe we are creating.
David Lewis Peart, a York graduate student focused on “exploring the beneficial use of performance for marginalized youth of colour,” worked with the metaphor of the circle to express his experiences of living and working on the periphery, and facing the simultaneously normalizing and exclusionary forces of the status quo, or centre of the circle. Embracing the margins, he found a place for creativity, autonomy, and reinvention. 
Andrew Lovett-Barron, a designer interested in “ambient interfaces, sentient cities, and our behavioural commons” analysed the impact that the rapidly-changing cityscape has upon our existence as city-dwellers. Posing the question “What happens when the environment can read you back?,” he reflected upon the constraints of targeted advertising, lamenting the dissipation of freedom in ambiguity, and stressing personal reinvention and risk-taking capacity as diminishing resources in need of preservation.
Alex Leitch, Co-founder of Site 3 coLaboratory, discussed the infectious, disruptive nature of curiosity and strategies for making the most productive use out of one’s weirdness. She closed her talk with the following instructions: Find people who make you uncomfortable, make friends with them, and make things together.    
Zahra Ebrahim, Founder/Principal of the design think tank and creative agency, archiTEXT, spoke of her journey in pulling together a community-led design project that brought a group of Toronto’s marginalized youth together to redesign The Storefront on Lawrence Avenue. Now that she’s being called upon as “expert” to explain how she did such a thing, she’d rather revert to a space in which she isn’t meant to have all the answers, but can rather be free to constantly learn through taking imaginative risks.
Britt Wray, a biologist turned artist interested in “biotechnically-driven change in the human and non-human living world” outlined the ways in which the realm of science – often presumed to stand as an untouched space of pure objectivity – is intertwined with art, politics, and society. She encouraged listeners not only to carefully consider the ways in which stories about science are being packaged for us, but to also take active part in the production of such stories.
Lukas Stark, a practicing magician now self-described as a “Mystery Entertainer” engaged the audience in a series of extremely convincing card illusions, then recounted his career as a magician and prompted us to welcome the mysteries in life – be they magic tricks or unsolvable physics problems – and to cherish the moments in which we are confronted with the unexpected and incomprehensible.
Lindy Wilkins, “maker of whimsical robots,” examined the ways in which games can be made enjoyable for everyone as well as the ways in which games can make unpleasant experiences not only enjoyable but anticipated. She discussed some of her inventions, including an umbrella that transforms falling rain into music, and a breakfast machine that makes eggs based on the daily forecast.
Eric Boyd, founder of electronic jewellery company, Sensebridge, explored the future of transhumanism. Explaining the plasticity of the human brain, and its ability to quickly incorporate tools into the human body, he described a variety of devices intended to augment our abilities – essentially delineating our path to cyborgism.
Trevor Haldenby, an “imaginative thinker focusing emerging technologies on exciting ideas,” reflected upon the insights to be gained from imaging our possible futures, and retraced the life-course of his most recent time machine: ZED.TO - an 8-month-long participatory enactment of the world’s end. 
* Graphic facilitation courtesy of Sacha Chua (Experivis) and Patricia Kambitsch (Playthink). See the rest of their work here.  
** Photo cred: Zahra Ebrahim and Ryan Maksymic
- Melissa Daly-Buajitti
TEDxOCADU 
This Saturday, January 19, The Ontario College of Art and Design University hosted its inaugural TEDxOCADU, dedicating a full day to “ideas worth spreading” specifically themed around the powerfully multifaceted concept of Simplexity.
For those who don’t already know, TEDx events are local, independently-organized conference-style gatherings modelled after the TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) format, mission, and brand. TEDxOCADU is the first TEDx event I’ve personally attended, and was a truly inspiring experience.
TEDxOCADU framed Simplexity as “the constant tension between the simple and the complex” – a flexible definition that came to house a plethora of diverse interpretations from its speakers, audience members, talent, and hosts.
Here’s a brief glimpse at what the 12 presenters had to share:
Arianne Schafer, a local urban story teller, discussed the community-building potential of truthful story-telling. In her eyes, exchanges of reciprocal vulnerability and empathy emerge from situations in which strangers are simply invited to share themselves with one another. She encourages everyone to send a love letter to their friend.
Mike Lovas, an Industrial Design student at OCADU currently focused on themes of healthcare and sustainability, recounted his tumultuous path of searching for an education and career trajectory that could guarantee security. As you might expect, he’s concluded that security will no longer suffice as an aspiration, and attests that we learn to embrace the ambiguity and hold faith amidst our uncertainty.
Sara Diamond, President of OCADU, explored the snowballing phenomenon of Big Data, insisting upon our need to actively understand the ways in which our personal production of data is building our identity – in her words, “our personal data portrait”. Such an understanding can function as a mode of self-discovery as well as a way in which to take ownership of this parallel universe we are creating.
David Lewis Peart, a York graduate student focused on “exploring the beneficial use of performance for marginalized youth of colour,” worked with the metaphor of the circle to express his experiences of living and working on the periphery, and facing the simultaneously normalizing and exclusionary forces of the status quo, or centre of the circle. Embracing the margins, he found a place for creativity, autonomy, and reinvention. 
Andrew Lovett-Barron, a designer interested in “ambient interfaces, sentient cities, and our behavioural commons” analysed the impact that the rapidly-changing cityscape has upon our existence as city-dwellers. Posing the question “What happens when the environment can read you back?,” he reflected upon the constraints of targeted advertising, lamenting the dissipation of freedom in ambiguity, and stressing personal reinvention and risk-taking capacity as diminishing resources in need of preservation.
Alex Leitch, Co-founder of Site 3 coLaboratory, discussed the infectious, disruptive nature of curiosity and strategies for making the most productive use out of one’s weirdness. She closed her talk with the following instructions: Find people who make you uncomfortable, make friends with them, and make things together.    
Zahra Ebrahim, Founder/Principal of the design think tank and creative agency, archiTEXT, spoke of her journey in pulling together a community-led design project that brought a group of Toronto’s marginalized youth together to redesign The Storefront on Lawrence Avenue. Now that she’s being called upon as “expert” to explain how she did such a thing, she’d rather revert to a space in which she isn’t meant to have all the answers, but can rather be free to constantly learn through taking imaginative risks.
Britt Wray, a biologist turned artist interested in “biotechnically-driven change in the human and non-human living world” outlined the ways in which the realm of science – often presumed to stand as an untouched space of pure objectivity – is intertwined with art, politics, and society. She encouraged listeners not only to carefully consider the ways in which stories about science are being packaged for us, but to also take active part in the production of such stories.
Lukas Stark, a practicing magician now self-described as a “Mystery Entertainer” engaged the audience in a series of extremely convincing card illusions, then recounted his career as a magician and prompted us to welcome the mysteries in life – be they magic tricks or unsolvable physics problems – and to cherish the moments in which we are confronted with the unexpected and incomprehensible.
Lindy Wilkins, “maker of whimsical robots,” examined the ways in which games can be made enjoyable for everyone as well as the ways in which games can make unpleasant experiences not only enjoyable but anticipated. She discussed some of her inventions, including an umbrella that transforms falling rain into music, and a breakfast machine that makes eggs based on the daily forecast.
Eric Boyd, founder of electronic jewellery company, Sensebridge, explored the future of transhumanism. Explaining the plasticity of the human brain, and its ability to quickly incorporate tools into the human body, he described a variety of devices intended to augment our abilities – essentially delineating our path to cyborgism.
Trevor Haldenby, an “imaginative thinker focusing emerging technologies on exciting ideas,” reflected upon the insights to be gained from imaging our possible futures, and retraced the life-course of his most recent time machine: ZED.TO - an 8-month-long participatory enactment of the world’s end. 
* Graphic facilitation courtesy of Sacha Chua (Experivis) and Patricia Kambitsch (Playthink). See the rest of their work here.  
** Photo cred: Zahra Ebrahim and Ryan Maksymic
- Melissa Daly-Buajitti
TEDxOCADU 
This Saturday, January 19, The Ontario College of Art and Design University hosted its inaugural TEDxOCADU, dedicating a full day to “ideas worth spreading” specifically themed around the powerfully multifaceted concept of Simplexity.
For those who don’t already know, TEDx events are local, independently-organized conference-style gatherings modelled after the TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) format, mission, and brand. TEDxOCADU is the first TEDx event I’ve personally attended, and was a truly inspiring experience.
TEDxOCADU framed Simplexity as “the constant tension between the simple and the complex” – a flexible definition that came to house a plethora of diverse interpretations from its speakers, audience members, talent, and hosts.
Here’s a brief glimpse at what the 12 presenters had to share:
Arianne Schafer, a local urban story teller, discussed the community-building potential of truthful story-telling. In her eyes, exchanges of reciprocal vulnerability and empathy emerge from situations in which strangers are simply invited to share themselves with one another. She encourages everyone to send a love letter to their friend.
Mike Lovas, an Industrial Design student at OCADU currently focused on themes of healthcare and sustainability, recounted his tumultuous path of searching for an education and career trajectory that could guarantee security. As you might expect, he’s concluded that security will no longer suffice as an aspiration, and attests that we learn to embrace the ambiguity and hold faith amidst our uncertainty.
Sara Diamond, President of OCADU, explored the snowballing phenomenon of Big Data, insisting upon our need to actively understand the ways in which our personal production of data is building our identity – in her words, “our personal data portrait”. Such an understanding can function as a mode of self-discovery as well as a way in which to take ownership of this parallel universe we are creating.
David Lewis Peart, a York graduate student focused on “exploring the beneficial use of performance for marginalized youth of colour,” worked with the metaphor of the circle to express his experiences of living and working on the periphery, and facing the simultaneously normalizing and exclusionary forces of the status quo, or centre of the circle. Embracing the margins, he found a place for creativity, autonomy, and reinvention. 
Andrew Lovett-Barron, a designer interested in “ambient interfaces, sentient cities, and our behavioural commons” analysed the impact that the rapidly-changing cityscape has upon our existence as city-dwellers. Posing the question “What happens when the environment can read you back?,” he reflected upon the constraints of targeted advertising, lamenting the dissipation of freedom in ambiguity, and stressing personal reinvention and risk-taking capacity as diminishing resources in need of preservation.
Alex Leitch, Co-founder of Site 3 coLaboratory, discussed the infectious, disruptive nature of curiosity and strategies for making the most productive use out of one’s weirdness. She closed her talk with the following instructions: Find people who make you uncomfortable, make friends with them, and make things together.    
Zahra Ebrahim, Founder/Principal of the design think tank and creative agency, archiTEXT, spoke of her journey in pulling together a community-led design project that brought a group of Toronto’s marginalized youth together to redesign The Storefront on Lawrence Avenue. Now that she’s being called upon as “expert” to explain how she did such a thing, she’d rather revert to a space in which she isn’t meant to have all the answers, but can rather be free to constantly learn through taking imaginative risks.
Britt Wray, a biologist turned artist interested in “biotechnically-driven change in the human and non-human living world” outlined the ways in which the realm of science – often presumed to stand as an untouched space of pure objectivity – is intertwined with art, politics, and society. She encouraged listeners not only to carefully consider the ways in which stories about science are being packaged for us, but to also take active part in the production of such stories.
Lukas Stark, a practicing magician now self-described as a “Mystery Entertainer” engaged the audience in a series of extremely convincing card illusions, then recounted his career as a magician and prompted us to welcome the mysteries in life – be they magic tricks or unsolvable physics problems – and to cherish the moments in which we are confronted with the unexpected and incomprehensible.
Lindy Wilkins, “maker of whimsical robots,” examined the ways in which games can be made enjoyable for everyone as well as the ways in which games can make unpleasant experiences not only enjoyable but anticipated. She discussed some of her inventions, including an umbrella that transforms falling rain into music, and a breakfast machine that makes eggs based on the daily forecast.
Eric Boyd, founder of electronic jewellery company, Sensebridge, explored the future of transhumanism. Explaining the plasticity of the human brain, and its ability to quickly incorporate tools into the human body, he described a variety of devices intended to augment our abilities – essentially delineating our path to cyborgism.
Trevor Haldenby, an “imaginative thinker focusing emerging technologies on exciting ideas,” reflected upon the insights to be gained from imaging our possible futures, and retraced the life-course of his most recent time machine: ZED.TO - an 8-month-long participatory enactment of the world’s end. 
* Graphic facilitation courtesy of Sacha Chua (Experivis) and Patricia Kambitsch (Playthink). See the rest of their work here.  
** Photo cred: Zahra Ebrahim and Ryan Maksymic
- Melissa Daly-Buajitti
TEDxOCADU 
This Saturday, January 19, The Ontario College of Art and Design University hosted its inaugural TEDxOCADU, dedicating a full day to “ideas worth spreading” specifically themed around the powerfully multifaceted concept of Simplexity.
For those who don’t already know, TEDx events are local, independently-organized conference-style gatherings modelled after the TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) format, mission, and brand. TEDxOCADU is the first TEDx event I’ve personally attended, and was a truly inspiring experience.
TEDxOCADU framed Simplexity as “the constant tension between the simple and the complex” – a flexible definition that came to house a plethora of diverse interpretations from its speakers, audience members, talent, and hosts.
Here’s a brief glimpse at what the 12 presenters had to share:
Arianne Schafer, a local urban story teller, discussed the community-building potential of truthful story-telling. In her eyes, exchanges of reciprocal vulnerability and empathy emerge from situations in which strangers are simply invited to share themselves with one another. She encourages everyone to send a love letter to their friend.
Mike Lovas, an Industrial Design student at OCADU currently focused on themes of healthcare and sustainability, recounted his tumultuous path of searching for an education and career trajectory that could guarantee security. As you might expect, he’s concluded that security will no longer suffice as an aspiration, and attests that we learn to embrace the ambiguity and hold faith amidst our uncertainty.
Sara Diamond, President of OCADU, explored the snowballing phenomenon of Big Data, insisting upon our need to actively understand the ways in which our personal production of data is building our identity – in her words, “our personal data portrait”. Such an understanding can function as a mode of self-discovery as well as a way in which to take ownership of this parallel universe we are creating.
David Lewis Peart, a York graduate student focused on “exploring the beneficial use of performance for marginalized youth of colour,” worked with the metaphor of the circle to express his experiences of living and working on the periphery, and facing the simultaneously normalizing and exclusionary forces of the status quo, or centre of the circle. Embracing the margins, he found a place for creativity, autonomy, and reinvention. 
Andrew Lovett-Barron, a designer interested in “ambient interfaces, sentient cities, and our behavioural commons” analysed the impact that the rapidly-changing cityscape has upon our existence as city-dwellers. Posing the question “What happens when the environment can read you back?,” he reflected upon the constraints of targeted advertising, lamenting the dissipation of freedom in ambiguity, and stressing personal reinvention and risk-taking capacity as diminishing resources in need of preservation.
Alex Leitch, Co-founder of Site 3 coLaboratory, discussed the infectious, disruptive nature of curiosity and strategies for making the most productive use out of one’s weirdness. She closed her talk with the following instructions: Find people who make you uncomfortable, make friends with them, and make things together.    
Zahra Ebrahim, Founder/Principal of the design think tank and creative agency, archiTEXT, spoke of her journey in pulling together a community-led design project that brought a group of Toronto’s marginalized youth together to redesign The Storefront on Lawrence Avenue. Now that she’s being called upon as “expert” to explain how she did such a thing, she’d rather revert to a space in which she isn’t meant to have all the answers, but can rather be free to constantly learn through taking imaginative risks.
Britt Wray, a biologist turned artist interested in “biotechnically-driven change in the human and non-human living world” outlined the ways in which the realm of science – often presumed to stand as an untouched space of pure objectivity – is intertwined with art, politics, and society. She encouraged listeners not only to carefully consider the ways in which stories about science are being packaged for us, but to also take active part in the production of such stories.
Lukas Stark, a practicing magician now self-described as a “Mystery Entertainer” engaged the audience in a series of extremely convincing card illusions, then recounted his career as a magician and prompted us to welcome the mysteries in life – be they magic tricks or unsolvable physics problems – and to cherish the moments in which we are confronted with the unexpected and incomprehensible.
Lindy Wilkins, “maker of whimsical robots,” examined the ways in which games can be made enjoyable for everyone as well as the ways in which games can make unpleasant experiences not only enjoyable but anticipated. She discussed some of her inventions, including an umbrella that transforms falling rain into music, and a breakfast machine that makes eggs based on the daily forecast.
Eric Boyd, founder of electronic jewellery company, Sensebridge, explored the future of transhumanism. Explaining the plasticity of the human brain, and its ability to quickly incorporate tools into the human body, he described a variety of devices intended to augment our abilities – essentially delineating our path to cyborgism.
Trevor Haldenby, an “imaginative thinker focusing emerging technologies on exciting ideas,” reflected upon the insights to be gained from imaging our possible futures, and retraced the life-course of his most recent time machine: ZED.TO - an 8-month-long participatory enactment of the world’s end. 
* Graphic facilitation courtesy of Sacha Chua (Experivis) and Patricia Kambitsch (Playthink). See the rest of their work here.  
** Photo cred: Zahra Ebrahim and Ryan Maksymic
- Melissa Daly-Buajitti
TEDxOCADU 
This Saturday, January 19, The Ontario College of Art and Design University hosted its inaugural TEDxOCADU, dedicating a full day to “ideas worth spreading” specifically themed around the powerfully multifaceted concept of Simplexity.
For those who don’t already know, TEDx events are local, independently-organized conference-style gatherings modelled after the TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) format, mission, and brand. TEDxOCADU is the first TEDx event I’ve personally attended, and was a truly inspiring experience.
TEDxOCADU framed Simplexity as “the constant tension between the simple and the complex” – a flexible definition that came to house a plethora of diverse interpretations from its speakers, audience members, talent, and hosts.
Here’s a brief glimpse at what the 12 presenters had to share:
Arianne Schafer, a local urban story teller, discussed the community-building potential of truthful story-telling. In her eyes, exchanges of reciprocal vulnerability and empathy emerge from situations in which strangers are simply invited to share themselves with one another. She encourages everyone to send a love letter to their friend.
Mike Lovas, an Industrial Design student at OCADU currently focused on themes of healthcare and sustainability, recounted his tumultuous path of searching for an education and career trajectory that could guarantee security. As you might expect, he’s concluded that security will no longer suffice as an aspiration, and attests that we learn to embrace the ambiguity and hold faith amidst our uncertainty.
Sara Diamond, President of OCADU, explored the snowballing phenomenon of Big Data, insisting upon our need to actively understand the ways in which our personal production of data is building our identity – in her words, “our personal data portrait”. Such an understanding can function as a mode of self-discovery as well as a way in which to take ownership of this parallel universe we are creating.
David Lewis Peart, a York graduate student focused on “exploring the beneficial use of performance for marginalized youth of colour,” worked with the metaphor of the circle to express his experiences of living and working on the periphery, and facing the simultaneously normalizing and exclusionary forces of the status quo, or centre of the circle. Embracing the margins, he found a place for creativity, autonomy, and reinvention. 
Andrew Lovett-Barron, a designer interested in “ambient interfaces, sentient cities, and our behavioural commons” analysed the impact that the rapidly-changing cityscape has upon our existence as city-dwellers. Posing the question “What happens when the environment can read you back?,” he reflected upon the constraints of targeted advertising, lamenting the dissipation of freedom in ambiguity, and stressing personal reinvention and risk-taking capacity as diminishing resources in need of preservation.
Alex Leitch, Co-founder of Site 3 coLaboratory, discussed the infectious, disruptive nature of curiosity and strategies for making the most productive use out of one’s weirdness. She closed her talk with the following instructions: Find people who make you uncomfortable, make friends with them, and make things together.    
Zahra Ebrahim, Founder/Principal of the design think tank and creative agency, archiTEXT, spoke of her journey in pulling together a community-led design project that brought a group of Toronto’s marginalized youth together to redesign The Storefront on Lawrence Avenue. Now that she’s being called upon as “expert” to explain how she did such a thing, she’d rather revert to a space in which she isn’t meant to have all the answers, but can rather be free to constantly learn through taking imaginative risks.
Britt Wray, a biologist turned artist interested in “biotechnically-driven change in the human and non-human living world” outlined the ways in which the realm of science – often presumed to stand as an untouched space of pure objectivity – is intertwined with art, politics, and society. She encouraged listeners not only to carefully consider the ways in which stories about science are being packaged for us, but to also take active part in the production of such stories.
Lukas Stark, a practicing magician now self-described as a “Mystery Entertainer” engaged the audience in a series of extremely convincing card illusions, then recounted his career as a magician and prompted us to welcome the mysteries in life – be they magic tricks or unsolvable physics problems – and to cherish the moments in which we are confronted with the unexpected and incomprehensible.
Lindy Wilkins, “maker of whimsical robots,” examined the ways in which games can be made enjoyable for everyone as well as the ways in which games can make unpleasant experiences not only enjoyable but anticipated. She discussed some of her inventions, including an umbrella that transforms falling rain into music, and a breakfast machine that makes eggs based on the daily forecast.
Eric Boyd, founder of electronic jewellery company, Sensebridge, explored the future of transhumanism. Explaining the plasticity of the human brain, and its ability to quickly incorporate tools into the human body, he described a variety of devices intended to augment our abilities – essentially delineating our path to cyborgism.
Trevor Haldenby, an “imaginative thinker focusing emerging technologies on exciting ideas,” reflected upon the insights to be gained from imaging our possible futures, and retraced the life-course of his most recent time machine: ZED.TO - an 8-month-long participatory enactment of the world’s end. 
* Graphic facilitation courtesy of Sacha Chua (Experivis) and Patricia Kambitsch (Playthink). See the rest of their work here.  
** Photo cred: Zahra Ebrahim and Ryan Maksymic
- Melissa Daly-Buajitti
TEDxOCADU 
This Saturday, January 19, The Ontario College of Art and Design University hosted its inaugural TEDxOCADU, dedicating a full day to “ideas worth spreading” specifically themed around the powerfully multifaceted concept of Simplexity.
For those who don’t already know, TEDx events are local, independently-organized conference-style gatherings modelled after the TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) format, mission, and brand. TEDxOCADU is the first TEDx event I’ve personally attended, and was a truly inspiring experience.
TEDxOCADU framed Simplexity as “the constant tension between the simple and the complex” – a flexible definition that came to house a plethora of diverse interpretations from its speakers, audience members, talent, and hosts.
Here’s a brief glimpse at what the 12 presenters had to share:
Arianne Schafer, a local urban story teller, discussed the community-building potential of truthful story-telling. In her eyes, exchanges of reciprocal vulnerability and empathy emerge from situations in which strangers are simply invited to share themselves with one another. She encourages everyone to send a love letter to their friend.
Mike Lovas, an Industrial Design student at OCADU currently focused on themes of healthcare and sustainability, recounted his tumultuous path of searching for an education and career trajectory that could guarantee security. As you might expect, he’s concluded that security will no longer suffice as an aspiration, and attests that we learn to embrace the ambiguity and hold faith amidst our uncertainty.
Sara Diamond, President of OCADU, explored the snowballing phenomenon of Big Data, insisting upon our need to actively understand the ways in which our personal production of data is building our identity – in her words, “our personal data portrait”. Such an understanding can function as a mode of self-discovery as well as a way in which to take ownership of this parallel universe we are creating.
David Lewis Peart, a York graduate student focused on “exploring the beneficial use of performance for marginalized youth of colour,” worked with the metaphor of the circle to express his experiences of living and working on the periphery, and facing the simultaneously normalizing and exclusionary forces of the status quo, or centre of the circle. Embracing the margins, he found a place for creativity, autonomy, and reinvention. 
Andrew Lovett-Barron, a designer interested in “ambient interfaces, sentient cities, and our behavioural commons” analysed the impact that the rapidly-changing cityscape has upon our existence as city-dwellers. Posing the question “What happens when the environment can read you back?,” he reflected upon the constraints of targeted advertising, lamenting the dissipation of freedom in ambiguity, and stressing personal reinvention and risk-taking capacity as diminishing resources in need of preservation.
Alex Leitch, Co-founder of Site 3 coLaboratory, discussed the infectious, disruptive nature of curiosity and strategies for making the most productive use out of one’s weirdness. She closed her talk with the following instructions: Find people who make you uncomfortable, make friends with them, and make things together.    
Zahra Ebrahim, Founder/Principal of the design think tank and creative agency, archiTEXT, spoke of her journey in pulling together a community-led design project that brought a group of Toronto’s marginalized youth together to redesign The Storefront on Lawrence Avenue. Now that she’s being called upon as “expert” to explain how she did such a thing, she’d rather revert to a space in which she isn’t meant to have all the answers, but can rather be free to constantly learn through taking imaginative risks.
Britt Wray, a biologist turned artist interested in “biotechnically-driven change in the human and non-human living world” outlined the ways in which the realm of science – often presumed to stand as an untouched space of pure objectivity – is intertwined with art, politics, and society. She encouraged listeners not only to carefully consider the ways in which stories about science are being packaged for us, but to also take active part in the production of such stories.
Lukas Stark, a practicing magician now self-described as a “Mystery Entertainer” engaged the audience in a series of extremely convincing card illusions, then recounted his career as a magician and prompted us to welcome the mysteries in life – be they magic tricks or unsolvable physics problems – and to cherish the moments in which we are confronted with the unexpected and incomprehensible.
Lindy Wilkins, “maker of whimsical robots,” examined the ways in which games can be made enjoyable for everyone as well as the ways in which games can make unpleasant experiences not only enjoyable but anticipated. She discussed some of her inventions, including an umbrella that transforms falling rain into music, and a breakfast machine that makes eggs based on the daily forecast.
Eric Boyd, founder of electronic jewellery company, Sensebridge, explored the future of transhumanism. Explaining the plasticity of the human brain, and its ability to quickly incorporate tools into the human body, he described a variety of devices intended to augment our abilities – essentially delineating our path to cyborgism.
Trevor Haldenby, an “imaginative thinker focusing emerging technologies on exciting ideas,” reflected upon the insights to be gained from imaging our possible futures, and retraced the life-course of his most recent time machine: ZED.TO - an 8-month-long participatory enactment of the world’s end. 
* Graphic facilitation courtesy of Sacha Chua (Experivis) and Patricia Kambitsch (Playthink). See the rest of their work here.  
** Photo cred: Zahra Ebrahim and Ryan Maksymic
- Melissa Daly-Buajitti
TEDxOCADU 
This Saturday, January 19, The Ontario College of Art and Design University hosted its inaugural TEDxOCADU, dedicating a full day to “ideas worth spreading” specifically themed around the powerfully multifaceted concept of Simplexity.
For those who don’t already know, TEDx events are local, independently-organized conference-style gatherings modelled after the TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) format, mission, and brand. TEDxOCADU is the first TEDx event I’ve personally attended, and was a truly inspiring experience.
TEDxOCADU framed Simplexity as “the constant tension between the simple and the complex” – a flexible definition that came to house a plethora of diverse interpretations from its speakers, audience members, talent, and hosts.
Here’s a brief glimpse at what the 12 presenters had to share:
Arianne Schafer, a local urban story teller, discussed the community-building potential of truthful story-telling. In her eyes, exchanges of reciprocal vulnerability and empathy emerge from situations in which strangers are simply invited to share themselves with one another. She encourages everyone to send a love letter to their friend.
Mike Lovas, an Industrial Design student at OCADU currently focused on themes of healthcare and sustainability, recounted his tumultuous path of searching for an education and career trajectory that could guarantee security. As you might expect, he’s concluded that security will no longer suffice as an aspiration, and attests that we learn to embrace the ambiguity and hold faith amidst our uncertainty.
Sara Diamond, President of OCADU, explored the snowballing phenomenon of Big Data, insisting upon our need to actively understand the ways in which our personal production of data is building our identity – in her words, “our personal data portrait”. Such an understanding can function as a mode of self-discovery as well as a way in which to take ownership of this parallel universe we are creating.
David Lewis Peart, a York graduate student focused on “exploring the beneficial use of performance for marginalized youth of colour,” worked with the metaphor of the circle to express his experiences of living and working on the periphery, and facing the simultaneously normalizing and exclusionary forces of the status quo, or centre of the circle. Embracing the margins, he found a place for creativity, autonomy, and reinvention. 
Andrew Lovett-Barron, a designer interested in “ambient interfaces, sentient cities, and our behavioural commons” analysed the impact that the rapidly-changing cityscape has upon our existence as city-dwellers. Posing the question “What happens when the environment can read you back?,” he reflected upon the constraints of targeted advertising, lamenting the dissipation of freedom in ambiguity, and stressing personal reinvention and risk-taking capacity as diminishing resources in need of preservation.
Alex Leitch, Co-founder of Site 3 coLaboratory, discussed the infectious, disruptive nature of curiosity and strategies for making the most productive use out of one’s weirdness. She closed her talk with the following instructions: Find people who make you uncomfortable, make friends with them, and make things together.    
Zahra Ebrahim, Founder/Principal of the design think tank and creative agency, archiTEXT, spoke of her journey in pulling together a community-led design project that brought a group of Toronto’s marginalized youth together to redesign The Storefront on Lawrence Avenue. Now that she’s being called upon as “expert” to explain how she did such a thing, she’d rather revert to a space in which she isn’t meant to have all the answers, but can rather be free to constantly learn through taking imaginative risks.
Britt Wray, a biologist turned artist interested in “biotechnically-driven change in the human and non-human living world” outlined the ways in which the realm of science – often presumed to stand as an untouched space of pure objectivity – is intertwined with art, politics, and society. She encouraged listeners not only to carefully consider the ways in which stories about science are being packaged for us, but to also take active part in the production of such stories.
Lukas Stark, a practicing magician now self-described as a “Mystery Entertainer” engaged the audience in a series of extremely convincing card illusions, then recounted his career as a magician and prompted us to welcome the mysteries in life – be they magic tricks or unsolvable physics problems – and to cherish the moments in which we are confronted with the unexpected and incomprehensible.
Lindy Wilkins, “maker of whimsical robots,” examined the ways in which games can be made enjoyable for everyone as well as the ways in which games can make unpleasant experiences not only enjoyable but anticipated. She discussed some of her inventions, including an umbrella that transforms falling rain into music, and a breakfast machine that makes eggs based on the daily forecast.
Eric Boyd, founder of electronic jewellery company, Sensebridge, explored the future of transhumanism. Explaining the plasticity of the human brain, and its ability to quickly incorporate tools into the human body, he described a variety of devices intended to augment our abilities – essentially delineating our path to cyborgism.
Trevor Haldenby, an “imaginative thinker focusing emerging technologies on exciting ideas,” reflected upon the insights to be gained from imaging our possible futures, and retraced the life-course of his most recent time machine: ZED.TO - an 8-month-long participatory enactment of the world’s end. 
* Graphic facilitation courtesy of Sacha Chua (Experivis) and Patricia Kambitsch (Playthink). See the rest of their work here.  
** Photo cred: Zahra Ebrahim and Ryan Maksymic
- Melissa Daly-Buajitti
TEDxOCADU 
This Saturday, January 19, The Ontario College of Art and Design University hosted its inaugural TEDxOCADU, dedicating a full day to “ideas worth spreading” specifically themed around the powerfully multifaceted concept of Simplexity.
For those who don’t already know, TEDx events are local, independently-organized conference-style gatherings modelled after the TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) format, mission, and brand. TEDxOCADU is the first TEDx event I’ve personally attended, and was a truly inspiring experience.
TEDxOCADU framed Simplexity as “the constant tension between the simple and the complex” – a flexible definition that came to house a plethora of diverse interpretations from its speakers, audience members, talent, and hosts.
Here’s a brief glimpse at what the 12 presenters had to share:
Arianne Schafer, a local urban story teller, discussed the community-building potential of truthful story-telling. In her eyes, exchanges of reciprocal vulnerability and empathy emerge from situations in which strangers are simply invited to share themselves with one another. She encourages everyone to send a love letter to their friend.
Mike Lovas, an Industrial Design student at OCADU currently focused on themes of healthcare and sustainability, recounted his tumultuous path of searching for an education and career trajectory that could guarantee security. As you might expect, he’s concluded that security will no longer suffice as an aspiration, and attests that we learn to embrace the ambiguity and hold faith amidst our uncertainty.
Sara Diamond, President of OCADU, explored the snowballing phenomenon of Big Data, insisting upon our need to actively understand the ways in which our personal production of data is building our identity – in her words, “our personal data portrait”. Such an understanding can function as a mode of self-discovery as well as a way in which to take ownership of this parallel universe we are creating.
David Lewis Peart, a York graduate student focused on “exploring the beneficial use of performance for marginalized youth of colour,” worked with the metaphor of the circle to express his experiences of living and working on the periphery, and facing the simultaneously normalizing and exclusionary forces of the status quo, or centre of the circle. Embracing the margins, he found a place for creativity, autonomy, and reinvention. 
Andrew Lovett-Barron, a designer interested in “ambient interfaces, sentient cities, and our behavioural commons” analysed the impact that the rapidly-changing cityscape has upon our existence as city-dwellers. Posing the question “What happens when the environment can read you back?,” he reflected upon the constraints of targeted advertising, lamenting the dissipation of freedom in ambiguity, and stressing personal reinvention and risk-taking capacity as diminishing resources in need of preservation.
Alex Leitch, Co-founder of Site 3 coLaboratory, discussed the infectious, disruptive nature of curiosity and strategies for making the most productive use out of one’s weirdness. She closed her talk with the following instructions: Find people who make you uncomfortable, make friends with them, and make things together.    
Zahra Ebrahim, Founder/Principal of the design think tank and creative agency, archiTEXT, spoke of her journey in pulling together a community-led design project that brought a group of Toronto’s marginalized youth together to redesign The Storefront on Lawrence Avenue. Now that she’s being called upon as “expert” to explain how she did such a thing, she’d rather revert to a space in which she isn’t meant to have all the answers, but can rather be free to constantly learn through taking imaginative risks.
Britt Wray, a biologist turned artist interested in “biotechnically-driven change in the human and non-human living world” outlined the ways in which the realm of science – often presumed to stand as an untouched space of pure objectivity – is intertwined with art, politics, and society. She encouraged listeners not only to carefully consider the ways in which stories about science are being packaged for us, but to also take active part in the production of such stories.
Lukas Stark, a practicing magician now self-described as a “Mystery Entertainer” engaged the audience in a series of extremely convincing card illusions, then recounted his career as a magician and prompted us to welcome the mysteries in life – be they magic tricks or unsolvable physics problems – and to cherish the moments in which we are confronted with the unexpected and incomprehensible.
Lindy Wilkins, “maker of whimsical robots,” examined the ways in which games can be made enjoyable for everyone as well as the ways in which games can make unpleasant experiences not only enjoyable but anticipated. She discussed some of her inventions, including an umbrella that transforms falling rain into music, and a breakfast machine that makes eggs based on the daily forecast.
Eric Boyd, founder of electronic jewellery company, Sensebridge, explored the future of transhumanism. Explaining the plasticity of the human brain, and its ability to quickly incorporate tools into the human body, he described a variety of devices intended to augment our abilities – essentially delineating our path to cyborgism.
Trevor Haldenby, an “imaginative thinker focusing emerging technologies on exciting ideas,” reflected upon the insights to be gained from imaging our possible futures, and retraced the life-course of his most recent time machine: ZED.TO - an 8-month-long participatory enactment of the world’s end. 
* Graphic facilitation courtesy of Sacha Chua (Experivis) and Patricia Kambitsch (Playthink). See the rest of their work here.  
** Photo cred: Zahra Ebrahim and Ryan Maksymic
- Melissa Daly-Buajitti
TEDxOCADU 
This Saturday, January 19, The Ontario College of Art and Design University hosted its inaugural TEDxOCADU, dedicating a full day to “ideas worth spreading” specifically themed around the powerfully multifaceted concept of Simplexity.
For those who don’t already know, TEDx events are local, independently-organized conference-style gatherings modelled after the TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) format, mission, and brand. TEDxOCADU is the first TEDx event I’ve personally attended, and was a truly inspiring experience.
TEDxOCADU framed Simplexity as “the constant tension between the simple and the complex” – a flexible definition that came to house a plethora of diverse interpretations from its speakers, audience members, talent, and hosts.
Here’s a brief glimpse at what the 12 presenters had to share:
Arianne Schafer, a local urban story teller, discussed the community-building potential of truthful story-telling. In her eyes, exchanges of reciprocal vulnerability and empathy emerge from situations in which strangers are simply invited to share themselves with one another. She encourages everyone to send a love letter to their friend.
Mike Lovas, an Industrial Design student at OCADU currently focused on themes of healthcare and sustainability, recounted his tumultuous path of searching for an education and career trajectory that could guarantee security. As you might expect, he’s concluded that security will no longer suffice as an aspiration, and attests that we learn to embrace the ambiguity and hold faith amidst our uncertainty.
Sara Diamond, President of OCADU, explored the snowballing phenomenon of Big Data, insisting upon our need to actively understand the ways in which our personal production of data is building our identity – in her words, “our personal data portrait”. Such an understanding can function as a mode of self-discovery as well as a way in which to take ownership of this parallel universe we are creating.
David Lewis Peart, a York graduate student focused on “exploring the beneficial use of performance for marginalized youth of colour,” worked with the metaphor of the circle to express his experiences of living and working on the periphery, and facing the simultaneously normalizing and exclusionary forces of the status quo, or centre of the circle. Embracing the margins, he found a place for creativity, autonomy, and reinvention. 
Andrew Lovett-Barron, a designer interested in “ambient interfaces, sentient cities, and our behavioural commons” analysed the impact that the rapidly-changing cityscape has upon our existence as city-dwellers. Posing the question “What happens when the environment can read you back?,” he reflected upon the constraints of targeted advertising, lamenting the dissipation of freedom in ambiguity, and stressing personal reinvention and risk-taking capacity as diminishing resources in need of preservation.
Alex Leitch, Co-founder of Site 3 coLaboratory, discussed the infectious, disruptive nature of curiosity and strategies for making the most productive use out of one’s weirdness. She closed her talk with the following instructions: Find people who make you uncomfortable, make friends with them, and make things together.    
Zahra Ebrahim, Founder/Principal of the design think tank and creative agency, archiTEXT, spoke of her journey in pulling together a community-led design project that brought a group of Toronto’s marginalized youth together to redesign The Storefront on Lawrence Avenue. Now that she’s being called upon as “expert” to explain how she did such a thing, she’d rather revert to a space in which she isn’t meant to have all the answers, but can rather be free to constantly learn through taking imaginative risks.
Britt Wray, a biologist turned artist interested in “biotechnically-driven change in the human and non-human living world” outlined the ways in which the realm of science – often presumed to stand as an untouched space of pure objectivity – is intertwined with art, politics, and society. She encouraged listeners not only to carefully consider the ways in which stories about science are being packaged for us, but to also take active part in the production of such stories.
Lukas Stark, a practicing magician now self-described as a “Mystery Entertainer” engaged the audience in a series of extremely convincing card illusions, then recounted his career as a magician and prompted us to welcome the mysteries in life – be they magic tricks or unsolvable physics problems – and to cherish the moments in which we are confronted with the unexpected and incomprehensible.
Lindy Wilkins, “maker of whimsical robots,” examined the ways in which games can be made enjoyable for everyone as well as the ways in which games can make unpleasant experiences not only enjoyable but anticipated. She discussed some of her inventions, including an umbrella that transforms falling rain into music, and a breakfast machine that makes eggs based on the daily forecast.
Eric Boyd, founder of electronic jewellery company, Sensebridge, explored the future of transhumanism. Explaining the plasticity of the human brain, and its ability to quickly incorporate tools into the human body, he described a variety of devices intended to augment our abilities – essentially delineating our path to cyborgism.
Trevor Haldenby, an “imaginative thinker focusing emerging technologies on exciting ideas,” reflected upon the insights to be gained from imaging our possible futures, and retraced the life-course of his most recent time machine: ZED.TO - an 8-month-long participatory enactment of the world’s end. 
* Graphic facilitation courtesy of Sacha Chua (Experivis) and Patricia Kambitsch (Playthink). See the rest of their work here.  
** Photo cred: Zahra Ebrahim and Ryan Maksymic
- Melissa Daly-Buajitti

TEDxOCADU 

This Saturday, January 19, The Ontario College of Art and Design University hosted its inaugural TEDxOCADU, dedicating a full day to “ideas worth spreading” specifically themed around the powerfully multifaceted concept of Simplexity.

For those who don’t already know, TEDx events are local, independently-organized conference-style gatherings modelled after the TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) format, mission, and brand. TEDxOCADU is the first TEDx event I’ve personally attended, and was a truly inspiring experience.

TEDxOCADU framed Simplexity as “the constant tension between the simple and the complex” – a flexible definition that came to house a plethora of diverse interpretations from its speakers, audience members, talent, and hosts.

Here’s a brief glimpse at what the 12 presenters had to share:

Arianne Schafer, a local urban story teller, discussed the community-building potential of truthful story-telling. In her eyes, exchanges of reciprocal vulnerability and empathy emerge from situations in which strangers are simply invited to share themselves with one another. She encourages everyone to send a love letter to their friend.

Mike Lovas, an Industrial Design student at OCADU currently focused on themes of healthcare and sustainability, recounted his tumultuous path of searching for an education and career trajectory that could guarantee security. As you might expect, he’s concluded that security will no longer suffice as an aspiration, and attests that we learn to embrace the ambiguity and hold faith amidst our uncertainty.

Sara Diamond, President of OCADU, explored the snowballing phenomenon of Big Data, insisting upon our need to actively understand the ways in which our personal production of data is building our identity – in her words, “our personal data portrait”. Such an understanding can function as a mode of self-discovery as well as a way in which to take ownership of this parallel universe we are creating.

David Lewis Peart, a York graduate student focused on “exploring the beneficial use of performance for marginalized youth of colour,” worked with the metaphor of the circle to express his experiences of living and working on the periphery, and facing the simultaneously normalizing and exclusionary forces of the status quo, or centre of the circle. Embracing the margins, he found a place for creativity, autonomy, and reinvention. 

Andrew Lovett-Barron, a designer interested in “ambient interfaces, sentient cities, and our behavioural commons” analysed the impact that the rapidly-changing cityscape has upon our existence as city-dwellers. Posing the question “What happens when the environment can read you back?,” he reflected upon the constraints of targeted advertising, lamenting the dissipation of freedom in ambiguity, and stressing personal reinvention and risk-taking capacity as diminishing resources in need of preservation.

Alex Leitch, Co-founder of Site 3 coLaboratory, discussed the infectious, disruptive nature of curiosity and strategies for making the most productive use out of one’s weirdness. She closed her talk with the following instructions: Find people who make you uncomfortable, make friends with them, and make things together.    

Zahra Ebrahim, Founder/Principal of the design think tank and creative agency, archiTEXT, spoke of her journey in pulling together a community-led design project that brought a group of Toronto’s marginalized youth together to redesign The Storefront on Lawrence Avenue. Now that she’s being called upon as “expert” to explain how she did such a thing, she’d rather revert to a space in which she isn’t meant to have all the answers, but can rather be free to constantly learn through taking imaginative risks.

Britt Wray, a biologist turned artist interested in “biotechnically-driven change in the human and non-human living world” outlined the ways in which the realm of science – often presumed to stand as an untouched space of pure objectivity – is intertwined with art, politics, and society. She encouraged listeners not only to carefully consider the ways in which stories about science are being packaged for us, but to also take active part in the production of such stories.

Lukas Stark, a practicing magician now self-described as a “Mystery Entertainer” engaged the audience in a series of extremely convincing card illusions, then recounted his career as a magician and prompted us to welcome the mysteries in life – be they magic tricks or unsolvable physics problems – and to cherish the moments in which we are confronted with the unexpected and incomprehensible.

Lindy Wilkins, “maker of whimsical robots,” examined the ways in which games can be made enjoyable for everyone as well as the ways in which games can make unpleasant experiences not only enjoyable but anticipated. She discussed some of her inventions, including an umbrella that transforms falling rain into music, and a breakfast machine that makes eggs based on the daily forecast.

Eric Boyd, founder of electronic jewellery company, Sensebridge, explored the future of transhumanism. Explaining the plasticity of the human brain, and its ability to quickly incorporate tools into the human body, he described a variety of devices intended to augment our abilities – essentially delineating our path to cyborgism.

Trevor Haldenby, an “imaginative thinker focusing emerging technologies on exciting ideas,” reflected upon the insights to be gained from imaging our possible futures, and retraced the life-course of his most recent time machine: ZED.TO - an 8-month-long participatory enactment of the world’s end. 

* Graphic facilitation courtesy of Sacha Chua (Experivis) and Patricia Kambitsch (Playthink). See the rest of their work here.  

** Photo cred: Zahra Ebrahim and Ryan Maksymic

- Melissa Daly-Buajitti

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

9 Photos
/ art design TEDx OCADU Toronto

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