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SpotLIGHT on Super Nature Design
Shanghai-based design company Super Nature Design has a unique approach to engaging audiences, by focusing on creating works that are interactive in design, communicate visually with those engaging with it, and most importantly, doing all of the above through the use of media technology.
It is not unheard of for design companies to create art, and Super Nature has a strong portfolio of interactive works, particularly those that use light and geometry to engage audiences, creating a dialogue between them, the space they are in, and the materiality and function of the work before them.
Some works, like “New Angles” (2010), include pyramid-like structures with lights that react to the movements of the viewer. Super Nature describes this work as one that reflects “the juxtaposition of subversive thinking and visual perception”, combining imagination, reality and technology. Further diving into the world of imagination is “Dreamscape” (2013) which utilizes the idea of a hypercube and the fourth dimension. Interacting with the work and its space allows audiences to experience different depths of field, as the lights travel through the many layers of the sculpture. This piece takes advantage of the architecture of the cube and characteristics of light, to create illusions that challenge our perceptions of visual dimensions.
Moving onto more literal homages to science, are works “PRISMA1666” (2011) and “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle” (2012). In “PRISMA1666”, Super Nature (collaborating with Wonwei) reference the year 1666, when Sir Isaac Newton conducted an experiment which today, is considered ”as a landmark discovery in the study of optics and color theory”. The piece consists of fifteen triangular blocks on a white surface, with colourful projections shining upon them, refracting and creating a performance of light. In “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle”, the mathematician’s triangle theory is magnified in the form of one-hundred LED triangles that are within their own fluorescent triangular holds. Audiences are encouraged to interact with the piece through a xylophone, which “generate[s] a series of music and lighting sequences”.For more examples of their works, you can visit Super Nature Design’s website here.
-Anna Paluch
SpotLIGHT on Super Nature Design
Shanghai-based design company Super Nature Design has a unique approach to engaging audiences, by focusing on creating works that are interactive in design, communicate visually with those engaging with it, and most importantly, doing all of the above through the use of media technology.
It is not unheard of for design companies to create art, and Super Nature has a strong portfolio of interactive works, particularly those that use light and geometry to engage audiences, creating a dialogue between them, the space they are in, and the materiality and function of the work before them.
Some works, like “New Angles” (2010), include pyramid-like structures with lights that react to the movements of the viewer. Super Nature describes this work as one that reflects “the juxtaposition of subversive thinking and visual perception”, combining imagination, reality and technology. Further diving into the world of imagination is “Dreamscape” (2013) which utilizes the idea of a hypercube and the fourth dimension. Interacting with the work and its space allows audiences to experience different depths of field, as the lights travel through the many layers of the sculpture. This piece takes advantage of the architecture of the cube and characteristics of light, to create illusions that challenge our perceptions of visual dimensions.
Moving onto more literal homages to science, are works “PRISMA1666” (2011) and “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle” (2012). In “PRISMA1666”, Super Nature (collaborating with Wonwei) reference the year 1666, when Sir Isaac Newton conducted an experiment which today, is considered ”as a landmark discovery in the study of optics and color theory”. The piece consists of fifteen triangular blocks on a white surface, with colourful projections shining upon them, refracting and creating a performance of light. In “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle”, the mathematician’s triangle theory is magnified in the form of one-hundred LED triangles that are within their own fluorescent triangular holds. Audiences are encouraged to interact with the piece through a xylophone, which “generate[s] a series of music and lighting sequences”.For more examples of their works, you can visit Super Nature Design’s website here.
-Anna Paluch
SpotLIGHT on Super Nature Design
Shanghai-based design company Super Nature Design has a unique approach to engaging audiences, by focusing on creating works that are interactive in design, communicate visually with those engaging with it, and most importantly, doing all of the above through the use of media technology.
It is not unheard of for design companies to create art, and Super Nature has a strong portfolio of interactive works, particularly those that use light and geometry to engage audiences, creating a dialogue between them, the space they are in, and the materiality and function of the work before them.
Some works, like “New Angles” (2010), include pyramid-like structures with lights that react to the movements of the viewer. Super Nature describes this work as one that reflects “the juxtaposition of subversive thinking and visual perception”, combining imagination, reality and technology. Further diving into the world of imagination is “Dreamscape” (2013) which utilizes the idea of a hypercube and the fourth dimension. Interacting with the work and its space allows audiences to experience different depths of field, as the lights travel through the many layers of the sculpture. This piece takes advantage of the architecture of the cube and characteristics of light, to create illusions that challenge our perceptions of visual dimensions.
Moving onto more literal homages to science, are works “PRISMA1666” (2011) and “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle” (2012). In “PRISMA1666”, Super Nature (collaborating with Wonwei) reference the year 1666, when Sir Isaac Newton conducted an experiment which today, is considered ”as a landmark discovery in the study of optics and color theory”. The piece consists of fifteen triangular blocks on a white surface, with colourful projections shining upon them, refracting and creating a performance of light. In “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle”, the mathematician’s triangle theory is magnified in the form of one-hundred LED triangles that are within their own fluorescent triangular holds. Audiences are encouraged to interact with the piece through a xylophone, which “generate[s] a series of music and lighting sequences”.For more examples of their works, you can visit Super Nature Design’s website here.
-Anna Paluch
SpotLIGHT on Super Nature Design
Shanghai-based design company Super Nature Design has a unique approach to engaging audiences, by focusing on creating works that are interactive in design, communicate visually with those engaging with it, and most importantly, doing all of the above through the use of media technology.
It is not unheard of for design companies to create art, and Super Nature has a strong portfolio of interactive works, particularly those that use light and geometry to engage audiences, creating a dialogue between them, the space they are in, and the materiality and function of the work before them.
Some works, like “New Angles” (2010), include pyramid-like structures with lights that react to the movements of the viewer. Super Nature describes this work as one that reflects “the juxtaposition of subversive thinking and visual perception”, combining imagination, reality and technology. Further diving into the world of imagination is “Dreamscape” (2013) which utilizes the idea of a hypercube and the fourth dimension. Interacting with the work and its space allows audiences to experience different depths of field, as the lights travel through the many layers of the sculpture. This piece takes advantage of the architecture of the cube and characteristics of light, to create illusions that challenge our perceptions of visual dimensions.
Moving onto more literal homages to science, are works “PRISMA1666” (2011) and “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle” (2012). In “PRISMA1666”, Super Nature (collaborating with Wonwei) reference the year 1666, when Sir Isaac Newton conducted an experiment which today, is considered ”as a landmark discovery in the study of optics and color theory”. The piece consists of fifteen triangular blocks on a white surface, with colourful projections shining upon them, refracting and creating a performance of light. In “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle”, the mathematician’s triangle theory is magnified in the form of one-hundred LED triangles that are within their own fluorescent triangular holds. Audiences are encouraged to interact with the piece through a xylophone, which “generate[s] a series of music and lighting sequences”.For more examples of their works, you can visit Super Nature Design’s website here.
-Anna Paluch

SpotLIGHT on Super Nature Design

Shanghai-based design company Super Nature Design has a unique approach to engaging audiences, by focusing on creating works that are interactive in design, communicate visually with those engaging with it, and most importantly, doing all of the above through the use of media technology.

It is not unheard of for design companies to create art, and Super Nature has a strong portfolio of interactive works, particularly those that use light and geometry to engage audiences, creating a dialogue between them, the space they are in, and the materiality and function of the work before them.

Some works, like “New Angles” (2010), include pyramid-like structures with lights that react to the movements of the viewer. Super Nature describes this work as one that reflects “the juxtaposition of subversive thinking and visual perception”, combining imagination, reality and technology. Further diving into the world of imagination is “Dreamscape” (2013) which utilizes the idea of a hypercube and the fourth dimension. Interacting with the work and its space allows audiences to experience different depths of field, as the lights travel through the many layers of the sculpture. This piece takes advantage of the architecture of the cube and characteristics of light, to create illusions that challenge our perceptions of visual dimensions.

Moving onto more literal homages to science, are works “PRISMA1666” (2011) and “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle” (2012). In “PRISMA1666”, Super Nature (collaborating with Wonwei) reference the year 1666, when Sir Isaac Newton conducted an experiment which today, is considered ”as a landmark discovery in the study of optics and color theory”. The piece consists of fifteen triangular blocks on a white surface, with colourful projections shining upon them, refracting and creating a performance of light. In “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle”, the mathematician’s triangle theory is magnified in the form of one-hundred LED triangles that are within their own fluorescent triangular holds. Audiences are encouraged to interact with the piece through a xylophone, which “generate[s] a series of music and lighting sequences”.

For more examples of their works, you can visit Super Nature Design’s website here.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ anna paluch Super Nature Design Dreamscape New Angles PRISMA1666 Lost in Pascal's Triangle optics light technology optical illusion Wonwei geometry interactive art art science art and science journal LED hypercube dimensions media art design shanghai
Jason Gowans
In his project 5 Landscape Modes, Vancouver-based photographic artist Jason Gowans studies the structural implications of photographed landscapes. Exploring simultaneously the second and third dimensions, Gowans carefully deconstructs a images and rearranges them to create new landscapes with a restored depth. The result is a series of photographs that offer thoughtful alternatives to the conventional landscape practice. Gowans expands on his process:
"This show was created from physical objects. I built maquettes using found negatives, my own photographs, and images from the Internet. I photographed them to create several angles, exposures, shadows
I took many cues from Robert Smithson’s Non-Sites, Michael Snow’s La Région Centrale, and western movie sets.”
See more of Gowans’ work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Jason Gowans
In his project 5 Landscape Modes, Vancouver-based photographic artist Jason Gowans studies the structural implications of photographed landscapes. Exploring simultaneously the second and third dimensions, Gowans carefully deconstructs a images and rearranges them to create new landscapes with a restored depth. The result is a series of photographs that offer thoughtful alternatives to the conventional landscape practice. Gowans expands on his process:
"This show was created from physical objects. I built maquettes using found negatives, my own photographs, and images from the Internet. I photographed them to create several angles, exposures, shadows
I took many cues from Robert Smithson’s Non-Sites, Michael Snow’s La Région Centrale, and western movie sets.”
See more of Gowans’ work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Jason Gowans
In his project 5 Landscape Modes, Vancouver-based photographic artist Jason Gowans studies the structural implications of photographed landscapes. Exploring simultaneously the second and third dimensions, Gowans carefully deconstructs a images and rearranges them to create new landscapes with a restored depth. The result is a series of photographs that offer thoughtful alternatives to the conventional landscape practice. Gowans expands on his process:
"This show was created from physical objects. I built maquettes using found negatives, my own photographs, and images from the Internet. I photographed them to create several angles, exposures, shadows
I took many cues from Robert Smithson’s Non-Sites, Michael Snow’s La Région Centrale, and western movie sets.”
See more of Gowans’ work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Jason Gowans
In his project 5 Landscape Modes, Vancouver-based photographic artist Jason Gowans studies the structural implications of photographed landscapes. Exploring simultaneously the second and third dimensions, Gowans carefully deconstructs a images and rearranges them to create new landscapes with a restored depth. The result is a series of photographs that offer thoughtful alternatives to the conventional landscape practice. Gowans expands on his process:
"This show was created from physical objects. I built maquettes using found negatives, my own photographs, and images from the Internet. I photographed them to create several angles, exposures, shadows
I took many cues from Robert Smithson’s Non-Sites, Michael Snow’s La Région Centrale, and western movie sets.”
See more of Gowans’ work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders

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