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Globalizing the Tag
 You couldn’t necessarily call him a cyborg, or a magician, but artist Alex Kiessling has managed to use robotic arms to create artworks in three separate cities simultaneously. The project, called Long Distance Art, incorporates satellite feeds and industrial robots, acting as an extension of the artist’s hand around the globe. While Kiessling himself was drawing and painting in Vienna, the robots physically mimicked him in London and Berlin.
The piece itself sets up an interesting dialogue between street artists and telepresence. By introducing communications technology into his art practice, Kiessling has raised the bar of the mobility of street art, altering the context of graffiti to that of a global scale. He is also broadcasting and globalizing his own personal ‘tag’, or his identity as a street artist. The robots have allowed him to transcend the confines of space and location, making living in the city whose streets are the canvas unnecessary. As robots and technology become more available and affordable, it becomes easier for an artist to replicate this identity through their artwork. Kiessling’s project also marks an historic moment for graffiti itself by being able to extend the sociopolitical power of graffiti into separate cultural contexts. 
To view a video of the project in action, click here.
- Lea Hamilton
Globalizing the Tag
 You couldn’t necessarily call him a cyborg, or a magician, but artist Alex Kiessling has managed to use robotic arms to create artworks in three separate cities simultaneously. The project, called Long Distance Art, incorporates satellite feeds and industrial robots, acting as an extension of the artist’s hand around the globe. While Kiessling himself was drawing and painting in Vienna, the robots physically mimicked him in London and Berlin.
The piece itself sets up an interesting dialogue between street artists and telepresence. By introducing communications technology into his art practice, Kiessling has raised the bar of the mobility of street art, altering the context of graffiti to that of a global scale. He is also broadcasting and globalizing his own personal ‘tag’, or his identity as a street artist. The robots have allowed him to transcend the confines of space and location, making living in the city whose streets are the canvas unnecessary. As robots and technology become more available and affordable, it becomes easier for an artist to replicate this identity through their artwork. Kiessling’s project also marks an historic moment for graffiti itself by being able to extend the sociopolitical power of graffiti into separate cultural contexts. 
To view a video of the project in action, click here.
- Lea Hamilton
Globalizing the Tag
 You couldn’t necessarily call him a cyborg, or a magician, but artist Alex Kiessling has managed to use robotic arms to create artworks in three separate cities simultaneously. The project, called Long Distance Art, incorporates satellite feeds and industrial robots, acting as an extension of the artist’s hand around the globe. While Kiessling himself was drawing and painting in Vienna, the robots physically mimicked him in London and Berlin.
The piece itself sets up an interesting dialogue between street artists and telepresence. By introducing communications technology into his art practice, Kiessling has raised the bar of the mobility of street art, altering the context of graffiti to that of a global scale. He is also broadcasting and globalizing his own personal ‘tag’, or his identity as a street artist. The robots have allowed him to transcend the confines of space and location, making living in the city whose streets are the canvas unnecessary. As robots and technology become more available and affordable, it becomes easier for an artist to replicate this identity through their artwork. Kiessling’s project also marks an historic moment for graffiti itself by being able to extend the sociopolitical power of graffiti into separate cultural contexts. 
To view a video of the project in action, click here.
- Lea Hamilton

Globalizing the Tag

 You couldn’t necessarily call him a cyborg, or a magician, but artist Alex Kiessling has managed to use robotic arms to create artworks in three separate cities simultaneously. The project, called Long Distance Art, incorporates satellite feeds and industrial robots, acting as an extension of the artist’s hand around the globe. While Kiessling himself was drawing and painting in Vienna, the robots physically mimicked him in London and Berlin.

The piece itself sets up an interesting dialogue between street artists and telepresence. By introducing communications technology into his art practice, Kiessling has raised the bar of the mobility of street art, altering the context of graffiti to that of a global scale. He is also broadcasting and globalizing his own personal ‘tag’, or his identity as a street artist. The robots have allowed him to transcend the confines of space and location, making living in the city whose streets are the canvas unnecessary. As robots and technology become more available and affordable, it becomes easier for an artist to replicate this identity through their artwork. Kiessling’s project also marks an historic moment for graffiti itself by being able to extend the sociopolitical power of graffiti into separate cultural contexts. 

To view a video of the project in action, click here.

- Lea Hamilton

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ Alex Kiessling robots art science global drawing painting London Vienna Berlin technology street art graffiti network
Sound Waves: Patterning Sonatas
If, at first, you are unsure as to what you are looking at, you are not alone. On their own, these fantastic drawings by Jorinde Voigt allow for several interpretations. One could presume that they are diagrams of wind patterns or ocean currents, or even the model for a physics equation gone awry. They are none of the above.
Actually, these undulating forms are a sort of graph. They are created through a combination of freehand intuition and emotional interpretation on the artist’s part. Each drawing represents the intonations and dynamic notations of Beethoven’s sonatas for solo piano, 1 through 32, extracted after translating from German to either English or Italian. The main structures of the drawings are built up from these translated intonations, or what Voigt calls ‘extracted progressions’.
The swooping lines all emerge from a series of epicenters, or ‘internal centres’, representing the inner compass of the piece. Each internal centre is connected through an axis that churns the lines into a vortex. All of the lines within each drawing are connected to this axis. The ‘external centres’, on the opposite end of the spectrum, refer to outside influences that have affected the creation of the piece: geographical or social changes that have altered the emotional interpretation of each sonata. These external influences, adapting with her own emotional reactions as she listens to the music, are what allow Voigt’s patterns to remain fresh and non-repetitive.
To view a zoom-friendly image of all the works together, click here.
-Lea Hamilton
Sound Waves: Patterning Sonatas
If, at first, you are unsure as to what you are looking at, you are not alone. On their own, these fantastic drawings by Jorinde Voigt allow for several interpretations. One could presume that they are diagrams of wind patterns or ocean currents, or even the model for a physics equation gone awry. They are none of the above.
Actually, these undulating forms are a sort of graph. They are created through a combination of freehand intuition and emotional interpretation on the artist’s part. Each drawing represents the intonations and dynamic notations of Beethoven’s sonatas for solo piano, 1 through 32, extracted after translating from German to either English or Italian. The main structures of the drawings are built up from these translated intonations, or what Voigt calls ‘extracted progressions’.
The swooping lines all emerge from a series of epicenters, or ‘internal centres’, representing the inner compass of the piece. Each internal centre is connected through an axis that churns the lines into a vortex. All of the lines within each drawing are connected to this axis. The ‘external centres’, on the opposite end of the spectrum, refer to outside influences that have affected the creation of the piece: geographical or social changes that have altered the emotional interpretation of each sonata. These external influences, adapting with her own emotional reactions as she listens to the music, are what allow Voigt’s patterns to remain fresh and non-repetitive.
To view a zoom-friendly image of all the works together, click here.
-Lea Hamilton
Sound Waves: Patterning Sonatas
If, at first, you are unsure as to what you are looking at, you are not alone. On their own, these fantastic drawings by Jorinde Voigt allow for several interpretations. One could presume that they are diagrams of wind patterns or ocean currents, or even the model for a physics equation gone awry. They are none of the above.
Actually, these undulating forms are a sort of graph. They are created through a combination of freehand intuition and emotional interpretation on the artist’s part. Each drawing represents the intonations and dynamic notations of Beethoven’s sonatas for solo piano, 1 through 32, extracted after translating from German to either English or Italian. The main structures of the drawings are built up from these translated intonations, or what Voigt calls ‘extracted progressions’.
The swooping lines all emerge from a series of epicenters, or ‘internal centres’, representing the inner compass of the piece. Each internal centre is connected through an axis that churns the lines into a vortex. All of the lines within each drawing are connected to this axis. The ‘external centres’, on the opposite end of the spectrum, refer to outside influences that have affected the creation of the piece: geographical or social changes that have altered the emotional interpretation of each sonata. These external influences, adapting with her own emotional reactions as she listens to the music, are what allow Voigt’s patterns to remain fresh and non-repetitive.
To view a zoom-friendly image of all the works together, click here.
-Lea Hamilton
Sound Waves: Patterning Sonatas
If, at first, you are unsure as to what you are looking at, you are not alone. On their own, these fantastic drawings by Jorinde Voigt allow for several interpretations. One could presume that they are diagrams of wind patterns or ocean currents, or even the model for a physics equation gone awry. They are none of the above.
Actually, these undulating forms are a sort of graph. They are created through a combination of freehand intuition and emotional interpretation on the artist’s part. Each drawing represents the intonations and dynamic notations of Beethoven’s sonatas for solo piano, 1 through 32, extracted after translating from German to either English or Italian. The main structures of the drawings are built up from these translated intonations, or what Voigt calls ‘extracted progressions’.
The swooping lines all emerge from a series of epicenters, or ‘internal centres’, representing the inner compass of the piece. Each internal centre is connected through an axis that churns the lines into a vortex. All of the lines within each drawing are connected to this axis. The ‘external centres’, on the opposite end of the spectrum, refer to outside influences that have affected the creation of the piece: geographical or social changes that have altered the emotional interpretation of each sonata. These external influences, adapting with her own emotional reactions as she listens to the music, are what allow Voigt’s patterns to remain fresh and non-repetitive.
To view a zoom-friendly image of all the works together, click here.
-Lea Hamilton

Sound Waves: Patterning Sonatas

If, at first, you are unsure as to what you are looking at, you are not alone. On their own, these fantastic drawings by Jorinde Voigt allow for several interpretations. One could presume that they are diagrams of wind patterns or ocean currents, or even the model for a physics equation gone awry. They are none of the above.

Actually, these undulating forms are a sort of graph. They are created through a combination of freehand intuition and emotional interpretation on the artist’s part. Each drawing represents the intonations and dynamic notations of Beethoven’s sonatas for solo piano, 1 through 32, extracted after translating from German to either English or Italian. The main structures of the drawings are built up from these translated intonations, or what Voigt calls ‘extracted progressions’.

The swooping lines all emerge from a series of epicenters, or ‘internal centres’, representing the inner compass of the piece. Each internal centre is connected through an axis that churns the lines into a vortex. All of the lines within each drawing are connected to this axis. The ‘external centres’, on the opposite end of the spectrum, refer to outside influences that have affected the creation of the piece: geographical or social changes that have altered the emotional interpretation of each sonata. These external influences, adapting with her own emotional reactions as she listens to the music, are what allow Voigt’s patterns to remain fresh and non-repetitive.

To view a zoom-friendly image of all the works together, click here.

-Lea Hamilton

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ art science physics music Beethoven sonata piano drawing Jorinde Voigt Lea Hamilton artandsciencejournal pattern sound composition method
Jerry’s Map: Building a World
Every artwork begins with an idea that interests the artist enough to compel them to create something from it. From the initial mark made at the beginning, the artist is creating in response to an idea that expands and changes as the work develops. Jerry Gretzinger has acted upon this notion of responding to an idea in the map that he has created, and continued to create for 50 years.
Jerry’s Map has ‘evolved’ over the years, growing out of a systemic, intricate process that Jerry has created himself. Jerry uses a deck of playing cards, which he dubs the ‘future predictor’, that gives him a set of instructions on what parts of the map he will work on that day. Depending on the instruction, Jerry can build different sections of the world he has created: add new institutions to a city or town, paint some new farmland, scan and archive original pieces and work on the next generation of each map card. Each change is recorded in his computer spreadsheet that contains the population of each town he had created. By using a deck of playing cards, Jerry allows for chance to play a major role in his world-building, and it keeps the map stimulating for him to work on.

Another element of chance that he allows to seep in is his ‘new void’ card, which dictates that Jerry wipe out a section of the map with a splotch of white. As the void expands, the map gets eaten up by the whiteness and replaced with the grey worlds that appear within the void. This idea of destroying and creating anew puts Jerry in a dual position of creator and observer, something that he remarks as being fascinating. The map has obviously taken on a life of its own, and has expanded to being more than 2500 pieces of 8x10 inch card. Having a few prints of the map and one original piece in my possession, I can affirm that they are intricately thought out, beautiful small treasures that show one artist’s dedication to an idea.
If you would like to see Gregory Whitmore’s short film about Jerry and his map (highly recommended), click here.
Jerry is also collaborating with other artists to make more map pieces. To check that out,  or if you’re interested in buying a print, check out Jerry’s website here.
-Lea Hamilton
Jerry’s Map: Building a World
Every artwork begins with an idea that interests the artist enough to compel them to create something from it. From the initial mark made at the beginning, the artist is creating in response to an idea that expands and changes as the work develops. Jerry Gretzinger has acted upon this notion of responding to an idea in the map that he has created, and continued to create for 50 years.
Jerry’s Map has ‘evolved’ over the years, growing out of a systemic, intricate process that Jerry has created himself. Jerry uses a deck of playing cards, which he dubs the ‘future predictor’, that gives him a set of instructions on what parts of the map he will work on that day. Depending on the instruction, Jerry can build different sections of the world he has created: add new institutions to a city or town, paint some new farmland, scan and archive original pieces and work on the next generation of each map card. Each change is recorded in his computer spreadsheet that contains the population of each town he had created. By using a deck of playing cards, Jerry allows for chance to play a major role in his world-building, and it keeps the map stimulating for him to work on.

Another element of chance that he allows to seep in is his ‘new void’ card, which dictates that Jerry wipe out a section of the map with a splotch of white. As the void expands, the map gets eaten up by the whiteness and replaced with the grey worlds that appear within the void. This idea of destroying and creating anew puts Jerry in a dual position of creator and observer, something that he remarks as being fascinating. The map has obviously taken on a life of its own, and has expanded to being more than 2500 pieces of 8x10 inch card. Having a few prints of the map and one original piece in my possession, I can affirm that they are intricately thought out, beautiful small treasures that show one artist’s dedication to an idea.
If you would like to see Gregory Whitmore’s short film about Jerry and his map (highly recommended), click here.
Jerry is also collaborating with other artists to make more map pieces. To check that out,  or if you’re interested in buying a print, check out Jerry’s website here.
-Lea Hamilton
Jerry’s Map: Building a World
Every artwork begins with an idea that interests the artist enough to compel them to create something from it. From the initial mark made at the beginning, the artist is creating in response to an idea that expands and changes as the work develops. Jerry Gretzinger has acted upon this notion of responding to an idea in the map that he has created, and continued to create for 50 years.
Jerry’s Map has ‘evolved’ over the years, growing out of a systemic, intricate process that Jerry has created himself. Jerry uses a deck of playing cards, which he dubs the ‘future predictor’, that gives him a set of instructions on what parts of the map he will work on that day. Depending on the instruction, Jerry can build different sections of the world he has created: add new institutions to a city or town, paint some new farmland, scan and archive original pieces and work on the next generation of each map card. Each change is recorded in his computer spreadsheet that contains the population of each town he had created. By using a deck of playing cards, Jerry allows for chance to play a major role in his world-building, and it keeps the map stimulating for him to work on.

Another element of chance that he allows to seep in is his ‘new void’ card, which dictates that Jerry wipe out a section of the map with a splotch of white. As the void expands, the map gets eaten up by the whiteness and replaced with the grey worlds that appear within the void. This idea of destroying and creating anew puts Jerry in a dual position of creator and observer, something that he remarks as being fascinating. The map has obviously taken on a life of its own, and has expanded to being more than 2500 pieces of 8x10 inch card. Having a few prints of the map and one original piece in my possession, I can affirm that they are intricately thought out, beautiful small treasures that show one artist’s dedication to an idea.
If you would like to see Gregory Whitmore’s short film about Jerry and his map (highly recommended), click here.
Jerry is also collaborating with other artists to make more map pieces. To check that out,  or if you’re interested in buying a print, check out Jerry’s website here.
-Lea Hamilton
Jerry’s Map: Building a World
Every artwork begins with an idea that interests the artist enough to compel them to create something from it. From the initial mark made at the beginning, the artist is creating in response to an idea that expands and changes as the work develops. Jerry Gretzinger has acted upon this notion of responding to an idea in the map that he has created, and continued to create for 50 years.
Jerry’s Map has ‘evolved’ over the years, growing out of a systemic, intricate process that Jerry has created himself. Jerry uses a deck of playing cards, which he dubs the ‘future predictor’, that gives him a set of instructions on what parts of the map he will work on that day. Depending on the instruction, Jerry can build different sections of the world he has created: add new institutions to a city or town, paint some new farmland, scan and archive original pieces and work on the next generation of each map card. Each change is recorded in his computer spreadsheet that contains the population of each town he had created. By using a deck of playing cards, Jerry allows for chance to play a major role in his world-building, and it keeps the map stimulating for him to work on.

Another element of chance that he allows to seep in is his ‘new void’ card, which dictates that Jerry wipe out a section of the map with a splotch of white. As the void expands, the map gets eaten up by the whiteness and replaced with the grey worlds that appear within the void. This idea of destroying and creating anew puts Jerry in a dual position of creator and observer, something that he remarks as being fascinating. The map has obviously taken on a life of its own, and has expanded to being more than 2500 pieces of 8x10 inch card. Having a few prints of the map and one original piece in my possession, I can affirm that they are intricately thought out, beautiful small treasures that show one artist’s dedication to an idea.
If you would like to see Gregory Whitmore’s short film about Jerry and his map (highly recommended), click here.
Jerry is also collaborating with other artists to make more map pieces. To check that out,  or if you’re interested in buying a print, check out Jerry’s website here.
-Lea Hamilton

Jerry’s Map: Building a World

Every artwork begins with an idea that interests the artist enough to compel them to create something from it. From the initial mark made at the beginning, the artist is creating in response to an idea that expands and changes as the work develops. Jerry Gretzinger has acted upon this notion of responding to an idea in the map that he has created, and continued to create for 50 years.

Jerry’s Map has ‘evolved’ over the years, growing out of a systemic, intricate process that Jerry has created himself. Jerry uses a deck of playing cards, which he dubs the ‘future predictor’, that gives him a set of instructions on what parts of the map he will work on that day. Depending on the instruction, Jerry can build different sections of the world he has created: add new institutions to a city or town, paint some new farmland, scan and archive original pieces and work on the next generation of each map card. Each change is recorded in his computer spreadsheet that contains the population of each town he had created. By using a deck of playing cards, Jerry allows for chance to play a major role in his world-building, and it keeps the map stimulating for him to work on.

image

Another element of chance that he allows to seep in is his ‘new void’ card, which dictates that Jerry wipe out a section of the map with a splotch of white. As the void expands, the map gets eaten up by the whiteness and replaced with the grey worlds that appear within the void. This idea of destroying and creating anew puts Jerry in a dual position of creator and observer, something that he remarks as being fascinating. The map has obviously taken on a life of its own, and has expanded to being more than 2500 pieces of 8x10 inch card. Having a few prints of the map and one original piece in my possession, I can affirm that they are intricately thought out, beautiful small treasures that show one artist’s dedication to an idea.

If you would like to see Gregory Whitmore’s short film about Jerry and his map (highly recommended), click here.

Jerry is also collaborating with other artists to make more map pieces. To check that out,  or if you’re interested in buying a print, check out Jerry’s website here.

-Lea Hamilton

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ map art cartography world building Jerry Gretzinger Lea Hamilton drawing painting mapping inspiring nature art and science journal
The Drawing Machines of Harvey Moon
Collaborations between artists are not uncommon, especially if two artists have different sets of talents, but share the same vision. What usually results is a finished, co-authored piece that both artists can take credit for. This notion of authorship within a collaborated work is questioned by new media artist Harvey Moon, who ‘extends the capabilities of his own system’ by collaborating with his Drawing Machines.
The Drawing Machine itself initially started off as a servo and two motors, run by an Arduino that is programmed with an algorithm telling it how to move the pen across the page. Moon has sophisticated his machines from the original model, using new algorithms to express himself in his unique works of art. Moon actually views himself as a producer more than as an artist; he creates the rules and systems in which the Drawing Machine can create, and then he lets the machine run as it pleases. The notion of relinquishing of artistic license to his robots is a concept that Moon is continually interested in.
Harvey Moon is currently using his drawing machine to create a series of works that takes satellite images from Google Earth. By drawing these places at random, and without knowing where it will draw next, the drawing machine is creating an ‘impossible map’ that is based off of the miscommunication between machines.
To view the interview with the artist and see the machines in action, check out this video here.
- Lea Hamilton
The Drawing Machines of Harvey Moon
Collaborations between artists are not uncommon, especially if two artists have different sets of talents, but share the same vision. What usually results is a finished, co-authored piece that both artists can take credit for. This notion of authorship within a collaborated work is questioned by new media artist Harvey Moon, who ‘extends the capabilities of his own system’ by collaborating with his Drawing Machines.
The Drawing Machine itself initially started off as a servo and two motors, run by an Arduino that is programmed with an algorithm telling it how to move the pen across the page. Moon has sophisticated his machines from the original model, using new algorithms to express himself in his unique works of art. Moon actually views himself as a producer more than as an artist; he creates the rules and systems in which the Drawing Machine can create, and then he lets the machine run as it pleases. The notion of relinquishing of artistic license to his robots is a concept that Moon is continually interested in.
Harvey Moon is currently using his drawing machine to create a series of works that takes satellite images from Google Earth. By drawing these places at random, and without knowing where it will draw next, the drawing machine is creating an ‘impossible map’ that is based off of the miscommunication between machines.
To view the interview with the artist and see the machines in action, check out this video here.
- Lea Hamilton
The Drawing Machines of Harvey Moon
Collaborations between artists are not uncommon, especially if two artists have different sets of talents, but share the same vision. What usually results is a finished, co-authored piece that both artists can take credit for. This notion of authorship within a collaborated work is questioned by new media artist Harvey Moon, who ‘extends the capabilities of his own system’ by collaborating with his Drawing Machines.
The Drawing Machine itself initially started off as a servo and two motors, run by an Arduino that is programmed with an algorithm telling it how to move the pen across the page. Moon has sophisticated his machines from the original model, using new algorithms to express himself in his unique works of art. Moon actually views himself as a producer more than as an artist; he creates the rules and systems in which the Drawing Machine can create, and then he lets the machine run as it pleases. The notion of relinquishing of artistic license to his robots is a concept that Moon is continually interested in.
Harvey Moon is currently using his drawing machine to create a series of works that takes satellite images from Google Earth. By drawing these places at random, and without knowing where it will draw next, the drawing machine is creating an ‘impossible map’ that is based off of the miscommunication between machines.
To view the interview with the artist and see the machines in action, check out this video here.
- Lea Hamilton
The Drawing Machines of Harvey Moon
Collaborations between artists are not uncommon, especially if two artists have different sets of talents, but share the same vision. What usually results is a finished, co-authored piece that both artists can take credit for. This notion of authorship within a collaborated work is questioned by new media artist Harvey Moon, who ‘extends the capabilities of his own system’ by collaborating with his Drawing Machines.
The Drawing Machine itself initially started off as a servo and two motors, run by an Arduino that is programmed with an algorithm telling it how to move the pen across the page. Moon has sophisticated his machines from the original model, using new algorithms to express himself in his unique works of art. Moon actually views himself as a producer more than as an artist; he creates the rules and systems in which the Drawing Machine can create, and then he lets the machine run as it pleases. The notion of relinquishing of artistic license to his robots is a concept that Moon is continually interested in.
Harvey Moon is currently using his drawing machine to create a series of works that takes satellite images from Google Earth. By drawing these places at random, and without knowing where it will draw next, the drawing machine is creating an ‘impossible map’ that is based off of the miscommunication between machines.
To view the interview with the artist and see the machines in action, check out this video here.
- Lea Hamilton

The Drawing Machines of Harvey Moon

Collaborations between artists are not uncommon, especially if two artists have different sets of talents, but share the same vision. What usually results is a finished, co-authored piece that both artists can take credit for. This notion of authorship within a collaborated work is questioned by new media artist Harvey Moon, who ‘extends the capabilities of his own system’ by collaborating with his Drawing Machines.

The Drawing Machine itself initially started off as a servo and two motors, run by an Arduino that is programmed with an algorithm telling it how to move the pen across the page. Moon has sophisticated his machines from the original model, using new algorithms to express himself in his unique works of art. Moon actually views himself as a producer more than as an artist; he creates the rules and systems in which the Drawing Machine can create, and then he lets the machine run as it pleases. The notion of relinquishing of artistic license to his robots is a concept that Moon is continually interested in.

Harvey Moon is currently using his drawing machine to create a series of works that takes satellite images from Google Earth. By drawing these places at random, and without knowing where it will draw next, the drawing machine is creating an ‘impossible map’ that is based off of the miscommunication between machines.

To view the interview with the artist and see the machines in action, check out this video here.

Lea Hamilton

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ Harvey Moon Lea Hamilton drawing machine technology arduino collaboration processing robot video art drawing machine Art and Science Journal
Ellen Grossman
Since you’ve probably all seen this charming video of Jay-Z meeting artist Ellen Grossman on the subway, it only seems fitting to feature her incredible work on A&SJ.
These highly-detailed drawings mimic those of topographic sciences, “mapping surfaces” as one would map terrain. The result is a careful study in two, even three, dimensions. By recording the date and time of each drawing session, Grossman invites the variable of observation into the process, recalling the uncertainty principle. She writes of her work:
"Lines build up, revealing the topography of surges, shifts, eruptions, trickles, and the wind made visible. Time also flows, so I began recording the date, hour and minute at the start and end of each line and running totals. This is daunting and that’s part of the point: Written numbers build up, forcing the lines to fan out, reading at first glance as a texture, radically changing the drawings. As in science recording observations can alter results."
See more of Grossman’s work here.
- Erin Saunders
Ellen Grossman
Since you’ve probably all seen this charming video of Jay-Z meeting artist Ellen Grossman on the subway, it only seems fitting to feature her incredible work on A&SJ.
These highly-detailed drawings mimic those of topographic sciences, “mapping surfaces” as one would map terrain. The result is a careful study in two, even three, dimensions. By recording the date and time of each drawing session, Grossman invites the variable of observation into the process, recalling the uncertainty principle. She writes of her work:
"Lines build up, revealing the topography of surges, shifts, eruptions, trickles, and the wind made visible. Time also flows, so I began recording the date, hour and minute at the start and end of each line and running totals. This is daunting and that’s part of the point: Written numbers build up, forcing the lines to fan out, reading at first glance as a texture, radically changing the drawings. As in science recording observations can alter results."
See more of Grossman’s work here.
- Erin Saunders

Ellen Grossman


Since you’ve probably all seen
this charming video of Jay-Z meeting artist Ellen Grossman on the subway, it only seems fitting to feature her incredible work on A&SJ.

These highly-detailed drawings mimic those of topographic sciences, “mapping surfaces” as one would map terrain. The result is a careful study in two, even three, dimensions. By recording the date and time of each drawing session, Grossman invites the variable of observation into the process, recalling the uncertainty principle. She writes of her work:

"Lines build up, revealing the topography of surges, shifts, eruptions, trickles, and the wind made visible. Time also flows, so I began recording the date, hour and minute at the start and end of each line and running totals. This is daunting and that’s part of the point: Written numbers build up, forcing the lines to fan out, reading at first glance as a texture, radically changing the drawings. As in science recording observations can alter results."

See more of Grossman’s work here.

- Erin Saunders

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ art science topography ellen grossman uncertainty principle drawing
Rithika Merchant
In this series, Origin of Species, Rithika Merchant explores hybrid creatures. She describes this project as an investigation into “the duality within nature and the idea of many selves in conversation with each other.”
When making her works, Merchant first figures out how she wants the creatures to interact. This is followed by research, which includes looking at pictures animals and plants, specifically, Botanical Drawings from the 18th and 19th Century. Merchant is also inspired by tribal art. Her favourite is the art of the Gond people, a tribe in central India. The inspiration behind the works, together with the arbitrary colouring throughout this series, make the works come alive. 
In her most recent series, Merchant deals with comparative mythology. As she describes the series, “I explore the common thread that runs through different cultures and religions. Similar versions of all these myths, stories and ideas are shared by cultures all around the world.I use creatures and symbolism that are part of my personal visual vocabulary to explore these narratives.” Currently she is re-interpreting the idea of the monomyth, the story of the hero, from the perspective of the heroine. To see more of Merchant’s works, click here.
- Lee Jones
Rithika Merchant
In this series, Origin of Species, Rithika Merchant explores hybrid creatures. She describes this project as an investigation into “the duality within nature and the idea of many selves in conversation with each other.”
When making her works, Merchant first figures out how she wants the creatures to interact. This is followed by research, which includes looking at pictures animals and plants, specifically, Botanical Drawings from the 18th and 19th Century. Merchant is also inspired by tribal art. Her favourite is the art of the Gond people, a tribe in central India. The inspiration behind the works, together with the arbitrary colouring throughout this series, make the works come alive. 
In her most recent series, Merchant deals with comparative mythology. As she describes the series, “I explore the common thread that runs through different cultures and religions. Similar versions of all these myths, stories and ideas are shared by cultures all around the world.I use creatures and symbolism that are part of my personal visual vocabulary to explore these narratives.” Currently she is re-interpreting the idea of the monomyth, the story of the hero, from the perspective of the heroine. To see more of Merchant’s works, click here.
- Lee Jones
Rithika Merchant
In this series, Origin of Species, Rithika Merchant explores hybrid creatures. She describes this project as an investigation into “the duality within nature and the idea of many selves in conversation with each other.”
When making her works, Merchant first figures out how she wants the creatures to interact. This is followed by research, which includes looking at pictures animals and plants, specifically, Botanical Drawings from the 18th and 19th Century. Merchant is also inspired by tribal art. Her favourite is the art of the Gond people, a tribe in central India. The inspiration behind the works, together with the arbitrary colouring throughout this series, make the works come alive. 
In her most recent series, Merchant deals with comparative mythology. As she describes the series, “I explore the common thread that runs through different cultures and religions. Similar versions of all these myths, stories and ideas are shared by cultures all around the world.I use creatures and symbolism that are part of my personal visual vocabulary to explore these narratives.” Currently she is re-interpreting the idea of the monomyth, the story of the hero, from the perspective of the heroine. To see more of Merchant’s works, click here.
- Lee Jones
Rithika Merchant
In this series, Origin of Species, Rithika Merchant explores hybrid creatures. She describes this project as an investigation into “the duality within nature and the idea of many selves in conversation with each other.”
When making her works, Merchant first figures out how she wants the creatures to interact. This is followed by research, which includes looking at pictures animals and plants, specifically, Botanical Drawings from the 18th and 19th Century. Merchant is also inspired by tribal art. Her favourite is the art of the Gond people, a tribe in central India. The inspiration behind the works, together with the arbitrary colouring throughout this series, make the works come alive. 
In her most recent series, Merchant deals with comparative mythology. As she describes the series, “I explore the common thread that runs through different cultures and religions. Similar versions of all these myths, stories and ideas are shared by cultures all around the world.I use creatures and symbolism that are part of my personal visual vocabulary to explore these narratives.” Currently she is re-interpreting the idea of the monomyth, the story of the hero, from the perspective of the heroine. To see more of Merchant’s works, click here.
- Lee Jones
Rithika Merchant
In this series, Origin of Species, Rithika Merchant explores hybrid creatures. She describes this project as an investigation into “the duality within nature and the idea of many selves in conversation with each other.”
When making her works, Merchant first figures out how she wants the creatures to interact. This is followed by research, which includes looking at pictures animals and plants, specifically, Botanical Drawings from the 18th and 19th Century. Merchant is also inspired by tribal art. Her favourite is the art of the Gond people, a tribe in central India. The inspiration behind the works, together with the arbitrary colouring throughout this series, make the works come alive. 
In her most recent series, Merchant deals with comparative mythology. As she describes the series, “I explore the common thread that runs through different cultures and religions. Similar versions of all these myths, stories and ideas are shared by cultures all around the world.I use creatures and symbolism that are part of my personal visual vocabulary to explore these narratives.” Currently she is re-interpreting the idea of the monomyth, the story of the hero, from the perspective of the heroine. To see more of Merchant’s works, click here.
- Lee Jones
Mark Nystrom’s Wind Drawings
Inspired by the simple sight of a leaf dancing across snow, American artist Mark Nystrom created his elegant Wind Drawings series in which a pen equipped with sails records one day’s wind conditions. Visual interpretations of wind and other invisible natural phenomena are always fascinating, and Nystrom’s drawings are no exception as they begin to characterize, even humanize the wind. While some drawings show clear patterns — implying a strong wind from a consistent direction — others are erratic and confused. One drawing from a very calm day only registers a tiny, barely visible, speck of movement.
You can look at more of Nystrom’s wind explorations and other projects at his website here. 
- Erin Saunders
Mark Nystrom’s Wind Drawings
Inspired by the simple sight of a leaf dancing across snow, American artist Mark Nystrom created his elegant Wind Drawings series in which a pen equipped with sails records one day’s wind conditions. Visual interpretations of wind and other invisible natural phenomena are always fascinating, and Nystrom’s drawings are no exception as they begin to characterize, even humanize the wind. While some drawings show clear patterns — implying a strong wind from a consistent direction — others are erratic and confused. One drawing from a very calm day only registers a tiny, barely visible, speck of movement.
You can look at more of Nystrom’s wind explorations and other projects at his website here. 
- Erin Saunders
Mark Nystrom’s Wind Drawings
Inspired by the simple sight of a leaf dancing across snow, American artist Mark Nystrom created his elegant Wind Drawings series in which a pen equipped with sails records one day’s wind conditions. Visual interpretations of wind and other invisible natural phenomena are always fascinating, and Nystrom’s drawings are no exception as they begin to characterize, even humanize the wind. While some drawings show clear patterns — implying a strong wind from a consistent direction — others are erratic and confused. One drawing from a very calm day only registers a tiny, barely visible, speck of movement.
You can look at more of Nystrom’s wind explorations and other projects at his website here. 
- Erin Saunders
Mark Nystrom’s Wind Drawings
Inspired by the simple sight of a leaf dancing across snow, American artist Mark Nystrom created his elegant Wind Drawings series in which a pen equipped with sails records one day’s wind conditions. Visual interpretations of wind and other invisible natural phenomena are always fascinating, and Nystrom’s drawings are no exception as they begin to characterize, even humanize the wind. While some drawings show clear patterns — implying a strong wind from a consistent direction — others are erratic and confused. One drawing from a very calm day only registers a tiny, barely visible, speck of movement.
You can look at more of Nystrom’s wind explorations and other projects at his website here. 
- Erin Saunders

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