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Bug Balls by Claire Moynihan
Not everyone has the ability to enjoy the intricate beauty that is insects and various other little creepy crawlies, because most people just find them, well, creepy. Insects and gastropods, such as the snail, can be intimidating when in a pack or swarm, but on their own there is so much to be in awe of, whether it’s the explosion of colour on a butterfly’s wings, or wondering how a shell can stay on a body, which looks like it could be made from gummy worms.
Artist Claire Moynihan allows us spectators to better study these intriguing beasts, but in a new way; through embroidery. That’s right! Moynihan creates insects and gastropods as anatomically correct as she possibly can, using only some thread. She mounts them on small little felt balls, and displays them in traditional entomological shadow boxes, like the specimens of old. Her little ‘bug balls’ are specific to the wildlife of the British Isles, but most are recognizable as international pests. Funny enough, Moynihan started her practice with just recreations of moths, aka, ‘moth balls’. 
Now, her collection has expanded; a real infestation if you will, but one I think anybody wouldn’t mind to have. As long as they don’t move!
- Anna Paluch 
Bug Balls by Claire Moynihan
Not everyone has the ability to enjoy the intricate beauty that is insects and various other little creepy crawlies, because most people just find them, well, creepy. Insects and gastropods, such as the snail, can be intimidating when in a pack or swarm, but on their own there is so much to be in awe of, whether it’s the explosion of colour on a butterfly’s wings, or wondering how a shell can stay on a body, which looks like it could be made from gummy worms.
Artist Claire Moynihan allows us spectators to better study these intriguing beasts, but in a new way; through embroidery. That’s right! Moynihan creates insects and gastropods as anatomically correct as she possibly can, using only some thread. She mounts them on small little felt balls, and displays them in traditional entomological shadow boxes, like the specimens of old. Her little ‘bug balls’ are specific to the wildlife of the British Isles, but most are recognizable as international pests. Funny enough, Moynihan started her practice with just recreations of moths, aka, ‘moth balls’. 
Now, her collection has expanded; a real infestation if you will, but one I think anybody wouldn’t mind to have. As long as they don’t move!
- Anna Paluch 

Bug Balls by Claire Moynihan

Not everyone has the ability to enjoy the intricate beauty that is insects and various other little creepy crawlies, because most people just find them, well, creepy. Insects and gastropods, such as the snail, can be intimidating when in a pack or swarm, but on their own there is so much to be in awe of, whether it’s the explosion of colour on a butterfly’s wings, or wondering how a shell can stay on a body, which looks like it could be made from gummy worms.

Artist Claire Moynihan allows us spectators to better study these intriguing beasts, but in a new way; through embroidery. That’s right! Moynihan creates insects and gastropods as anatomically correct as she possibly can, using only some thread. She mounts them on small little felt balls, and displays them in traditional entomological shadow boxes, like the specimens of old. Her little ‘bug balls’ are specific to the wildlife of the British Isles, but most are recognizable as international pests. Funny enough, Moynihan started her practice with just recreations of moths, aka, ‘moth balls’.

Now, her collection has expanded; a real infestation if you will, but one I think anybody wouldn’t mind to have. As long as they don’t move!

- Anna Paluch 

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ claire moynihan bug balls embroidery insects gastropods art science anna paluch art and science journal bugs
Tyler Varsell
In this series Science, collage and mixed media artist Tyler Varsell embroiders on canvas. Her works bring back the fun from elementary school science, and the quirky textbooks that went with it. As Varsell describes the series,
"The series began with ‘Nucleus’, in which I was inspired by the aesthetic design of the atom symbol. I decided to create a series based on scientific curiosity and wonder, and the aesthetic beauty of patterns found in science and nature. Each work is centered around a different hand-embroidered design over collaged images from vintage children’s encyclopedias."
For more of Varsell’s works, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Tyler Varsell
In this series Science, collage and mixed media artist Tyler Varsell embroiders on canvas. Her works bring back the fun from elementary school science, and the quirky textbooks that went with it. As Varsell describes the series,
"The series began with ‘Nucleus’, in which I was inspired by the aesthetic design of the atom symbol. I decided to create a series based on scientific curiosity and wonder, and the aesthetic beauty of patterns found in science and nature. Each work is centered around a different hand-embroidered design over collaged images from vintage children’s encyclopedias."
For more of Varsell’s works, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Tyler Varsell
In this series Science, collage and mixed media artist Tyler Varsell embroiders on canvas. Her works bring back the fun from elementary school science, and the quirky textbooks that went with it. As Varsell describes the series,
"The series began with ‘Nucleus’, in which I was inspired by the aesthetic design of the atom symbol. I decided to create a series based on scientific curiosity and wonder, and the aesthetic beauty of patterns found in science and nature. Each work is centered around a different hand-embroidered design over collaged images from vintage children’s encyclopedias."
For more of Varsell’s works, click here. 
- Lee Jones

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