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Another Look at Canadian Landscape
The most recent project of Berlin based artist Charles Stankievech presents us with a 35 mm film installation which reimagines Northern Canadian landscape and its relationship to military infrastructure and the architecture of remote outposts. The time-lapse footage is accompanied by a highly effective soundtrack scored by the artist himself. The footage for the project, The Soniferous Æther of The Land Beyond The Land Beyond, was shot by Stankievech while at the CFS ALERT Signals Intelligence Station - the northern-most settlement on earth that remains populated year round. The Station was built on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut in the 1950’s, and has a complex military history with the station having been used throughout the cold war as surveillance for Russian communications. Today it is a Canadian operation with about 200 inhabitants at any given time. The name of the project plays with a phrase describing the region in the Inuit language Inukitut, which translates to “The Land Beyond the Land of the People”. Filmed during the winter months, the station is shrouded in darkness, with inhabitants taking refuge from temperatures reaching -50 degrees celsius.
The result is an unsettling vision of the far North - the footage definitely relies on certain aesthetics that are linked to science fiction, and even our expectations of solitary outposts at the end of the world. Stankievech explains in conversation with WIRED that this outpost is a place where “the celestial meets the terrestial” with a landscape that easily relates to outer space. The haunting images in the film render this far-off destination as an extra-terrestrial or even post-human environment.
Here’s the artist’s website for more details. The above images are screen shots from the film - if you weren’t lucky enough to catch the project in person at Toronto’s Nuit Blanche (like me) - you can take a look at the trailer here.
-Katherine Lawson
Another Look at Canadian Landscape
The most recent project of Berlin based artist Charles Stankievech presents us with a 35 mm film installation which reimagines Northern Canadian landscape and its relationship to military infrastructure and the architecture of remote outposts. The time-lapse footage is accompanied by a highly effective soundtrack scored by the artist himself. The footage for the project, The Soniferous Æther of The Land Beyond The Land Beyond, was shot by Stankievech while at the CFS ALERT Signals Intelligence Station - the northern-most settlement on earth that remains populated year round. The Station was built on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut in the 1950’s, and has a complex military history with the station having been used throughout the cold war as surveillance for Russian communications. Today it is a Canadian operation with about 200 inhabitants at any given time. The name of the project plays with a phrase describing the region in the Inuit language Inukitut, which translates to “The Land Beyond the Land of the People”. Filmed during the winter months, the station is shrouded in darkness, with inhabitants taking refuge from temperatures reaching -50 degrees celsius.
The result is an unsettling vision of the far North - the footage definitely relies on certain aesthetics that are linked to science fiction, and even our expectations of solitary outposts at the end of the world. Stankievech explains in conversation with WIRED that this outpost is a place where “the celestial meets the terrestial” with a landscape that easily relates to outer space. The haunting images in the film render this far-off destination as an extra-terrestrial or even post-human environment.
Here’s the artist’s website for more details. The above images are screen shots from the film - if you weren’t lucky enough to catch the project in person at Toronto’s Nuit Blanche (like me) - you can take a look at the trailer here.
-Katherine Lawson

Another Look at Canadian Landscape

The most recent project of Berlin based artist Charles Stankievech presents us with a 35 mm film installation which reimagines Northern Canadian landscape and its relationship to military infrastructure and the architecture of remote outposts. The time-lapse footage is accompanied by a highly effective soundtrack scored by the artist himself. The footage for the project, The Soniferous Æther of The Land Beyond The Land Beyond, was shot by Stankievech while at the CFS ALERT Signals Intelligence Station - the northern-most settlement on earth that remains populated year round. The Station was built on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut in the 1950’s, and has a complex military history with the station having been used throughout the cold war as surveillance for Russian communications. Today it is a Canadian operation with about 200 inhabitants at any given time. The name of the project plays with a phrase describing the region in the Inuit language Inukitut, which translates to “The Land Beyond the Land of the People”. Filmed during the winter months, the station is shrouded in darkness, with inhabitants taking refuge from temperatures reaching -50 degrees celsius.

The result is an unsettling vision of the far North - the footage definitely relies on certain aesthetics that are linked to science fiction, and even our expectations of solitary outposts at the end of the world. Stankievech explains in conversation with WIRED that this outpost is a place where “the celestial meets the terrestial” with a landscape that easily relates to outer space. The haunting images in the film render this far-off destination as an extra-terrestrial or even post-human environment.

Here’s the artist’s website for more details. The above images are screen shots from the film - if you weren’t lucky enough to catch the project in person at Toronto’s Nuit Blanche (like me) - you can take a look at the trailer here.

-Katherine Lawson

2 Photos
/ charles stankievech art landscape sci fi military canadian film katherine lawson space
Powers of Ten
Powers of Ten is a seminal documentary film produced in 1977 by Charles and Ray Eames, better known in their lifetimes as boundary-pushing designers and architects. It attempts to do visually what exponents do mathematically: that is, render intelligible the unfathomably vast and the infinitely small. Beginning at a lakeside picnic, the camera pans out to the edge of the observable universe before diving into the human body, passing through an individual cell to the vibrations of its component carbon atoms. The film itself has aged surprisingly well, and its central premise—making the microcosm and macrocosm both relative and relevant to the human scale—hasn’t aged at all. You can watch it and further explore each order of magnitude here.
- Alex Tesar
Powers of Ten
Powers of Ten is a seminal documentary film produced in 1977 by Charles and Ray Eames, better known in their lifetimes as boundary-pushing designers and architects. It attempts to do visually what exponents do mathematically: that is, render intelligible the unfathomably vast and the infinitely small. Beginning at a lakeside picnic, the camera pans out to the edge of the observable universe before diving into the human body, passing through an individual cell to the vibrations of its component carbon atoms. The film itself has aged surprisingly well, and its central premise—making the microcosm and macrocosm both relative and relevant to the human scale—hasn’t aged at all. You can watch it and further explore each order of magnitude here.
- Alex Tesar
Powers of Ten
Powers of Ten is a seminal documentary film produced in 1977 by Charles and Ray Eames, better known in their lifetimes as boundary-pushing designers and architects. It attempts to do visually what exponents do mathematically: that is, render intelligible the unfathomably vast and the infinitely small. Beginning at a lakeside picnic, the camera pans out to the edge of the observable universe before diving into the human body, passing through an individual cell to the vibrations of its component carbon atoms. The film itself has aged surprisingly well, and its central premise—making the microcosm and macrocosm both relative and relevant to the human scale—hasn’t aged at all. You can watch it and further explore each order of magnitude here.
- Alex Tesar
Powers of Ten
Powers of Ten is a seminal documentary film produced in 1977 by Charles and Ray Eames, better known in their lifetimes as boundary-pushing designers and architects. It attempts to do visually what exponents do mathematically: that is, render intelligible the unfathomably vast and the infinitely small. Beginning at a lakeside picnic, the camera pans out to the edge of the observable universe before diving into the human body, passing through an individual cell to the vibrations of its component carbon atoms. The film itself has aged surprisingly well, and its central premise—making the microcosm and macrocosm both relative and relevant to the human scale—hasn’t aged at all. You can watch it and further explore each order of magnitude here.
- Alex Tesar
Randy Scott Slavin: Alternate PerspectivesRandy Scott Slavin is an award winning and sought after filmmaker from NYC whose music videos, described as mashups of clever concepts and bold imagery, encapsulate the energy of modern pop culture. He approaches photography with the same philosophy he applies to filmmaking – to push concepts to a stimulating and engaging level."When I began shooting landscapes, I was compelled to push the perspective. After experimenting heavily with panoramic photography, I developed a technique that could realize my desire to turn the real into the surreal." 
Slavin’s process consists of digitally “stitching” together hundreds of photos to reach his desired final product. To see the landscapes and cityscapes of his ‘Alternate Perspectives’ series, click here.- Shaya Ishaq 
Randy Scott Slavin: Alternate PerspectivesRandy Scott Slavin is an award winning and sought after filmmaker from NYC whose music videos, described as mashups of clever concepts and bold imagery, encapsulate the energy of modern pop culture. He approaches photography with the same philosophy he applies to filmmaking – to push concepts to a stimulating and engaging level."When I began shooting landscapes, I was compelled to push the perspective. After experimenting heavily with panoramic photography, I developed a technique that could realize my desire to turn the real into the surreal." 
Slavin’s process consists of digitally “stitching” together hundreds of photos to reach his desired final product. To see the landscapes and cityscapes of his ‘Alternate Perspectives’ series, click here.- Shaya Ishaq 
Randy Scott Slavin: Alternate PerspectivesRandy Scott Slavin is an award winning and sought after filmmaker from NYC whose music videos, described as mashups of clever concepts and bold imagery, encapsulate the energy of modern pop culture. He approaches photography with the same philosophy he applies to filmmaking – to push concepts to a stimulating and engaging level."When I began shooting landscapes, I was compelled to push the perspective. After experimenting heavily with panoramic photography, I developed a technique that could realize my desire to turn the real into the surreal." 
Slavin’s process consists of digitally “stitching” together hundreds of photos to reach his desired final product. To see the landscapes and cityscapes of his ‘Alternate Perspectives’ series, click here.- Shaya Ishaq 

Randy Scott Slavin: Alternate Perspectives

Randy Scott Slavin is an award winning and sought after filmmaker from NYC whose
music videos, described as mashups of clever concepts and bold imagery, encapsulate the energy of modern pop culture. He approaches photography with the same philosophy he applies to filmmaking – to push concepts to a stimulating and engaging level.

"When I began shooting landscapes, I was compelled to push the perspective. After experimenting heavily with panoramic photography, I developed a technique that could realize my desire to turn the real into the surreal." 

Slavin’s process consists of digitally “stitching” together hundreds of photos to reach his desired final product. To see the landscapes and cityscapes of his ‘Alternate Perspectives’ series, click here.

- Shaya Ishaq 

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ art artscience science art and science randy scott slavin film
THE ART PROCESS: photographing your insides (but don’t do this one at home)
Want to know what film looks like once it’s gone through your body? Well two University students from Kingston decided to find out, announced The Lomography Society in early June. But before you get started, wait and don’t do it. At the beginning of their post, the Lomography Society clearly warns “Disclaimer: do not try this at home,”  and you shouldn’t since film is toxic, but as always it’s super cool to see other people do it.
For the images above Luke Evans and Josh Lake swallowed 35 mm film and then scanned the damaged film electronically to get some crazy results. To see more of their work, click here for Luke Evans and here for Josh Lake.
- Lee Jones
[image credit - the Creative Review]
THE ART PROCESS: photographing your insides (but don’t do this one at home)
Want to know what film looks like once it’s gone through your body? Well two University students from Kingston decided to find out, announced The Lomography Society in early June. But before you get started, wait and don’t do it. At the beginning of their post, the Lomography Society clearly warns “Disclaimer: do not try this at home,”  and you shouldn’t since film is toxic, but as always it’s super cool to see other people do it.
For the images above Luke Evans and Josh Lake swallowed 35 mm film and then scanned the damaged film electronically to get some crazy results. To see more of their work, click here for Luke Evans and here for Josh Lake.
- Lee Jones
[image credit - the Creative Review]
THE ART PROCESS: photographing your insides (but don’t do this one at home)
Want to know what film looks like once it’s gone through your body? Well two University students from Kingston decided to find out, announced The Lomography Society in early June. But before you get started, wait and don’t do it. At the beginning of their post, the Lomography Society clearly warns “Disclaimer: do not try this at home,”  and you shouldn’t since film is toxic, but as always it’s super cool to see other people do it.
For the images above Luke Evans and Josh Lake swallowed 35 mm film and then scanned the damaged film electronically to get some crazy results. To see more of their work, click here for Luke Evans and here for Josh Lake.
- Lee Jones
[image credit - the Creative Review]
THE ART PROCESS: photographing your insides (but don’t do this one at home)
Want to know what film looks like once it’s gone through your body? Well two University students from Kingston decided to find out, announced The Lomography Society in early June. But before you get started, wait and don’t do it. At the beginning of their post, the Lomography Society clearly warns “Disclaimer: do not try this at home,”  and you shouldn’t since film is toxic, but as always it’s super cool to see other people do it.
For the images above Luke Evans and Josh Lake swallowed 35 mm film and then scanned the damaged film electronically to get some crazy results. To see more of their work, click here for Luke Evans and here for Josh Lake.
- Lee Jones
[image credit - the Creative Review]
THE ART PROCESS: photographing your insides (but don’t do this one at home)
Want to know what film looks like once it’s gone through your body? Well two University students from Kingston decided to find out, announced The Lomography Society in early June. But before you get started, wait and don’t do it. At the beginning of their post, the Lomography Society clearly warns “Disclaimer: do not try this at home,”  and you shouldn’t since film is toxic, but as always it’s super cool to see other people do it.
For the images above Luke Evans and Josh Lake swallowed 35 mm film and then scanned the damaged film electronically to get some crazy results. To see more of their work, click here for Luke Evans and here for Josh Lake.
- Lee Jones
[image credit - the Creative Review]
THE ART PROCESS: photographing your insides (but don’t do this one at home)
Want to know what film looks like once it’s gone through your body? Well two University students from Kingston decided to find out, announced The Lomography Society in early June. But before you get started, wait and don’t do it. At the beginning of their post, the Lomography Society clearly warns “Disclaimer: do not try this at home,”  and you shouldn’t since film is toxic, but as always it’s super cool to see other people do it.
For the images above Luke Evans and Josh Lake swallowed 35 mm film and then scanned the damaged film electronically to get some crazy results. To see more of their work, click here for Luke Evans and here for Josh Lake.
- Lee Jones
[image credit - the Creative Review]

THE ART PROCESS: photographing your insides (but don’t do this one at home)


Want to know what film looks like once it’s gone through your body? Well two University students from Kingston decided to find out,
announced The Lomography Society in early June. But before you get started, wait and don’t do it. At the beginning of their post, the Lomography Society clearly warns “Disclaimer: do not try this at home,”  and you shouldn’t since film is toxic, but as always it’s super cool to see other people do it.

For the images above Luke Evans and Josh Lake swallowed 35 mm film and then scanned the damaged film electronically to get some crazy results. To see more of their work, click here for Luke Evans and here for Josh Lake.

- Lee Jones

[image credit - the Creative Review]

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

6 Photos
/ art artscience art and science film josh lake luke evans

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