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Ajay Malghan
In this series, Naturally Modified, Ajay Malghan takes a look at the food we eat. This camerless body of work was created by putting fruits and vegetables between glass plates and using them as a negative. As Malghan states,
“By utilizing colour, the works abstract the viewer and remove the otherwise ordinary fruits and vegetables from their context. As photography is deeply rooted in science; these images extract the camera and allow us to see the ordinary in new ways while blurring the lines between art and science. As our food is more processed and more steps are introduced between farm and table, the colour added becomes ironic with art imitating life.”
To see more of Malghan’s photography, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Ajay Malghan
In this series, Naturally Modified, Ajay Malghan takes a look at the food we eat. This camerless body of work was created by putting fruits and vegetables between glass plates and using them as a negative. As Malghan states,
“By utilizing colour, the works abstract the viewer and remove the otherwise ordinary fruits and vegetables from their context. As photography is deeply rooted in science; these images extract the camera and allow us to see the ordinary in new ways while blurring the lines between art and science. As our food is more processed and more steps are introduced between farm and table, the colour added becomes ironic with art imitating life.”
To see more of Malghan’s photography, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Ajay Malghan
In this series, Naturally Modified, Ajay Malghan takes a look at the food we eat. This camerless body of work was created by putting fruits and vegetables between glass plates and using them as a negative. As Malghan states,
“By utilizing colour, the works abstract the viewer and remove the otherwise ordinary fruits and vegetables from their context. As photography is deeply rooted in science; these images extract the camera and allow us to see the ordinary in new ways while blurring the lines between art and science. As our food is more processed and more steps are introduced between farm and table, the colour added becomes ironic with art imitating life.”
To see more of Malghan’s photography, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Ajay Malghan
In this series, Naturally Modified, Ajay Malghan takes a look at the food we eat. This camerless body of work was created by putting fruits and vegetables between glass plates and using them as a negative. As Malghan states,
“By utilizing colour, the works abstract the viewer and remove the otherwise ordinary fruits and vegetables from their context. As photography is deeply rooted in science; these images extract the camera and allow us to see the ordinary in new ways while blurring the lines between art and science. As our food is more processed and more steps are introduced between farm and table, the colour added becomes ironic with art imitating life.”
To see more of Malghan’s photography, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Ajay Malghan
In this series, Naturally Modified, Ajay Malghan takes a look at the food we eat. This camerless body of work was created by putting fruits and vegetables between glass plates and using them as a negative. As Malghan states,
“By utilizing colour, the works abstract the viewer and remove the otherwise ordinary fruits and vegetables from their context. As photography is deeply rooted in science; these images extract the camera and allow us to see the ordinary in new ways while blurring the lines between art and science. As our food is more processed and more steps are introduced between farm and table, the colour added becomes ironic with art imitating life.”
To see more of Malghan’s photography, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Ajay Malghan
In this series, Naturally Modified, Ajay Malghan takes a look at the food we eat. This camerless body of work was created by putting fruits and vegetables between glass plates and using them as a negative. As Malghan states,
“By utilizing colour, the works abstract the viewer and remove the otherwise ordinary fruits and vegetables from their context. As photography is deeply rooted in science; these images extract the camera and allow us to see the ordinary in new ways while blurring the lines between art and science. As our food is more processed and more steps are introduced between farm and table, the colour added becomes ironic with art imitating life.”
To see more of Malghan’s photography, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Ajay Malghan
In this series, Naturally Modified, Ajay Malghan takes a look at the food we eat. This camerless body of work was created by putting fruits and vegetables between glass plates and using them as a negative. As Malghan states,
“By utilizing colour, the works abstract the viewer and remove the otherwise ordinary fruits and vegetables from their context. As photography is deeply rooted in science; these images extract the camera and allow us to see the ordinary in new ways while blurring the lines between art and science. As our food is more processed and more steps are introduced between farm and table, the colour added becomes ironic with art imitating life.”
To see more of Malghan’s photography, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Ajay Malghan
In this series, Naturally Modified, Ajay Malghan takes a look at the food we eat. This camerless body of work was created by putting fruits and vegetables between glass plates and using them as a negative. As Malghan states,
“By utilizing colour, the works abstract the viewer and remove the otherwise ordinary fruits and vegetables from their context. As photography is deeply rooted in science; these images extract the camera and allow us to see the ordinary in new ways while blurring the lines between art and science. As our food is more processed and more steps are introduced between farm and table, the colour added becomes ironic with art imitating life.”
To see more of Malghan’s photography, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Jennilee Murray
In this series, Animalia/Victus, artist Jennilee Murray combines animals with food. As the artists describes this hybrid, “The series is a fanciful look at what-ifs and curiosities—documenting flora and fauna indigenous to the land of childhood fantasy.”
Murray’s work carries questions, “What if we harvested peas from the tail of a fennec fox? What if neither of these things were seen as food?” Animalis/Victus is not so much a dialogue on the current food situation or any specific way of eating, as it is an innocent, child-like search into the realm of impossibility and suspended disbelief. 
Murray is also interested in how we classify subjects. As she states, “I’ve always been interested in the science of life, and classification, and learning the specifics about many different types of things. I drool over books like Grey’s Anatomy and Audobon’s bird books, and beautiful illustrated children’s books, and thought how nice it would be to tie them all together.” To see more of Murray’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Jennilee Murray
In this series, Animalia/Victus, artist Jennilee Murray combines animals with food. As the artists describes this hybrid, “The series is a fanciful look at what-ifs and curiosities—documenting flora and fauna indigenous to the land of childhood fantasy.”
Murray’s work carries questions, “What if we harvested peas from the tail of a fennec fox? What if neither of these things were seen as food?” Animalis/Victus is not so much a dialogue on the current food situation or any specific way of eating, as it is an innocent, child-like search into the realm of impossibility and suspended disbelief. 
Murray is also interested in how we classify subjects. As she states, “I’ve always been interested in the science of life, and classification, and learning the specifics about many different types of things. I drool over books like Grey’s Anatomy and Audobon’s bird books, and beautiful illustrated children’s books, and thought how nice it would be to tie them all together.” To see more of Murray’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Jennilee Murray
In this series, Animalia/Victus, artist Jennilee Murray combines animals with food. As the artists describes this hybrid, “The series is a fanciful look at what-ifs and curiosities—documenting flora and fauna indigenous to the land of childhood fantasy.”
Murray’s work carries questions, “What if we harvested peas from the tail of a fennec fox? What if neither of these things were seen as food?” Animalis/Victus is not so much a dialogue on the current food situation or any specific way of eating, as it is an innocent, child-like search into the realm of impossibility and suspended disbelief. 
Murray is also interested in how we classify subjects. As she states, “I’ve always been interested in the science of life, and classification, and learning the specifics about many different types of things. I drool over books like Grey’s Anatomy and Audobon’s bird books, and beautiful illustrated children’s books, and thought how nice it would be to tie them all together.” To see more of Murray’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Jennilee Murray
In this series, Animalia/Victus, artist Jennilee Murray combines animals with food. As the artists describes this hybrid, “The series is a fanciful look at what-ifs and curiosities—documenting flora and fauna indigenous to the land of childhood fantasy.”
Murray’s work carries questions, “What if we harvested peas from the tail of a fennec fox? What if neither of these things were seen as food?” Animalis/Victus is not so much a dialogue on the current food situation or any specific way of eating, as it is an innocent, child-like search into the realm of impossibility and suspended disbelief. 
Murray is also interested in how we classify subjects. As she states, “I’ve always been interested in the science of life, and classification, and learning the specifics about many different types of things. I drool over books like Grey’s Anatomy and Audobon’s bird books, and beautiful illustrated children’s books, and thought how nice it would be to tie them all together.” To see more of Murray’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Jennilee Murray
In this series, Animalia/Victus, artist Jennilee Murray combines animals with food. As the artists describes this hybrid, “The series is a fanciful look at what-ifs and curiosities—documenting flora and fauna indigenous to the land of childhood fantasy.”
Murray’s work carries questions, “What if we harvested peas from the tail of a fennec fox? What if neither of these things were seen as food?” Animalis/Victus is not so much a dialogue on the current food situation or any specific way of eating, as it is an innocent, child-like search into the realm of impossibility and suspended disbelief. 
Murray is also interested in how we classify subjects. As she states, “I’ve always been interested in the science of life, and classification, and learning the specifics about many different types of things. I drool over books like Grey’s Anatomy and Audobon’s bird books, and beautiful illustrated children’s books, and thought how nice it would be to tie them all together.” To see more of Murray’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones

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