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The Future of Nature in Art
The forms of nature are, in their own ways, works of art. For centuries, artists have mimicked natural phenomenon, such as the roughness of tree bark, and the vibrant colours of fruit, in oil paintings and even sculpture. Now, most artists are using new tools to attempt to control these forms, and in doing so, re-create the natural form. Artist Ken To, for example, uses metal wiring to create detailed and realistically sized bonsai trees. The easing twists of the metal perfectly mimic the tree bark, that ever so slightly curves up and outwards, creating branches. 
Even more extreme, artist Natalie Jeremijenko uses L-systems, which are algorithms created in order to mimic the cell growth of a tree. With the L-system technology, you could have your very own forest growing on your computers’ desktop! She has even created a whole art project called ONETREES, and she calls her virtual trees ‘e-trees’, or ‘electronic trees’. Not only that, the e-trees themselves can be manipulated to grow at certain rates when a CO2 reader is plugged into the USB ports of the computer. The virtual trees mimic the cell growth of natural trees, and they also react in a similar way that trees do when they come into contact with atmospheric changes. It is a revolutionary twist of artistic mimesis.
So whether you prefer a forest of trees on your desktop, or a little bonsai tree on top of your desk, there are many different mediums that you can explore in order to experience this new movement of nature mimesis in the 21st Century.-Anna Paluch

The Future of Nature in Art

The forms of nature are, in their own ways, works of art. For centuries, artists have mimicked natural phenomenon, such as the roughness of tree bark, and the vibrant colours of fruit, in oil paintings and even sculpture. Now, most artists are using new tools to attempt to control these forms, and in doing so, re-create the natural form. Artist Ken To, for example, uses metal wiring to create detailed and realistically sized bonsai trees. The easing twists of the metal perfectly mimic the tree bark, that ever so slightly curves up and outwards, creating branches.

Even more extreme, artist Natalie Jeremijenko uses L-systems, which are algorithms created in order to mimic the cell growth of a tree. With the L-system technology, you could have your very own forest growing on your computers’ desktop! She has even created a whole art project called ONETREES, and she calls her virtual trees ‘e-trees’, or ‘electronic trees’. Not only that, the e-trees themselves can be manipulated to grow at certain rates when a CO2 reader is plugged into the USB ports of the computer. The virtual trees mimic the cell growth of natural trees, and they also react in a similar way that trees do when they come into contact with atmospheric changes. It is a revolutionary twist of artistic mimesis.

So whether you prefer a forest of trees on your desktop, or a little bonsai tree on top of your desk, there are many different mediums that you can explore in order to experience this new movement of nature mimesis in the 21st Century.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

art science artandsciencejournal ken to natalie jeremijenko L-systems tree mimesis future nature bonsai sculpture screen Anna Paluch
Philips Bio-Light: Bacteria as Energy Source
Philips’ newest Microbial Home concept is a resourceful and visually dynamic bio-light that uses bioluminescent bacteria, fed with methane and composted material (poop and waste) as an energy source. As you can see, this light is not only an achievement technologically and scientifically, but it is pretty impressive aesthetically as well.
For Philips, however, this is more than a light — it is a life-changing idea: “Potentially biological products could be self-energizing, adaptive, responsive, self-repairing, act as biological sensors to environmental conditions, and change the way we communicate information.”
So there’s waste, and then light, but how does it work? In scientific terms, bioluminescent organisms produce luciferase, an enzyme, which interacts with a molecule called a luciferin, which emits light. This type of light is produced at low temperatures (unlike incandescence, where light is produced as a result of high heat).
Luminescent light is consequently less intense, described as “more suitable for … ambience and indication than functional illumination”. It is slower than conventional light sources, and its functionality depends on the living material’s life itself. What’s cool about that, though, is that the light emitted is susceptible to change, and likely to react to its environmental setting. Essentially, it’s an ambiance-creating light source with a life of its own. 
Philips sees a more practical future for this concept in night-time road markings, warning strips on flights of stairs, informational markings on cultural institutions, and the like. As well, they see potential in its ability to create new genres of atmospheric interior lighting, that could potentially have therapeutic effects. All of this said, there are no plans to sell this light as a Philips product. Instead, it is intended to spark discussion: “this concept is testing a possible future — not prescribing one.” Oh well… we can dream! 
In the meantime, you can have a look at some other Philips Microbial Home concepts here. For more information on the bio-light, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Philips Bio-Light: Bacteria as Energy Source
Philips’ newest Microbial Home concept is a resourceful and visually dynamic bio-light that uses bioluminescent bacteria, fed with methane and composted material (poop and waste) as an energy source. As you can see, this light is not only an achievement technologically and scientifically, but it is pretty impressive aesthetically as well.
For Philips, however, this is more than a light — it is a life-changing idea: “Potentially biological products could be self-energizing, adaptive, responsive, self-repairing, act as biological sensors to environmental conditions, and change the way we communicate information.”
So there’s waste, and then light, but how does it work? In scientific terms, bioluminescent organisms produce luciferase, an enzyme, which interacts with a molecule called a luciferin, which emits light. This type of light is produced at low temperatures (unlike incandescence, where light is produced as a result of high heat).
Luminescent light is consequently less intense, described as “more suitable for … ambience and indication than functional illumination”. It is slower than conventional light sources, and its functionality depends on the living material’s life itself. What’s cool about that, though, is that the light emitted is susceptible to change, and likely to react to its environmental setting. Essentially, it’s an ambiance-creating light source with a life of its own. 
Philips sees a more practical future for this concept in night-time road markings, warning strips on flights of stairs, informational markings on cultural institutions, and the like. As well, they see potential in its ability to create new genres of atmospheric interior lighting, that could potentially have therapeutic effects. All of this said, there are no plans to sell this light as a Philips product. Instead, it is intended to spark discussion: “this concept is testing a possible future — not prescribing one.” Oh well… we can dream! 
In the meantime, you can have a look at some other Philips Microbial Home concepts here. For more information on the bio-light, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Philips Bio-Light: Bacteria as Energy Source
Philips’ newest Microbial Home concept is a resourceful and visually dynamic bio-light that uses bioluminescent bacteria, fed with methane and composted material (poop and waste) as an energy source. As you can see, this light is not only an achievement technologically and scientifically, but it is pretty impressive aesthetically as well.
For Philips, however, this is more than a light — it is a life-changing idea: “Potentially biological products could be self-energizing, adaptive, responsive, self-repairing, act as biological sensors to environmental conditions, and change the way we communicate information.”
So there’s waste, and then light, but how does it work? In scientific terms, bioluminescent organisms produce luciferase, an enzyme, which interacts with a molecule called a luciferin, which emits light. This type of light is produced at low temperatures (unlike incandescence, where light is produced as a result of high heat).
Luminescent light is consequently less intense, described as “more suitable for … ambience and indication than functional illumination”. It is slower than conventional light sources, and its functionality depends on the living material’s life itself. What’s cool about that, though, is that the light emitted is susceptible to change, and likely to react to its environmental setting. Essentially, it’s an ambiance-creating light source with a life of its own. 
Philips sees a more practical future for this concept in night-time road markings, warning strips on flights of stairs, informational markings on cultural institutions, and the like. As well, they see potential in its ability to create new genres of atmospheric interior lighting, that could potentially have therapeutic effects. All of this said, there are no plans to sell this light as a Philips product. Instead, it is intended to spark discussion: “this concept is testing a possible future — not prescribing one.” Oh well… we can dream! 
In the meantime, you can have a look at some other Philips Microbial Home concepts here. For more information on the bio-light, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron

Philips Bio-Light: Bacteria as Energy Source


Philips’ newest Microbial Home concept is a resourceful and visually dynamic bio-light that uses bioluminescent bacteria, fed with methane and composted material (poop and waste) as an energy source. As you can see, this light is not only an achievement technologically and scientifically, but it is pretty impressive aesthetically as well.

For Philips, however, this is more than a light — it is a life-changing idea: “Potentially biological products could be self-energizing, adaptive, responsive, self-repairing, act as biological sensors to environmental conditions, and change the way we communicate information.”

So there’s waste, and then light, but how does it work? In scientific terms, bioluminescent organisms produce luciferase, an enzyme, which interacts with a molecule called a luciferin, which emits light. This type of light is produced at low temperatures (unlike incandescence, where light is produced as a result of high heat).

Luminescent light is consequently less intense, described as “more suitable for … ambience and indication than functional illumination”. It is slower than conventional light sources, and its functionality depends on the living material’s life itself. What’s cool about that, though, is that the light emitted is susceptible to change, and likely to react to its environmental setting. Essentially, it’s an ambiance-creating light source with a life of its own. 

Philips sees a more practical future for this concept in night-time road markings, warning strips on flights of stairs, informational markings on cultural institutions, and the like. As well, they see potential in its ability to create new genres of atmospheric interior lighting, that could potentially have therapeutic effects. All of this said, there are no plans to sell this light as a Philips product. Instead, it is intended to spark discussion: “this concept is testing a possible future — not prescribing one.” Oh well… we can dream!

In the meantime, you can have a look at some other Philips Microbial Home concepts here. For more information on the bio-light, click here.

- Gabrielle Doiron

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/ Microbial Home Philips art art and science artscience bacteria bio-light biology bioluminescence design environment future nature renewable energy science sustainability Gabrielle Doiron

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