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You Are The Universe
It is common knowledge that we humans are merely tiny specs of matter floating in a vast (and I mean vast!) universe, but what if, for a moment, we could become the universe? Or at least a galaxy? That is what Barcelona-based artist Sergio Albiac is attempting to achieve through his series of work entitled Stardust Portraits. Based on an algorithm set-up by Albiac, portraits of people are merged with selected images from the Hubble Telescope. The result? Your face turns into a cluster of stars, nebulae and galaxies. An astronomical collage.
What is even more impressive is the artists’ process. Participants are able to send the artist their portraits, and the only work that the artist has to put into his pieces, is putting them through the algorithm. All the images are the result of chance and spontaneity. For the artist, his work perfectly reflects the idea of chance experiences in our lives. The process of building these portraits from both the image of the face and galaxies, parallels new matter coming into existence all throughout space and time, becoming another important piece of the universe’s structure. 
And though these portraits may look like they are trying to put us at the centre of the universe, in reality, we are all the centre of our own universes. Together though, these galaxy portraits become one, cohesive, beautiful universe, reflective of our diversity. It transforms into a social universe.
- Anna Paluch
You Are The Universe
It is common knowledge that we humans are merely tiny specs of matter floating in a vast (and I mean vast!) universe, but what if, for a moment, we could become the universe? Or at least a galaxy? That is what Barcelona-based artist Sergio Albiac is attempting to achieve through his series of work entitled Stardust Portraits. Based on an algorithm set-up by Albiac, portraits of people are merged with selected images from the Hubble Telescope. The result? Your face turns into a cluster of stars, nebulae and galaxies. An astronomical collage.
What is even more impressive is the artists’ process. Participants are able to send the artist their portraits, and the only work that the artist has to put into his pieces, is putting them through the algorithm. All the images are the result of chance and spontaneity. For the artist, his work perfectly reflects the idea of chance experiences in our lives. The process of building these portraits from both the image of the face and galaxies, parallels new matter coming into existence all throughout space and time, becoming another important piece of the universe’s structure. 
And though these portraits may look like they are trying to put us at the centre of the universe, in reality, we are all the centre of our own universes. Together though, these galaxy portraits become one, cohesive, beautiful universe, reflective of our diversity. It transforms into a social universe.
- Anna Paluch
You Are The Universe
It is common knowledge that we humans are merely tiny specs of matter floating in a vast (and I mean vast!) universe, but what if, for a moment, we could become the universe? Or at least a galaxy? That is what Barcelona-based artist Sergio Albiac is attempting to achieve through his series of work entitled Stardust Portraits. Based on an algorithm set-up by Albiac, portraits of people are merged with selected images from the Hubble Telescope. The result? Your face turns into a cluster of stars, nebulae and galaxies. An astronomical collage.
What is even more impressive is the artists’ process. Participants are able to send the artist their portraits, and the only work that the artist has to put into his pieces, is putting them through the algorithm. All the images are the result of chance and spontaneity. For the artist, his work perfectly reflects the idea of chance experiences in our lives. The process of building these portraits from both the image of the face and galaxies, parallels new matter coming into existence all throughout space and time, becoming another important piece of the universe’s structure. 
And though these portraits may look like they are trying to put us at the centre of the universe, in reality, we are all the centre of our own universes. Together though, these galaxy portraits become one, cohesive, beautiful universe, reflective of our diversity. It transforms into a social universe.
- Anna Paluch

You Are The Universe

It is common knowledge that we humans are merely tiny specs of matter floating in a vast (and I mean vast!) universe, but what if, for a moment, we could become the universe? Or at least a galaxy? That is what Barcelona-based artist Sergio Albiac is attempting to achieve through his series of work entitled Stardust Portraits. Based on an algorithm set-up by Albiac, portraits of people are merged with selected images from the Hubble Telescope. The result? Your face turns into a cluster of stars, nebulae and galaxies. An astronomical collage.

What is even more impressive is the artists’ process. Participants are able to send the artist their portraits, and the only work that the artist has to put into his pieces, is putting them through the algorithm. All the images are the result of chance and spontaneity. For the artist, his work perfectly reflects the idea of chance experiences in our lives. The process of building these portraits from both the image of the face and galaxies, parallels new matter coming into existence all throughout space and time, becoming another important piece of the universe’s structure. 

And though these portraits may look like they are trying to put us at the centre of the universe, in reality, we are all the centre of our own universes. Together though, these galaxy portraits become one, cohesive, beautiful universe, reflective of our diversity. It transforms into a social universe.

Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ art science art and science journal sergio albiac portrait algorithm hubble telescope galaxy the universe nebula digital art anna paluch
Galactic Poetry
The downfall of living in an urban center, is that all we get to see during the night are blankets of cloud (possibly smog), and if we’re lucky, a few stars. What artist Sanjeev Sivarulrasa is trying to show in his work, Night Light, is what we are missing out on; a magical world, swimming through space, with galaxies and nebulae bejeweling the cosmos.
It is visual poetry.
The artist uses astrophotography to capture the various forms and colours of the stars and planets outside of an observatory setting. According to journalist Becky Rynor, it is as if he is capturing the great masterpieces that our ancestors would see; a natural art. Space does not have to be sacred scientific ground; it can also be merely another aesthetic aspect of our lives, that inspires people to think about the greater world around us. The simple observer plays as big of a role, as the great scientist. When this right to observe is taken away from us, via artificial city lights, we have to make the effort to go to the sources such as countryside’s, forests, lakes, and mountains. We must go to the nature, to connect back to ancient ideas of aesthetic beauty, and renew the senses. Sanjeev’s astrophotographs are to be seen as meditative, bringing awareness to our daily surroundings, and that sometimes, we need to take a step back, and see the bigger picture.
Night Light is currently exhibited at Karsh-Masson Gallery, until the 5th of May, 2013, and there will be an artist talk on the 24th of March, 2013-Anna Paluch
Galactic Poetry
The downfall of living in an urban center, is that all we get to see during the night are blankets of cloud (possibly smog), and if we’re lucky, a few stars. What artist Sanjeev Sivarulrasa is trying to show in his work, Night Light, is what we are missing out on; a magical world, swimming through space, with galaxies and nebulae bejeweling the cosmos.
It is visual poetry.
The artist uses astrophotography to capture the various forms and colours of the stars and planets outside of an observatory setting. According to journalist Becky Rynor, it is as if he is capturing the great masterpieces that our ancestors would see; a natural art. Space does not have to be sacred scientific ground; it can also be merely another aesthetic aspect of our lives, that inspires people to think about the greater world around us. The simple observer plays as big of a role, as the great scientist. When this right to observe is taken away from us, via artificial city lights, we have to make the effort to go to the sources such as countryside’s, forests, lakes, and mountains. We must go to the nature, to connect back to ancient ideas of aesthetic beauty, and renew the senses. Sanjeev’s astrophotographs are to be seen as meditative, bringing awareness to our daily surroundings, and that sometimes, we need to take a step back, and see the bigger picture.
Night Light is currently exhibited at Karsh-Masson Gallery, until the 5th of May, 2013, and there will be an artist talk on the 24th of March, 2013-Anna Paluch
Galactic Poetry
The downfall of living in an urban center, is that all we get to see during the night are blankets of cloud (possibly smog), and if we’re lucky, a few stars. What artist Sanjeev Sivarulrasa is trying to show in his work, Night Light, is what we are missing out on; a magical world, swimming through space, with galaxies and nebulae bejeweling the cosmos.
It is visual poetry.
The artist uses astrophotography to capture the various forms and colours of the stars and planets outside of an observatory setting. According to journalist Becky Rynor, it is as if he is capturing the great masterpieces that our ancestors would see; a natural art. Space does not have to be sacred scientific ground; it can also be merely another aesthetic aspect of our lives, that inspires people to think about the greater world around us. The simple observer plays as big of a role, as the great scientist. When this right to observe is taken away from us, via artificial city lights, we have to make the effort to go to the sources such as countryside’s, forests, lakes, and mountains. We must go to the nature, to connect back to ancient ideas of aesthetic beauty, and renew the senses. Sanjeev’s astrophotographs are to be seen as meditative, bringing awareness to our daily surroundings, and that sometimes, we need to take a step back, and see the bigger picture.
Night Light is currently exhibited at Karsh-Masson Gallery, until the 5th of May, 2013, and there will be an artist talk on the 24th of March, 2013-Anna Paluch

Galactic Poetry


The downfall of living in an
urban center, is that all we get to see during the night are blankets of cloud (possibly smog), and if we’re lucky, a few stars. What artist Sanjeev Sivarulrasa is trying to show in his work, Night Light, is what we are missing out on; a magical world, swimming through space, with galaxies and nebulae bejeweling the cosmos.

It is visual poetry.

The artist uses astrophotography to capture the various forms and colours of the stars and planets outside of an observatory setting. According to journalist Becky Rynor, it is as if he is capturing the great masterpieces that our ancestors would see; a natural art. Space does not have to be sacred scientific ground; it can also be merely another aesthetic aspect of our lives, that inspires people to think about the greater world around us. The simple observer plays as big of a role, as the great scientist. When this right to observe is taken away from us, via artificial city lights, we have to make the effort to go to the sources such as countryside’s, forests, lakes, and mountains. We must go to the nature, to connect back to ancient ideas of aesthetic beauty, and renew the senses. Sanjeev’s astrophotographs are to be seen as meditative, bringing awareness to our daily surroundings, and that sometimes, we need to take a step back, and see the bigger picture.

Night Light is currently exhibited at Karsh-Masson Gallery, until the 5th of May, 2013, and there will be an artist talk on the 24th of March, 2013

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ Sanjeev Sivarulrasa Astronomy astrophotography galaxy space anna paluch art science art and science journal karsh-masson gallery
Tomás Saraceno, Part Two
Saraceno’s work continues to enthrall me. This installation, titled Galaxies forming along filaments, like droplets along the strands of a spider’s web, in particular, compares the clustering of galaxies in the universe to the intricate parts of a spider’s web. Saraceno illustrates here the groups of stars and other cosmic matter, which appear to be collected along strands like water droplets caught in a web.
The installation, composed primarily of bungee rope, encompasses and overpowers interior spaces and places the viewer as a navigational figure that weaves through the tangled branches of this giant web. The viewer’s interaction with the installation is at first off putting; the viewer perhaps humbled by the galactic presence that engulfs the room, but the work demands to be seen from a close distance. It is from up-close that the viewer is given the rare opportunity to witness the intricacies of the universe. 
I see the web not just as an illustration of galaxy clusters, but also as a model of contemporary technology and the sharing of information over the Internet. Each strand is a different piece of information sent from one computer to another. In fact, this makes me think of the Internet as a vast, ever-expanding web we experience on a daily basis; it is perhaps a universe contained within our computer screens. 
For more information about Saraceno and his other projects, visit his website here. 
- Victoria Nolte
Tomás Saraceno, Part Two
Saraceno’s work continues to enthrall me. This installation, titled Galaxies forming along filaments, like droplets along the strands of a spider’s web, in particular, compares the clustering of galaxies in the universe to the intricate parts of a spider’s web. Saraceno illustrates here the groups of stars and other cosmic matter, which appear to be collected along strands like water droplets caught in a web.
The installation, composed primarily of bungee rope, encompasses and overpowers interior spaces and places the viewer as a navigational figure that weaves through the tangled branches of this giant web. The viewer’s interaction with the installation is at first off putting; the viewer perhaps humbled by the galactic presence that engulfs the room, but the work demands to be seen from a close distance. It is from up-close that the viewer is given the rare opportunity to witness the intricacies of the universe. 
I see the web not just as an illustration of galaxy clusters, but also as a model of contemporary technology and the sharing of information over the Internet. Each strand is a different piece of information sent from one computer to another. In fact, this makes me think of the Internet as a vast, ever-expanding web we experience on a daily basis; it is perhaps a universe contained within our computer screens. 
For more information about Saraceno and his other projects, visit his website here. 
- Victoria Nolte
Tomás Saraceno, Part Two
Saraceno’s work continues to enthrall me. This installation, titled Galaxies forming along filaments, like droplets along the strands of a spider’s web, in particular, compares the clustering of galaxies in the universe to the intricate parts of a spider’s web. Saraceno illustrates here the groups of stars and other cosmic matter, which appear to be collected along strands like water droplets caught in a web.
The installation, composed primarily of bungee rope, encompasses and overpowers interior spaces and places the viewer as a navigational figure that weaves through the tangled branches of this giant web. The viewer’s interaction with the installation is at first off putting; the viewer perhaps humbled by the galactic presence that engulfs the room, but the work demands to be seen from a close distance. It is from up-close that the viewer is given the rare opportunity to witness the intricacies of the universe. 
I see the web not just as an illustration of galaxy clusters, but also as a model of contemporary technology and the sharing of information over the Internet. Each strand is a different piece of information sent from one computer to another. In fact, this makes me think of the Internet as a vast, ever-expanding web we experience on a daily basis; it is perhaps a universe contained within our computer screens. 
For more information about Saraceno and his other projects, visit his website here. 
- Victoria Nolte
Tomás Saraceno, Part Two
Saraceno’s work continues to enthrall me. This installation, titled Galaxies forming along filaments, like droplets along the strands of a spider’s web, in particular, compares the clustering of galaxies in the universe to the intricate parts of a spider’s web. Saraceno illustrates here the groups of stars and other cosmic matter, which appear to be collected along strands like water droplets caught in a web.
The installation, composed primarily of bungee rope, encompasses and overpowers interior spaces and places the viewer as a navigational figure that weaves through the tangled branches of this giant web. The viewer’s interaction with the installation is at first off putting; the viewer perhaps humbled by the galactic presence that engulfs the room, but the work demands to be seen from a close distance. It is from up-close that the viewer is given the rare opportunity to witness the intricacies of the universe. 
I see the web not just as an illustration of galaxy clusters, but also as a model of contemporary technology and the sharing of information over the Internet. Each strand is a different piece of information sent from one computer to another. In fact, this makes me think of the Internet as a vast, ever-expanding web we experience on a daily basis; it is perhaps a universe contained within our computer screens. 
For more information about Saraceno and his other projects, visit his website here. 
- Victoria Nolte
Tomás Saraceno, Part Two
Saraceno’s work continues to enthrall me. This installation, titled Galaxies forming along filaments, like droplets along the strands of a spider’s web, in particular, compares the clustering of galaxies in the universe to the intricate parts of a spider’s web. Saraceno illustrates here the groups of stars and other cosmic matter, which appear to be collected along strands like water droplets caught in a web.
The installation, composed primarily of bungee rope, encompasses and overpowers interior spaces and places the viewer as a navigational figure that weaves through the tangled branches of this giant web. The viewer’s interaction with the installation is at first off putting; the viewer perhaps humbled by the galactic presence that engulfs the room, but the work demands to be seen from a close distance. It is from up-close that the viewer is given the rare opportunity to witness the intricacies of the universe. 
I see the web not just as an illustration of galaxy clusters, but also as a model of contemporary technology and the sharing of information over the Internet. Each strand is a different piece of information sent from one computer to another. In fact, this makes me think of the Internet as a vast, ever-expanding web we experience on a daily basis; it is perhaps a universe contained within our computer screens. 
For more information about Saraceno and his other projects, visit his website here. 
- Victoria Nolte
Tomás Saraceno, Part Two
Saraceno’s work continues to enthrall me. This installation, titled Galaxies forming along filaments, like droplets along the strands of a spider’s web, in particular, compares the clustering of galaxies in the universe to the intricate parts of a spider’s web. Saraceno illustrates here the groups of stars and other cosmic matter, which appear to be collected along strands like water droplets caught in a web.
The installation, composed primarily of bungee rope, encompasses and overpowers interior spaces and places the viewer as a navigational figure that weaves through the tangled branches of this giant web. The viewer’s interaction with the installation is at first off putting; the viewer perhaps humbled by the galactic presence that engulfs the room, but the work demands to be seen from a close distance. It is from up-close that the viewer is given the rare opportunity to witness the intricacies of the universe. 
I see the web not just as an illustration of galaxy clusters, but also as a model of contemporary technology and the sharing of information over the Internet. Each strand is a different piece of information sent from one computer to another. In fact, this makes me think of the Internet as a vast, ever-expanding web we experience on a daily basis; it is perhaps a universe contained within our computer screens. 
For more information about Saraceno and his other projects, visit his website here. 
- Victoria Nolte

Tomás Saraceno, Part Two

Saraceno’s work continues to enthrall me. This installation, titled Galaxies forming along filaments, like droplets along the strands of a spider’s web, in particular, compares the clustering of galaxies in the universe to the intricate parts of a spider’s web. Saraceno illustrates here the groups of stars and other cosmic matter, which appear to be collected along strands like water droplets caught in a web.

The installation, composed primarily of bungee rope, encompasses and overpowers interior spaces and places the viewer as a navigational figure that weaves through the tangled branches of this giant web. The viewer’s interaction with the installation is at first off putting; the viewer perhaps humbled by the galactic presence that engulfs the room, but the work demands to be seen from a close distance. It is from up-close that the viewer is given the rare opportunity to witness the intricacies of the universe. 

I see the web not just as an illustration of galaxy clusters, but also as a model of contemporary technology and the sharing of information over the Internet. Each strand is a different piece of information sent from one computer to another. In fact, this makes me think of the Internet as a vast, ever-expanding web we experience on a daily basis; it is perhaps a universe contained within our computer screens. 

For more information about Saraceno and his other projects, visit his website here

- Victoria Nolte

6 Photos
/ art artscience galaxy spider web the internet the universe tomas saraceno victoria nolte
THE ART PROCESS: photographing outer space
The universe is constantly being created—and destroyed. It hides nothing. You’ve seen these colorful, wondrous images of galaxies, nebulae and supernovas before but have you ever wondered how these images are collected? Here’s some truth about the process with the most-ess. 
First of all, a little history to put things in perspective. The first full photograph of planet Earth wasn’t captured until 1972, when the Apollo 17 crew left Earth en-route to the moon on December 7th. Since the moon was behind them, they had a perfectly lit view of, well, us! And this photograph was taken so that we can marvel at, well, ourselves! 
The leading photograph shown above is of Spiral Galaxy NGC 3982. To achieve this image as we see it, there’s first over 1400 screen captures taken, one every 10 seconds, from the Hubble telescope over the course of 3 weeks. This amounts to 10 hours of processing, beginning with black and white images from 3 Hubble cameras. 
“Creating color images out of the original black-and-white exposures is equal parts art and science”- hubblesite.org
Hubble doesn’t use film, it’s cameras record light from the universe with special electronic detectors. Finished color images, as we see them, are actually combinations of two or more black and white exposures to which color has been added during images processing. So, not to shatter any or all illusion, but these colorful and dazzling images are not exactly what we would see in outer space with our own eyes. Hubble can detect all the visible wavelengths of light plus many more that are invisible to human eyes, such as ultraviolet and infrared light.
The images, in order, are Spiral Galaxy NGC 3982 (I personally would have called it something cooler), The Crab Nebula, The Eskimo Nebula, The Helix Nebula, an old star giving up the ghost, The Eagle Nebula, and the last two are the great Carina Nebula. 
Thanks for the eye vacation, NASA. 
- Jess Petrella 
THE ART PROCESS: photographing outer space
The universe is constantly being created—and destroyed. It hides nothing. You’ve seen these colorful, wondrous images of galaxies, nebulae and supernovas before but have you ever wondered how these images are collected? Here’s some truth about the process with the most-ess. 
First of all, a little history to put things in perspective. The first full photograph of planet Earth wasn’t captured until 1972, when the Apollo 17 crew left Earth en-route to the moon on December 7th. Since the moon was behind them, they had a perfectly lit view of, well, us! And this photograph was taken so that we can marvel at, well, ourselves! 
The leading photograph shown above is of Spiral Galaxy NGC 3982. To achieve this image as we see it, there’s first over 1400 screen captures taken, one every 10 seconds, from the Hubble telescope over the course of 3 weeks. This amounts to 10 hours of processing, beginning with black and white images from 3 Hubble cameras. 
“Creating color images out of the original black-and-white exposures is equal parts art and science”- hubblesite.org
Hubble doesn’t use film, it’s cameras record light from the universe with special electronic detectors. Finished color images, as we see them, are actually combinations of two or more black and white exposures to which color has been added during images processing. So, not to shatter any or all illusion, but these colorful and dazzling images are not exactly what we would see in outer space with our own eyes. Hubble can detect all the visible wavelengths of light plus many more that are invisible to human eyes, such as ultraviolet and infrared light.
The images, in order, are Spiral Galaxy NGC 3982 (I personally would have called it something cooler), The Crab Nebula, The Eskimo Nebula, The Helix Nebula, an old star giving up the ghost, The Eagle Nebula, and the last two are the great Carina Nebula. 
Thanks for the eye vacation, NASA. 
- Jess Petrella 
THE ART PROCESS: photographing outer space
The universe is constantly being created—and destroyed. It hides nothing. You’ve seen these colorful, wondrous images of galaxies, nebulae and supernovas before but have you ever wondered how these images are collected? Here’s some truth about the process with the most-ess. 
First of all, a little history to put things in perspective. The first full photograph of planet Earth wasn’t captured until 1972, when the Apollo 17 crew left Earth en-route to the moon on December 7th. Since the moon was behind them, they had a perfectly lit view of, well, us! And this photograph was taken so that we can marvel at, well, ourselves! 
The leading photograph shown above is of Spiral Galaxy NGC 3982. To achieve this image as we see it, there’s first over 1400 screen captures taken, one every 10 seconds, from the Hubble telescope over the course of 3 weeks. This amounts to 10 hours of processing, beginning with black and white images from 3 Hubble cameras. 
“Creating color images out of the original black-and-white exposures is equal parts art and science”- hubblesite.org
Hubble doesn’t use film, it’s cameras record light from the universe with special electronic detectors. Finished color images, as we see them, are actually combinations of two or more black and white exposures to which color has been added during images processing. So, not to shatter any or all illusion, but these colorful and dazzling images are not exactly what we would see in outer space with our own eyes. Hubble can detect all the visible wavelengths of light plus many more that are invisible to human eyes, such as ultraviolet and infrared light.
The images, in order, are Spiral Galaxy NGC 3982 (I personally would have called it something cooler), The Crab Nebula, The Eskimo Nebula, The Helix Nebula, an old star giving up the ghost, The Eagle Nebula, and the last two are the great Carina Nebula. 
Thanks for the eye vacation, NASA. 
- Jess Petrella 
THE ART PROCESS: photographing outer space
The universe is constantly being created—and destroyed. It hides nothing. You’ve seen these colorful, wondrous images of galaxies, nebulae and supernovas before but have you ever wondered how these images are collected? Here’s some truth about the process with the most-ess. 
First of all, a little history to put things in perspective. The first full photograph of planet Earth wasn’t captured until 1972, when the Apollo 17 crew left Earth en-route to the moon on December 7th. Since the moon was behind them, they had a perfectly lit view of, well, us! And this photograph was taken so that we can marvel at, well, ourselves! 
The leading photograph shown above is of Spiral Galaxy NGC 3982. To achieve this image as we see it, there’s first over 1400 screen captures taken, one every 10 seconds, from the Hubble telescope over the course of 3 weeks. This amounts to 10 hours of processing, beginning with black and white images from 3 Hubble cameras. 
“Creating color images out of the original black-and-white exposures is equal parts art and science”- hubblesite.org
Hubble doesn’t use film, it’s cameras record light from the universe with special electronic detectors. Finished color images, as we see them, are actually combinations of two or more black and white exposures to which color has been added during images processing. So, not to shatter any or all illusion, but these colorful and dazzling images are not exactly what we would see in outer space with our own eyes. Hubble can detect all the visible wavelengths of light plus many more that are invisible to human eyes, such as ultraviolet and infrared light.
The images, in order, are Spiral Galaxy NGC 3982 (I personally would have called it something cooler), The Crab Nebula, The Eskimo Nebula, The Helix Nebula, an old star giving up the ghost, The Eagle Nebula, and the last two are the great Carina Nebula. 
Thanks for the eye vacation, NASA. 
- Jess Petrella 
THE ART PROCESS: photographing outer space
The universe is constantly being created—and destroyed. It hides nothing. You’ve seen these colorful, wondrous images of galaxies, nebulae and supernovas before but have you ever wondered how these images are collected? Here’s some truth about the process with the most-ess. 
First of all, a little history to put things in perspective. The first full photograph of planet Earth wasn’t captured until 1972, when the Apollo 17 crew left Earth en-route to the moon on December 7th. Since the moon was behind them, they had a perfectly lit view of, well, us! And this photograph was taken so that we can marvel at, well, ourselves! 
The leading photograph shown above is of Spiral Galaxy NGC 3982. To achieve this image as we see it, there’s first over 1400 screen captures taken, one every 10 seconds, from the Hubble telescope over the course of 3 weeks. This amounts to 10 hours of processing, beginning with black and white images from 3 Hubble cameras. 
“Creating color images out of the original black-and-white exposures is equal parts art and science”- hubblesite.org
Hubble doesn’t use film, it’s cameras record light from the universe with special electronic detectors. Finished color images, as we see them, are actually combinations of two or more black and white exposures to which color has been added during images processing. So, not to shatter any or all illusion, but these colorful and dazzling images are not exactly what we would see in outer space with our own eyes. Hubble can detect all the visible wavelengths of light plus many more that are invisible to human eyes, such as ultraviolet and infrared light.
The images, in order, are Spiral Galaxy NGC 3982 (I personally would have called it something cooler), The Crab Nebula, The Eskimo Nebula, The Helix Nebula, an old star giving up the ghost, The Eagle Nebula, and the last two are the great Carina Nebula. 
Thanks for the eye vacation, NASA. 
- Jess Petrella 
THE ART PROCESS: photographing outer space
The universe is constantly being created—and destroyed. It hides nothing. You’ve seen these colorful, wondrous images of galaxies, nebulae and supernovas before but have you ever wondered how these images are collected? Here’s some truth about the process with the most-ess. 
First of all, a little history to put things in perspective. The first full photograph of planet Earth wasn’t captured until 1972, when the Apollo 17 crew left Earth en-route to the moon on December 7th. Since the moon was behind them, they had a perfectly lit view of, well, us! And this photograph was taken so that we can marvel at, well, ourselves! 
The leading photograph shown above is of Spiral Galaxy NGC 3982. To achieve this image as we see it, there’s first over 1400 screen captures taken, one every 10 seconds, from the Hubble telescope over the course of 3 weeks. This amounts to 10 hours of processing, beginning with black and white images from 3 Hubble cameras. 
“Creating color images out of the original black-and-white exposures is equal parts art and science”- hubblesite.org
Hubble doesn’t use film, it’s cameras record light from the universe with special electronic detectors. Finished color images, as we see them, are actually combinations of two or more black and white exposures to which color has been added during images processing. So, not to shatter any or all illusion, but these colorful and dazzling images are not exactly what we would see in outer space with our own eyes. Hubble can detect all the visible wavelengths of light plus many more that are invisible to human eyes, such as ultraviolet and infrared light.
The images, in order, are Spiral Galaxy NGC 3982 (I personally would have called it something cooler), The Crab Nebula, The Eskimo Nebula, The Helix Nebula, an old star giving up the ghost, The Eagle Nebula, and the last two are the great Carina Nebula. 
Thanks for the eye vacation, NASA. 
- Jess Petrella 
THE ART PROCESS: photographing outer space
The universe is constantly being created—and destroyed. It hides nothing. You’ve seen these colorful, wondrous images of galaxies, nebulae and supernovas before but have you ever wondered how these images are collected? Here’s some truth about the process with the most-ess. 
First of all, a little history to put things in perspective. The first full photograph of planet Earth wasn’t captured until 1972, when the Apollo 17 crew left Earth en-route to the moon on December 7th. Since the moon was behind them, they had a perfectly lit view of, well, us! And this photograph was taken so that we can marvel at, well, ourselves! 
The leading photograph shown above is of Spiral Galaxy NGC 3982. To achieve this image as we see it, there’s first over 1400 screen captures taken, one every 10 seconds, from the Hubble telescope over the course of 3 weeks. This amounts to 10 hours of processing, beginning with black and white images from 3 Hubble cameras. 
“Creating color images out of the original black-and-white exposures is equal parts art and science”- hubblesite.org
Hubble doesn’t use film, it’s cameras record light from the universe with special electronic detectors. Finished color images, as we see them, are actually combinations of two or more black and white exposures to which color has been added during images processing. So, not to shatter any or all illusion, but these colorful and dazzling images are not exactly what we would see in outer space with our own eyes. Hubble can detect all the visible wavelengths of light plus many more that are invisible to human eyes, such as ultraviolet and infrared light.
The images, in order, are Spiral Galaxy NGC 3982 (I personally would have called it something cooler), The Crab Nebula, The Eskimo Nebula, The Helix Nebula, an old star giving up the ghost, The Eagle Nebula, and the last two are the great Carina Nebula. 
Thanks for the eye vacation, NASA. 
- Jess Petrella 
THE ART PROCESS: photographing outer space
The universe is constantly being created—and destroyed. It hides nothing. You’ve seen these colorful, wondrous images of galaxies, nebulae and supernovas before but have you ever wondered how these images are collected? Here’s some truth about the process with the most-ess. 
First of all, a little history to put things in perspective. The first full photograph of planet Earth wasn’t captured until 1972, when the Apollo 17 crew left Earth en-route to the moon on December 7th. Since the moon was behind them, they had a perfectly lit view of, well, us! And this photograph was taken so that we can marvel at, well, ourselves! 
The leading photograph shown above is of Spiral Galaxy NGC 3982. To achieve this image as we see it, there’s first over 1400 screen captures taken, one every 10 seconds, from the Hubble telescope over the course of 3 weeks. This amounts to 10 hours of processing, beginning with black and white images from 3 Hubble cameras. 
“Creating color images out of the original black-and-white exposures is equal parts art and science”- hubblesite.org
Hubble doesn’t use film, it’s cameras record light from the universe with special electronic detectors. Finished color images, as we see them, are actually combinations of two or more black and white exposures to which color has been added during images processing. So, not to shatter any or all illusion, but these colorful and dazzling images are not exactly what we would see in outer space with our own eyes. Hubble can detect all the visible wavelengths of light plus many more that are invisible to human eyes, such as ultraviolet and infrared light.
The images, in order, are Spiral Galaxy NGC 3982 (I personally would have called it something cooler), The Crab Nebula, The Eskimo Nebula, The Helix Nebula, an old star giving up the ghost, The Eagle Nebula, and the last two are the great Carina Nebula. 
Thanks for the eye vacation, NASA. 
- Jess Petrella 

THE ART PROCESS: photographing outer space

The universe is constantly being created—and destroyed. It hides nothing. You’ve seen these colorful, wondrous images of galaxies, nebulae and supernovas before but have you ever wondered how these images are collected? Here’s some truth about the process with the most-ess. 

First of all, a little history to put things in perspective. The first full photograph of planet Earth wasn’t captured until 1972, when the Apollo 17 crew left Earth en-route to the moon on December 7th. Since the moon was behind them, they had a perfectly lit view of, well, us! And this photograph was taken so that we can marvel at, well, ourselves! 

The leading photograph shown above is of Spiral Galaxy NGC 3982. To achieve this image as we see it, there’s first over 1400 screen captures taken, one every 10 seconds, from the Hubble telescope over the course of 3 weeks. This amounts to 10 hours of processing, beginning with black and white images from 3 Hubble cameras. 

“Creating color images out of the original black-and-white exposures is equal parts art and science”
- hubblesite.org

Hubble doesn’t use film, it’s cameras record light from the universe with special electronic detectors. Finished color images, as we see them, are actually combinations of two or more black and white exposures to which color has been added during images processing. So, not to shatter any or all illusion, but these colorful and dazzling images are not exactly what we would see in outer space with our own eyes. Hubble can detect all the visible wavelengths of light plus many more that are invisible to human eyes, such as ultraviolet and infrared light.

The images, in order, are Spiral Galaxy NGC 3982 (I personally would have called it something cooler), The Crab Nebula, The Eskimo Nebula, The Helix Nebula, an old star giving up the ghost, The Eagle Nebula, and the last two are the great Carina Nebula.

Thanks for the eye vacation, NASA. 



-
Jess Petrella 

8 Photos
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