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Mineral Microscopy
Stephanie Bateman-Graham does mineral microscopy, or as she prefers to call it “using a low-powered digital toy microscope to take pictures of beautiful minerals”. In these works Bateman-Graham discovers the parts of nature that are weirdly similar to recognizable art styles — from Van Gogh impressionism to the fractured lines of Picasso. I’ve included her descriptions of the three works above:
Ecosystem (Moss Agate):  Do you see a mixed population of microbes living together in a complete ecosystem? Actually it’s a microscope view of the mineral Stringy Moss Agate from Lake Bonneville. The material is translucent which gives a watery feel to the image, but it is entirely solid crystal.
Heart of Stony Glass (Opalite): Microscope view of the Australian mineral Rosella Opalite. The light bounces around this veined and fractured crystalline material to reveal a heart and vascular system inside the stone. The amazing brushstrokes and textures in this image are all natural.
Fire Mountain (Lace Agate): A mountain burns in this microscope view of the mineral Laguna Lace Agate from Mexico. Also known as Crazy Lace Agate.
To see more of Bateman-Graham’s works, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mineral Microscopy
Stephanie Bateman-Graham does mineral microscopy, or as she prefers to call it “using a low-powered digital toy microscope to take pictures of beautiful minerals”. In these works Bateman-Graham discovers the parts of nature that are weirdly similar to recognizable art styles — from Van Gogh impressionism to the fractured lines of Picasso. I’ve included her descriptions of the three works above:
Ecosystem (Moss Agate):  Do you see a mixed population of microbes living together in a complete ecosystem? Actually it’s a microscope view of the mineral Stringy Moss Agate from Lake Bonneville. The material is translucent which gives a watery feel to the image, but it is entirely solid crystal.
Heart of Stony Glass (Opalite): Microscope view of the Australian mineral Rosella Opalite. The light bounces around this veined and fractured crystalline material to reveal a heart and vascular system inside the stone. The amazing brushstrokes and textures in this image are all natural.
Fire Mountain (Lace Agate): A mountain burns in this microscope view of the mineral Laguna Lace Agate from Mexico. Also known as Crazy Lace Agate.
To see more of Bateman-Graham’s works, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mineral Microscopy
Stephanie Bateman-Graham does mineral microscopy, or as she prefers to call it “using a low-powered digital toy microscope to take pictures of beautiful minerals”. In these works Bateman-Graham discovers the parts of nature that are weirdly similar to recognizable art styles — from Van Gogh impressionism to the fractured lines of Picasso. I’ve included her descriptions of the three works above:
Ecosystem (Moss Agate):  Do you see a mixed population of microbes living together in a complete ecosystem? Actually it’s a microscope view of the mineral Stringy Moss Agate from Lake Bonneville. The material is translucent which gives a watery feel to the image, but it is entirely solid crystal.
Heart of Stony Glass (Opalite): Microscope view of the Australian mineral Rosella Opalite. The light bounces around this veined and fractured crystalline material to reveal a heart and vascular system inside the stone. The amazing brushstrokes and textures in this image are all natural.
Fire Mountain (Lace Agate): A mountain burns in this microscope view of the mineral Laguna Lace Agate from Mexico. Also known as Crazy Lace Agate.
To see more of Bateman-Graham’s works, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Bernardo Cesare
Rocks, plastics and crystals—who would have thought they would look so brilliant?! In his works, Bernardo Cesare takes transparent, thinly sliced materials (and we’re taking very thin, about 0.03 mm) and then photographs them through an optical microscope using transmitted polarized light. And this is really what they look like! As Cesare describes,
“The technique doesn’t include any manipulation during or after shooting: the variety and tones ofinterference colours are the results of the natural propagation of polarized light into minerals, and of the use of the accessory “λ“ compensator.”
Cesare creates this works as an artistic extension of his research as a Professor of Petrology at the Department of Geosciences in the University of Padova, Italy. His scientific interests include metamorphism and melting of rocks, mineralogy, and the study of inclusions in minerals. He uses photography to describe his studies and their  features. For more on Cesare’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Bernardo Cesare
Rocks, plastics and crystals—who would have thought they would look so brilliant?! In his works, Bernardo Cesare takes transparent, thinly sliced materials (and we’re taking very thin, about 0.03 mm) and then photographs them through an optical microscope using transmitted polarized light. And this is really what they look like! As Cesare describes,
“The technique doesn’t include any manipulation during or after shooting: the variety and tones ofinterference colours are the results of the natural propagation of polarized light into minerals, and of the use of the accessory “λ“ compensator.”
Cesare creates this works as an artistic extension of his research as a Professor of Petrology at the Department of Geosciences in the University of Padova, Italy. His scientific interests include metamorphism and melting of rocks, mineralogy, and the study of inclusions in minerals. He uses photography to describe his studies and their  features. For more on Cesare’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Bernardo Cesare
Rocks, plastics and crystals—who would have thought they would look so brilliant?! In his works, Bernardo Cesare takes transparent, thinly sliced materials (and we’re taking very thin, about 0.03 mm) and then photographs them through an optical microscope using transmitted polarized light. And this is really what they look like! As Cesare describes,
“The technique doesn’t include any manipulation during or after shooting: the variety and tones ofinterference colours are the results of the natural propagation of polarized light into minerals, and of the use of the accessory “λ“ compensator.”
Cesare creates this works as an artistic extension of his research as a Professor of Petrology at the Department of Geosciences in the University of Padova, Italy. His scientific interests include metamorphism and melting of rocks, mineralogy, and the study of inclusions in minerals. He uses photography to describe his studies and their  features. For more on Cesare’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Bernardo Cesare
Rocks, plastics and crystals—who would have thought they would look so brilliant?! In his works, Bernardo Cesare takes transparent, thinly sliced materials (and we’re taking very thin, about 0.03 mm) and then photographs them through an optical microscope using transmitted polarized light. And this is really what they look like! As Cesare describes,
“The technique doesn’t include any manipulation during or after shooting: the variety and tones ofinterference colours are the results of the natural propagation of polarized light into minerals, and of the use of the accessory “λ“ compensator.”
Cesare creates this works as an artistic extension of his research as a Professor of Petrology at the Department of Geosciences in the University of Padova, Italy. His scientific interests include metamorphism and melting of rocks, mineralogy, and the study of inclusions in minerals. He uses photography to describe his studies and their  features. For more on Cesare’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Bernardo Cesare
Rocks, plastics and crystals—who would have thought they would look so brilliant?! In his works, Bernardo Cesare takes transparent, thinly sliced materials (and we’re taking very thin, about 0.03 mm) and then photographs them through an optical microscope using transmitted polarized light. And this is really what they look like! As Cesare describes,
“The technique doesn’t include any manipulation during or after shooting: the variety and tones ofinterference colours are the results of the natural propagation of polarized light into minerals, and of the use of the accessory “λ“ compensator.”
Cesare creates this works as an artistic extension of his research as a Professor of Petrology at the Department of Geosciences in the University of Padova, Italy. His scientific interests include metamorphism and melting of rocks, mineralogy, and the study of inclusions in minerals. He uses photography to describe his studies and their  features. For more on Cesare’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Bernardo Cesare
Rocks, plastics and crystals—who would have thought they would look so brilliant?! In his works, Bernardo Cesare takes transparent, thinly sliced materials (and we’re taking very thin, about 0.03 mm) and then photographs them through an optical microscope using transmitted polarized light. And this is really what they look like! As Cesare describes,
“The technique doesn’t include any manipulation during or after shooting: the variety and tones ofinterference colours are the results of the natural propagation of polarized light into minerals, and of the use of the accessory “λ“ compensator.”
Cesare creates this works as an artistic extension of his research as a Professor of Petrology at the Department of Geosciences in the University of Padova, Italy. His scientific interests include metamorphism and melting of rocks, mineralogy, and the study of inclusions in minerals. He uses photography to describe his studies and their  features. For more on Cesare’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones

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